Skip to main content

November 8, 2013

November 8, 2013

Embedded Scribd iPaper - Requires Javascript and Flash Player
www.pawtuckettimes.com
The Blackstone Valley’s Neighborhood Newspaper since 1885
Newsstand: 50 Cents
PC Friars open season at The Dunk
Sports, B1
Friday, November 8, 2013
WEATHER
TODAY High: 46 Low: 39 TODAY’S QUESTION
Do you ever use a space heater in your home? Yes No
Go to pawtuckettimes.com to answer
State, C.F. cops collaborate on drug bust
Police say 23 drug dealers arrested in joint operation
By DONNA KENNY KIRWAN
dkirwan@pawtuckettimes.com
YESTERDAY’S RESULTS
Did this week’s elections leave you optimistic? Yes No
Please recycle this paper
25% 75%
CENTRAL FALLS – “The streets feel safer,” Central Falls Mayor James Diossa stated on Thursday from City Council chambers. He was referring to a joint effort between local and state police that put 23 alleged drug dealers out of action and moved a large quantity of heroin, cocaine and a handgun out of public reach. Called the Safe Streets Initiative, officers from the Rhode Island State Police High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (HIDTA) Task Force and the Central Falls Police Department worked together for three Photo by Donna Kenny Kirwan months to target “street level” At the podium, Superintendent of the Rhode Island State Police Col. Steven G. O'Donnell speaks about the effort between the State Police and Central Falls Police that resulted in 23 drug dealers. While admitting “there is still a lot of work to drug arrests. Central Falls Police Chief James J. Mendonca and Central Falls Mayor James do,” Diossa said that from Diossa look on, at left.
what he is hearing on the streets, those who are involved in illegal drug activity “feel the presence of this collaboration.” At a press conference at City Hall, Colonel Steven G. O'Donnell, Superintendent of the Rhode Island State Police and Commissioner of Public Safety, and Colonel James J. Mendonca, Chief of the Central Falls Police, announced the 23 arrests that came about as a result of five search warrants for alleged drug and other offenses in Central Falls. The arrests occurred from August to November. The warrants also led to the seizure of 229 grams of cocaine, 126 grams of crack cocaine, 214 grams of heroin, $18,480 in cash, and one handgun. The total street See BUST, page A2
Vol. CXXVIII No. 255
EARNING THEIR STRIPES
Three members of Lincoln PD make sgt. rank
BY JOSEPH B. NADEAU
jnadeau@woonsocketcall.com
Photo by Ernest A. Brown
General Treasurer Gina Raimondo speaks to the Pawtucket Rotary Club during their luncheon at St. Paul’s Parish House Thursday. Raimondo spoke about Treasury programs, but when pressed, spoke about pension reform and her possible run for governor.
LINCOLN – The Police Department has three new sergeants following a promotional ceremony in the Town Council chamber Tuesday afternoon. Town Administrator T. Joseph Almond swore in Sgts. David J. Waycott, Kevin Marcoux and Edward Walusiak with the help of their families and a large crowd of current and former department members, town employees and friends looking on. Almond, himself a retired department member, and Police Chief Brian Sullivan said the three officers’ experience with the department will assist them in See STRIPES, page A3
Above, Sienna Walusiak, 3, reaches out for Sgt. Edward Walusiak’s badge while being held by her mom, Caitlin Walusiak. Her sister, Reese, 1, also attended. Left, newly promoted Lincoln Police sergeants, from left, David Waycott, Kevin Marcoux, and Edward Walusiak stand with Capt. Phillip Gould during the ceremony.
Raimondo at Rotary talks unemployment
Remains mum on potential Gov. run
By JIM BARON
jbaron@pawtuckettimes.com
PAWTUCKET – General Treasurer Gina Raimondo still isn’t making any commitments to run for governor next year, but she told the Pawtucket Rotary Club Thursday that, if she does run her top priority would be to create job opportunities for Rhode Island. Noting that the statistic quoted for unemployment in Rhode Island is above 9 percent (9.1), Raimondo told the
Rotarians that if you count people with part-time jobs who want full-time employment, the rate is actually closer to 17 percent. “That is the issue,” she said. “How many people do you know who say, ‘there are no jobs here for our kids, all my kids are leaving’?” The Democrat pledged that “If I run and if I will take all the skill and passion” that she has put toward pension reform and apply it to increasing employment. See RAIMONDO, page A2
Photos by Joseph B. Nadeau
THE TIMES
Presents
City Council approves raises for E.P. school administrators
Principals, assistants get 3.5% over 3 years
By JOSEPH FITZGERALD
jfitzgerald@woonsocketcall.com
EAST PROVIDENCE – The City Council Tuesday unanimously voted to ratify a new contract that will give school district principals a total 3.5 percent salary increase over the course of the next three years. The School Committee and East Providence Association of School approved the new contract on Oct. 1 for principals and assistant principals in
the elementary, middle and high schools. The City Council signed off on the agreement at its meeting Tuesday because the city charter requires collective bargaining agreements between the city - including the School Committee - and any labor organization, to be ratified by a majority vote of the council before it becomes effective. The new three-year pact for principals took effect Nov. 1 and expires Oct. 31, 2015. See RAISES, page A2
SANTA TO THE STARS
Saturday, November 23 from 12pm to 2pm Apex, 100 Main Sreet, Pawtucket, RI
aÉ~ê=oÉ~ÇÉêë=~åÇ=^ÇîÉêíáëÉêëI THE TIMES kÉï=lÑÑáÅÉ=eçìêë=~êÉ VWMM~ã=íç=QWMMéã jçåÇ~ó=íÜêçìÖÜ=cêáÇ~ó
PHOTOS WITH SANTA
$5.00 for one photo • $8.00 for two photos
The Times will also accept donations to The Times Merry Christmas Fund.
of Camera Werks, Pawtucket, RI
Photos by Pat Zacks
All donations go to the Pawtucket Corps of the Salvation Army
A2 THE TIMES
FROM PAGE ONE
Raimondo
In a brief speech followed by a question-and-answer session, Raimondo said she is sticking to a schedule of making a decision on the governor’s race “by the end of the year.” If she were to make a bid for governor, the field of opponents has started to take shape. Providence Mayor Angel Taveras, a Democrat, and Cranston Mayor Allan Fung, a Republican, have each announced their bids in the past two weeks. Declared candidate Ken Block, who announced his candidacy months ago, recently revealed that he will run as a Republican. That leaves Raimondo and Clay Pell, the grandson of the late U.S. Sen. Claiborne Pell as potential candidates who have yet to take the plunge. Asked after the event if there is a possibility that she could still run for a second term as treasurer, Raimondo told The Times, “of course.” One question from the audience concerned the heat she has taken for what have been called excessive fees the state is paying to managers of hedge funds and for other alternative investments. “I do think it is important to realize where the criticism is coming from,” Raimondo said. “The union leadership has spent tens of thousands of dollars to come after me. The reports you are reading in the paper isn’t necessarily true. It should be seen for what it is, a paid-for political hit job. “Our allocation to alternative assets is slightly less the average pension funds around the country,” she asserted. “It’s all about what you are going to get for your fees. If you pay fees to protect yourself from the downside, then it is money well spent. “For example, in 2008 and 2009, when the market crashed, the state pension system lost nearly $2 billion in value,” Raimondo said, adding that if the pension fund money were allocated then the way it is now, “we would have saved $500 mil-
Friday, November 8, 2013
Photo by Ernest A. Brown
lion.” She told the group that is her job to protect the pension system and, with the way the fund’s assets are now invested, “we will lose less money the next time the market crashes.” Last year, she said, the pension fund earned 11 percent “net of all fees and expenses.” Protecting the value of the fund is important, Raimondo said, pointing to the pain created when Central Falls went bankrupt and slashed the pension payments to retirees. “In Central Falls, they went to people who are 70 and 80 years old and cut their pensions in half,” she said. As a result, “these people are losing their homes, they can’t buy their groceries, they can’t pay for health care.” Raimondo said, “it is really sad that politicians have anything to do with pensions. There shouldn’t be politics involved with anybody’s pension.” Follow Jim Baron on Twitter @Jim_Baron
Dr. Robert MacBeth, an optometrist in Pawtucket and Rotary Club member, poses a question to Gina Raimondo regarding her run for governor at a Pawtucket Rotary luncheon at St. Paul's Parish House Thursday.
Bust
took part in this initiative.” Mendonca said that he and other city officials reached out value of these drugs is more to the State Police after the than $42,000, said the law city experienced a spike in enforcement officials. violent crime at the beginning O'Donnell said that these of the summer. This included arrests were individual in several shootings, a homicide nature and not believed to be on Sylvian Street and also an part of a drug trafficking arson there. “We needed to organization. He categorized it see if it was organized or dismore as an unfortunate reality jointed,” he said. of people who live an urban Through the joint investilife of selling narcotics “and gation with the State Police, prevailing on misery and the Mendonca said it became violence associated with it.” apparent that most of the narO'Donnell added that the cotics sales were loosely mission of the HIDTA Task organized and not part of Force is to assist local police organized crime. He said the departments like Central Falls shootings and other incidents with narcotic investigations. were found to be largely “ter“Public safety and the quality ritorial disputes.” He added of life are essential to the eco- that the homicide, which has nomic success of any commu- not been solved, does not nity,” he said. “I want to com- appear to be related to any of mend Colonel Mendonca, all these 23 arrests. the Central Falls Police “I'm proud of the accomOfficers, and members of the plishments so far,” said Rhode Island State Police who Mendonca. He added, “Trusting that the Safe Streets Initiative has made a significant impact, we are mutually All Readers can submit determined in the continuing goal to make the streets safer • Birth Announcements for the citizens of Central • Engagement Announcements Falls.” • Wedding Announcements The following arrests • Anniversary Announcements resulted from the Safe Streets As well as email events, Initiative: community news, Letters to the 1. On August 8, 2013, Editor, submit photos and even David Gomes Xavier, age 32, subscribe online at our website? of 52 Blackstone Street, www.pawtuckettimes.com Woonsocket, was arrested and charged with 1) Possession Of Heroin, 2) Resisting Arrest, 3) Obstructing a Police Officer, We accept these announcements 4) Driving on a Suspended in a number of ways: License and 5) Superior Court • You can Fax to 401-767-8509
• You can stop by our office located at: 23 Exchange St., Pawtucket, RI • You can email Birth Announcements to advertising@pawtuckettimes.com • You can email Anniversaries, Engagements and Weddings to notices@pawtuckettimes.com • You can download a form from our website: www.pawtuckettimes.com Simply complete the form then mail, fax or scan to email the announcement. If you would like a copy of the pdf of your announcement as it appeared in the paper, we can provide you with that for $5.00 simply stop into The Times with the publication date and page number in which your announcement appeared.
Lottery
RHODE ISLAND Last night’s number — 9-3-3-3 Wild Money — 05-07-10-11-22, Extra: 34 Powerball — 01-05-10-15-49, Powerball: 22 MASSACHUSETTS Mid-day number — 3-3-8-3 Last night’s number — 6-0-7-3 Yesterday’s Megabucks – 17-24-27-31-36-41
Warrant. 2. On August 14, 2013, Sony Feliciano, age 36, of 91 Ledge Street, 3rd Floor, Central Falls was arrested and charged with 1. Possession of Cocaine with Intent to Deliver, 2. Possession of Schedule (IV) Narcotics 3. Possession of Schedule (III) Narcotics, 4. Possession of Firearm while committing Control Substance Violation 5. Possession of firearm after previous conviction for a Crime of Violence. 3. On August 16, 2013, Jaime Barreto, age 31, of 120 Summer Street, Apt. 2, Central Falls, was arrested and charged with 1) Delivery of Heroin and 2) Possession of Heroin. 4. On August 16, 2013, Angel Luis Rivera, age 35, of 108 Hedley Avenue, Central Falls, was arrested and charged with Possession of Heroin. 5. On August 20, 2013, Jorge A. Rodriguez, age 32, of 39 Darling St., Apt. 1, Central Falls, RI was arrested and charged with 1) Possession With Intent to Deliver Cocaine and 2) Possession of Cocaine. 6. On August 22, 2013, David Thompson, age 23, of 47 Doyle Avenue, Apt. 1, Providence, was arrested and charged with 1) Possession of Cocaine 2) Possession of Heroin. 7. On August 22, 2013, Robert Morrison, age 19, of 162 Broad Street, Providence, was arrested and charged with Possession of Cocaine. 8. On August 23, 2013, Edgar Mejia, age 42, of 121 Randall Street, Pawtucket, was arrested and charged with
1) Possession of Cocaine with Intent to Deliver, 2) Possession of Cocaine and three counts of Possession of Schedule I-V and 3) Possession of Cocaine One Ounce–One Kilo. 9. On September 9, 2013, Bernard Hagerty, age 46, of 135 Sylvian Street, 1st Floor, Central Falls, was arrested and charged with 1) Possession of Cocaine 1 oz to 1 kilo and 2) Possession of Cocaine with Intent to Deliver. 10. On September 9, 2013, Angel Rodriguez, age 23, of 152 Washington Street, Central Falls, was arrested and charged with 1) Possession of Cocaine with Intent to Deliver and 2) Conspiracy to Violate the Controlled Substance Act. 11. On September 9, 2013, Kingna Sanchez, age 26, of 152 Washington Street, Central Falls, was arrested and charged with 1) Possession of Cocaine with Intent to Deliver and 2) Conspiracy to Violate the Controlled Substance Act. 12. On September 3, 2013, Scott Hagopian, age 27, of 121 Armistice Boulevard., #3, Pawtucket, was arrested and charged with Possession of Crack Cocaine. 13. On September 7, 2013, Joseph Gill, age 35, of 527 Laurel Hill Avenue, #2, Cranston, was arrested and charged with 1) Manufacture/Deliver/Int Cocaine One Ounce-One Kilo and 2) Possession with Intent to Deliver Crack Cocaine. 14. On September 10, 2013, Nyklas Tavares, age 22, of 221 Montgomery Avenue, Providence, was arrested and charged with Possession of Crack Cocaine. 15. On September 22, 2013, Anthony Jaiman, age 22, of 145 Chestnut Street,
Apt. 8, Central Falls, was arrested and charged with Possession of Heroin. 16. On September 24, 2013, Jose Matos, age 38, of 21 Knight Street, First Floor, Central Falls, was arrested and charged with 1) Possession of Heroin with Intent to Deliver, 2) Possession of Marijuana with Intent to Deliver, 3) Three counts of Delivery of Heroin to an Undercover Police Officer, 4) Controlled Substance Conspiracy and 5) four Court Warrants. 17. On October 2, 2013, Verlin Perry, age 23, of 76/78 Liberty Street, Central Falls, was arrested and charged with 1) Manufacturing/Possession/Del ivery of Crack Cocaine and 2) Possession to Distribute Narcotics within a school zone. 18. On October 9, 2013, Pedro Rodriguez, age 47, of 6 Fletcher Street, 3rd floor, Central Falls, was arrested for Delivery of Heroin to a Police Officer and Controlled Substance Conspiracy. 19. On October 25, 2013, Walter Restrepo, age 29, of 60 Chestnut St, 2nd Floor, Central Falls was arrested for: 1. Possession of Heroin 1 oz to 1 kilo, 2. Possession of Heroin with Intent to Deliver, 3. Possession of Cocaine 1 oz to 1 kilo, 4. Possession of Cocaine with Intent to Deliver, 5. Possession of Crack Cocaine with Intent to Deliver, 6. Possession of Alprazolam with Intent to Deliver, 7. Possession of Amphetamine/Dextroamphet amine with Intent to Deliver,
8. Distribution of Controlled Substances in a School Zone, 9. Sixth Division District Court Bench Warrant for Failure to Pay Fines on a Simple Assault charge, 10. Superior Court Bench Warrant for Failure to appear for arraignment for Reckless Driving. 20. On October 31, 2013, Robert White, age 22, of 96 Summit Avenue, Central Falls, was arrested on an Affidavit Arrest Warrant from Pawtucket Police Department for the charge of Vandalism Malicious Injury to Property. 21. On October 31, 2013, Justin James, age 26, of 280 Cowden Street, Central Falls, was arrested on a Sixth District Court Bench Warrant for failure to appear for an ability to pay hearing on the original charge of Possession of Marijuana originating from the State Police Lincoln Woods Barracks 22. On November 1, 2013, Alfonso Merced, age 28, of 57 Garfield Street, Apartment #3, Central Falls was arrested for Possession of Crack Cocaine with Intent to Deliver. 23. On November 1, 2013, Felicia DaRosa, age 22 of 57 57 Garfield Street, Apartment #3, Central Falls for Disorderly Conduct. In addition to the above arrests, during the “Safe Streets Initiative” members conducted car stops that resulted in 74 summonses, eight citation arrests, two “notice and demand,” and two verbal warnings. There were an additional 12 arrests made by the Violent Fugitive Task Force and uniform members of the Rhode Island State Police.
Raises
THE TIMES
23 Exchange Street, Pawtucket, RI 02860 Newsroom fax: (401) 727-9250 www.pawtuckettimes.com e-mail: notices@pawtuckettimes.com.com sports@pawtuckettimes.com.com
SUBSCRIBER SERVICES
Delivery by 7 a.m. weekdays, 8 a.m. on weekends, holidays Call by 11 a.m. to receive guaranteed redelivery. Home delivery or billing questions: 767-8522 For missed deliveries or damaged papers on weekends, call between 8 a.m. and 11 a.m.
$99,000 a year. With the cost of living adjustment of 2 percent in 2014, the high school East Providence Finance principal’s salary is expected Director Malcolm Moore told to jump to $101,420 a year. the council Tuesday that the The salaries for the two midcontract is in line with other dle school principals will be collective bargaining agree$97,699 a year. ments that have been passed The yearly salaries for eleand is consistent with the mentary school principals five-year plan established by will be $83,294 to $85,512, the Budget Commission. and the assistant principals The first year of the consalaries will be $88,438 at tract calls for a zero salary the middle school; and increase, followed by a 2 $88,057 to $90,678 at the percent cost of living adjust- high school. ment in the second year and The contract also covers a 1.5 percent adjustment in the director at the East the third year. Providence Career and Finance Advisor Paul Technical Center, whose base Luba told the council that the salary in the second year of average cost of living adjust- the contract is expected to ment over the three-year jump to $90,678 a year. duration of the contract is As far as the contract’s 1.16 percent. fiscal impact, Moore said the The base salary for princi- agreement will cost approxipals in the East Providence mately $12,000 combined school system currently over the three years. ranges from $81,000 to In other business Tuesday,
the council learned that the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) has agreed to reimburse the city $170,350, which is 75 percent of the $227,134 in expenses incurred by the city in the aftermath of Winter Storm Nemo in February. After a lengthy debate, the council Tuesday also voted 3 to 2 to reject a resolution to rename Rose Larisa Memorial Park to Crescent Park. Crescent Park was established on or about 1886 as an amusement park on the shores of Narragansett Bay in Riverside, and the famous Crescent Park Looff Carousel was later placed on the National Register of Historic Places. When Crescent Park was auctioned off, a dedicated group of five local residents, Gail Durfee, Jobelle (Tracy) Aguiar, Richard
READER’S REWARDS WINNERS
GRILLE
At LeFoyer
ADVERTISING
Classified: 365-1438 Display: 767-8505 Advertising FAX: 727-9250
BUSINESS OFFICE
Classified Billing: 767-8504 Display Billing: 767-8504
Fri., November 15, 2013 @ 7:00pm
FRIDAY SPECIALS
CIRCULATION: Per copy - $.50 daily; Per week by carrier - $3.40; By mail subscription - 13 weeks, $55.25; 26 weeks, $110.50; one year - $221. (These USPS 423-840 rates apply to mailing addresses in Published daily except the United States and Canada. Rates Sunday by Rhode Island Media Group for subscription to foreign points on application.) POSTMASTER: Send address correction to: The Times, 23 Periodicals postage paid Exchange St., Pawtucket, RI 02860. at Pawtucket, RI
The Times, copyright 2011, is published daily. No articles, photographs or any editorial content may be reproduced or reprinted in whole or in part without the express permission of the publisher.
THE TIMES
John Grivers - Cumberland William Rickett – Woonsocket Rick Gamache - Woonsocket Rose Anne Tighe – East Providence Nancy Menard – Pawtucket Lisa Keenan - Providence
Congratulations!
Fish & Chips......................$7.95 Fried Calamari ...................$8.95 Fisherman’s Platter ...........$15.95 Parmesan Crusted Chicken ..$13.95
Served 11am to 9pm Late Night Menu 9pm to 11pm
Solo Acoustics by “KEARSLEY” 11/8
151 Fountain Street, Pawtucket, RI 401.725.8530 • www.LeFoyerRI.com
Lund, Linda McEntee, Robin Peacock and longtime volunteer Rose Larisa rescued the Crescent Park Looff Carousel from being sold. Since then, the Crescent Park Looff Carousel has been fully restored and continues to operate each season with the assistance of the Edward Serowik, Sr. The land and beach adjacent to the Crescent Park Looff Carousel was named Rose Larisa Memorial Park by vote of the City Council in 2002. The resolution introduced by Councilor Thomas A. Rose Jr. proposed that the name of the park be returned to its original name, Crescent Park, in honor of all six of the residents who helped rescue the carousel. Voting in favor of the resolution were Rose and Councilman Helder Cunha. Voting to reject the proposal were Councilors James A. Briden, Christine A. Rossi and Tracy A Capobianco. The council Tuesday unanimously passed a second resolution supporting the establishment of the brew pub business to encourage economic growth in East Providence. The number of brew pubs in the United States has grown to over 1,100 creating jobs and economic benefits to the areas that support them. Brew pub licenses are authorized and regulated by statute in Rhode Island and allow the business to manufacture beer on the premises for consumption on the premises.
Friday, November 8, 2013
LOCAL/FROM PAGE ONE
School, 325 Public St., Providence. Ayala said he used to be on the staff at The Met School and school officials are letting him use space there. He said that any type of donation will be accepted, including clothing, gift certificates, baby supplies, and diapers size 2-3. Anyone who can't come to the collection event but who still wishes to donate is asked to call Ayala at (401) 297-6642. According to Police Major Arthur Martins, the cause of the explosion is considered to be accidental and stemmed from some type of gas leak either in piping or in an appliance inside the apartment. He added that the exact cause has not been pinpointed and the investigation is ongoing. However, he said there is no criminal act involved. Also home at the time of the explosion were a couple who lived on the first floor, Victoria Major and Eric Silva, along with a three-yearold child and a dog. Silva is credited with helping the third floor tenants evacuate with their baby. The second floor apartment was also occupied but the tenants were out. Mineral Spring Avenue, which had been closed for the demolition, was opened to traffic by late Wednesday night, although a portion of Hurley Avenue remained closed
THE TIMES A3
Donations sought for family left homeless by explosion
By DONNA KENNY KIRWAN
dkirwan@pawtuckettimes.com
hospitalized but is improving, according to police and fire officials. Gonzalez shared the apartment PAWTUCKET – As their home with his girlfriend, Rubie Oliveiras, of just a few short months is being who escaped injury, and the couple's torn down following Tuesday's nine-month-old daughter, who explosion and fire, the young family received burns to the cheek and involved is recovering, but also in head. The baby also remains hospineed. talized at Hasbro Children's Hospital On Thursday, Pawtucket Police but is reportedly in stable condition. released the names of the couple A friend of the family, Pedro who were at home with their baby Ayala, has told the local news media daughter in the third floor apartment that the couple has lost all of their at 420-422 Mineral Spring Ave. belongings in the explosion and fire when the blast occurred. Ruben that followed. As Gonzalez, 23, suffered significant such, he has organized a collection burns and was taken to Rhode Island to help them on Saturday, Nov. 9, Hospital for treatment. He remains from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at The Met
into Thursday afternoon. City officials have reported that both National Grid and the state Public Utilities Commission found no evidence a gas leak from the outside leading into the house. A spokesman also noted that the house, built in 1880, was of “balloon construction,” meaning there is not much material between floors to block gas from going through and gathering near the roof. The explosion was believed to have erupted from an accumulation of gas at the top part of the house that was sparked by some unknown cause. The investigation is continuing.
