Memorial for the victims

A makeshift memorial of handwritten notes and flowers sits on a fence outside the former home of Kim and Mark Dupre at 125 Main St. in Manville Tuesday.

By RUSS OLIVO

rolivo@woonsocketcall.com

 

LINCOLN – The man accused in last week's brutal bludgeoning deaths of Kimberly and Mark Dupre is now dead himself, the victim of an apparent jailhouse suicide.

 

Timothy McQuesten, 49, was pronounced dead at Rhode Island Hospital Monday night, shortly after corrections officers found him unresponsive in his cell at the Adult Correctional Institutions, J.R. Ventura, spokesman for the state Department of Corrections said in a statement.

 

Yesterday evening Correctional Officers found an inmate unresponsive in his single-cell at the Intake Service Center,” Ventura said. “They immediately began performing CPR while they waited for Cranston Rescue to arrive. The inmate was transported to Rhode Island Hospital where he was later pronounced dead.”

 

Ventura confirmed the identity of the deceased prisoner during a phone interview and stopped short of calling the death a suicide, saying the matter remains under investigation by the DOC's investigative units and the Rhode Island State Police. But Ventura said, “He was alone in his cell and no foul play is suspected.”

 

The Lincoln Police Department had no immediate reaction to news of McQuesten's death, though Detective Capt. Philip Gould said police might issue a formal statement later.

 

Things have taken so many twists and turns, particularly since last night,” Gould said.

 

Members of the LPD arrested McQuesten on the Blackstone Valley Bikeway about 12:30 p.m. on Thursday, less than five hours after the savagely beaten body of Kimberly Dupre, 60, was found on the floor of her home at 125 Main St., in the Manville section. Mark Dupre, 65, her husband, was lying nearby – still alive – but police say he succumbed to his injuries after being transported to Rhode Island Hospital.

 

It was McQuesten who delivered himself into the hands of police, dialing 911 with the explanation that he wanted to talk to investigators about the Dupres after seeing a TV report about the violence at their home. He later gave incriminating statements about the deaths, including a description of them as murders at a time when the police had not yet made that information public.

 

Later, police seized bloody shoes from McQuesten's home, located blocks away from the Dupres, as well as a crowbar and a hammer from his vehicle – objects that were consistent with the cause of the victims' injuries, a prosecutor said during the suspect's appearance in Third District Court.

 

As he was being arraigned in the Warwick courthouse on two counts of first-degree murder last Friday, McQuesten appeared confused and complained that he was not taking his anti-psychotic medication.

 

The utterance apparently prompted the judge to order McQuesten to undergo a competency evaluation, with a hearing set for next week.

 

I don't know all of the nuances of what's going on,” he told the court. “I just know I don't have my anti-psychotic medication.”

 

A resident of Summer Street, McQuesten has been described as estranged acquaintance of Kimberly Dupre, who had once cared for him after his mother died. After a falling out, they had not spoken in some time – until quite recently – when McQuesten reportedly reached out to Kimberly Dupre, seeking to get in touch. She put McQuesten off, however, possibly citing the risks of COVID-19.

 

Last Thursday morning – about an hour after Kimberly Dupre exchanged small talk with a neighbor, McQuesten showed up unexpectedly and attacked the couple. The motive, police said last week, was a mystery – and it will almost certainly remain one in view of the suspect's death.

 

Friends and neighbors described the Dupres as a kind, loving couple who were struggling with Mark's debilitating medical condition. Mark suffered from kidney dysfunction and was also hoping to get a liver transplant. More recently, he had come down with a case of the shingles that left him in constant pain.

 

His wife, who owned the prominent tenement where they lived, had become his full-time caretaker.

 

Follow Russ Olivo on Twitter @russolivo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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