Stripes
their new duties of supervising patrol members of the department. “David Waycott has 18 years with the department, Kevin Marcoux, 13 years, and Edward Walusiak 10 years, so that is a combined total of 41 years of policing and I think that is really important to point out because they will be in some ways the first line and last line of supervisors for what goes on when the chief is not around,” Almond said. “And I trust that they will do that well,” he added. Almond said he gets a lot of feedback about town departments and understands that feedback for police officers who deal with “a lot of unhappy customers,” can sometimes be mixed. “But I can tell you that with a few exceptions, the feedback about the police is really positive, especially from the people of Lincoln, the residents of Lincoln,” he said. Almond pointed to the Lonsdale Bleachery mill fire off Front Street last week as an example of the sometimes low key but important duties police officers are called on to manage. As the local firefighters worked on a “really incredible job, a fantastic job,” to control what turned out to be a very “serious and spectacular” fire, local police officers were called on to secure the area around the fire, keep people safe and direct motorists through detours. Almond was able to watch that work from the fire scene and was impressed with the department members’ professionalism, he said. “They had to tell all the people they had to drive seven miles backwards through to Cumberland and that is not an easy thing to do when somebody is there at night and wants to know why, and there are 25 people behind them wanting to know why,” Almond said. The administrator said he did not receive one negative complaint about their work and in fact heard “a lot of positive things” said. “And that really speak volumes too. Sometimes it is not a glamorous job, as a matter of fact a lot of times it is not a glamorous job, but they do it so well,” he said. The day to day work done by the sergeants on their way to a leadership role is an essential part of the police department’s success in the community, according to
Photos by Joseph B. Nadeau
Above left, Lincoln Town Administrator T. Joseph Almond swears in the new sergeants with their family members at their side. Above right, Kristen Waycott, who participated in the ceremony with her daughter, Mackenzie, pins Sgt. Waycott with his badge. Left, Jayln Marcoux, 8, and Braden Marcoux, 6, pin Sgt. Marcoux, as their mother, Michaela Marcoux watches from right.
Almond. “It really reflects what the retired officers know, what I know, and hopefully the families know and the public knows, and that is what a great police department we have,” he said of the new sergeants. The trio will also complete the department’s promotional process begun by several retirements and requiring the higher command positions such as captains and lieutenants to be filled first. “So I know these three new sergeants will complete a very worthy command and supervisory staff at the police department to complement the really great officers that work there.
And I know that these officers will continue to maintain what we all know is a really good police department,” Almond said. Chief Brian Sullivan, just returning from an injury leave due to a soccer mishap and still using crutches, also noted the importance of the new sergeants’ first level of supervision for the department. “As sergeants you now have the responsibility for the oversight, the direction, motivation and discipline of the subordinate officers. With this promotion you not only become a sergeant but you also become a teacher,” Sullivan said.
“You will share your knowledge and experience with those you work with. And you will be charged with educating the public on things they may not understand. As a sergeant you also become a learner,” he said. “You must be open and willing to learn from your subordinates and from the public you serve,” the chief said. “As a sergeant one of your most important responsibilities will be to help the officers you work with in doing the most important part of their job and that is to serve the citizens with integrity and justice. You are all dependable and committed to the people you work with and the community you
work for, I am confident that you will work to improve the Lincoln Police Department,” Sullivan said. In addition the sergeants’ families, retired police department sergeants, lieutenants and deputy chiefs joined members of the fire departments, current police department members and the sergeants’ families in honoring the appointees. Waycott said he was very excited about his new role and noted it would be a change from his longtime service as a school resource officer at the high school. “I loved my time there but I am looking forward to my new challenges,” he said. Marcoux said he felt very
proud to be following in his father, Lucien Marcoux’s footsteps as a department sergeant. The elder Marcoux was a department member for 20 years, retiring in 1992, and his son said that had him feeling very excited as he earned his own sergeant’s badge on Tuesday. Walusiak said he too was looking forward to his new department role on the midnight to 7 shift. “It is a good group of guys that I will be working with and they have a lot of experience on the job,” he said. “I am just excited to be stepping up the next level of leadership and I will perform and well as I can,” he said.
“Jingle Mingle”
(This fund supports the Pawtucket Corps of The Salvation Army who assist our LOCAL families in need.)
THE TIMES
TO BENEFIT THE TIMES MERRY CHRISTMAS FUND
Get on board
THE
ETS TICK LY ON 0 $20.0
HOSTED AND SPONSORED BY HO
POLAR EXPRESS
TRAIN RIDE with
Subscribe to 26 Weeks of The Times for $88.40 and get
TM
LEFOYER / THE FOUNTAIN STREET GRILLE
151 FOUNTAIN STREET, PAWTUCKET, RI
Res Tab er ve you le f a r H or Par oliday ty!
Saturday, December 7, 2013 7:00-11:00 pm
Music By “Upscale
(Tickets value $73.00 - your subscription comes to only $15.40!)
TWO FREE TICKETS TO THE POLAR EXPRESS*
Music Entertainment”
Buffet Included And Cash Bar Available
TICKETS ARE AVAILABLE IN THE FOUNTAIN STREET GRILLE AT LEFOYER or GET YOUR TICKETS AT THE TIMES OFFICE PLEASE CALL 401-767-8525 TO RESERVE A TABLE
CALL TO SUBSCRIBE BEFORE THIS TRAIN LEAVES THE STATION! ONLY 5 SPOTS AVAILABLE!
*New subscribers only. No cancellations.
BLACKSTONE VALLEY POLAR EXPRESS
Polar Express Train Station • One Depot Square • Woonsocket, Rhode Island November 24, 29, and 30 • December 1, 6, 8, 13, 14, 15, 20, 21 and 22
OPINION
Page A4 THE TIMES — Friday, November 8, 2013
PUBLISHER: Mary Lynn Bosiak
Executive Editor: Bianca Pavoncello Managing Editor: David Pepin Sports Editor: Eric Benevides Assistant Editor/News/The Call: Russ Olivo Assistant Editor/News/The Times: Donna Kenny Kirwan Controller: Kathleen Needham Circulation Manager: Jorge Olarte
Concerts support health care initiative for R.I. musicians
When Bruce McCrae (a.k.a. Rudy Cheeks), a member of legendary Rhode Island musical bands the “Fabulous Motels,” “The Young Adults" and “The Jackiebeat Orchestra,” left his full-time job in 2011, the sixty-one year old had the freedom to pursue his dream of creating a television series about Rhode Island’s music scene. But, the long-time musician, a highly regarded columnist who writes the Phillipe & Jorge’s Cool Cool World with sidekick Chip Young for the Providence Phoenix, left his employment with no health care coverage in place. Throughout his career, Cheeks had health care insurance when he was employed by radio stations or at Insight, a nonprofit serving blind and visually impaired Rhode Islanders. Today, at age 63, Cheeks, who is Executive Producer and host for the TV show "Meet Me at the Met," is among hundreds of Ocean State musicians who do not have health insurance (unless they are the lucky few provided coverage through a spouse’s coverage.) Cheeks clearly understands the value of health insurance coverage. Three years ago, high blood pressure would put him in the intensive care unit at Rhode Island Hospital. Luckily he had health insurance at that time. But today, with no health insurance coverage he is forced to forego medical treatment from a primary care physician even if he is sick. nity make the hard decision to live without proper preventive health care, skipping routine annual exams and turning down medical services because they can't afford them or are unwilling to pay their insurance's high deductibles if they even have insurance. In effect, people are denying themselves basic primary care." Fellow RIMHOF board member and Tune In & Tune Up cofounder Russell Gusetti, who plays in Pendragon, one of Rhode Island’s most prominent Celtic band, adds, "It can be scary being a musician. Because we are independent contractors, we usually have no health insurance unless we are lucky enough to have a spouse who does. Because we don't work for just one company, musicians have no benefits nor do we make much to begin with." Gusetti notes, "Too many of us have seen friends who are musicians go without health care of any kind, simply because they felt they could not afford it. So year after year, we end up holding benefit concerts for fellow musicians who have suffered major health events. And with musicians, if you are sick, you don't play. And if you don't play, you can't earn a living let alone pay for health care visits or procedures. It made us want to do something to let the music community know that there ARE options out there for affordable health care and that prevention really IS the best medicine." Culp adds, "And we want to be clear – we are trying to reach the entire music community so that includes music professionals such as sound techs, studio engineers, roadies and more, as well as their spouses. We also want to stress that there is no paid staff or financial gain for RIMHOF or Tune In & Tune Up committee members. Our sole interest is helping our fellow musicians... it is straight from the heart." Gusetti concludes, "Instead of only reacting after a health problem becomes serious we hope we can, in some small way, inspire the music community to be proactive about their health so they can prevent or address some health problems before they get even worse. And if we become a model for the dance, visual arts and acting community, we would be thrilled as we all face similar situations and as parts of the creative community, we are all in this together." RIMHOF organizers say that the upcoming Unity Concerts idea builds off the March, 2013 CD release concerts held at The Ocean Mist by 2012 Hall of Fame inductees Roomful of Blues who chose to donate the proceeds of one of those concerts to the Tune In & Tune Up initiative which was just then getting off the ground. Ocean Mist owner Kevin Finnegan was so inspired by the idea that he suggested trying an even bigger benefit event with more bands later in the year.
The U.S. shifts to the left
The center of gravity in American politics moved left in Tuesday’s off-year elections. Republicans took a big step back from the tea party. An ebullient progressive was elected mayor of New York City. And a Democrat was elected governor of Virginia after campaigning unapologetically as a supporter of gun control and a liberal on social issues. The one bright spot for Republicans, Chris Christie’s landslide reelection in New Jersey, was won precisely because Christie ran briskly away from the party’s right wing and developed a civil relationship with President Obama. His victory speech spoke of the need for politicians to go to places where they might be “uncomfortable” — exactly where the tea party does not want to go. And in the one direct intraparty fight over the GOP’s future, a tea party E.J. Dionne candidate lost a primary in Alabama to a more traditional conservative. A telling distinction between the victor, Bradley Byrne, and the defeated Dean Young: Byrne said that Obama was born in the United States; Young suggested the president was born in Kenya. Young’s persistent “birtherism” is a reminder of how far right the American political discussion veered after the elections of 2009 and the midterms of 2010. The pendulum is swinging back. And this week was not just a story of the Republican Party struggling to disentangle itself from extremism, or of the revival of moderation. The Democratic victories in New York and Virginia plainly marked the triumph of two different kinds of progressivism. Terry McAuliffe won in Virginia as a middle-of-the-road, business-friendly champion of “jobs.” But he was also firmly liberal on gay marriage and abortion, and cast Ken Cuccinelli, his opponent, as a social troglodyte. More than that: McAuliffe was outspoken against the National Rifle Association and in favor of a variety of gun-safety measures, including background checks. McAuliffe did not shrink from his F rating from the NRA. He boasted about it. His outspokenness was rewarded. He overwhelmingly won the suburbs outside of Washington and built a large margin among women. The power of the gun-control issue should not be lost in the sometimes-foggy talk about centrism. This should embolden supporters of sane gun laws. In New York City, Bill de Blasio built the day’s second landslide on another sort of liberalism, a populist assault on rising inequality. In a victory speech that will be read as a manifesto for a new progressivism, de Blasio declared that inequality “is the defining challenge of our time.” He renewed his campaign call for modest tax increases on the best-off to finance education programs to give poorer kids a chance to join the ranks of the successful. New York has a reputation as a great liberal city, and in many ways it is. But not since David Dinkins won in 1989 has it sent a Democrat and a staunch progressive to City Hall. The de Blasio experiment will be a test case for the nation. Conservatives quickly sought to take the edge off their defeats by arguing that Cuccinelli’s attacks on Obamacare at the end of the campaign nearly allowed him to snatch victory from McAuliffe in a race that turned out to be closer than polls had predicted. But the evidence for this is thin. In the Virginia exit polls, only 27 percent of the voters said health care was their most important issue, and they split 49 percent for Cuccinelli, 45 percent for McAuliffe . When media reports about Obamacare are almost universally bad, this narrow advantage is surprisingly positive news for friends of the Affordable Care Act — especially since McAuliffe strongly and repeatedly endorsed using its expansion of Medicaid to provide insurance for Virginia’s near-poor. Republicans would be wiser to pay attention to the fact that McAuliffe re-created the coalition that twice elected Obama. When Democrats lost Virginia in 2009, Obama supporters stayed home in large numbers. This time, the electorate was significantly more Democratic, and the African American share of the vote rose sharply. In next year’s midterms, Republicans cannot count on the sort of Democratic demobilization that was helpful to them in 2010. To say that this election nudged the nation leftward is not to claim a sudden mandate for liberalism. But it is to insist that the center ground in American politics is a long way from where it was three years ago — and that if there is a new populism in the country, it is now speaking with a decidedly progressive accent.
Bringing Health Care to Musicians
In 2011, Cheeks and a group of local musicians banded together to found Herb Weiss the Rhode Island Music Hall of Fame (RIMHOF). Although the Pawtucket-based nonprofit is primarily dedicated to celebrating and honoring the legacy of Rhode Island musicians, educators and industry professionals, who have made significant contributions to both the local and national music scene, the Organization also decided to turn its attention to bringing health care and wellness options to those in the music scene, says Cheeks. According to Cheeks, RIMHOF’s Tune In & Tune Up initiative came about because its Board members, along with many of the state’s musicians, were fed up with the lack of affordable health care options for those in the music community. The Tune In & Tune Up (TI&TU) Rhode Island Musicians Health Awareness Initiative has already partnered with medical professionals such as Dr. Stephanie Hansen, psychologist, and Dr. Mark Andreozzi, ENT, who both serve on the advisory committee. They also support Dr. Zaheer A. Shah's Access Basic Care (ABC) initiative and have already enrolled nine R.I. musicians in Shah's membership health care program, some who had not had an annual physical for decades. The ABC initiative waives a $15 charge for health visits when the patient presents their TI&TU membership card. RIMHOF is also looking into other well-run, inexpensive and effective health care programs to suggest to members, adds Cheeks. As part of TI&TU, members will be eligible for discounts at area health and wellness retail locations and will receive free admission to a planned series of healthrelated forums geared specifically to musicians. Additionally, a web site focusing on the music community will be developed directing them to area health and wellness options and trying to make the topic of health care more understandable so they don't just "tune out." To date, Cheeks and 100 people in the music industry have been issued TI&TU membership cards. RIMHOF anticipates another 200 to be signed up for and available by the Unity Concerts weekend. In addition, TI&TU's planned bi-monthly series of conversations/ workshops will focus on topics aimed at the music community, everything from carpal tunnel problems, to stage anxiety, to vocal health and more. The first of the series will feature Megan Hall, the Outreach and Education Lead at HealthsourceRI.
The Unity Concerts Benefits Musicians
So, this weekend, RIMHOF, in partnership with The Wakefield-based Ocean Mist (895 Matunuck Beach Rd) will hold The Unity Concerts, with ALL proceeds benefiting the TI&TU Rhode Island Musicians Health Awareness Program, tomorrow, November 9, from 6 p.m. to 1 a.m., and Sunday, November 10, from 2 p.m. to 11:30 p.m. Participating bands, who are all donating their performances, represent an unprecedented array of R.I. talent teamed with the generous donation of the venue as well as concert support by The Ocean Mist. The weekend features four inductees to the R.I. Music Hall of Fame on the same stage for the first time – John Cafferty and the Beaver Brown Band, Roomful of Blues, Ken Lyon, and Steve Smith & the Nakeds. In addition, participating bands include every musician member of the R.I. Music Hall of Fame board as well as two up-andcoming bands – Kim Petrarca and The Brian McKenzie Band – to further the Hall's mission of also spotlighting new musical talent in the Ocean State while celebrating Rhode Island's past and present music scene. On Saturday, the lineup in order of appearance is: Adrienne West and the Tabers, Rossoni, The Brian McKenzie Band, John Cafferty and the Beaver Brown Band, The 100 Watt Suns, and The Rudy Cheeks Band. Sunday's lineup in order of appearance features: Kim Petrarca, Ken Lyon, The Zimmermen, Longshot VooDoo, Becky Chace, Mark Cutler, Pendragon, Roomful of Blues, Steve Smith & the Nakeds, and James Montgomery. Cheeks gives credit to RIMHOF for getting the ball rolling on putting together a initiative to bring health care to Rhode Island musicians who are not covered. "You need a large organization [and vision] to take it on. I am glad they saw a problem and moved quickly to address it,” he says. Admission to the Unity Concerts is only $20.00 per day or $35.00 for a weekend ticket. Etix can be purchased at www.oceanmist.net or tickets can be purchased at the door. For a special room rate for the Unity Concerts call the Hampton Inn South Kingstown at 401/788-3500. Herb Weiss, LRI ’12, is a Pawtucketbased freelance writer covering aging, health care and medical issues. Weiss is a board member of the Rhode Island Music Hall of Fame. He can be reached at hweissri@aol.com.
Letters to the editor policy
The newspaper welcomes letters to the editor and guest commentaries. Letters should be no longer than 500 words and should be typed. Letters must include the writer’s name, hometown and a phone number. The newspaper will verify all letters before publication. The newspaper reserves the right to edit all submissions. The newspaper reserves the right to reject submissions for publication. Guest commentaries will be published on a space available basis. Guest commentaries must include the writer’s name, hometown and phone number. The newspaper reserves the right to edit all submissions.
A Call for Action
According to a RIMHOF press release, during the nonprofit’s first induction ceremony in 2012, Hall of Fame inductee Ken Lyon mentioned from the stage that many musicians in the Ocean State do not have adequate health care and that it was an issue that concerned him greatly. He challenged the Hall of Fame to look into this important issue and that is exactly what happened as board member Don "D.C." Culp started constructing what would eventually turn in to a grassroots movement spearheaded by several Hall of Fame board members. Culp explains "I first brought up the idea of joining together some type of affordable health care with a health awareness information center. The idea was met with great enthusiasm but also a realization of the greatest obstacle to overcome – existing programs with very high monthly fees and/or high co-pays which make them far from affordable for most musicians." "Unfortunately," RIMHOF chair Robert Billington says, "most in the music commu-
WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU:
BY MAIL: Send letters to the editor to: Editor/The Times, 23 Exchange St., Pawtucket, R.I. 02860 Send area event listings to: Events/The Times, 23 Exchange St., Pawtucket, R.I. 02860 BY EMAIL: Send letters to the editor to: editor@pawtuckettimes.com Send area event listings to: notices@pawtuckettimes.com BY TELEPHONE: Call the newsroom: 401-722-4000 401-767-8550 ONLINE: Twitter: @TheTimesofPawt Facebook: Pawtucket Times Website: pawtuckettimes.com
Friday, November 8, 2013
LOCAL
THE TIMES A5
OBITUARIES
Blackstone River Theatre presents an evening of fiddle music Saturday
CUMBERLAND — Blackstone River Theatre will present an evening of fiddle music featuring Hanneke Cassel and Jeremy Kittel joined by Keith Murphy on Saturday, Nov. 9, 8 p.m. Former U.S. National Scottish Fiddle Champions Hanneke Cassel and Jeremy Kittel will team up with accompanist Keith Murphy to bring audiences a night of innovative Scottish and Irish fiddle music and songs from Eastern Canada and Quebec. Both Hanneke and Jeremy are at the forefront of the contemporary fiddle scene in America., playing and composing new tunes that retain the integrity and soul of traditional music. "Exuberant and rhythmic, somehow both wild and innocent, delivered with captivating melodic clarity and an irresistible playfulness," says the Boston Globe about Hanneke Cassel's playing. Such charismatic fiddling has brought the native Oregonian many honors and awards. She is the 1997 U.S. National Scottish Fiddle Champion, she holds a Bachelors of Music in Violin Performance from Berklee College of Music, and she has performed and taught across North America, Europe, New Zealand, Australia, and China. Hanneke's latest release, "For Reasons Unseen," features an all-star cast of musicians including Alasdair Fraser, Natalie Haas, Rushad Eggleston, and Aoife O'Donovan. Influences from Scotland to China, along with grooves and musical innovations from the hip Boston bluegrass/Americana scene, fuse together to create a uniquely American
Soup kitchen to host Thanksgiving Day dinner
PAWTUCKET —The Pawtucket Soup Kitchen will be hosting its annual Thanksgiving Day Dinner on Thursday, November 28, from noon to 1 p.m. The dinner will be held at the Soup Kitchen, which is located at 195 Walcott Street, basement, Pawtucket, RI. The building is handicapped accessible. Thanks to the generosity of Mayor Donald R. Grebien and the City of Pawtucket, shuttle service will be available from the Visitors Center on Roosevelt Avenue in downtown Pawtucket to the Soup Kitchen from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. In the spirit of Thanksgiving and all it represents, the Pawtucket Soup Kitchen invites anyone in need of a Thanksgiving Dinner to join them in celebrating the holiday.
Photos courtesy of Blackstone River Theatre
Fiddlers Hanneke Cassel, left, and Jeremy Kittle, above, will perform at the Blackstone River Theatre in Cumberland at 8 p.m. on Saturday.
approach to Scottish music. Currently touring internationally with his name-sake group, the Jeremy Kittel Band, Jeremy Kittel leads audiences into exciting new-acoustic music territory. He also maintains an active schedule of collaborations with some of today's most innovative and influential artists, from genres diverse as folk, jazz, classical, and pop music. Recently completing a five-year position as a full-time member of the Grammy-winning Turtle Island Quartet, Kittel has also toured and recorded with such musical giants as Mark O'Connor, Bela Fleck, Edgar
Meyer, Paquito D'Rivera, My Morning Jacket, and Abigail Washburn. A native of Newfoundland, singer/guitarist Keith Murphy, known for his work with Nightingale, Childsplay and Assembly, has a sophisticated approach to old ballads and songs, and fills out fiddle tunes with his grooving guitar style as well as contributing great songs. Blackstone River Theatre is located at 549 Broad Street. Admission is $15 in advance, $18 day of show. For reservations or information call Blackstone River Theatre at (401) 7259272.
North Attleboro Historical Society to meet Nov. 18
NORTH ATTLEBORO — The North Attleboro Historical Society will hold its next meeting on Monday, November 18th at 7:30 p.m. at the Little Red Schoolhouse. The Society invites you to join them as Freedom Trail Guide, Al Soucy, gives us a virtual tour of Boston's Freedom Trail through slides and lecture. The meeting takes place in the Little Red Schoolhouse next door to the Woodcock Garrison House at 362 North Washington Street in North Attleborough. Refreshments will be served following the presentation and a plant donated by Brigg's Nursery will be raffled. This meeting is free and open to the public.
Pawtucket couple enlists teens to help the needy
PAWTUCKET – Continuing to expand what started out as a clothing drive by adding numerous other items to help the homeless and needy, Gloria Cardenas and her husband, Carlos Cadavid, with a legion of teenage helpers will be setting up tables with donated items on Saturday, Nov. 16 from 10 a.m. to noon in the lobby of the downtown Visitor Center building, 175 Main St. The items are free to anyone who may need them, Cardenas said. Available items will include clothing, shoes, household items “and a lot of toys,” she said. This is the third donation event orchestrated in the city by the Pawtucket couple, deploying teenage and other members of their extended family and friends, with the previous event filling 14 tables in the Visitor Center. On Nov. 16, refreshments including hot dogs, coffee and water will also be available. “We collect and store stuff throughout the year,” said Cardenas, noting that no further donations are nities and so she could reunite with her five brothers. She later obtained a bachelor degree in education from Springfield College and more recently began studying for a master’s degree in social work to better help others. Their good works started by organizing a youth group out of her church, Holy Name Parish on Walcott Street, which collected used clothing to distribute to homeless shelters once a month in Providence. She said the positive feedback encouraged them to undertake a similar effort in Pawtucket. “We decided to do something for the city we live in,” she said. Mayor Donald R. Grebien, who has been supportive of the charitable effort – dubbed THH for short – from the start, praised the extended family’s community involvement. “We’re especially fortunate to have young people like this who are so committed to helping others,” he said. — Doug Hadden
Veterans Day ceremony planned in Pawtucket
PAWTUCKET — The Pawtucket Veterans Council, an umbrella organization for local veterans groups, will conduct its annual Veterans Day ceremony and wreath-laying at 11 a.m. on Monday, Nov. 11, at Veterans Memorial Park, at the corner of Roosevelt and Exchange streets, adjacent to City Hall. Members of the state congressional delegation, state legislators, Pawtucket City Council and Pawtucket School Committee, as well as members of the public, particularly veterans, are cordially invited.
Submitted photo
This lobby area in the Downtown Visitor Center at 175 Main St. will be filled with tables stacked with donated items available to the needy in the third “Teenagers Helping the Homeless” effort conducted by (from left) Carlos Cadavid and his wife Gloria Cardenas, of Pawtucket, with continuing support from Mayor Donald R. Grebien. Among the family’s teens helping out are (continued from left) their son Christopher Cardenas, 15, and nieces and nephew Jessica, 14, James, 13, Vanessa, 17, as well as Gloria Cardenas’s sister Beatriz.
needed for the Nov. 16 giveaway under the project they call Teenagers Helping the Homeless.
Participants sport T-shirts which picture a circle of children holding hands. Cardenas said she and
her husband, who settled in Pawtucket in 2003, came to this country about 20 years ago seeking better opportu-
Newman Church CUMBERLAND POLICE Police responded to a two-vehicle acciplans annual dent at 2000 Mendon Road at 10:11 a.m. on Christmas bazaar Friday. Operators were identified as Brenda
EAST PROVIDENCE – Newman Congregational Church will host its 18th annual Christmas Mission Bazaar to benefit various charities on Saturday, Dec. 7, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Among the tables you will find fresh pine wreaths and ornaments; “Newman’s Own” Country Store featuring a variety of crafts, homemade jams, breads, snack mixes, and cookies. Ten Thousand Villages will provide baskets, instruments and other gifts from around the world. There will be hand knit items, quilted Christmas items, a quilt raffle, fleece scarves, handmade crafts, book table, and silent auction. You are sure to find treasures at “Newman Marcus” (our white elephant tables). Alternative gifts will be available. The kitchen is open for lunch. Bring your friends, and enjoy the festivities! Newman Church is located on the corner of Pawtucket and Newman Avenues in Rumford Dean, of Rocky Crest Road, and David Boucher of Wake Robin Road, Lincoln. No injuries were reported at the scene, police said. • A second accident at 2000 Mendon Road was investigated at 12:53 p.m. Friday, police said. Operators were identified as
Ronald H. Dufault of Cozy Lane, and Susan L. Johnson of Deerfield Road. No injuries were reported, police said. • Police investigated a reported vandalism at the Ashton School on Scott Road at 10:58 p.m. Friday, police said. • Neisa Aspinwall, 46, of 12 Main St., was charged with domestic simple assault and domestic disorderly conduct following a disturbance at the 12 Main St. address at 11:58 p.m. Friday, police said.
Charles Coelho Funeral Home
151 Cross Street, Central Falls, RI 02863 401-724-9440 160 Park Street, Attleboro, MA 02703 508-222-7700
Funeral Home
350 Willett Ave., E. Providence, RI 02915 401-433-4400
Directory
Cook-Hathaway Funeral Home Raymond Watson Funeral Home Foley-Hathaway Funeral Home J.H. Williams Funeral Home
126 South Main St., Attleboro, MA 02703 508-222-0498
Duffy-Poule Funeral Home
20 Peck Street, Attleboro, MA 02703 508-222-0193
210 Taunton Avenue, E. Providence, RI 02915 401-434-2600
Bellows Funeral Chapel
160 River Road, Lincoln, RI 02865 401-723-9792
Diamond Funeral Home
180 N. Washington Street, North Attleboro, MA 02760 • 508-695-5931
Cheetham Funeral Home
1012 Newport Avenue, Pawtucket, RI 02861 401-725-4525
Thank You Novenas
For Favors or Prayers Answered
(Sample ads. Many others to choose from)
ST. JUDE’S 0 NOVENACarmel,
Dyer-Lake Funeral Home
161 Commonwealth Avenue, North Attleboro, MA 02763 • 508-695-0200
Costigan-O’Neill Funeral Home
220 Cottage Street, Pawtucket, RI 02860 401-723-4035
PRAYER 0 TO THE 0 . BLESSED VIRGIN 20 Oh$Most Beautiful Flower of Mt.
Sperry & McHoul Funeral Home
15 Grove Street, N. Attleboro, MA 02760 508-695-5651
Lachapelle Funeral Home
643 Main Street, Pawtucket, RI 02860 401-724-2226
Darlington Mortuary of L. Heroux & Sons, Inc.
1042 Newport Avenue, Pawtucket, RI 02861 401-722-4376
Manning-Heffern Funeral Home
68 Broadway, Pawtucket, RI 02860 401-723-1312
Thank 0You Blessed 0.0 1 $Virgin Mary for favor granted.
N.M. &
To place your ad in this publication
Call 401-365-1438
fruitful vine, splendor of Heaven, Blessed Mother of the Son 0 . May 5 the Sacred Heart of of God, Immaculate Virgin, assist $1 be adored, glorified, Jesus me in this, my necessity. Oh Star of loved and preserved the Sea, help me and show me here throughout the world now you are my Mother, Oh Holy Mary, Mother of God, Queen of Heaven and forever. Sacred Heart of and Earth, I humbly beseech you Jesus, pray for us. from the bottom of my heart to St. Jude, help of the secure me in my necessity (make hopeless pray for us. St. Jude request). There are none that can worker of miracles pray for withstand your power. Oh Mary, us. conceived without sin, pray for us R.B. Thank You St. Jude. who have recourse to thee (3 times). Holy Mary, I place this prayer in B.Z. your hands (3 times). Say this prayer for three consecutive days and then you must publish it and it will be granted to you.
Keefe Funeral Home
5 Higginson Avenue, Lincoln, RI 02865 401-725-4253
Merrick Williams Funeral Home
530 Smithfield Avenue, Pawtucket, RI 02860 401-723-2042
Lincoln Funeral Home
1501 Lonsdale Ave., Lincoln, RI 02865 401-726-4117
Prata Funeral Home
220 Cottage Street, Pawtucket, RI 02860 401-722-8324 1008 Newport Avenue, Pawtucket, RI 02861 401-722-2140
Karol A. Romenski Funeral Home William Tripp Funeral Home
342 High Street, Central Falls, RI 02863 401-722-7250
R.W. Chatigny Funeral Home
151 Cross Street, Central Falls, RI 02863 401-725-7756
Russell Boyle Funeral Home
331 Smith Street, Providence, RI 02908 401-272-3100
J.J. Duffy Funeral Home
757 Mendon Road, Cumberland, RI 02864 401-334-2300
Mariani & Son Funeral Home
200 Hawkins Street, Providence, RI 02904 401-861-5432
Perry-McStay Funeral Home
2555 Pawtucket Avenue, E. Providence, RI 02914 • 401-434-3885
O’Neill Funeral Home
3102 Mendon Road, Cumberland, RI 02864 401-658-1155
L.L.
Rebello Funeral Home
901 Broadway, E. Providence, RI 02914 401-434-7744
ALLIANCE BLACKSTONE VALLEY FEDERAL CREDIT UNION
594 Central Avenue, Pawtucket, RI • 401-722-8236 • www.ABVFCU.com
Mon. 9-5pm, Tues. & Wed. 9-4:30pm, Thur. & Fri. 9-6pm, Sat. 9-12pm
PRESENTS YOUR COMMUNITY CALENDAR
Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday
3
Blackstone Woonsocket
• ‘Les Miserables’ at the Stadium Theatre, presented by Encore Repertory Company, 2 p.m. 7624545, www.stadiumtheatre.com for tickets and information. • St. Stanislaus Church, 174 Harris Ave., will host a Christmas Bazaar at the church from 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
4
Central Falls
5
Pawtucket
6
Woonsocket
•Harris Public Library hosts Creative Writing Group Wednesdays, 7:30 p.m.
7
Woonsocket
8
Burrillville
• Pascoag Council, 383, Knights of Columbus Friday Night Bingo at the Columbus Club, 98 Roosevelt Ave. Games begin promptly at 6:20 p.m.; doors open at 4:30 p.m. and the kitchen at 5 p.m.
9
Woonsocket
•St. Charles Borromeo Church Christmas Bazaar, North Main and Daniels streets, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Handicap accessible. • Woonsocket Health & Rehabilitation Centre hosts a harvest bazaar from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. • Sacred Heart Church on Third Avenue hosts a “Cabaret Night” in the Parish Hall from 7:30 to 10:30 p.m. Wine, beer, soda and water available for purchase. Guests invited to bring snacks. Tickets are $13 and can be purchased after Mass or at the rectory.
• The Blackstone Lions will hold a •Forand Manor holds Bingo every non-perishable food drive from 10 Monday and Wednesday, starting a.m. to 2 p.m. in front Park & at 5:15 p.m. Shop, 3 Main St.
Lincoln
•Student-led open house for eighth-graders and their parents from 1 to 4 p.m. at Lincoln High school.
• The Leon Mathieu Senior Center and Shri Studio have partnered to offer a “Yoga for Seniors” on Tuesday mornings Bellingham from 9:30am-10:30am at Shri • Reading with Indy, 6:30 to 7:30 Studio, 21 Broad Street. The fee p.m. at the Bellingham Public for Leon Mathieu Senior Center Library. Indy, a certified reading members is $5 per person per therapy dog will be at the library on month. 728-7582. Mondays. Children sign up for 15 minutes to read to Indy. All ages Cumberland welcome. Please register only one • Teen Anime Club at the time per month in order to give Cumberland Public Library, every other children opportunities to Tuesday from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. read. for teens 13+. Watch anime and have a snack, draw, play games and meet special gifts.
East Greenwich
•Stephen Marra Foundation 5K Road Race, the Grille on Main, 50 Main St. Race day registration 8 to 9 a.m., race starts at 9:30. www.StephenMarraFoundation.org.
• “Ghost Army - A Documentary Film” 7 p.m. at the Stadium Theatre, Monument Square. The Ghost Army tells the astonishing Central Falls true story of American G.I.s who •Forand Manor holds Bingo every tricked the enemy with rubber Monday and Wednesday, starting tanks, sound effects and visual at 5:15 p.m. illusions during WWII. Visit www.stadiumtheatre.com/Event/ Pawtucket 356 for more information. •Family Movie Night at the • Beacon Charter High School Pawtucket Public Library, 6 p.m. for the Arts open house, 6 to 8 Discover what happens when p.m. www.beaconart.org. (401) monsters go off to college. 671-6261. Animated G-rated movie. Bring snacks, a drink and enjoy the Lincoln show. Children ages 10 and older • Book fair, 2:30 to 5:30 p.m. at may attend without a caregiver. St. James School cafeteria, 57 Free and not registration required. Division St., Manville, sponsored (401) 725-3174 ext. 209 for infor- by Scholastic Books and the mation. Northern Rhode Island Collaborative. Children’s books will be available at all reading levels. (401) 769-6445 for more information.
Pawtucket
• St. Mary Antiochian Orthodox Church, 60 St. Mary Way, holds 33rd annual Christmas bazaar, Nov.8, 5-8 p.m.; Nov. 9, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; and Novl 10, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.
North Attleboro
• Madonna Manor’s annual Christmas Fair, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m., and also Nov. 9 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., 85 North Washington St.
North Smithfield
•PTO to host annual Artisans Fair from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the high school, featuring Santa and free photography sittings. •St. John the Evangelist Church, 63 Church St., Slatersville, bazaar and craft fair, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. and also Nov. 10, 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Woonsocket
• Woonsocket Head Start Child Development Association to hold flu clinic at Cass Park Center, 350 Newland Ave., from 1:30 to North Attleboro 2:30 p.m. Flu shots will be pro• Madonna Manor’s annual vided to staff, teachers, students, Christmas Fair, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., family members of staff and stu85 North Washington St. dents. Bring along your insurance card.
10
Cumberland
• Widow support group meets every Sunday — the first two Sundays of the month are at the Community Chapel on Diamond Hill Rd. The second two are at Emerald Bay Manor, Diamond Hill Road. All meetings 2 p.m. Call 401-333-5815.
11 VETERANS DAY 12
Woonsocket
• Annual Veterans Day Observance ceremony outside of the Museum of Work and Culture, Market Square, 10 a.m. This year’s theme is World War II. Public is invited. • The Knights of Columbus Woonsocket Council 113 hold a memorial Mass for past members at 7 p.m. at Sacred Heart Church, 415 Olo St. This will be their November social event.
13
Lincoln
•The Lincoln Garden Club meets from 1-3 p.m. at the Chapel Street Congregational Church, 185 Chapel St. Topic: Winter container gardening.
14
Woonsocket
• Written Word Writing Group Thursdays, 7:15 p.m. at Harris Public Library. An outlet for adult writers of all leanings: poetry, journaling, prose, short story, sermon, comedy, script writing, puppets. No critiquing. All are welcome and there is no charge.
15
Burrillville
• Pascoag Council, 383, Knights of Columbus Friday Night Bingo at the Columbus Club, 98 Roosevelt Ave. Games begin promptly at 6:20 p.m.; doors open at 4:30 p.m. and the kitchen at 5 p.m. • Berean Baptist Church in Harrisville will hold a fundraiser, ‘Skating To End Hunger,’ from 9 to 11 p.m. at the June Rockwell Levy Ice Skating Rink, 425 East Ave., Harrisville. Admission is $5 per person and includes a free raffle ticket. The drawing is at 10 and prizes include an Apple iPod Nano, four-pack of movie tickets and a $20 Dunkin’ Donuts gift card.
16
Lincoln
• St. James Church, 33 Division St., holds a Holiday Bazaar & Giant Flea Market, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. (401)766-1558.
Pawtucket
• The Leon Mathieu Senior Center and Shri Studio have partnered to offer a “Yoga for Seniors” on Tuesday mornings from 9:30am-10:30am at Shri Studio, 21 Broad Street. The fee for Leon Mathieu Senior Center members is $5 per person per month. 728-7582.
Burrillville
• “Winter Floral & Craft” workshop at 1 p.m. at the Burrillville Community Recreation Center (Beckwith-Bruckshaw Lodge), 50 Lodge Road. $10 materials fee will be charged. Call Burrillville Parks & Recreation at 568-9470 or e-mail at parksandrec@burrillville.org to register.
Woonsocket
Pawtucket
• The Pawtucket Fireworks Committee holds its annual Fall Breakfast from 8 a.m. to noon at St. Teresa’s Church Hall, Newport Ave. Tickets for the event are $10 for adults, $5 for children, with children under five free. For tickets call 288-7226 or pay at the door.
Cumberland
• Teen Anime Club at the Cumberland Public Library, every Tuesday from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. for teens 13+. Watch anime and have a snack, draw, play games and meet special gifts.
Central Falls
• The Eugene T. Lefebvre VFW Post 1271 will hold its annual Veterans Day Ceremony at 11 a.m. at Quinn’s Square at the corner of Dexter and Hungt streets. The public is welcome.
• Our Lady Queen of Martyrs Annual Holiday Bazaar in the School Hall, 1371 Park Ave., 9 am to 5 pm • Woonsocket Autism Benefit presents “Whose Line is it Anyway?” 7 p.m., Stage Right Studio. Tickets: $5. Proceeds to fund April’s Event. www.woonsocketautismbenefit.org
Northbridge
•The Blackstone Valley Coin and Collectables Club will host a coin show at Brians Restaurant on 122 Northbridge, Ma from 3 to 8 p.m.
Cumberland
Woonsocket
• A chicken dinner celebrating Veterans Day will be held at noon in the Elks hall, 380 social St. Veterans cost is $2. Family and guests is $8 per person can be purchased at the Elks lounge with the bar steward or by contacting Jane Iskierski. No tickets will be sold at the door. Deadline to purchase tickets is Nov. 4.
Woonsocket
•Mended Hearts meets at 5:30 p.m. Speaker and host: Dr. Ibrahim Elgabry. Meeting will be held at his office, 191 Clinton St. Topic: Cardiovascular disease. All Are welcome. (508) 883-1291.
• Heritage Ballet will present a Nutcracker Storytime for children 4 and older in the Children’s Room of the Cumberland Public Library at 10 a.m.
North Smithfield
• The North Smithfield Heritage Association will open the Little Red Schoolhouse, 190 School St., Forestdale, for a holiday shop from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The annual ornament will be avialble.
17
Woonsocket
• Disney’s “My Son Pinoccio,” presented by Encore Kids at the Stadium Theatre, 2 p.m. Call (401) 762-4545 or visit www.stadiumtheatre.com for tickets and information. • Stage Right Studio will host its third annual dance party for the Milk Fund from 4 to 7 p.m. at City Side, 74 South Main St. Complimentary hors d’oeuvres, raffles and cash bar. Tickets are $10 in advance by calling (401) 356-0255, and $15 at the door.
18
Central Falls
19
Pawtucket
20
Woonsocket
•Harris Public Library hosts Creative Writing Group Wednesdays, 7:30 p.m.
21
Pawtucket
• The Pawtucket Fireworks Committee presents a night with psychic/medium Matt Fraser called “Message from Heaven,” at the Portuguese Social Club, School Street. Doors open at 6, event starts at 7. Tickets are $35 and can be purchased onlin at www.meetmattfraser.com.
22
Blackstone
• Holiday Fundrasier Shopping Event, 6 to 10 p.m., Millerville Mens Club, 8 Lloyd St. Over 20 local vendors, crafters and raffles. 18+ event. Proceeds to benefit the Woonsocket Track and Field Jr. Olympians.
23
Woonsocket
• Le Club Par-X to host Beer ‘n’ Dynamite fundraiser from 4 to 8 p.m., 36 Stanley St. $10 per person in advance at the club or $12 at th door. Must be 21 years or older. 765-1520.
•Forand Manor holds Bingo every • The Leon Mathieu Senior Monday and Wednesday, starting Center and Shri Studio have partat 5:15 p.m. nered to offer a “Yoga for Seniors” on Tuesday mornings Woonsocket from 9:30am-10:30am at Shri •The Knights of Columbus Moylan Studio, 21 Broad Street. The fee Assembly will hold a business for Leon Mathieu Senior Center meeting at 7 p.m. at All Saints members is $5 per person per Parish Hall, 323 Rathbun St. month. 728-7582.
Central Falls
• Forand Manor holds Bingo every Monday and Wednesday, starting at 5:15 p.m.
Bellingham
Cumberland
• Teen Anime Club at the Cumberland Public Library, every Tuesday from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. for teens 13+. Watch anime and have a snack, draw, play games and meet special gifts.
North Smithfield
• The North Smithfield Public Library will hold and Adult and Teen Craft Night at 6:30 p.m. Participants will create ornaments from wire and beads. All supplies will be provided by the library. Please register as space is limited.
Burrillville
• Pascoag Council, 383, Knights of Columbus Friday Night Bingo at the Columbus Club, 98 Roosevelt Ave. Games begin promptly at 6:20 p.m.; doors open at 4:30 p.m. and the kitchen at 5 p.m.
Glocester
• Glocester Heritage Society hosts a Peddlars’ Faire from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Job Armstrong Store, 1181 Main St., Chepachet.
• Reading with Indy, 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Bellingham Public Library. Indy, a certified reading therapy dog will be at the library on Cumberland Mondays. Children sign up for 15 • Widow support group meets minutes to read to Indy. All ages every Sunday — the first two welcome. Please register only one Sundays of the month are at the time per month in order to give Community Chapel on Diamond other children opportunities to Hill Rd. The second two are at Emerald Bay Manor, Diamond Hill read. Road. All meetings 2 p.m. Glocester Call 401-333-5815. • Holiday Countdown craft at the Jesse M. Smith Library, Harrisville. Join Deb at 6:30 p.m. for an adult craft session. Registration is required and can be done in person or by calling 710-7800. Materials will be provided and are free.
Lincoln
Glocester
• The Harmony Library will feature a Medicare Options Workshop at 6 p.m. The public is encouraged to reserve a space, although walk-ins are welcome. 949-2850. www.harmonylibrary.org.
• Vietnam Veterans of America James Michael Ray Memorial Chapter #818 will meet at 7 p.m. at the Lincoln Senior Center, 150 Jenckes Hill Road. Dinner before at 6. All Vietnam veterans welcome. For more information call Glocester Joe Gamache, (401) 651-6060. • The Harmony Library Memoir • The Children’s Room at the Writers Group meets at 6 p.m. at Cumberland Library presents the library. Registration is required. Cook-a-Book program for chil949-2850. dren ages 4-9, 4 to 5 p.m., featuring the story “Strega Nona” by Tomie dePaola. Participants will enjoy a delicious snack, make a craft and dance the tatntella. Register at the library beginning Nov. 9. Call 333-2552 ext. 3 for information.
Providence
• The Church of St. Mary holds its annual Bazaar on Broadway Pawtucket today from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and • The Walter Gatchell Post 306, Oct. 24 from 9 a.m. to 1:30 171 Fountain St., will hold a p.m. in the lower level of the Paul Turkey Trot at 7 p.m. There will be Cuffee School, 30 Barton St., drawings for turkeys every half directly behind the church. hour from 7:30 to 11 p.m. There will also be drawings throughout Central Falls the night for full Thanksgiving bas- • Church of the Holy Cross, corkets and other raffles as well. All ner of High and Clay streets, proceeds to benefit local veterans Polish kitchen between 11 a.m. and military families. and 2 p.m. Offering homemade pierogi, stuffed cabbage and other authentic homemade foods. Craft fair, also.
24
Cumberland
• Widow support group meets every Sunday — the first two Sundays of the month are at the Community Chapel on Diamond Hill Rd. The second two are at Emerald Bay Manor, Diamond Hill Road. All meetings 2 p.m. Call 401-333-5815.
25
Central Falls
26
Pawtucket
27
Woonsocket
•Harris Public Library hosts Creative Writing Group Wednesdays, 7:30 p.m.
28 THANKSGIVING 29
Pawtucket
• The Pawtucket Soup Kitchen, 195 Walcott St., will host its annual Thanksgiving Day dinner from noon to 1 p.m. Shuttle service will be available from the Visitors Center on Roosevelt Ave. from 11:30 a.m. to 1. Anyone in need of Thanksgiving dinner is invited.
30
Cumberland
• Blackstone River Theatre Homecoming Concert and Silent Auction Fundraiser, 6:30 to 10 p.m., featuring Atwater Donnelly, Eastern Medicine Singer, Peter Janson, Ken Lyon, Torrin Ryan, Pendragon and more. For more information visit www.riverfolk.org
Burrillville
• Pascoag Council, 383, Knights of Columbus Friday Night Bingo at the Columbus Club, 98 Roosevelt Ave. Games begin promptly at 6:20 p.m.; doors open at 4:30 p.m. and the kitchen at 5 p.m.
Woonsocket
• Holy Family Church holds its eighth annual Thanksgiving Interfaith Service at 3 p.m., 414 South Main St. All are welcome.
Pawtucket
• A “Christkindlmarkt” or German Christmas Market will be held at the German American Cultural Society Hall, 78 Carte Ave., from noon to 5 p.m. Admission is free.
•Forand Manor holds Bingo every • The Leon Mathieu Senior Monday and Wednesday, starting Center and Shri Studio have partat 5:15 p.m. nered to offer a “Yoga for Seniors” on Tuesday mornings Bellingham from 9:30am-10:30am at Shri • Reading with Indy, 6:30 to 7:30 Studio, 21 Broad Street. The fee for Leon Mathieu Senior Center p.m. at the Bellingham Public members is $5 per person per Library. Indy, a certified reading therapy dog will be at the library on month. 728-7582. Mondays. Children sign up for 15 Cumberland minutes to read to Indy. All ages welcome. Please register only one • Teen Anime Club at the time per month in order to give Cumberland Public Library, every other children opportunities to Tuesday from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. read. for teens 13+. Watch anime and have a snack, draw, play games and meet special gifts.
Central Falls
• Forand Manor holds Bingo every Monday and Wednesday, starting at 5:15 p.m.
Woonsocket
• Trans-Siberian Orchestra Experience - Wizards of Winter, at the Stadium Theatre, 8 p.m. Performing The Trans Siberian Orchestra’s Greatest Hits: Christmas Eve Sarajevo, Old City Bar, Christmas Cannon Rock, Queen of the Winter Night, and many others, plus music from their own album. www.stadiumtheatre.com.
Woonsocket
• Stadium Theatre Christmas, 7:30 p.m. Come and enjoy music, dance and drama at the 8th annual holiday spectacular. www.stadiumtheatre.com.
Millville
Lincoln
• Students in grades 6-12 are invited to the Lincoln Public Library to create a holiday ornament from 3 to 4 p.m. Class is limited to 10. Register at reference or call 333-2422 ext. 17. See more events at www.lincolnlibrary.com.
Woonsocket
• The Arts Guild of Woonsocket will hold its first multi media art show and artist’s reception from 6 to 8 p.m. in the village square at Le Moulin, 68 South Main St., with an awards presentation at 7.
• Firearms Safety Certification Course for the public, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Millville Senior Center, 40 Prospect St. $75 fee. Call the police at (508) 883-3117 to sign up.
Pawtucket
• The Pawtucket Dog Park Committee presents “Paws and Claus” at Daggett Farm from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Pet photos with Santa. Proceeds benefit the dog park.
Send your community events to notices@pawtuckettimes.com
Blackstone Valley
Own A Car? Looking To Upgrade? Need Service Or Repair?
Friday, November 8, 2013 THE TIMES A7
The 2014 Nissan Versa Note 1.6 S has a base price of $13,900, which is what most of us can afford in a new car.
AUTO GUIDE
Prepare your car for winter
(BPT) — Getting ready for winter is no small feat. It takes time and planning to make sure your family and your home are ready to brave the elements. But is your car as ready as you are? If you haven't thought about preparations for your vehicle, these simple tips will help you prepare for the colder months ahead. * Check your tires. You depend on your tires more during the winter than any other season. So before the roads get slick, check your tires to be sure they aren't worn and that they are properly inflated. You should be able to find the proper tire pressure on the inside of your driver's side door. Once you're sure your tire pressure is appropriate, make a note to check again later in the winter. Cold air will cause the air in your tires to compress and may cause your tires to lose pressure. * Check your brakes. Your brakes will work harder once the icy conditions of winter set in. Make sure they are up to the task by bringing your vehicle in to your mechanic for a thorough brake inspection. * Wash and wax your car at a professional car wash. Putting your car through the car wash during the sloppiest season of the year may seem a strange idea but a thorough wash can remove harmful compounds that may cause damage when mixed with sand and road salt. Experts from the International Carwash Association also recommend a coat of wax for an extra layer of protection from the elements. Besides protecting your car, you'll also be protecting the environment. Professional car washes can save up to 20 percent of the amount of water you'd use by washing your car at home. They do this by treating and reusing their water, rather than releasing toxic chemicals and grime into the storm drains, which can often occur when you wash your car yourself. You can learn more about the environmental benefits of a professional car wash at washwithwatersavers.com. * Check fluids. It's good practice to stay on top of fluids such as oil, windshield washer or transmission fluid. But in the winter, no fluid is more important than your coolant because, if you're out of coolant, you're out of heat. Your owner's manual will tell you how much coolant you need as well and provide the correct blend. It's also never a bad idea to keep an additional bottle of coolant in your car for emergencies. * Test your battery. A lack of coolant will stop your heater from working and so will a dead battery. Before you head out this winter, be sure your battery is working properly. No one wants to be stranded by the side of the road with a dead battery and, in the cold winter months, being stranded could be dangerous. * Check your wipers. You checked the wiper fluid along with your other fluids but don't forget the wipers themselves. Replace old wiper blades and make sure to have a reservoir full of wiper fluid. * Winter emergency kit. Sometimes all the preparation in the world can't prevent a winter emergency. If you find yourself stranded by the side of the road, a winter survival kit can be very helpful. Include an ice scraper/brush, extra blankets or clothes including hats and gloves snacks and bottled water and a first aid kit. A small shovel can come in handy if you get stuck and a bag of cat litter can be used to provide needed traction for your tires.
Photos/Nissan
SENSIBLE & AFFORDABLE
By WARREN BROWN
Special to The Washington Post
The numbers say the 2014 Nissan Versa Note 1.6 S hatchback, with a base price of $13,900, makes perfect marketing sense. It is all most of us can comfortably afford in a new car. The numbers, collected from a variety of sources in the automotive and financial industries, are sobering. To wit: • The average price of a new car sold in the United States in 2012 was $30,500. • Barely 19 percent of the U.S. population bought
the estimated 16 million new cars and trucks sold in this country last year. • Residents of only one metropolitan area — Washington, with an average household income of $86,680 — could comfortably handle the monthly payments on a new automobile costing $31,000 or more. "Comfortably" means buyers can make due car notes without jeopardizing rent, mortgage, utility, food or other necessary payments. In the Washington metropolitan area, the home See NISSAN, Page A8
NUTS & BOLTS
Bottom line: The 2014 Nissan Versa Note 1.6 S is a very good economy car. Compare with the Chevrolet Spark and Sonic, Toyota Yaris and Corolla, Ford Fiesta, Mazda 3 hatchback, Hyundai Accent, and Kia Rio hatchback. Ride, acceleration, and handling: It gets decent marks in all three for drivers willing to obey posted speed limits and those who are not the least bit concerned about 0-to-60-mph acceleration times. Head-turning quotient: Convent-friendly — that is, it reminds me of certain Holy Ghost nuns who taught me in elementary school. I was always happy to see them, but I easily forgot that they were there. Body style/layout: The Nissan Versa 1.6 S is the hatchback version of the Nissan Versa subcompact sedan, which was revised last year. The Versa Note is a subcompact, frontwheel-drive four-door hatchback offered in three trim levels — base S, mid-grade S Plus and top-of-the-line SV.
Most booster seats do well in new safety rankings
The Ferrari Beline SP
DEE-ANN DURBIN
AP Auto Writer
DETROIT — More than half of child booster seats that went on sale this year earned a top rating from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety. The institute, which is funded by insurers, ranked 31 new models. Nineteen earned the top rating of "best bet," which means they correctly position a 4- to 8-year-old child to use the regular shoulder and lap belts in almost any car. Britax, Evenflo, Ferrari, Graco, Harmony, Recaro and Safety 1st all had seats on the institute's "best bet" list. Both booster seats with high backs and those without backs performed well. One seat — the Ferrari
Beline SP — got a "good bet" rating when used in its high-back mode. That means the fit is acceptable in most vehicles. Eleven seats got a "check fit" rating, which means the seats may provide a good fit in some vehicles but parents should make sure. A belt fits correctly when the lap portion lies flat across the child's upper thighs and the shoulder portion crosses snugly over the middle of the shoulder. The institute said children in booster seats are much more likely to escape serious injury in a crash than those without boosters. Children should use boosters until they're big enough for adult belts to fit properly. The cheapest "best bet" was the Graco Connext backless seat, which costs $18. The most expensive, the Ferrari Beline SP, which has both high-back and backless modes, is $300. The institute said seats have made big improvements since it
began testing them five years ago. In all, there are 58 seats ranked on its website, including seats that weren't new in 2013. The group tested the boosters based on how they positioned a child-sized test dummy to use a car's seat belts. There are only two booster seats the institute warns people not to buy: The Safety 1st All-In-One and Safety 1st Alpha Omega Elite. Both are made by Dorel Juvenile Group, which has several other seats on the "best bet" list. The institute said the seats — which can be used in rear-facing mode for infants as well as forward-facing mode for young children — aren't recommended because the lap belt comes up too far on the abdomen and the shoulder belt is too far out on the shoulder. Dorel Juvenile Group said in a statement that the seats comply with all federal safety requirements and are recommended by the institute in some of their other modes.
A8 THE TIMES
AUTOMOTIVE
Today’s Forecast
Narragansett Bay Weather Wind (knots) Seas (feet) Visibility (miles) NW 12-20 2-3 5 Buzzards Bay NW 12-20 2 5
Friday, November 8, 2013
Merrimack to Chatham NW 10-22 2-4 5
Chatham to Watch Hill NW 12-25 3-4 5
..............Breezy, Partly to Mostly Sunny.........
FRI
SAT
SUN
MON
TUE
Mark Searles’s Southern New England Area Forecast
46-50 46-50 32-36 28-32
Breezy Incr. Clouds
52-57 38-43
M Sunny
48-52 30-35
P Sunny
43-47 30-35
M Cloudy
Five Day Forecast data supplied by Storm Team 10
lA gusty northwest wind wil make it feel cooler than the upper 40s this afternoon. There will be a good deal of sunshine blending with some clouds at times today. The wind will drop off overnight and temperatures will fall into the lower 30s Saturday morning. Clouds will increase tomorrow as a surge of milder air moves in from the west. This milder air will be with us Sunday with a mostly sunny sky and highs reaching into the middle 50s.
Gov’t oversight of bus, truck industries faulted Nissan
JOAN LOWY
Associated Press
WASHINGTON — Federal accident investigators called on Thursday for a probe of the government agency charged with ensuring the safety of commercial vehicles, saying their own look into four tour bus and truck crashes that killed 25
people raises "serious questions" about how well the agency is doing its job. Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration inspectors failed to respond to red flags indicating significant safety problems on the part of bus and truck companies involved in accidents in California, Oregon, Kentucky and Tennessee,
documents released by the National Transportation Safety Board said. Besides those killed, 83 other people were injured in the crashes, many of them seriously. The motor carrier administration needs to crack down on bad actors "before crashes occur, not just after high visibility events," said NTSB Chairman Deborah Hersman. In one crash, federal inspectors gave a California tour bus company safety clearance a month before one of the company's buses overturned near San Bernardino last February while returning from a ski resort. Seven passengers and a pickup truck driver were killed, 11 passengers were seriously injured and 22 others received minor to moderate injuries. The bus driver
told passengers the bus' brakes had failed. Federal inspectors didn't ask to examine Scapadas Magicas' buses during their visit to the company's headquarters near San Diego even though the company's buses had been cited previously for a host of mechanical problems during spot roadside inspections. California Highway Patrol crash investigators found a catastrophic failure of the brakes that a proper inspection by federal officials could have foreseen. All six brakes on the crashed bus were defective, according to the NTSB's report. Drums were worn or cracked, linings were worn down and some were otherwise "defective or inoperative."
Continued from Page D1 of hundreds of thousands of federal employees, it also means a government that does not periodically shut down to entertain adolescent political squabbles. • Of the 25 large U.S. metropolitan areas in the 2013 Car Affordability Study, the primary source of this column's data, produced by Interest.com, a company specializing in personal finance, residents of the last-ranked metropolis in terms of average household income, Tampa, Fla., with $43,832 annually, could comfortably afford a new automobile priced at $14,516. So, Tampa, the new Nissan Versa Note 1.6 S is for you, as it is for all of us more interested in getting from one place to another than we are in making statements our bank accounts can't afford. It's not such a bad deal. It just requires understanding and significant attitude adjustment. To wit: The Versa Note 1.6 S is a basic subcompact automobile engineered to carry five people and their stuff safely, reliably, efficiently (27 miles per gallon in the city and 36 on the highway using regular unleaded gasoline) without drama, good or bad. If you approach this car with Walter Mitty racetrack performance fantasies, you are looking at the wrong automobile. The 1.6-liter in-line fourcylinder engine in the Versa Note 1.6 S gets a maximum 109 horsepower and 107 pound-feet of torque — not exactly the stuff of throttlejockey yore. The little car's interior is several steps above mediocre.
Hard plastics abound and the cloth seats are, well, cloth — washable, cleanable cloth. Spill, stain, clean, let dry overnight. Drive the next day. Let none of this mislead you into thinking that the Versa Note 1.6 S is "cheap" in all of the derisive meaning of that word. The subcompact car is well made. Fit and finish are excellent — all the plastic interior pieces fit well. And there are certain options — onboard navigation, electronic keyless entry, high-definition backup camera, sound system with radio data and speed-sensitive volume control — that make the Versa Note 1.6 S feel a tad upperclass. Credit a growing awareness among global automobile manufacturers that most of the people in the 99 percent earnings group have 1 percent tastes. The trick is to satisfy those askew longings without busting manufacturing or marketing budgets. Nissan seems to have done a good job of performing that magic with the Versa Note 1.6 S. It is a small economy car that does not make you feel bad about driving economy. It is reasonably attractive and, with front and rear head air bags as standard equipment, reasonably safe. The Versa Note 1.6 S is not the sexiest ride in the world. But it understands the value of commitment. It will take you home when you're laid off, help you get to the unemployment benefits office, and bring you back to work when that time comes. In the interim, you should be able to make monthly payments — even if you live in Tampa.
The Times Halloween Costume Contest Winners!
Most Creative
Funniest Ages 21/2 & 13 months
Most Lovable
Most Lovable
Jamye & Mom Philip & Patrick
Bradley
11 months
Kingston
(We did not receive any entries for “Scariest”, so we chose 2 “Most Lovable”)
Thank you to all who submitted photos! They were all great!
SPORTS
Blackstone Valley
THE TIMES, Friday, November 8, 2013 — B1
High school football
PLAYOFF CONUNDRUM AFOOT?
Result of West Warwick-Cumberland game could produce ripple effect
By ERIC BENEVIDES ebenevides@pawtuckettimes.com CUMBERLAND — Before looking ahead to what could result in an unusual five-way tie for first place in the Division II-B ranks once the regular season ends this weekend, it’s time to take a history lesson and look back to the last (and only other) time this happened in the state. In 2008, Tolman, Woonsocket, West Warwick, Warwick Vets, and Westerly found themselves tied for first place in the Division II-A standings with 5-2 records and scratching their heads over which were going to be the four that would play in the following weekend’s opening round of the playoffs. According to Section 5, Chapter A of the football bylaws of the RIIL (Rhode Island Interscholastic League), the pool records of the five teams were to be the first tiebreaker. But the five teams each finished with 2-2 marks, posting their other three wins against the other non-playoff teams. That brought the next tiebreaker – quality points. ERNEST A. BROWN / Blackstone Valley Sports photo Each team earned a quality point based on the number of wins of the division opponents they defeated. Cumberland head coach Chris Skurka knows exactly what’s at stake when the Again, each school ended up with the same number Clippers host West Warwick in a key Division II-B contest Friday night at Tucker (13), and again, another tiebreaker was needed. Field. If the Wizards defeat the Clippers, it would set the wheels in motion for an And it was that next tiebreaker that decided everyunprecedented five-way tie for first place.
thing – the total defensive points allowed in the contests between the five teams involved. If one team had given up the fewest points, then that team would win the tiebreaker and earn the division’s top seed. That meant West Warwick, which gave up only 70 points in its four games, was the lucky recipient. As for the other four teams, they had to revert back to the first tiebreaker and recalculate their pool play records. That meant Tolman and Westerly, with 2-1 pool play records, were the next two seeds. Woonsocket and Vets were next with 1-2 marks, but because the Hurricanes topped the Villa Novans, 26-7, they had the head-to-head tiebreaker and the fourth and final seed, thus leaving Woonsocket on the outside looking in. Now let’s return to the present and view the state of affairs in Division II-B. Cumberland currently sits in first place with a 5-1 mark, while St. Raphael, Rogers, North Kingstown, and West Warwick are tied for second place with 4-2 records. The Clippers will have their hands full tonight at 7 at Tucker Field when the defending champions host the Wizards, who have won their last four games (five if you count their non-league win three weekends ago against Warwick Vets), but the Saints, Vikings, and Skippers will close out their schedules by facing the See CLIPPERS, page B3
NHL
B’s Rask continues dominance of Panthers
Stops 29 shots as Boston tops Florida
BOSTON (AP) — Tuukka Rask made 29 saves and the Boston Bruins got goals from four different players to hand the Florida Panthers their seventh straight loss, 4-1 on Thursday night. Rask improved to 9-1 against Florida in helping Boston win for the third time in its last seven home games. The Bruins have won five straight and seven of their last eight against the Panthers. Florida has lost 10 of its past 11 games and is on its longest skid (0-3-4) since a 10-game slide in April 2011. David Krejci gave Boston a 1-0 lead when his shot from the blue line beat Panthers goalie Scott Clemmensen at 7:17 of the second period. Brad Marchand had the winner on a wrist shot 4:09 into the third period, snapping a 12-game drought without a goal for Boston. Panthers' goalie Tim Thomas is still out with a lower body injury, but the former Bruins goalie was shown on the Jumbotron midway through the third period and received a rousing ovation. Thomas played for the Bruins from 200212 and led Boston to the Stanley Cup title and winning the Conn Smythe Trophy as the postseason's most valuable player in 2011. Thomas lost to Boston 3-2 in Florida last month, but has yet to oppose the Bruins at the TD Garden at any point in his career. Torey Krug gave Boston a 3-0 lead when he wristed home Chris Kelly's pass at 8:57 of the third for his sixth goal of the season. Jesse Winchester cut Boston's lead to 3-1 with 5:35 remaining when he batted Nick Bjugstad's shot past Rask. Reilly Smith capped the scoring for the Bruins at 18:13 of the third with an unassisted goal. Clemmensen made 20 saves for Florida in his second start this season. *** NOTES: Florida's only road victory this season came against Dallas on opening night. ... Boston has outscored Florida 19-2 over the last four home games and Marchand has notched nine points. ... Florida began the night tied with Buffalo for allowing most goals in the Eastern Conference with 53. . Winchester flattened Kelly with an elbow to the face five minutes into the game causing him to briefly leave the game.
AP photo
A week ago, Providence College head coach Ed Cooley, flanked by senior forward Kadeem Batts (10) and junior forward LaDontae Henton (23) had no such concerns about his depth. Now as the Friars get set to ring in the new season, they do so with concerns regarding how many bodies they will have available for tonight’s opener against New England rival Boston College at the Dunkin’ Donuts Center.
Men’s college basketball
Making the most of a tough situation
Friars expected to be shorthanded for opener against Boston College
By BRENDAN McGAIR bmcgair@pawtuckettimes.com PROVIDENCE — In his wildest dreams, Ed Cooley could probably not have imagined that he would have to deal with several crises regarding player personnel on the eve of a new season for the Providence College Friars. Instead of looking ahead to Friday’s showdown against Boston College, Cooley spent part of his Thursday answering questions regarding the Friars. When there’s this many issues regarding the health and availability of three Providence hoopsters in particular – sophomore Kris Dunn, along with freshmen Brandon Austin and Rodney Bullock – any and or chatter about what kind of threat the Eagles pose automatically gets placed on the backburner. “Either way, your whole program changes when you have suspensions and injuries,” Cooley stated while watching the Friars hoist up shots prior to Thursday’s practice session. By now, the circumstances surrounding Dunn, Austin and Bullock have been well publicized. Dunn’s issue is a right shoulder injury that he suffered during the first half of last Saturday’s exhibition game against Rhode Island College. Austin and Bullock are in the same predicament after Cooley announced Wednesday that both players were suspended indefinitely for “not upholding their responsibilities as student-athletes.” Dunn was seen Thursday afternoon following PC athletic trainer Bryn VanPatten just before practice inside Alumni Hall was shortly about to commence. Cooley didn’t exactly exude confidence regarding the health of his sophomore playmaker, but the head coach wasn’t prepared to rule Dunn out for the Friars’ season opener. “Not good. He’s getting some rehab right now, so we’re going to see if he can practice today,” said Cooley shortly after 1 p.m. Thursday. Cooley politely declined to talk about the findings from the MRI that Dunn underwent earlier in the week, citing issues of confidentiality. “The thing is that we’re going to see how he does in practice,” said PC’s third-year head coach. “(Thursday) is a real big day for him.” ERNEST A. BROWN / Blackstone Valley Sports photo Asked if it’s better to declare Dunn out the night before the BC game or wait until gameday with the hope that his shoulder could take a turn for the Providence will rely on senior sharpshooter Bryce Cotton to once again pile up the points. Cotton led the Friars in scoring last season, See FRIARS, page B3 averaging just under 20 points per game.
B2 THE TIMES
SPORTS
By JIM LITKE AP Sports Writer Fans in the stands at Super Bowls past only think they've seen it all. They've been sun-burned in Los Angeles, soaked in Miami and buffeted by winds at stops in between. Deafened during flyovers. Titillated at halftime, blacked out mid-game and even moved to tears by tributes to servicemen, veterans and the victims of 9/11. Even so, this next Super Bowl promises those in attendance something different: The chance to freeze their rear ends off. On Feb. 2, 2014 — the date could still be changed if a Nor'easter rolls in off the Jersey Shore — every one of the 82,000 or so ticketholders entering MetLife Stadium will receive a gift bag. Inside are a seat cushion, muffler, ski gaiters, three pairs of hand- and foot-warmers, lip balm and a package of tissues, plastered with enough logos to make a NASCAR driver jealous. The Super Bowl has been played in northern cities four times before — inside climate-controlled domes — but never outdoors. The average daily low for East Rutherford, N.J., in early February is 22 degrees, with temperatures typically falling throughout the night, when the game will be played. Snow, wind and rain, or all three at once, is not out of the question. Exactly how much protection all that swag provides against Mother Nature's wrath remains to be seen. "We can't provide them with coats," said Frank Supovitz, the NFL's vice president in charge of preparations for the game. "But we will be strongly encouraging them to stay in their seats." Which begs the question: If the game is for the fans, why stage it outdoors in the New Jersey-New York metro area precisely when the trusty Farmer's Almanac, hardly alone among forecasters, is predicting a blizzard? Money. NFL commissioner Roger Goodell and his owners are taking advantage of a lull in the tourism calendar to turn a swath of Manhattan into a playground and make cash registers sing. A 180 foot-tall toboggan slide will be plopped down in Times Square, and a stretch of Broadway from 34th Street to 48th will be closed to traffic, renamed "Super Bowl Boulevard," and converted into a rollicking theme park, merchandise shop and concert venue called the "NFL Experience." For a week, kids will punt, pass and kick while their parents shop for replica jerseys in locales where bankers and account executives usually gobble down lunch. It won't be the only place on an already crowded spit of land where jaded New Yorkers trade elbows with their guests. As many as 200,000 out-of-towners will be cast in the role of Jack Lemmon in the movie of the same name, dazzled by the goings-on and trying not to get fleeced by savvy hoteliers and street vendors. Already, reports are circulating about prices being tripled, with modest hotel rooms in Midtown jacked to $1,000 a night, and even more modest accommodations across the Hudson River in New Jersey, close to MetLife Stadium, offered at the princely sum of $600. That's on top of what's already the highest ticket prices
Friday, November 8, 2013
Getting ready for Super Bowl Sunday REGIONAL NFL preps its biggest game for the biggest stage
SCOREBOARD
R.I. HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS SCHEDULE
FRIDAY BOYS Football Smithfield at North Smithfield, Central Falls at Plainfield (Central Village, Conn.), 6 p.m.; Woonsocket at Coventry, West Warwick at Cumberland, Tolman at South Kingstown, St. Raphael at Pilgrim, Shea at North Kingstown, 7 p.m. GIRLS Soccer Division II Semifinals: Lincoln vs. Warwick Vets (at Cranston Stadium), 6 p.m. Division II Semifinals: Burrillville vs. Pilgrim (at Cranston Stadium), 8 p.m. SATURDAY BOYS Football Moses Brown at Burrillville, 10:30 a.m.; Lincoln at Classical, noon. Soccer Division II Championship: Lincoln vs. Toll Gate, at Rhode Island College, 2 p.m. Co-ed New England Championships, Manchester, N.H., TBA SUNDAY GIRLS Soccer Division II Championship: Teams TBA, at Rhode Island College, 2 p.m.
AREA ROAD RACE SCHEDULE
Saturday, November 9 PROVIDENCE — A Walk To Remember: A Walk to End Alzheimers, 9:30 a.m., New Track Facility, 1 Cunningham Square (Providence College hosts its first annual Alzheimers Walk on Nov. 9.) Contact: Michelle La France (A Walk To Remember Alzheimers Walk). 1-860-921-6399 Sunday, November 10 WARWICK — Rhode Island 6 hour Ultra & Relay, 8 a.m., Warwick City Park, Steven O Connor Blvd (Timed Ultra & Relay. Run as many miles as you can within the 6 hour time limit.) Contact: Robert Jackman (A Better Pace Monday, November 11 PROVIDENCE — Park View Veterans Day 5K Run/Walk, 9 a.m., Roger Williams Park, 1000 Elmwood Ave. (Proceeds will benefit the Wounded Warrior Project) Contact: John Macera (Park View Middle School). 1-401-270-8090 Saturday, November 16 PORTSMOUTH — The Portsmouth 375 Road Race, 10 a.m. Common Fence Point Community Center, 900 Anthony Road (3.75 Mile Race and Walk to celebrate 375 years of Portsmouth, R.I.) Contact: John Farley (Portsmouth Business Association). 1-603-429-8879. Saturday, November 23 EAST PROVIDENCE — Turkey Trot Charity Road Race 4.3 miles, 10 a.m., East Providence Rec Center, 100 Bullocks Pt. Ave (flat course with one small hill at the finish) Contact: Diane Sullivan (East Providence Rec Center). 1-401-433-6360. Thursday, November 28 PAWTUCKET — Family Turkey Trot & Youth Run, 10 a.m., Pawtucket City Hall, 137 Roosevelt Ave (Thanksgiving Day Run/walk Downtown Pawtucket RI. Youth race at 9:30 a.m.) Contact: Race organizer. 1-401-952-6333. CRANSTON — Just Off The Mayflower 5K, 10 a.m., Starts and finishes just off Mayflower on Robert Circle, 11 Robert Circle (Flat, fast 5K through a quiet neighborhood, Kids Race, Strollers allowed) Contact: Patrick Cronan. 1-781-708-1900. Saturday, November 30 BARRINGTON — 14th Annual Trot Off Your Turkey 5K & 1.5 Mile,10 a.m., St. Luke School, 108 Washington Road (Enjoy a fast, flat course with famous turkey soup and prizes at finish!)Contact: Denise Languirand (St. Lukes School). 1-401-7431648. Tuesday, December 3 NEWPORT — SP Run Club, 6 p.m., Slimport, 4 Spring Wharf (Weekly, free, self timed fun runs. No pre reg, all abilities welcome! 3 or 5 m) This event is the 6th part of a weekly 8 part series. Contact: Melissa (Run Club). 1-401-829-3483. Thursday, December 5 NEWPORT — RIRR Thursday Night 5 Mile Pub Run, 6:3) p.m., Mudville Pub, 8 W Marlborough St (Weekly free self-timed run. No pre-reg necessary. Reflective gear a must!) Contact: Graham Powers (RIRR and Freak Factor). 1-401-636-1522. Saturday, December 7 WARWICK — RIRR Thursday Night 5 Mile Pub Run, 6:30 p.m., Dohertys Ale House (THE NEW LOCATION), 30 Jefferson BLVD (Weekly free self-timed run. No pre-reg necessary. Reflective gear a must!) Contact: Graham Powers (RIRR and Freak Factor). 1-401-636-1522.
On The Banner
PHOTO FEATURED IN PIC OF THE DAY LAST WEEK
September 25, 2013 - Woonsocket sophomore forward Erin Roth-Doharty, left, battles South Kingstown forward Haley Dionne for control of the ball during 1st half field hockey action at Barry Field Wednesday. Ernest A. Brown photo/RIMG.
ever — ranging from $500 to $2,600 — a hike the NFL candidly acknowledged was intended to make life tough on scalpers. But hustlers won't be the only folks forced to improvise. Plans for the event have been three years in the making, but depending on weather, they might not be finalized until the last minute. Moving fans across the region, even aided by the nation's most extensive public transportation network, presents a logistical nightmare — even before security considerations are factored in. "You've got two states, separated by a river, and people from the five boroughs and eight or nine counties in New Jersey all heading for the same place in a matter of hours," said Al Kelly, who heads up the host Super Bowl committee. "What we have is a series of contingency plans where priorities shift according to the day and in some cases hour by hour. ... If a storm hits one day, we'll shift resources to clearing certain roads and bridges; if it lands somewhere else at a different time, we could be forced to change the entire blueprint. "The one thing we better be," Kelly said finally, "is nimble." But it's not just the region's reputation on the line. By waiving the normal Super Bowl specifications to grease New York's winning bid in 2010 — previously, bid cities were required to average 50-degree temperatures during game week — Goodell and his owners are out to prove the proposition Frank Sinatra laid out in "New York, New York." Namely, that if you can make it there, you can make it anywhere. Since taking over as commissioner in 2006, Goodell has made securing new stadiums or renovating existing ones for his already wealthy owners — almost always with some level of taxpayerfinancing — every bit as much a signature issue as player safety. It's no coincidence that all five of the stadiums that have, or will, come online during his tenure have already been awarded the big game. Nor is Goodell above dangling the carrot of a future Super Bowl as a reward to cities and states willing to throw tax dollars into stadium pots. With 19 of the league's 32 teams situated within winter's reach — six already have domed stadiums — a successful Super Bowl outdoors could put the entire U.S. map in play for his pitch. New York might seem like a tough place to set a precedent. It's already a nexus for many of the world's financial, entertainment and media empires, and chaotic on its quietest day. Just rising above that clutter is no small feat. And even if the NFL does a bang-up job, it won't turn around and ask the region's taxpayers for help anytime soon. MetLife Stadium opened for business in April, 2010, with the $1.6 billion construction cost covered jointly by the co-tenants, New York's Giants and Jets, using private funds. "The other thing that's important," said Giants co-owner John Mara, the third generation of his family to run the club, "is that all of us, across the NFL for many years, said over and over that so many of
the most memorable games ever played were played in extreme weather. "So why not here?" The coldest Super Bowl on record was played in Tulane University's stadium in 1972 — temperature at kickoff: 39 degrees — back when the big game was still a small event. More relevant in this case were the 2000 and 2011 Super Bowls, when late-arriving storms turned Atlanta and Dallas, respectively, into ghost towns. Though both games were played in domes, much of Atlanta was frozen over and inaccessible; Dallas did a face-plant in the four inches of snow that fell early in the week, mostly shutting down instead of shoveling out. At the moment, the NFL is one of the slickest, best-run conglomerates on the planet. It has the kind of monopolistic hold on American sports that Microsoft once exercised over technology. The league takes the lion's share of sportsrelated TV dollars, ad revenues and airtime, and routinely crushes rivals in headto-head, time-slot matchups. That's why the date of the Super Bowl has creeped from its traditional Sunday spot late in January to the first week of February, which just happens to be the start of sweeps month. Next year's big game will be viewed by 100 million-plus people in the United States, and depending on whose numbers are crunched, it's already the mostwatched annual sporting event around the world. Only the Olympics and the original futbol — with its World Cup and UEFA Champions League final showcases — can offer an argument. So no matter how many fannies are frozen off inside MetLife, the fans are essentially extras in a show practically guaranteed to be a hit. Last year's Super Bowl, matching Baltimore against San Francisco inside New Orleans' Superdome, joined nearly two dozen of its predecessors on the short list of most-viewed television broadcasts in U.S. history. That despite a 34-minute stretch early in the third quarter when an electrical failure cut the lights over much of the stadium, delaying the game and sending fans at home scurrying to their refrigerators. No one was surprised those fans returned in droves soon after to watch a game that wasn't decided for the Ravens until the final play. But it mystified some, and outraged others, that the power went out in a building to which taxpayers have contributed, in installments over the years, about $1 billion to build and then renovate after Hurricane Katrina swept through in 2005. Ravens linebacker Ray Lewis, who retired after that game, and his old sidekick, Terrell Suggs, came up with a conspiracy theory of their own. Both pointed a finger at Goodell, suggesting without so much as a shred of evidence that he threw the switch so the 49ers could climb back into the game. "You're a zillion-dollar company, and your lights go out? No," Lewis said. "No way." Apparently, he won't have to worry about that this time around, no matter how cold it gets. "The one thing I feel really confident about," Mara said, "is that the lights won't go out."
Local sports to report? Call us at 767-8540, 767-8543, 727-9292 or send us an email at sports@pawtuckettimes.com
BOYS’ & GIRLS’ CLUB OF CUMBERLAND-LINCOLN PLANS SIGNUPS FOR YOUTH WINTER BASKETBALL PROGRAMS
CUMBERLAND — The Boys & Girls Club of Cumberland-Lincoln has scheduled registration sessions for its winter basketball programs for youngsters ages 3-15. The fee to register is $50. For more information, contact Joe at 333-4850.
CUMBERLAND HIGH ATHLETIC HALL OF FAME PLANS TO INDUCT EIGHT MEMBERS ON NOV. 29 AT WRIGHT’S FARM
CUMBERLAND — The Cumberland High School Athletic Hall of Fame will induct Dan McKee, Charley Bourgery, Todd Carey, Tim Carey, Dave Wright, Kim Mooney, Roxanne LaBrosse, and Christine Boutiette into its latest class on Friday, Nov. 29 at Wright's Farm. There will be a social from 6-7 p.m. and dinner at 7, followed by awards. Contact Tom Kenwood at (401) 658-0831 or e-mail him at kenwood2@cox.net for tickets or information. Tickets are $30 and benefit the CHS Hall of Fame scholarships given out each year. This year's recipients are Tom Sullivan and Caylin Legare.
CUMBERLAND YOUTH BASEBALL/SOFTBALL LEAGUE IS CONDUCTING ONLINE REGISTRATIONS FOR 2014 SEASON
CUMBERLAND — The Cumberland Youth Baseball/Softball League is currently accepting online registrations for its Instructional, Farm, and Minor and Major Baseball and Softball programs. To register or for more information, visit the website at www.cybsl.org.
K R BASEBALL ACADEMY PLANS OPEN HOUSE ON SUNDAY, NOV. 10
PAWTUCKET — The K R Baseball Academy on 413 Central Ave. is planning an open house on Sunday, Nov. 10 from 11 a.m.-2 p.m. There will be free batting practice by the K R baseball instructors, free batting tokens, and free food and beverages. You can also meet the Pawtucket Red Sox’s mascot “Paws” and learn more about the Academy’s programs and facility. For more information, call (401) 724-7555.
UPPER DECK BASEBALL ACADEMY SEEKS PLAYERS FOR “LITTLE TIKES BASEBALL SKILLS” PROGRAM
CUMBERLAND — Upper Deck Baseball Academy is accepting players for its “Little Tikes Baseball Skills” program for ages 5 to 7. The program covers hitting, throwing, baseball running, bunting, and fielding, and it starts Sunday, Nov. 10 at 1 p.m. for 10 weeks. The sessions will run one hour, and the price for all 10 weeks is $100. Call the Deck at 334-1539 or go to Upperdeckba.com for more information or to register a player.
BOYS’ & GIRLS’ CLUB OF CUMBERLAND-LINCOLN PLANS SIGNUPS FOR YOUTH WINTER BASKETBALL PROGRAMS
CUMBERLAND — The Boys & Girls Club of Cumberland-Lincoln has scheduled registration sessions for its winter basketball programs for youngsters ages 3-15. The fee to register is $50. For more information, contact Joe at 333-4850.
Friday, November 8, 2013
SPORTS
Men’s college basketball
THE TIMES B3
Friars could be working with limited numbers in season opener
Continued from page B1
ERNEST A. BROWN / Blackstone Valley Sports photo
Providence College head coach Ed Cooley isn't sure if he'll have the services of sophomore point guard Kris Dunn (3) for Friday's season opener at the Dunkin' Donuts Center against Boston College. Dunn injured his right shoulder in an exhibition game last weekend.
better, Cooley responded, “Anytime you’re dealing with a player like that, it’s a game time decision. He’s too good of a player.” As Cooley finished that sentence, he said that he had to go and observe Dunn, who was about to set foot on the floor. Named to the watch list for the 2014 Bob Cousy Award, Dunn missed the first nine games of his freshman season at PC after undergoing surgery to repair a torn labrum in his right shoulder in July 2012. It’s the same shoulder that is once again providing the player and the program with uneasiness. “You just feel for the young man because it’s an unfortunate situation. You know he puts so much into the game, especially after last year,” said Craig Parker, who coached Dunn at New London High. “Hopefully this will still be a big year for Kris up at Providence.” In Austin and Bullock, the two members of Providence’s freshman class were in practice gear Thursday, hoisting up shots just like the rest of their teammates. “They are allowed to practice,” said Cooley. Regarding whether Austin and Bullock will be allowed to sit on the bench Friday, Cooley said that such a decision will hinge based on a post-
practice conversation. “That’s still questionable and something not to air right now until my conversation with them after practice,” stated Cooley. It was less than a week ago when the Friars featured no depth issues whatsoever. Now with Dunn severely questionable for Friday night and Austin and Bullock likely to also serve as spectators, Cooley and his assistant coaches find themselves in a position where they must get creative with the available bodies they have at their disposal. “It’s going to be put to the test, for sure,” said Cooley when asked about the depth issues that couldn’t have surfaced at a more inopportune time. “If we have Dunn, it’ll be okay. If we don’t have him, and not having Brandon, it really puts us at a disadvantage, but we’ll keep working at what we need to do.” Playing with a shorthanded deck as far as backcourt pieces go isn’t uncharted territory for Cooley and the Friars. Last year saw Vincent Council go down with a hamstring injury in the opening minutes of the first game. There were times when the pain in Bryce Cotton’s knees proved too much, while Dunn didn’t make his Providence debut until a week before Christmas. Just like the early stages of last season, Josh Fortune and Ted
Bancroft are expected to find their services in high demand. For now, the two guards will team up with a returning Big East First-Team performer in Cotton, who Cooley says “is ready to go” despite recent concerns about his surgically repaired knee. “Josh will play a lot and Ted will play,” said Cooley. Cooley’s disposition seemed to brighten when the focus shifted to his frontcourt, which save for Bullock, isn’t compounded by uncertainty. From a quartet of veterans who are familiar in terms of what to expect in Kadeem Batts, LaDontae Henton, Lee Goldsbrough and Brice Kofane to a pair of promising newcomers in Tyler Harris and Carson Desrosiers, PC figures to boast one of the best collection of big men in the entire Big East. “Having depth up there as far as foul trouble really helps,” said Cooley. “We recruited backcourt depth, but now we have frontcourt depth.” Even at a time when the walls appear to be rapidly closing, Cooley knows that pushing the panic button still remains a last resort. “We’ve just got to see what happens,” he said. “You’ve got to hang in there.” Follow Brendan McGair on Twitter @BWMcGair03
High school football
Clippers know that taking care of business against the Wizards is crucial
Continued from page B1
bottom three teams in the league, Pilgrim, Central, and Shea. If Cumberland loses to West Warwick, and SRA, Rogers, N.K., as expected, take care of business in their games, that means a five-way tie for first place and flashbacks of 2008. And how does that break out? Like 2008, you can throw out the pool records – each team finished 2-2 – as well as the quality points (13). That leaves the total defensive points allowed between the five schools, and that’s where the Clippers’ showdown with the Wizards comes into play. If West Warwick defeats the Clippers and allows them to score fewer than 20 points, then the Wizards are the top seed. To date, the Wizards have allowed just 55 points, while Rogers and Cumberland have the second-most with 75. Since the Clippers obviously can’t lose a game and give up zero points in the process, they would not factor in the scenario. As for the pool records to determine the last four seeds, the Clippers and the Vikings would have 2-1 records, with Cumberland earning the second seed for beating Rogers earlier in the season. SRA and N.K. would be next at 1-2, and because the Saints topped the Skippers, they would be the final seed and the Skippers would be out of the picture. However, if West Warwick wins tonight and surrenders more than 20 points to the Clippers, then things get a bit odd. Rogers (and its 75 points allowed) lands the top seed. SRA and N.K. claim the next two (with 2-1 pool records, and the Saints earning the second seed for defeating the Skippers), and West Warwick earns the final seed for its head-to-head win over Cumberland. That obviously means that the Clippers are out, sharing the same cruel fate that their Thanksgiving rivals endured five years ago – a 5-2 division record and no postseason berth to show for their fine season. “I made my kids aware of the fact that there is a formula that we follow and so on,” said Cumberland head coach Chris Skurka. “I told them, ‘If we lose, there is a possibility of us not being in the playoffs. But let’s not worry about that. Let’s just go out, play the game, and take care of our own business, and if we do that, it’s not going to be a problem.’” The total defensive points allowed tiebreaker raises a very interesting point. What if the Clippers are losing to the Hurricanes? What if they are down by a 26-18 score in the last two minutes with the ball inside the Hurricanes’ 40? Would they roll the dice and play for the win, or play it safe, try not to score and lose the game, and settle for the second seed? “I can’t answer that right now,” said Skurka. Of course, the Clippers could make life easier for themselves and simply win the game, thus eliminating the Wizards from the playoff hunt. Rogers would then be the No. 2 seed for its wins over SRA and N.K., and the Saints
would lock up the third seed for topping the Skippers. If the Wizards beat the Clippers, but the Vikings, Saints, or Skippers endure an upset loss, then the Clippers would be in the playoffs and the remaining four teams would be seeded according to the RIIL bylaws, but the Clippers, to a man, would rather control their own destiny and beat a very good team to punch their ticket to the tournament. “This is a playoff game for us,” said Skurka. “(West Warwick) is a very good team. At the beginning of the year, they were one of the favorites to win the division. They have been playing very well as of late, and they’re the hottest team in the division. This is going to be a very good game.” *** The other three Division II-B games take place tonight at 7 p.m., with Shea visiting N.K., St. Raphael heading to Warwick to battle Pilgrim, and Central taking on Rogers at Newport’s historic Toppa Field. The Saints have the easiest game of the bunch, encountering a woeful Patriot team that has been outscored 271-46 in its six league losses (including 117-0 in back-to-back setbacks to the Clippers and Vikings), lost its last 14 league games, and dealing with a lack of personnel. Two weekends ago against the Clippers, the Patriots only dressed 21 players. If there’s one upset that could occur in these three contests, it could come in the Raiders’ game with the Skippers. Even though the Raiders are 2-4, they have been down to the wire in every game but a 28-7 defeat to the Wizards. Their other three losses have come by a total of 16 points. *** Two other Blackstone Valley teams also remain alive in their respective bids for a playoff berth and will be in action this weekend. North Smithfield hosts Smithfield in a Division IV matchup tonight at 6 p.m., while in Division III, Burrillville faces Moses Brown tomorrow at 10:30 a.m. With unbeaten Exeter/West Greenwich and North Providence already locked into two of the four Division IV tournament spots, that means N.S. (2-2) and Smithfield (3-2), along with Hope (3-3) and Scituate (2-2), are vying for the last two berths. The Northmen, who haven’t played a league contest since Oct. 19 and have enjoyed two byes in the last four weeks, could insert a dent in the Sentinels’ playoff hopes with a win tonight. Smithfield’s final game is on Thanksgiving against N.P. A key to the Northmen’s success will be the play of their defense. Smithfield has had its problems scoring points this year – its 72 points are the second-lowest in the division, and 28 of them came in last weekend’s rout of winless Providence Country Day/Wheeler/Juanita Sanchez. Burrillville, meanwhile, is 3-3 and in a three-way tie for fifth place with East
Greenwich and Narragansett, and Moses Brown is 6-1 and trailing unbeaten Mount Pleasant in the standings. Back-to-back wins over Tiverton and Lincoln have kept the Broncos in the playoff picture, and an impressive win over the Quakers would be just what the doctor ordered. A loss to the Quakers would still mathematically keep the Broncos’ playoff hopes alive, but on life support. Moses Brown comes into the game with four straight wins and arguably the division’s best defense. They have allowed just 41 points in league play. *** As for the rest of the weekend’s schedule,
Woonsocket, which is a perfect 6-0 in Division II-A action and assured of a top seed in the upcoming playoffs, will visit Coventry (one of three 3-3 teams tied for fourth place) tonight at 7 p.m. and look to snuff out their playoff hopes. Also tonight at 7, winless Tolman will take on one-win South Kingstown in a Division I affair at the Curtis Corner Middle School, and Central Falls will take a few steps over the Connecticut line to face Plainfield High in a non-league meeting. In a Division III game on Saturday at noon, Lincoln (1-6) will face Classical (4-2) at the Morro Athletic Complex. Follow Eric Benevides on Twitter @EricBen24
Free Pic of the Day Photo Give-A-Way
If your child’s name appears in the Pic of the Day you are welcome to receive FREE photo reproductions of the Pic of the Day. Call Diane Ames at 401-7678505 to request your Pic of the Day photo set and you will receive one 8”x10” and two 5”x7” photos as a free gift from Navigant Credit Union. Please give us the date that your Pic of the Day ran in the paper.
Additional photos can be ordered at a cost of $8.00 each for one 8”x10” or two 5”x7” 11”x17” Posters can also be ordered at a cost of $10.00
Please leave your order quantities and contact information when you call. You will be called when your order will be ready for pick up. We accept cash, check and all major credit cards.
B4 THE TIMES
SPORTS
SPORTS ON THE AIR
TODAY MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 6 p.m. — Boston College at Providence, FS1, WEEI-FM (103.7). 6:30 p.m. — Maryland vs. UConn, at Brooklyn, N.Y., ESPN2. 7:30 p.m. — Maine at Rhode Island, OSN, WHJJ-FM (101.5). 7:30 p.m. — Armed Forces Classic, Oregon vs. Georgetown, at Seoul, South Korea, ESPN. NBA BASKETBALL 7 p.m. — Boston at Orlando, CSN, WBZ-FM (98.5). HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL 7 p.m. — West Warwick at Cumberland, WOON (1240). AHL HOCKEY 7 p.m. — Providence at Hartford, WNRI (1380). AUTO RACING Noon — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, practice for ServiceMaster 200, at Avondale, Ariz., FS1. 1:30 p.m. — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, practice for AdvoCare 500, at Avondale, Ariz., FS1. 3:30 p.m. — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, practice for ServiceMaster 200, at Avondale, Ariz., FS1. 8 p.m. — NASCAR, Truck Series, Lucas Oil 150, at Avondale, Ariz., FS1. COLLEGE FOOTBALL 8:30 p.m. — Louisville at UConn, ESPN2. GOLF 1 p.m. — PGA Tour, The McGladrey Classic, second round, at St. Simons Island, Ga., Golf Channel. 4 a.m. — European PGA Tour, Turkish Airlines Open, third round, at Antalya, Turkey, Golf Channel. MEN'S COLLEGE HOCKEY 7:30 p.m. — Minnesota at Notre Dame, NBC Sports. TENNIS 3 p.m. — ATP World Tour Finals, round robin, at London, ESPN2.
EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Pct GB Philadelphia 3 2 .600 — Brooklyn 2 2 .500 ½ Toronto 2 3 .400 1 New York 1 3 .250 1½ Boston 1 4 .200 2 Southeast Division W L Pct GB Charlotte 3 2 .600 — Miami 3 2 .600 — Orlando 3 2 .600 — Atlanta 2 2 .500 ½ Washington 1 3 .250 1½ Central Division W L Pct GB Indiana 5 01.000 — Detroit 2 2 .500 2½ Milwaukee 2 2 .500 2½ Cleveland 2 3 .400 3 Chicago 1 3 .250 3½ WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division W L Pct GB Houston 4 1 .800 — San Antonio 4 1 .800 — Dallas 3 2 .600 1 Memphis 2 3 .400 2 New Orleans 2 3 .400 2 Northwest Division W L Pct GB Oklahoma City 3 1 .750 — Minnesota 3 2 .600 ½ Portland 2 2 .500 1 Denver 0 3 .000 2½ Utah 0 5 .000 3½ Pacific Division W L Pct GB Golden State 4 1 .800 — L.A. Clippers 3 2 .600 1 Phoenix 3 2 .600 1
Friday, November 8, 2013
SCOREBOARD
NFL
AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PA New England 7 2 0.778234175 N.Y. Jets 5 4 0.556169231 Miami 4 4 0.500174 187 Buffalo 3 6 0.333189236 South W L T Pct PF PA Indianapolis 6 2 0.750214 155 Tennessee 4 4 0.500173 167 Houston 2 6 0.250146221 Jacksonville 0 8 0.000 86264 North W L T Pct PF PA Cincinnati 6 3 0.667217 166 Cleveland 4 5 0.444172 197 Baltimore 3 5 0.375168 172 Pittsburgh 2 6 0.250156208 West W L T Pct PF PA Kansas City 9 0 01.000215111 Denver 7 1 0.875343218 San Diego 4 4 0.500192 174 Oakland 3 5 0.375146 199 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PA Dallas 5 4 0.556257209 Philadelphia 4 5 0.444225231 Washington 3 5 0.375203253 N.Y. Giants 2 6 0.250141223 South W L T Pct PF PA New Orleans 6 2 0.750216 146 Carolina 5 3 0.625204106 Atlanta 2 6 0.250176 218 Tampa Bay 0 8 0.000124 190 North W L T Pct PF PA Chicago 5 3 0.625240226 Detroit 5 3 0.625217 197 Green Bay 5 3 0.625232185 Minnesota 1 7 0.125 186252 West L T Pct PF PA 1 0.889232149 2 0.750218 145 4 0.500160 174 6 0.333186226 ——— Thursday’s Game Washington at Minnesota, (n) Sunday’s Games Detroit at Chicago, 1 p.m. Philadelphia at Green Bay, 1 p.m. Jacksonville at Tennessee, 1 p.m. Cincinnati at Baltimore, 1 p.m. St. Louis at Indianapolis, 1 p.m. Seattle at Atlanta, 1 p.m. Oakland at N.Y. Giants, 1 p.m. Buffalo at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m. Carolina at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m. Denver at San Diego, 4:25 p.m. Houston at Arizona, 4:25 p.m. Dallas at New Orleans, 8:30 p.m. Open: Cleveland, Kansas City, N.Y. Jets, New England Monday’s Games Miami at Tampa Bay, 8:40 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 14 Indianapolis at Tennessee, 8:25 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 17 Baltimore at Chicago, 1 p.m. Oakland at Houston, 1 p.m. N.Y. Jets at Buffalo, 1 p.m. Atlanta at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m. Detroit at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m. Washington at Philadelphia, 1 p.m. Cleveland at Cincinnati, 1 p.m. Arizona at Jacksonville, 1 p.m. San Diego at Miami, 4:05 p.m. Minnesota at Seattle, 4:25 p.m. San Francisco at New Orleans, 4:25 p.m. Green Bay at N.Y. Giants, 4:25 p.m. Kansas City at Denver, 8:30 p.m. Open: Dallas, St. Louis Monday, Nov. 18 New England at Carolina, 8:40 p.m. Seattle San Francisco Arizona St. Louis W 8 6 4 3
NBA
L.A. Lakers Sacramento 2 3 .400 2 1 3 .250 2½ ——— Wednesday's Games Orlando 98, L.A. Clippers 90 Washington 116, Philadelphia 102 Indiana 97, Chicago 80 Charlotte 92, Toronto 90 Boston 97, Utah 87 Golden State 106, Minnesota 93 Milwaukee 109, Cleveland 104 New Orleans 99, Memphis 84 San Antonio 99, Phoenix 96 Oklahoma City 107, Dallas 93 Thursday's Games L.A. Clippers at Miami, (n) Atlanta at Denver, (n) L.A. Lakers at Houston, (n) Friday's Games Boston at Orlando, 7 p.m. Cleveland at Philadelphia, 7 p.m. Toronto at Indiana, 7 p.m. Brooklyn at Washington, 7 p.m. New York at Charlotte, 7 p.m. Oklahoma City at Detroit, 7:30 p.m. Utah at Chicago, 8 p.m. Dallas at Minnesota, 8 p.m. L.A. Lakers at New Orleans, 8 p.m. Golden State at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m. Denver at Phoenix, 9 p.m. Sacramento at Portland, 10 p.m. Saturday's Games Utah at Toronto, 7 p.m. Indiana at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m. Philadelphia at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m. Boston at Miami, 7:30 p.m. Orlando at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Houston, 8 p.m. Golden State at Memphis, 8 p.m. Dallas at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m. Portland at Sacramento, 10 p.m.
NHL
EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF Tampa Bay 14 10 4 0 20 47 Toronto 15 10 5 0 20 48 Detroit 16 9 5 2 20 40 Boston 15 9 5 1 19 42 Montreal 17 8 8 1 17 44 Ottawa 16 6 6 4 16 50 Florida 16 3 9 4 10 32 Buffalo 17 3 13 1 7 31 Metropolitan Division GP W L OT Pts GF Pittsburgh 16 11 5 0 22 49 Washington 16 9 7 0 18 53 N.Y. Rangers 16 8 8 0 16 35 Carolina 16 6 7 3 15 30 N.Y. Islanders 16 6 7 3 15 47 New Jersey 15 4 7 4 12 29 Columbus 15 5 10 0 10 36 Philadelphia 15 4 10 1 9 22 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF Colorado 14 12 2 0 24 46 Chicago 16 10 2 4 24 56 Minnesota 17 9 4 4 22 45 St. Louis 13 9 2 2 20 47 Nashville 15 8 5 2 18 37 Dallas 15 7 6 2 16 40 Winnipeg 17 6 9 2 14 40 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF Anaheim 17 13 3 1 27 57 San Jose 15 10 1 4 24 57 Phoenix 17 11 4 2 24 56 Vancouver 17 10 5 2 22 48 Los Angeles 15 9 6 0 18 43 GA 35 36 41 29 38 49 57 53 GA 38 44 43 45 51 42 44 42 GA 25 43 38 31 44 44 51 GA 42 32 53 44 40
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
Norfolk St. (2-7) at Bethune-Cookman (8-1), 4 p.m. NC State (3-5) at Duke (6-2), 4 p.m. E. Kentucky (6-3) at Jacksonville St. (7-2), 4 p.m. FIU (1-7) at Middle Tennessee (5-4), 4 p.m. Lamar (4-5) at Northwestern St. (4-5), 4 p.m. UT-Martin (6-3) at Memphis (1-6), 4:30 p.m. Southern Miss. (0-8) at Louisiana Tech (3-5), 7 p.m. Arkansas St. (4-4) at Louisiana-Monroe (5-4), 7 p.m. Virginia Tech (6-3) at Miami (7-1), 7 p.m. Houston (7-1) at UCF (6-1), 7 p.m. LSU (7-2) at Alabama (8-0), 8 p.m. MIDWEST SMU (3-4) at Cincinnati (6-2), Noon TCU (3-6) at Iowa St. (1-7), Noon Penn St. (5-3) at Minnesota (7-2), Noon Iowa (5-4) at Purdue (1-7), Noon Valparaiso (1-8) at Butler (7-3), 1 p.m. W. Michigan (1-8) at E. Michigan (1-8), 1 p.m. Dayton (6-3) at Drake (5-4), 2 p.m. N. Colorado (1-8) at North Dakota (2-7), 2 p.m. Tennessee Tech (3-7) at SE Missouri (2-7), 2 p.m. Montana (7-2) at South Dakota (4-5), 2 p.m. Indiana St. (1-8) at S. Dakota St. (5-4), 3 p.m. Missouri St. (4-6) at S. Illinois (5-4), 3 p.m. Illinois (3-5) at Indiana (3-5), 3:30 p.m. Nebraska (6-2) at Michigan (6-2), 3:30 p.m. Illinois St. (5-4) at N. Dakota St. (8-0), 3:30 p.m. BYU (6-2) at Wisconsin (6-2), 3:30 p.m. Youngstown St. (8-1) at N. Iowa (4-5), 5 p.m. SOUTHWEST Kansas St. (4-4) at Texas Tech (7-2), Noon Tulane (6-3) at UTSA (4-5), 2 p.m. Nicholls St. (4-5) at Sam Houston St. (7-2), 3 p.m. Grambling St. (1-8) at Ark.-Pine Bluff (1-7), 3:30 p.m. UTEP (1-7) at North Texas (6-3), 3:30 p.m. Mississippi St. (4-4) at Texas A&M (7-2), 3:30 p.m. Kansas (2-6) at Oklahoma St. (7-1), 4 p.m. McNeese St. (7-2) at Stephen F. Austin (3-6), 4 p.m. SE Louisiana (7-2) at Cent. Arkansas (5-4), 8 p.m. FAR WEST Southern Cal (6-3) at California (1-8), 3 p.m. S. Utah (6-3) at Weber St. (1-8), 3 p.m. Montana St. (7-2) at E. Washington (7-2), 3:10 p.m. Nevada (3-6) at Colorado St. (4-5), 3:30 p.m. Boston College (4-4) at New Mexico St. (18), 3:30 p.m. Arizona St. (6-2) at Utah (4-4), 4 p.m. Old Dominion (6-3) at Idaho (1-8), 5 p.m. Portland St. (5-4) at Idaho St. (3-6), 5:05 p.m. Utah St. (5-4) at UNLV (5-4), 8 p.m. Colorado (3-5) at Washington (5-3), 8 p.m. Sacramento St. (4-5) at Cal Poly (4-5), 9:05 p.m. UCLA (6-2) at Arizona (6-2), 10 p.m. Fresno St. (8-0) at Wyoming (4-4), 10:15 p.m. San Diego St. (4-4) at San Jose St. (5-3), 10:30 p.m.
College Football Schedule By The Associated Press All Times EST (Subject to change) Friday, Nov. 8 EAST Louisville (7-1) at UConn (0-7), 8:30 p.m. FAR WEST Air Force (2-7) at New Mexico (2-6), 9 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 9 EAST W. Kentucky (5-4) at Army (3-6), Noon St. Francis (Pa.) (3-5) at Bryant (4-5), Noon Robert Morris (4-4) at CCSU (4-5), Noon Princeton (6-1) at Penn (4-3), Noon Duquesne (5-3) at Sacred Heart (8-2), Noon Monmouth (NJ) (4-5) at Wagner (2-7), Noon Brown (5-2) at Yale (4-3), Noon Harvard (6-1) at Columbia (0-7), 12:30 p.m. Holy Cross (3-7) at Lehigh (6-2), 12:30 p.m. James Madison (6-3) at New Hampshire (44), 12:30 p.m. Villanova (4-5) at Rhode Island (3-7), 12:30 p.m. Bucknell (4-4) at Fordham (9-0), 1 p.m. Richmond (3-6) at Stony Brook (3-5), 1 p.m. William & Mary (6-3) at Delaware (7-2), 3 p.m. Maine (8-1) at Albany (NY) (1-8), 3:30 p.m. Colgate (3-6) at Lafayette (3-5), 3:30 p.m. Hawaii (0-8) at Navy (4-4), 3:30 p.m. Cornell (1-6) at Dartmouth (3-4), 4 p.m. Texas (6-2) at West Virginia (4-5), 7 p.m. Notre Dame (7-2) at Pittsburgh (4-4), 8 p.m. SOUTH Florida St. (8-0) at Wake Forest (4-5), Noon Wesley (6-2) at Charlotte (4-5), Noon Vanderbilt (4-4) at Florida (4-4), Noon Missouri (8-1) at Kentucky (2-6), Noon UAB (2-6) at Marshall (5-3), Noon Auburn (8-1) at Tennessee (4-5), Noon Arkansas (3-6) at Mississippi (5-3), 12:21 p.m. Appalachian St. (2-7) at Georgia (5-3), 12:30 p.m. Virginia (2-7) at North Carolina (3-5), 12:30 p.m. Marist (6-3) at Campbell (2-7), 1 p.m. Coastal Carolina (9-0) at Charleston Southern (8-2), 1 p.m. NC Central (4-5) at Hampton (3-6), 1 p.m. Savannah St. (1-9) at Howard (3-6), 1 p.m. San Diego (6-3) at Morehead St. (3-6), 1 p.m. NC A&T (5-3) at Morgan St. (3-6), 1 p.m. E. Illinois (8-1) at Murray St. (5-4), 1 p.m. Gardner-Webb (5-4) at VMI (1-8), 1 p.m. The Citadel (3-6) at Elon (2-7), 1:30 p.m. Samford (6-3) at Furman (4-5), 1:30 p.m. Florida A&M (3-6) at SC State (6-3), 1:30 p.m. Jackson St. (6-2) at Alabama A&M (3-6), 2 p.m. Southern U. (5-4) at Alabama St. (6-3), 2 p.m. Wofford (5-3) at Chattanooga (7-2), 2 p.m. W. Carolina (2-7) at Georgia Southern (4-4), 2 p.m. Texas Southern (2-7) at MVSU (1-8), 2 p.m. Jacksonville (4-5) at Mercer (8-1), 3 p.m. Davidson (0-9) at Stetson (1-7), 3 p.m. Austin Peay (0-9) at Tennessee St. (7-3), 3 p.m. Presbyterian (3-5) at Liberty (5-4), 3:30 p.m. Syracuse (4-4) at Maryland (5-3), 3:30 p.m. Tulsa (2-6) at East Carolina (6-2), 3:45 p.m.
THIS DATE IN SPORTS
By The Associated Press Nov. 8 1942 — Parker Hall of the Cleveland Rams throws seven interceptions against the Green Bay Packers. 1952 — Maurice Richard of the Montreal Canadiens becomes the NHL's leading career goal scorer with his 325th in a 6-4 victory over the Chicago Black Hawks. 1959 — Elgin Baylor of the Minneapolis Lakers scores 64 points against the Boston Celtics. 1970 — Tom Dempsey of New Orleans kicks an NFL-record 63-yard field goal on the final play of the game to give the Saints a 19-17 victory over the Detroit Lions. 1975 — Kansas snaps second-ranked Oklahoma's 28-game winning streak, 23-3, in Norman, Okla. The Jayhawks defense holds the Sooners' offense to its lowest scoring output since 1966. 1980 — Dave Wilson of Illinois sets an NCAA record with 621 yards passing in a 49-42 victory over Ohio State. 1981 — Don Shula records his 200th NFL victory when the Miami Dolphins edge the New England Patriots 30-27 in overtime. 1986 — Tulsa's Steve Gage is the first quarterback to rush and pass for 200 yards in a game. Gage rushes for 212 and passes for 209 in a 34-27 triumph over New Mexico. 1987 — The St. Louis Cardinals score 28 points — three TD passes by Neil Lomax and a fumble recovery by Niko Noga — to overcome a 28-3 deficit and beat the Tampa Bay Buccaneers 31-28. 1991 — Paul Coffey breaks the NHL career mark for goals by a defenseman by scoring in the second period of the Pittsburgh Penguins' 3-1 victory over the Winnipeg Jets. Coffey's 311th career goal breaks the mark set by Denis Potvin, who had 310 for the New York Islanders. 1997 — Phil Housley becomes the second U.S.-born player in NHL history to score 1,000 points, tallying an assist as the Washington Capitals beat the Edmonton Oilers 2-1. 2003 — John Gagliardi becomes college football's career victory leader when St. John's rallies to beat Bethel 29-26. Gagliardi, in his 55th season and his 51st at the Minnesota school, gets his 409th victory, passing Eddie Robinson, who retired in 1997 after winning 408 games at Grambling. 2005 — Pierre Turgeon becomes the 34th player in NHL history to reach 500 goals, scoring in the third period of Colorado's 5-2 win over San Jose. 2008 — Chris Paul has his sixth straight double-double with 21 points and 13 assists in New Orleans' 100-89 victory over Miami. Paul sets an NBA record for consecutive games at the start of a season with at least 20 points and 10 assists, breaking the mark set by Oscar Robertson in 1968. 2009 — Indianapolis becomes the fourth team in league history with 17 consecutive regular-season wins with a 20-17 victory over Houston. New England did it twice — winning a record 21 straight from 2006-08 and 18 in a row from 2003-04. Chicago won 17 straight from 1933-34. 2009 — Italy clinches the Fed Cup title after Flavia Pennetta beats Melanie Oudin 7-5, 6-2. Pennetta's victory gives the experienced Italians an insurmountable 3-0 lead over a young United States team in the best-of-five series.
Calgary 15 6 7 2 14 43 54 Edmonton 16 4 10 2 10 40 62 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. ——— Wednesday's Games N.Y. Rangers 5, Pittsburgh 1 Chicago 4, Winnipeg 1 Nashville 6, Colorado 4 Anaheim 5, Phoenix 2 Thursday's Games Washington 3, Minnesota 2, SO Boston 4, Florida 1 Ottawa 4, Montreal 1 New Jersey 3, Philadelphia 0 Carolina 1, N.Y. Islanders 0 N.Y. Rangers 4, Columbus 2 Dallas at Detroit, (n) Edmonton at Tampa Bay, (n) Calgary at St. Louis, (n) Buffalo at Los Angeles, (n) Vancouver at San Jose, (n) Friday's Games New Jersey at Toronto, 7:30 p.m. Nashville at Winnipeg, 8 p.m. Calgary at Colorado, 9 p.m. Buffalo at Anaheim, 10 p.m. Saturday's Games Edmonton at Philadelphia, 1 p.m. Florida at Ottawa, 2 p.m. Toronto at Boston, 7 p.m. Tampa Bay at Detroit, 7 p.m. Minnesota at Carolina, 7 p.m. N.Y. Islanders at Columbus, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh at St. Louis, 8 p.m. Chicago at Dallas, 8 p.m. Washington at Phoenix, 8 p.m. Vancouver at Los Angeles, 10 p.m.
AHL
EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OL SL PtsGF GA Manchester 12 8 1 1 2 19 42 29 St. John's 12 5 6 1 0 11 35 37 Providence 10 4 4 0 2 10 30 37 Worcester 7 3 4 0 0 6 16 21 Portland 8 2 5 0 1 5 20 27 East Division GP W L OL SL PtsGF GA WB/Scranton11 8 1 0 2 18 41 28 Norfolk 12 7 2 0 3 17 32 25 Syracuse 11 7 3 1 0 15 39 31 Binghamton 10 6 4 0 0 12 31 31 Hershey 9 2 4 2 1 7 23 29 Northeast Division GP W L OL SL PtsGF GA Hartford 12 7 3 0 2 16 39 37 Springfield 10 7 2 0 1 15 29 23 Adirondack 11 5 4 0 2 12 27 31 Albany 11 5 5 0 1 11 25 29 Bridgeport 9 3 5 1 0 7 26 34 WESTERN CONFERENCE Midwest Division GP W L OL SL PtsGF GA Grand Rapids12 8 2 1 1 18 47 34 Rockford 14 7 6 1 0 15 42 48 Milwaukee 8 6 0 2 0 14 25 17 Chicago 12 5 6 0 1 11 30 35 Iowa 9 5 4 0 0 10 26 26 North Division GP W L OL SL PtsGF GA Toronto 10 6 3 1 0 13 30 25 Hamilton 11 5 3 0 3 13 30 32 Rochester 9 5 2 1 1 12 32 32 Lake Erie 10 5 5 0 0 10 29 31 Utica 10 0 8 1 1 2 20 40 West Division GP W L OL SL PtsGF GA
TRANSACTIONS
Thursday's Sports Transactions By The Associated Press BASEBALL American League TEXAS RANGERS — Signed LHP Martin Perez to a four-year contract through 2017. National League CHICAGO CUBS — Named Rick Renteria manager and agreed to terms on a three-year contract. ST. LOUIS CARDINALS — Named Dann Bilardello manager of Palm Beach (FSL), Joe Kruzel manager of Peoria (MWL) and Johnny Rodriguez manager of Johnson City (Appalachian). Promoted Tim Leveque to pitching coordinator. Announced Paul Davis will take on the role of minor league pitching coach and coordinator of pitching analytics along with his role as Johnson City pitching coach. Named Mike Roberts special assistant to amateur scouting, Matt Swanson midwest cross-checker for the 2014 season and Patrick Casanta baseball development analyst. Eastern League READING FIGHTIN PHILS — Named Jon Nally group sales manager, Zach Haas merchandising manager and Travis Hart concessions manager. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association NBA — Suspended Atlanta G Dennis Schroder one game for striking Sacramento C DeMarcus Cousins in the groin, during a Nov. 5 game. HOUSTON ROCKETS — Assigned G Isaiah Canaan and F Robert Covington to Rio Grande Valley (NBADL). FOOTBALL National Football League ARIZONA CARDINALS — Placed C-G Philip Blake on the practice squad injured reserve list. Signed C Tom Draheim to the practice squad. NEW YORK GIANTS — Activated RB Andre Brown from the injured reserve/return list and DT Markus Kuhn from the PUP list. Placed RB David Wilson and DT Shaun Rogers on injured reserve. HOCKEY National Hockey League FLORIDA PANTHERS — Loaned RW Steve Pinizzotto to San Antonio (AHL). NASHVILLE PREDATORS — Recalled F Taylor Beck from Milwaukee (AHL). Assigned F Filip Forsberg to Milwaukee. NEW YORK ISLANDERS — Recalled D Aaron Ness from Bridgeport (AHL). PHOENIX COYOTES — Assigned F Andy Miele to Portland (AHL). ECHL GWINNETT GLADIATORS — Signed F Marshall Everson. Southern Professional Hockey League PEORIA RIVERMEN — Released G Phil Cook. Signed G Eric Levine. LACROSSE National Lacrosse League COLORADO MAMMOTH — Signed D Dan Coates to a five-year contract. COLLEGE HORIZON LEAGUE — Named Tom Crowley special assistant to the commissioner. NEBRASKA — Suspended men's senior basketball G Ray Gallegos for the first two games for a violation of team rules. Announced junior F Jordan Tyrance is leaving the men's basketball team for personal reasons.
Abbotsford 14 9 4 0 1 19 41 40 Texas 12 6 4 2 0 14 43 27 Charlotte 11 5 5 0 1 11 31 31 Oklahoma City125 6 0 1 11 27 35 San Antonio 11 4 6 0 1 9 26 32 San Antonio11 4 6 0 1 9 26 32 NOTE: Two points are awarded for a win, one point for an overtime or shootout loss. ——— Wednesday's Games Grand Rapids 6, Rockford 2 Syracuse 4, Wilkes-Barre/Scranton 3, SO Rochester 5, Hamilton 3 Abbotsford 3, San Antonio 2, SO Thursday's Games Chicago 2, Charlotte 1 Lake Erie 4, Utica 0 Friday's Games Manchester at St. John's, 6 p.m. Adirondack at Springfield, 7 p.m. Worcester at Portland, 7 p.m. Providence at Hartford, 7 p.m. Binghamton at Rochester, 7:05 p.m. Albany at Wilkes-Barre/Scranton, 7:05 p.m. Grand Rapids at Hamilton, 7:30 p.m. Syracuse at Norfolk, 7:30 p.m. Utica at Lake Erie, 7:30 p.m. Iowa at Rockford, 8 p.m. Milwaukee at Texas, 8:30 p.m. Saturday's Games Adirondack at Albany, 5 p.m. Manchester at St. John's, 6 p.m. Providence at Worcester, 7 p.m. Bridgeport at Hershey, 7 p.m. Chicago at Charlotte, 7 p.m. Rochester at Binghamton, 7:05 p.m. Syracuse at Norfolk, 7:15 p.m. Iowa at Rockford, 8 p.m. Milwaukee at Texas, 8 p.m.
MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER PLAYOFFS
GOLF
Turkish Open Leading Scores The Associated Press By The Associated Press Thursday At Maxx Royal Course Belek, Turkey Purse: $7 million Yardage: 7,100; Par: 72 First Round (15 players finished the round because of rain-delayed start) Ricardo Gonzalez, Argentina 30-36—66 Thorbjorn Olesen, Denmark 33-33—66 Ross Fisher, England 33-35—68 Pablo Larrazabal, Spain 32-36—68 David Lynn, England 33-35—68 Marc Warren, Scotland 34-35—69 David Horsey, England 34-35—69 Marcel Siem, Germany 34-35—69 Garth Mulroy, South Africa 36-34—70 Liang Wen-chong, China 34-37—71 Shane Lowry, Ireland 33-39—72 JB Hansen, Denmark 36-36—72 Morton Orum Madsen, Denmark39-34—73 Paul Lawrie, Scotland 36-38—74 Hamza Sayin, Turkey 39-36—75 Leaderboard THRU SCORE Paul Casey, England 14 -7 Darren Fichardt, South Africa 14 -7 Steve Webster, England 12 -7 Ricardo Gonzalez, Argentina 18 -6 Thorbjorn Olesen, Denmark 18 -6 Rafa Cabrera-Bello, Spain 16 -6 Ricardo Santos, Portugal 15 -6 Goerge Coetzee, South Africa 15 -6 Peter Uihlein, United States 12 -6 Thomas Bjorn, Denmark 12 -6 Justin Walters, South Africa 11 -6 Also Charl Schwartzel, South Africa 12 -4 Lee Westwood, England 11 -4 Padraig Harrington, Ireland 16 -3 Tiger Woods, United States 10 -1 Justin Rose, England 10 -1 Louis Oosthuizen, South Africa12 E
NASCAR
NASCAR Sprint Cup Leaders By The Associated Press Through Nov. 3 Points 1, Jimmie Johnson, 2,342. 2, Matt Kenseth, 2,335. 3, Kevin Harvick, 2,302. 4, Kyle Busch, 2,290. 5, Dale Earnhardt Jr., 2,280. 6, Jeff Gordon, 2,273. 7, Clint Bowyer, 2,273. 8, Greg Biffle, 2,269. 9, Joey Logano, 2,251. 10, Kurt Busch, 2,246. 11, Carl Edwards, 2,226. 12, Ryan Newman, 2,224. 13, Kasey Kahne, 2,209. 14, Brad Keselowski, 968. 15, Jamie McMurray, 966. 16, Martin Truex Jr., 922. 17, Paul Menard, 916. 18, Aric Almirola, 860. 19, Jeff Burton, 858. 20, Ricky Stenhouse Jr., 855. Money 1, Jimmie Johnson, $8,670,203. 2, Kyle Busch, $6,639,324. 3, Matt Kenseth, $6,613,344. 4, Kevin Harvick, $6,213,286. 5, Brad Keselowski, $6,156,893. 6, Jeff Gordon, $5,637,897. 7, Carl Edwards, $5,626,250. 8, Dale Earnhardt Jr., $5,568,438. 9, Joey Logano, $5,429,831. 10, Ryan Newman, $5,362,305. 11, Clint Bowyer, $5,254,715. 12, Martin Truex Jr., $5,188,934. 13, Ricky Stenhouse Jr., $5,167,352. 14, Kasey Kahne, $5,106,454. 15, Kurt Busch, $4,950,328. 16, Aric Almirola, $4,809,869. 17, Jamie McMurray, $4,758,903. 18, Greg Biffle, $4,675,769. 19, Juan Pablo Montoya, $4,609,710. 20, Paul Menard, $4,592,017.
CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS Eastern Conference Sporting Kansas City vs. New England Leg 1 — Saturday, Nov. 2: New England 2, Sporting KC 1 Leg 2 — Wednesday, Nov. 6: Sporting KC 3, New England 1, OT, Sporting KC advanced on 4-3 aggregate New York vs. Houston Leg 1 — Sunday, Nov. 3: New York 2, Houston 2 Leg 2 — Wednesday, Nov. 6: Houston 2, New York 1, OT, Houston advanced on 4-3 aggregate Western Conference Portland vs. Seattle Leg 1 — Saturday, Nov. 2: Portland 2, Seattle 1 Leg 2 — Thursday, Nov. 7: Seattle at Portland, 11 p.m. Real Salt Lake vs. LA Galaxy Leg 1 — Sunday, Nov. 3: L.A. Galaxy 1, Real Salt Lake 0 Leg 2 — Thursday, Nov. 7: L.A. Galaxy at Real Salt Lake, 9 p.m. ——— CONFERENCE FINALS Eastern Conference Leg 1 — Saturday, Nov 9: Sporting KC vs. Houston, 2:30 p.m. Leg 2 — Saturday, Nov. 23: Houston vs. Sporting KC, TBA Western Conference Leg 1 — Sunday, Nov. 10: West (lower seed) vs. West (higher seed), 9 p.m. Leg 2 — Sunday, Nov. 24: West (higher seed) vs. West (lower seed), TBA ——— MLS CUP Saturday, Dec. 7: at higher seed, 4 p.m.
BOXING
Fight Schedule By The Associated Press Saturday’s Fights At American Bank Center, Corpus Christi, Texas (HBO), Roman Martinez vs. Mikey Garcia, 12, for Martinez's WBO junior lightweight title; Nonito Donaire vs. Vic Darchinyan, 10, featherweights; Demetrius Andrade vs. Vanes Martirosyan, 12, for the vacant WBO junior middleweight title; Nicholas Walters vs. Alberto Garza, 12, for Walters' WBA World featherweight title. Sunday’s Fights At Ryogoku Kokugikan, Tokyo, Shinsuke Yamanaka vs. Alberto Guevara, 12, for Yamanaka's WBC bantamweight title; Richar Abril vs. Jorge Linares, 12, for Abril's WBA World lightweight title; Takahiro Ao vs. Edgar Alejandro Lomeli, 10, lightweights; Roman Gonzalez vs. Oscar Blanquet, 10, flyweights. Monday, Nov. 11 At Cowboys Dancehall, San Antonio (FS1), Fidel Maldonado Jr. vs. Luis Ramos Jr., 10, junior welterweights; Fernando Guerrero vs. Raymond Gatica, 10, middleweights. Friday, Nov. 15 At Ubon Ratchathani, Thailand, Srisaket Sor Rungvisai vs. Hirofumi Mukai, 12, for Rungvisai's WBC super flyweight title. Saturday, Nov. 16 At Turning Stone Resort and Casino, Verona, N.Y. (NBC), Tomasz Adamek vs. Vyacheslav Glazkov, 12, IBF heavyweight eliminator. At Citizens Business Bank Arena, Ontario, Calif. (HBO), Andre Ward vs. Edwin Rodriguez, 12, for Ward's WBA Super World super middleweight title. Tuesday, Nov. 19 At Jeju, South Korea, Koki Kameda vs. Jung-Oh Son, 12, for Kameda's WBA World bantamweight title.
GLANTZ-CULVER LINE
College Football
FAVORITE Louisville at New Mexico Iowa W. Kentucky at Cincinnati at Duke at East Carolina at Indiana TCU Florida St. at Marshall at Miami at Minnesota at Maryland Missouri at North Carolina at Florida W. Michigan OPEN 27 1½ 14½ 5 7 10 14 9½ 6½ 35 20½ 6 1½ 3 13½ 14 7½ 4 TODAY O/U Tonight’s Games 27½ (49) 3 (59½) Saturday’s Games 15 (45) 6 (57½) 9 (65½) 9 (57) 17 (52½) 9 (77½) 7½ (46) 35 (54½) 24 (67) 6½ (44) 1½ (48½) 5 (54) 13½ (56½) 13½ (51½) 10 (42½) 2½ (58½) UNDERDOG at UConn Air Force at Purdue at Army SMU NC State Tulsa Illinois at Iowa St. at Wake Forest UAB Virginia Tech Penn St. Syracuse at Kentucky Virginia Vanderbilt at E. Michigan at UTSA Fresno St. at Texas Tech at Wisconsin at Mississippi at Colorado St. at Washington Texas Arizona St. at Michigan at Navy at North Texas at Oklahoma St. Southern Cal Notre Dame at Texas A&M Boston College Utah St. at Middle Tenn. at Louisiana-Monroe at Louisiana Tech Auburn 7½ 14 2½ 7½ 17½ 7½ 26 8 7 6½ 17 21 32 17 3½ 19 24 13 17 3½ 14 7 9 9 2½ 7½ 17 9 28 6 6½ 7 17 25 31 16½ 4½ 19½ 24 14½ 18 4 16½ 7½ (51) (79) (59½) (55½) (53½) (65) (60½) (56) (63½) (57½) (53) (57) (53½) (56) (51) (66½) (60½) (56½) (48½) (57) (52) (55) Tulane at Wyoming Kansas St. BYU Arkansas Nevada Colorado at West Virginia at Utah Nebraska Hawaii UTEP Kansas at California at Pittsburgh Mississippi St. at New Mexico St. at UNLV FIU Arkansas St. Southern Miss. at Tennessee at UCF at Arizona at Alabama at San Jose St. 10 +2½ 9 6½ 10½ Pk 12½ 6½ (63½) (56) (55) (56) Houston UCLA LSU San Diego St.
NFL
FAVORITE at Tennessee at Green Bay at Pittsburgh at N.Y. Giants at Indianapolis Seattle Cincinnati at Chicago at San Francisco at Arizona Denver at New Orleans Miami OPEN 13½ 9 3½ 6½ 12 6½ 2½ +2½ 6½ 1 7 6½ 3½ TODAY O/U Sunday’s Games 12 (41) 1 (47) 3 (43½) 7 (43½) 9½ (44) 5½ (44½) 1½ (44) 1 (52½) 6 (43) 2½ (41) 7 (58) 6½ (54) Monday 2½ (41) UNDERDOG Jacksonville Philadelphia Buffalo Oakland St. Louis at Atlanta at Baltimore Detroit Carolina Houston at San Diego Dallas at Tampa Bay
Friday, November 8, 2013
AMUSEMENTS
THE TIMES B5
What food allergy sufferers don’t know can kill them
DEAR ABBY:
I am a 25-year-old woman with a food allergy. Last year I was a guest at a Thanksgiving dinner where the host insisted I could eat the food “since there was just a little in there.” I understand that making separate food is difficult, but all I ask is that people let me know if a dish contains an ingredient that will make me sick. At best, an allergic reaction is uncomfortable. At worst, it can be life-threatening. Would you please print a message about allergy awareness before the holidays? If you do, perhaps someone will be spared what I went through. — NOT PICKY, REALLY ALLERGIC IN ILLINOIS DEAR REALLY ALLERGIC: I’m glad to raise awareness because every year there is at least one story in the media about some poor individual winding up in an emergency room or dying because of an allergic reaction. Exposure to even a TRACE of a substance that an individual is allergic to is dangerous because “just a little” CAN hurt you. The symptoms of a potentially fatal allergic reaction — which have appeared in this column before — are a education and advance research. Its website is loaded with valuable information on this important subject. Check it out at www.foodallergy.org. children to behave this way aren’t doing their job, which is to teach them to be respectful of the performers and the effort that was put into the show. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. To order “How to Write Letters for All Occasions,” send your name and mailing address, plus check or money order for $7 (U.S. funds) to: Dear Abby — Letter Booklet, P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. Shipping and handling are included in the price.
DEAR ABBY:
Last week I attended two events for my grandchildren. One was a school concert, the other a dance recital. Both times, during the performance I saw electronic devices turned on throughout the audience. It seemed that parents were encouraging children to play video games, watch movies or surf the Internet instead of pay attention to the show. It drove me crazy. What are these parents teaching their children? Not only are they missing out on the experience, but they are also being taught terrible manners. I held my tongue, but it was a struggle because I wanted to slap the parents in the back of the head. (I’m old school.) Am I wrong? — HOLDING MY TONGUE DEAR HOLDING: No, you’re 100 percent right. Before many performances, the director or principal will request that electronic devices be turned off. That’s what should have been done at the concert and recital you attended. Parents who allow or encourage their
DEAR ABBY
Jeanne Phillips
tingling sensation, itching or metallic taste in the mouth followed by hives, a sensation of warmth, asthma symptoms, swelling of the mouth and throat area, difficulty breathing, vomiting, diarrhea, cramping, a drop in blood pressure and loss of consciousness. The symptoms can occur in as few as five to 15 minutes after exposure, but life-threatening reactions may progress over several hours. Someone experiencing these symptoms should be treated at the nearest emergency room or hospital. This information was provided by Food Allergy Research and Education, an organization whose mission is to raise public awareness about food allergies, provide
Sudoku solution
Horoscope
By HOLIDAY MATHIS
ARIES (March 21-April 19). Make healthy choices and plans in the morning when your willpower is high. Then later, when it’s time to implement those decisions, there’s no choice to be made. You did it already. TAURUS (April 20-May 20). Consider the obstacles you might face so that you can proactively deal with them. The more prepared you are for the outcomes you don’t want the less likely they are to occur. GEMINI (May 21-June 21). The goal is to win someone over to your side without making them think they’ve crossed some kind of line. You’ll do this with your charm, friendliness and humor. Laughter is a kind of agreement. CANCER (June 22-July 22). Like a little bird that has broken out of an egg, you have made it past a barrier but are still not ready to fly. Let people take care of you while you gather the strength you need to take the next risk. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). If you would rather be doing something else, the task at hand won’t be fun. You can make the present seem like less work by reminding yourself that it’s what’s happening now, so you may as well get into the spirit of it. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). When it feels like too much work has depleted your good mood, dreaming will invigorate you. You’ll get energy from making goals and/or imagining your new improved life. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). You always try to move upward on the morality scale, and so people around you behaving badly will hold no sway over your actions. That said, peer pressure is very real to you now. So avoid potentially problematic associations. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21). Because you have moxie, you know what it is. The people who don’t have it don’t recognize it in you. Don’t blame them, but don’t give them an important responsibility, either. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21). You intended your life story to go one way, and now it seems you’re living it another. Whether the versions are close or drastically different, just know that every life story goes through this. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19). You’re a regular productivity master. If it’s been done by someone else, you’ll choose a different task. Duplicate work, ideas and opinions aren’t helpful, and that’s all the reason you need to just be yourself. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18). Once you do all you can do, the next step is to determine that it was enough. Do not forget that step. Give yourself the satisfaction of acknowledging that you gave it your all. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20). If you’re not sure how to judge a situation, look at the people involved. What’s their mood? Do they seem happy or malcontent? If you’re not sure how to judge a person, look at his friends.
A - Cox B - Uxbridge, Millville Comcast C - Blackstone, Franklin Comcast D - Bellingham Comcast
A B C D
FRIDAY EVENING NOVEMBER 8, 2013
7:30
Just Seen It Å Open Studio
^ WGBH $ WBZ % WCVB & WLNE _ WHDH * WJAR , WPRI 9 WFXT < WLWC D WSBE F WSBK L WGBX X WLVI ∞ WNAC ¥ WBPX µ WPXQ
A&E A-P AMC BET BRAV CNBC CNN COM CSNE DISC DISN E! ESPN ESPN2 ESPNC EWTN FAM FOOD FX HGTV HIST LIFE MTV NESN NICK SYFY SPIKE TLC TNT TOON TVL USA WTBS
2
2 4 5
2 4 5
2 4 5
PBS NewsHour (N) Å
6 PM
6:30
7 PM
8 PM
8:30
9 PM
9:30
10 PM
10:30
11 PM
11:30
DISH DTV P-VF BrVF BuVF
6 7 7 7
10 10 10 12 6 13 13 9 8 15 9 9
8 14 14 21 21 16 16 9 12 12
WBZ News CBS Evening (N) Å News/Pelley NewsCenter 5 ABC World at Six (N) News ABC6 News at 6 ABC World (N) Å News 7 News at 6PM NBC Nightly (N) News (N) NBC 10 News at NBC Nightly 6pm (N) News (N) 12 News at 6 CBS Evening News/Pelley Fox 25 News at Fox 25 News at 6 (N) Å 6:30 (N) Modern Fam- Modern Family ily Å “Flip Flop” World News Nightly BusiAmerica ness Report Two and a Half Two and a Half Men Men Greater BosNightly Busiton Å ness Report The Middle Å The Middle Å
Greater BosBasic Black ton Å Patriots All Access (N)
Entertainment Access Hol11 Tonight (N) lywood (N) Cold Case “Shore Leave” A 20 15 15 Marine who was found dead. Cold Case “Shore Leave” A 7 Marine who was found dead.
Great Performances “Stephen Sondheim’s Company With the New York PhilharCharlie Rose monic” A concert production of “Company.” (N) Å (N) Å Undercover Boss Family Dollar Hawaii Five-0 The team watches Blue Bloods A Wall Street execu- WBZ News Late Show W/ Stores COO Mike Bloom. Mary’s baby. (N) tive is murdered. (N) (N) Å Letterman Last Man (:31) The Shark Tank Helping men with NewsCenter 5 (:35) Jimmy Inside Edition Chronicle Å (:01) 20/20 (N) Å Standing (N) Neighbors (N) marriage proposals. (N) Late (N) Kimmel Live (N) Å omg! Insider Inside Edition Last Man (:31) The Shark Tank Helping men with ABC6 News at (:35) Jimmy (:01) 20/20 (N) Å (N) Å (N) Å Standing (N) Neighbors (N) marriage proposals. (N) Eleven (N) Kimmel Live Access HolGrimm An old feud is resurDracula Grayson earns a power- 7 News at Tonight Show Extra (N) Å Dateline NBC Å lywood (N) rected. (N) Å ful enemy. (N) Å 11PM (N) w/Jay Leno NBC 10 News at Extra (N) Å Grimm An old feud is resurDracula Grayson earns a power- NBC 10 News at Tonight Show Dateline NBC Å 7pm (N) rected. (N) Å ful enemy. (N) Å 11pm (N) w/Jay Leno Wheel of For- Jeopardy! Undercover Boss Family Dollar Hawaii Five-0 The team watches Blue Bloods A Wall Street execu- News at 11 Late Show W/ tune (N) (N) Å Stores COO Mike Bloom. Mary’s baby. (N) tive is murdered. (N) Letterman Dish Nation MasterChef (Season Finale) The Sleepy Hollow Abbie turns to Fox 25 News at TMZ Å TMZ (N) Å Fox 25 News at 10 (N) Å (N) Å winner is chosen. (N) Henry Parrish for help. Å 11 (N) The Big Bang The Big Bang The Carrie Diaries Larissa America’s Next Top Model Two and a Half Two and a Half The Office The Office “Two Theory Å Theory Å clashes with Samantha. (N) (N) Å Men Men “Vandalism” Weeks” Antiques Road- Are You Being Inside Wash- A Lively Experi- Masterpiece Classic “Downton Abbey” Matthew and others go off BBC World (Off Air) show Served? ington Å ment to war. Å News Å The Big Bang The Big Bang Monk Monk’s friend seems too Monk Natalie suspects foul WBZ News OK! TV (N) Å Seinfeld “The The Office Theory Å Theory Å good to be true. Å play. Å (N) Å Cafe” Å “Vandalism” Greater BosCharlie Rose Antiques Road- Cook’s Country Washington McLaughlin PBS NewsHour (N) Å Moyers & Company Å ton Å -- The Week show Week Group (N) Modern Fam- Modern Family The Carrie Diaries Larissa America’s Next Top Model 7 News at 10PM on CW56 (N) Å The Arsenio Hall Show Å ily Å “Flip Flop” clashes with Samantha. (N) (N) Å Dish Nation MasterChef (Season Finale) The Sleepy Hollow Abbie turns to Eyewitness (:45) Sports Seinfeld “The Family Guy Å TMZ (N) Å (N) Å winner is chosen. (N) Henry Parrish for help. Å News at 10 Wrap Wink” Å Cold Case The body of a single Cold Case Case of a murdered Cold Case The case of a murCold Case “Pin Up Girl” New evi- Cold Case Murder case of a mother is found. Å 12-year-old boy. Å dered Russian defector. dence in pinup girl’s killing. young politician. Å Cold Case The body of a single Cold Case Case of a murdered Cold Case The case of a murCold Case “Pin Up Girl” New evi- Cold Case Murder case of a mother is found. Å 12-year-old boy. Å dered Russian defector. dence in pinup girl’s killing. young politician. Å
2
2 4
2 4 5
6
6 6
5 6 7
7
10 12
10 12
10 12
10 12 8
28 36
28 36
9 8
9 8 3 18 3 44 26 12
64
64
11
11 15
15
15
CABLE
37 64 37 37 42 56 63 63 25 71 59 59 79 67
6 PM
6:30
7 PM
7:30
8 PM
8:30
9 PM
9:30
10 PM
10:30
11 PM
11:30
CABLE
265 118 181 181 181 282 184 130 130 130 254 130 231 231 231 329 124 270 270 270 273 129 185 185 185 355 208 102 102 102 202 200 100 100 100 249 107 190 190 190 77 77 77
70 63 57 57 48 44 46 46 49 41 42 42 58 67 61 61 55 36 52 52 24 59 39 39 34 53 24 24 63 72 34 34 30 34 49 49 29 35 50 50 132 309 258 258 22 96 56 56 38 50 26 26 28 62 53 53 53 30 30 30 44 61 32 32 41 69 58 58 40 28 36 36 60 76 28 28 56 37 51 51 35 52 25 25 69 73 62 62 26 74 55 55 39 55 38 38 27 32 33 33 36 51 60 60 43 48 64 64 52 31 35 35 45 33 31 31
Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars (:01) Storage (:31) Storage New York (N) New York (N) Wars Å Wars Å Å Å Å Å Å Å Å Å Tanked: Unfiltered CleopatraTo Be Announced Tanked: Unfiltered “A Healthy Tanked Client wants 8-piece Tanked Wayde sends team to Tanked Client wants 8-piece inspired tank; lava-lamp tank. Dose of ATM” drum set tank. work boot camp. (N) drum set tank. } ## Hard to Kill (1990, Action) Steven Seagal, Kelly LeBrock. The Walking Dead The supply (4:30) } Out for } ### Under Siege (1992, Action) Steven Seagal, Tommy Lee Jones, Gary Justice (1991) Busey. A Navy cook thwarts a plot to hijack a battleship. Years after nearly dying, a policeman seeks revenge. mission faces hurdles. 106 & Park: BET’s Top 10 Live “Freestyle Friday” } # Money Train (1995, Action) Wesley Snipes, Woody Harrelson. Premiere. A The Mathis Project (N) Å Husbands- Ho. Husbands- Ho. (N) Å transit cop’s foster brother plans a subway robbery. Å Shahs of Sunset Reza tries to fix The Real Housewives of Atlanta Styled to Rock Punk styles for The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills “A Catered Affair to Remem- } ### My Best Friend’s things with MJ. Kelly Osbourne. (N) ber” Kyle hosts a cocktail party. Wedding (1997) Julia Roberts. Mad Money (N) The Kudlow Report (N) American Greed: The Fugitives The Car Chas- The Car Chas- American Greed Business part- Mad Money ers ers ners steal millions. (5:00) The Situ- Crossfire (N) Erin Burnett OutFront (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Å Piers Morgan Live (N) Crossfire Unguarded Anthony Bourdain Parts ation Room With Rachel Unknown (N) (5:58) South (:28) Tosh.0 Å The Colbert Daily Show/Jon At Midnight Å Futurama Å Tosh.0 Å Tosh.0 Å Key & Peele Å Key & Peele Å Tosh.0 Å South Park Å Park Å Report Å Stewart SportsNet Cen- Celtics PreNBA Basketball Boston Celtics at Orlando Magic. From Amway Center in Orlando, Celtics PostSportsNet Cen- UNO’s Sports Patriots This SportsNet Central (N) game Live Fla. (N Subject to Blackout) game Live tral (N) Tonight Live Week tral (N) (5:00) Gold Rush The Hoffman Gold Rush Todd learns his claim Gold Rush - The Dirt (N) Å Gold Rush A new crewmember Alaska: The Last Frontier (N) Å Gold Rush A new crewmember crew relocates. Å is mined out. Å makes a costly mistake. makes a costly mistake. Good Luck Jessie Å Dog With a Wander Over Dog With a Dog With a Dog With a Dog With a Liv & MadAustin & Ally Å Good Luck A.N.T. Farm Å Charlie Å Blog Å Yonder Å Blog Å Blog Blog Å Blog Å die Å Charlie Å (5:00) The Voice “Best of the E! News (N) Keeping Up With the KarFashion Police (N) Hello Ross (N) The Soup Chelsea Lately E! News Blinds” Å dashians SportsCenter (N) Å College Basketball Georgetown vs. Oregon. From Seoul, South Korea. (N) SportsCenter (N) Å NFL Kickoff College Basketball Maryland at Connecticut. (N) College Football Teams TBA. (N) Å Olbermann (N) Å (N) Å (5:00) College Football Å Friday Night Lights The Panthers Friday Night Lights Matt’s father SEC Storied 30 for 30 (N) await game results. returns from Iraq. Å Faith and Cul- Notre-Dame du Daily Mass The Franciscan Mis- Life on the Rock Assistance for Catholicism on Rosary Crossing the Evangelization Parables of Women of ture Å Cap Shrine sionaries. Å wounded soldiers. Campus Goal Å Christ Å Grace } # } ## The Middle Å The Middle Zookeeper (2011, Comedy) Kevin James. Talking animals Along Came Polly (2004) Ben Stiller, Jennifer Aniston. A The 700 Club Å “The Friend” teach their shy caretaker how to woo a woman. jilted newlywed finds solace with another woman. Guy’s Grocery Games Salad Diners, Drive- Diners, Drive- Diners, Drive- Diners, Drive- Diners, Drive- Diners, Drive- Diners, Drive- Diners, Drive- Mystery Diners Mystery Diners without greens; budget battle. Ins and Dives Ins and Dives Ins and Dives Ins and Dives Ins and Dives Ins and Dives Ins and Dives Ins and Dives Two and a Half Two and a Half } ## The A-Team (2010, Action) Liam Neeson, Bradley Cooper, Jessica Biel. Former Special Forces soldiers form a } ## Rush Hour 2 (2001, Action) Jackie Chan, Men Men rogue unit. Chris Tucker, John Lone. Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Fixer Upper The Castle Heights Flip or Flop Å Flip or Flop A House Hunters Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l neighborhood. Å short sale. (N) Å Modern Marvels Snakes, sports, American Pickers Mike and American Pickers Mike and American Pickers The guys go American Pickers The guys meet (:02) American Pickers “Jurassic weather events. Å Frank head to California. Frank pick Minnesota. Å back to Hobo Jack’s. an octogenarian artist. Pick” Å } On Strike for Christmas (2010) Daphne Zuniga. Neighborhood } Christmas Crash (2008, Drama) Michael Madsen. A man and } ### A Christmas Proposal (2008) Nicole Eggert. Two lawwomen band together during the holidays. Å his wife reconnect after surviving a plane crash. Å yers -- one-time sweethearts --battle over a ski resort. Å Ridiculousness Ridiculousness Ridiculousness Ridiculousness Wait Till Next Year The first Wait Till Next Year Coach Kalby Ridiculousness Ridiculousness Ridiculousness Ridiculousness game against their rival. (N) makes a change. (N) Penn State Pro Football College Basketball Cornell at Syracuse. (N) College Basketball Miami (Ohio) at Notre Dame. (N) Sports Today Charlie Moore Football: Next Weekly (N) LIVE (N) Outdoors SpongeBob SpongeBob Sanjay and Sanjay and Sanjay and The Legend of Full House Å Full House Å Full House Å Full House Å Friends Å (:33) Friends Å SquarePants SquarePants Craig Å Craig Å Craig Å Korra (5:00) } ## Godzilla (1998) Matthew Broderick. Nuclear testing WWE Friday Night SmackDown! (N) Å Haven “William” The thugs are Being Human Liam returns with in the South Pacific produces a giant mutated lizard. Å holding William. (N) an agenda for Aidan. Cops “Coast to Cops Å Cops Å Cops Å Cops “Busted Cops Å Bellator MMA Live The world’s top fighters take part in this tourna- Cops Å Cops Å Coast” No. 3” Å ment. (N) Say Yes: ATL Say Yes: ATL Say Yes: ATL Say Yes: ATL Say Yes: ATL Say Yes: ATL Say Yes: ATL Say Yes: ATL Secret Princes A pool party at Say Yes: ATL Say Yes: ATL the new house. (N) Å } ## Invincible (2006) Mark Wahlberg. The Castle A half-naked body is Castle Castle and Beckett hunt a } ## The Longest Yard (2005, Comedy) Adam Sandler, Chris Rock. Prisoners found in a park. serial killer. Å train for a football game against the guards. Å (DVS) story of football’s Vince Papale. Å (5:00) Movie Uncle Grandpa Adventure Time Teen Titans Go! MAD King of the The Cleveland American American Family Guy Å Family Guy Å Hill Å Show Dad Å Dad Å The Andy The Andy The Andy The Andy The Andy The Andy Everybody-Ray- Everybody-Ray- Friends Å Friends Å 30 Rock Å (:36) 30 Rock Å Griffith Show Griffith Show Griffith Show Griffith Show Griffith Show Griffith Show mond mond Law & Order: Special Victims Law & Order: Special Victims Modern Fam- Modern Fam- Modern Fam- Modern Fam- Modern Fam- Modern Fam- Modern Fam- Modern FamUnit “Contagious” Å Unit Missing boy is found. ily Å ily Å ily Å ily Å ily Å ily Å ily Å ily Å Seinfeld “The Seinfeld “The Seinfeld Å Family Guy Å } # Mr. Deeds (2002, Comedy) Adam Sandler, Winona Ryder. A } ## 50 First Dates (2004) Adam Sandler. A man falls for a Baby Shower” Jacket” Å pizza maker inherits a fortune from a distant relative. (DVS) woman who has short-term memory loss. (DVS)
278 182 120 120 120 290 172 250 250 250 236 114 196 196 196 206 140 209 144 208 143 70 74 71 70 74 71 70 74 71
422 261 285 285 285 311 180 199 199 199 231 110 164 164 164 248 137 53 53 53
229 112 165 165 165 269 120 128 128 128 252 108 140 140 140 331 160 210 210 210 623 434 76 76 76
299 170 252 252 252 244 122 180 180 180 262 168 54 54 54
280 183 139 139 139 245 138 51 51 51
296 176 257 257 257 301 106 244 244 244 242 105 247 139 50 52 50 52 50 52
PREMIUM
ENC HBO MAX SHOW STARZ TMC 292 630 326 326 200 400 301 301 220 450 341 341 240 500 361 361 280 600 321 321 260 550 381 381
6 PM
6:30
7 PM
7:30
8 PM
8:30
9 PM
9:30
10 PM
10:30
11 PM
11:30
PREMIUM
526 340 350 350 350 501 300 400 400 400 512 310 420 420 420 537 318 365 365 365 520 350 340 340 340 544 327 385 385 385
(4:20) } ## (:20) } ### The Princess Bride (1987, Adven- } ## A Knight’s Tale (2001) Heath Ledger. A peasant poses as a (:15) } ### Maverick (1994, Western) Mel Gibson. A conniving knight for a shot at jousting glory. ‘PG-13’ Å cardsharp heads for a high-stakes poker game. ‘PG’ Å Mr. Jones ‘R’ ture) Cary Elwes, Robin Wright. ‘PG’ Å } ### War of the Worlds (2005) Tom Cruise. A man and his (4:45) } Dark (:45) 2 Days: Boardwalk Empire Nucky refuses Real Time With Bill Maher Real Time With Bill Maher Å Shadows Å Mikey Garcia children try to survive an alien invasion. ‘PG-13’ Å to back Chalky. Å (N) Å (5:30) } ### The Thin Red Line (1998, War) Sean Penn, Adrien Brody. Based } # Vehicle 19 (2013) Paul Walker. A man finds Strike Back: Origins Porter Strike Back: Origins Porter on James Jones’ novel about the battle of Guadalcanal. ‘R’ Å a woman in his rental car’s trunk. ‘R’ enters Zimbabwe in disguise. enters Zimbabwe in disguise. (:15) } ### Mean Girls (2004) Lindsay Lohan. A teen becomes Masters of Sex Libby and Mas- Time of Death “Maria & Lenore” } ### Jarhead (2005, War) Jake Gyllenhaal, Peter Sarsgaard. friends with three cruel schoolmates. ‘PG-13’ Å ters rest in Miami. (N) Marines band together during the Gulf War. ‘R’ } # Pawn Shop Chronicles (2013, Action) Paul Walker, Elijah } # Ghost Rider: Spirit of (5:30) } ## The Vow (2012, Romance) Rachel (:20) } ## The Transporter (2002, Action) McAdams, Channing Tatum. ‘PG-13’ Å Jason Statham, Shu Qi. ‘PG-13’ Å Wood. The chase is on for a missing wedding ring. ‘R’ Å Vengeance (2012) ‘PG-13’ } ## Sylvia (2003, Biography) Gwyneth Paltrow, Daniel Craig. } ### Intolerable Cruelty (2003, Romance(:40) } # I Don’t Know How She Does It (2011) (:10) } ## Uptown Girls Writers Sylvia Plath and Ted Hughes get married. ‘R’ Å Comedy) George Clooney. ‘PG-13’ Å Sarah Jessica Parker. ‘PG-13’ Å (2003) Brittany Murphy. Å
B6 THE TIMES
COMICS
By Norm Feuti
Friday, November 8, 2013
Retail
Lio
By Mark Tatulli
For Better or Worse
By Lynn Johnston
Crankshaft
By Tom Batiuk
Blondie
By Dean Young & Denis Lebrun
Garfield
By Jim Davis
Mother Goose & Grimm
By Mike Peters
Gasoline Alley
By Jim Scancarelli
Baby Blues
By Rick Kirkman & Jerry Scott
Zits
By Jerry Scott & Jim Borgman
Rose Is Rose
By Pat Brady
Marvin
By Tom Armstrong
Funky Winkerbean
By Tom Batiuk
Pearls Before Swine
By Stephan Pastis
B.C.
By Johnny Hart
Get Fuzzy
By Darby Conley
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Jumble puzzle magazines available at pennydellpuzzles.com/jumblemags
Cryptoquote
Su Do Ku Tips and computer program at www.sudoku.com.
For solutions, check “JRC Publications” on the solutions page of www.sudoku.com.
Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.
© Puzzles by Pappocom
OGAME
©2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved.
KIRTC
CAUTIQ
GAHRAN
Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.
A:
Yesterday’s (Answers tomorrow) WIPER SHROUD ABRUPT Jumbles: YOUNG Answer: If the archaeologist’s assistant didn’t improve, he’d — BE HISTORY
Friday, November 8, 2013
THE TIMES B7
Monday-Friday 9:00am-5:00pm
Business Hours: Website:
401-365-1438
www.pawtuckettimes.com 24 Hour Classifieds Online
Just click “Place A Classified Ad” And send us your ad It’s simple and user friendly
Annoucements
111 Special Notices
READ THE TIMES EVERY DAY...to find out what's happening in your neighborhood. You'll find school news, employment news, health news, sports, who's getting married, who's getting promoted, who's running for office and much more. If it's important to you, it'll probably be in The Times. To get The Times delivered to your home every day, call 401722-4000.
123 Autos For Sale
123 Autos For Sale
1985 MERCEDES 380SL, 2 2005 Nissan Sentra SE. tops, silver/gray, 4dr., loaded, auto, 4cyl garaged, all records, ex- (32MPG) Inspected, nice, cellent $10k best, 401- must see, runs new. First 821-1066 $2350. 401-241-0413
159 General Services
ATTENTION TO ADVERTISE YOUR BUSINESS IN THIS SECTION CALL THE TIMES CLASSIFIED DEPT 401-722-4000
204 General Help Wanted
304 Apartments Unfurnished
107 Personals
CREDIT FOR ERRORS Each advertiser is asked to check his/her advertisement on the first day of publication and to report any error to the Times classified department (7224000) as soon as possible for correction. No adjustment will be given for typographical errors, which do not change the meaning or lessen the value of the advertisement. Credit will be allowed only to that portion of the advertisement where the error occurred.
Vehicles
123 Autos For Sale
01 Honda Accord LX. 4dr., loaded, auto, burgundy, wheels, alarm, low miles, must see & drive, first $2500. 401-301-0056 1973 CADILLAC always garaged, 8 yrs. not used, 75k miles, $3,590. 401767-2248 1979 CHEVY Corvette Stingray, in good condition, runs excellent $8,000 or best. Call 401426-7461
111 Special Notices
DID YOU KNOW that the Classified Section is filled with lots of interesting information? You can find a house, an apartment, a cat, a job and lots more!! The Times Classifieds are loaded with "local" information and merchandise that you will find useful. Be in the know....read the classified section every day.
146 Business Services
APPLIANCE REPAIR
Fast efficient service on all makes & models Reasonable Rates. Call
1989 TOYOTA COROLLA 2011 NISSAN Versa Manu$500, 114,000 m, call Joe al 5 speed, 47,000 miles, 726-1237 very good condition. $7,000. 401-714-5120 1997 Chevy Blazer. 4dr., 4WD, tow package, load- FULLY LOADED MINI-VAN ed. $1500. 401-339-8312 Leather interior, DVD player, remote starter, heated 1997 Lincoln Towncar Ltd seats. $6500. Jeff - 5084dr., loaded, auto, 360-1519. Must see! leather, low miles, runs We are looking for very new, 2nd owner, must see HONDA ACCORD dependable, hardwork$1450. 401-241-0354 2004 LX, Clear title, 70k ing, and honest people. Cumberland. 3rd, 1 bed, mi, Automatic, exterior Drug and alcohol free newly remodeled, off str 1999 VW Beetle, GLS, color Gold. $2750. Call workplace. parking, no pets, Section 122k miles, 5 speed, (828) 919-9835. 8 ok. 401-714-8478 leather, sunroof, runs & Please fax work history, looks like new, $4,500. SELL YOUR CAR, VAN OR references, contact numTRUCK THE EASY WAY. 401-333-9929 ber, and email to 401Call the classified team at 406-2842 2000 Chrysler Seabring The Times today. Tell JXI Limited Conv. Load- more than 40,000 adult DULUDE Avenue. 4 rms, 2 NEW TODAY 200 Employment ed, new inspection, low readers in the are about bed, new carpets, full miles, 1 owner, must see. your vehicle. It's easy to PLANT OPERATOR porch, off st. parking. Services $2,050. 401-585-2421 Synagro, the nations lead- $650. 401-651-1992 or do, just dial 401-722ing provider of waste and 401-480-9257 4000. or visit us at www.2000 NISSAN ALTIMA pawtuckettimes.com wastewater treatment The Times does not knowGXE, auto, a/c, CD player, ingly accept advertise- services, is seeking Plant runs great only 89k TOYOTA RAV4 LIMITED Operators for the miles. $4,300. 401-333- 2006, V6, 67K miles, one ments in the Employment Woonsocket facility. classifications that are Owner, runs well, selling 9929 Qualified applicants Lincoln. 2Nd , 3 bed, hdwds, for $12,000, Contact Amit not bonafide job offers. should possess a mini- appl., fireplace, no pets., Classification 200 is pro2001 Kia Sportage. 4 cylin- at 732-763-3265 mum of 3 years experi- w/d hkp, garage, $1150. vided for Employment In- ence in an industrial envi- 334-3286 or 241-9701 der, 4 wheel drive, 5 speed, 148k miles, VOLKS WAGON JETTA GT formation, Services and ronment be considered $1600. Call 769-2350 1998, 5 speed, 32 MPG, Referrals. This newspa- for the position, please inspected. $995. Call per does not knowingly provide a resume to accept Employment ads careers@synagro.com 2001 Nissan Altima GXE 401-767-7025 that indicate a preference Ltd. 4dr., loaded, auto, bases on age from emN. SMITHFIELD 2 bed, 4cyl, roof, wheels, mint. ployees covered be Age 126 Trucks Low miles. Must see. appliances, quiet, w/heat Discrimination In Em$2,000. 401-241-0259 & hot water. parking ployment Act. Nor do we $975. 401-369-0215 1998 FORD Ranger PLU, in any way condone em4x4, 5 speed, 6 cyl., runs ployment based solely 146 Business great, new sticker till upon discrimination prac2015, $2,495. 401-447- tices. Services 4451 or 401-769-0095 N. SMITHFIELD- Lovely 2 bed, appliances & heat in204 General Help cluded, no smoking/pets $850mo. 401-710-7066 Wanted
Employment
CARPENTRY/DRYWALL Accepting applications. El(BARRINGTON) derly/disabled. Heat & Busy contractor looking to electricity included. Fairhire carpenters with met- mont Heights 765-1320 al stud framing and drywall experience. Ability to interpret plans and specs and layout a plus. Applicants with the ability to BLACKSTONE, MA 2 bed, perform multiple skills a 2nd , no utilities, off st. plus. Ideal candidates will parking, laundry on site have at least 5 years ex- $750mo. Security reperience and have reliable quired. 508-962-1570 transportation.
Demand for Payment: To all persons hereafter named and to all whom it may concern: The content of your leased unit is subject to our lien for nonpayment of rent. You are denied access to the unit. Rent and other charges will continue to accrue. Failure to make payment in full by or on November 25, 2013 will result in the sale or disposal of your goods by United Storage, 61 Putnam Pike, Johnston, RI 02919, 401-233-3333. The auction will be held on December 12, 2013 at 1:00 pm. Shane Michael Valliere $437.30 Kim A Mccullough $583.00 Tammy A Leite $310.00 Maureen J Gendron $865.00 Matthew L Mallette $440.00 Jennifer Norigenna $278.80 Jorge L Navedo $454.20 NOTICE OF MORTGAGEE'S SALE 30 Eliot Avenue North Providence, Rhode Island
Instructions
The premises described in the mortgage will be sold, subject to all encumbrances, prior liens and such matters which may constitute valid liens or encumbrances after sale, at public auction on November 15, 2013 at 10:00 a.m., on the premises by virtue of the power of sale in said mortgage made by Constance Zaccagnini and Constance D'Ambra, dated November 5, 2004, and recorded in the North Providence, RI Land Evidence Records in Book 2012 at Page 245, the conditions of said mortgage having been broken. $5,000.00 in cash, certified or bank check required to bid. Other terms to be announced at the sale.
Business Services
223 Schools - Learning
ULTIMATE Chimney Sweep year round work, HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA nd will train, full benefits, FROM HOME. 6-8 weeks. Pawtucket. 2 , 1 bed, hot valid drivers license, 4 ACCREDITED. Get a Diplo- water/heat, appliances inMill St., Bellingham, MA ma. Get a job! No Com- cluded. Recently remodputer Needed. FREE eled. No pets. Section 8 508-966-2316 Brochure. 1-800-264- ok. 401-714-8478 8330. Benjamin Franklin HS www.diplo mafromhome.com
Lambco 508-226-1150
Merchandise
STUDIO AND 3 BEDROOM 5 Pacific St - Central Falls Immediately available, off-street parking, laundry on site. Call: 508 965 5636
261 Coins & Stamps
100 Indian Head pennies, average circulated, $59.00. Woonsocket 401-597-6426 Buying US coins dated before 1965: dimes $1.35, quarters $3.37, halves $6.75 Woonsocket 5976426
WOONSOCKET 2 bed, North End, 1st floor, hook ups, $195/week. Call 401-309-1257
SHECHTMAN HALPERIN SAVAGE, LLP 1080 Main Street Pawtucket, Rhode Island Attorney for the present Holder of the Mortgage (6006701)(Zaccagnini) (10-25-13, 11-01-13, 11-08-13)(302738) Notice of Sale: Notice of sale and disposition of goods in accordance with the provisions of the RI Self Storage Facility Act, RI General Laws, Chapter 34 42. Date: November 14, 2013 Time: 1:00 pm Place: United Storage, 61 Putnam Pike, Johnston, Rhode Island 02919 All household furniture, decorations, clothes, appliances, antiques, tools, and miscellaneous items being held for the accounts of: Kenneth D Barone #00570 Erica L Polke #00161 Marlon Carmona #00284 Michael A Dufresne #00508 Alisha M DeFusco #00313 Richard Dion, Manning Law Office #00322 NOTICE OF MORTGAGEE'S SALE 65-67 Abbott Street Pawtucket, Rhode Island Assessor's Plat 46 Lot 579
Real Estate-Sale
265 Furniture Household
HOUSE full of furniture & kitchen items everything must go, Cumberland 401-333-2444
272 Machinery & Tools
TABLE saw with stand on wheels, no blade, motor runs good, heavy, yours for the price of scrap $40.00. 401-766-4984
Will be sold, subject to any and all prior liens and encumbrances, at public auction on November 15, 2013 at 10:00 AM Local Time, on the premises by virtue of the Power of Sale contained in the certain Mortgage Deed made and executed by Herculano A. Lopes and Maria C. Lopes dated November 19, 2004 and recorded in 330 Brokers - Agents Book 2236 at Page 134, et seq. with the Records of Land Evidence of the City of Pawtucket, County of Providence, State of Rhode Island, the conditions of said Mortgage Deed having been broFIND A HOME. Sell a ken. FIVE THOUSAND DOLLARS ($5,000.00) home. Find a tenant. Call the classified team at The down payment in cash, bank check or certified Times to place your ad- check at time of sale; other terms will be anvertisement. Call 401nounced at time of sale. 722-4000 Marinosci Law Group, P.C. 1350 Division Road, Suite 301 West Warwick, RI 02893 Attorney for the present Holder of the Mortgage MLG File #: 11-00944FC A-4417958 10/25/2013, 11/01/2013, 11/08/2013 NOTICE OF MORTGAGEE'S SALE 66 Enfield Street Pawtucket, Rhode Island Assessor's Plat 27 Lot 565
273 Miscellaneous Merchandise
LOOKING FOR SOMETHING HARD TO FIND? Be sure to look in the classified pages of The TImes every day. Surely you'll find interesting things that you may want or need. The Times is the perfect marketplace you can enjoy in the comfort of your own home. There is something for everyone in The Times classifieds!
100 Legals
277 Toys – Children's Items
BABY car seat, includes base. Great condition. $20.00. 401-651-9904
LEGAL NOTICE INFORMATION Legal Notices may be mailed to: The Times, P.O. Box 307, Pawtucket, RI 02860 Faxed to: (401) 727-9250 or Emailed to:
280 Crafts & Hobbies
Model tools. Accessories, charges, electronics, etc. $100 for everything. Call 401-710-9240 Two wooden model airplanes. Albatros DVA 1917. 22.5 inch wing span. $100 for both. 7109240
Real Estate-Rent
Will be sold, subject to any and all prior liens and encumbrances, at public auction on November 15, 2013 at 11:00 AM Local Time, on the premises by virtue of the Power of Sale contained in the certain Mortgage Deed made and classified@pawtuckettimes.com executed by Michael F. Densmore and Kenneth Complete instructions R. Mitchell, Jr. dated December 21, 2010 and recorded in Book 3329 at Page 287, et seq. with should include: the Records of Land Evidence of the City of PawPublication dates, Billing information and tucket, County of Providence, State of Rhode Isthe Name and Phone land, the conditions of said Mortgage Deed havnumber of individual to ing been broken. FIVE THOUSAND DOLLARS contact if necessary. ($5,000.00) down payment in cash, bank check or certified check at time of sale; other terms will LEGAL NOTICES be announced at time of sale. MUST BE RECEIVED 3 BUSINESS DAYS Marinosci Law Group, P.C. PRIOR TO 1350 Division Road, Suite 301 PUBLICATION West Warwick, RI 02893 For further information Attorney for the present Call 722-4000 Monday Holder of the Mortgage thru Friday; MLG File # 12-09516FC A-4418116 8:30 a.m. To 4:30 p.m. 10/25/2013, 11/01/2013, 11/08/2013
300 Rental Agencies
Readers of The Times are advised The Times does not knowingly accept advertisements that are in violation of the Federal Fair Housing Law and the Rhode Island Fair Housing Practices Act. The Federal Fair Housing Law and Rhode Island Fair Housing Practices Act are designed to prevent discrimination in the purchase and rental of housing. Refusal to rent, lease, or sell property to anyone due to age, race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, disability, familial status, or country of ancestral origin is in violation of the Fair Housing Law. If you have a complaint, contact the Rhode Island Commission for Human Rights. They will help any person that has been discriminated against in the rental of housing, the sale of housing, home financing or public accommodations. Call the Rhode Island Commission for Human Rights, 401-2222661.
Whatever You Wish To Sell! WOO S D E S T M OVE O S H
CAR
TRUC
S
KS
ANTIQUES
PET S
NS
or TOYS ES CL BICY
TELEVISIO
Your Classified Ad will appear in The Call, The Times & ‘Burbs, plus Online 24/7!
WE CAN HELP! CALL TODAY!
All new/first time advertisers will receive
25% OFF their first ad!
401-365-1438
1,600 cars on one 52 acre lot! • Cars from $4,999!
Mike Penner
Kevin Meehan
B8 THE TIMES
Heated Leather, Sunroof, 4 Cyl. Economy, Loaded! #35131
2012 BUICK VERANO
#35071A #S13349A #351651A
Al Jason
NOVEMBER
DAVID BAUDER
AP Television Writer
List Price: $25,977
Save 6,400! $
$
J.P. Carlo
19,577
#P8182A
#13700A
NEW YORK — Jimmy Kimmel brought tears to the eyes of many children recently. But they weren't tears of joy. ABC's late-night host conducted what's becoming an annual prank during the past week, encouraging parents to tell their children they had eaten all of their Halloween candy, film the response and upload the video so he could show it on his TV show and on YouTube. Predictably, many of the fooled children were quite upset. "Pranking your own children is not harmless fun, but is cruel and potentially damaging," said Mark
2011 CHEVY TAHOE LT 4X4
Leather, 3rd Row, Tow Pkg., Alloys, Every Option! #35131
Michael Kind
Aaron Jacobs
List Price: $38,977
RED TAG
2010 Chevy Aveo LS
2007 Chevy impala LT
Save 6,600! $
Only
Mike DiMella
$
32,377
We finance your future, not your past.
Bad credit...don’t sweat it!
2009 FORD 2007 Ford 2006 CHEVY FOCUS SEL Freestyle HHR LT
Your Choice Either One
Dave Mello
42 MPG!, Alloy Wheels, Full Power Package #35106
2012 CHEVY CRUZE ECO
Keyless Entry, Alloy Wheels, Full Power Pkg. #35125R
2012 CHEVY CAPTIVA LS
All Wheel Drive, Moonroof, Back Up Camera. #35132
2010 GMC TERRAIN SLE
Save $5,100! $13,877
Hybrid, Moonroof, Nav., 9,700 Miles, Loaded! #35064
List Price: $19,977
Save $4,100! $15,877
List Price: $20,977
Save $7,000! $17,977
List Price: $24,977
Your Choice $ Any One
$
2010 CHRYSLER SEBRING LTD.
Convertible, Leather, Alloys Absolutely Loaded! #34969A Heated Leather, Alloy Wheels, Absolutely Loaded! #35085
8,977
9,977
2013 CHEVY IMPALA LTZ
Will Granata Jeff Nadim
Karyn Ingram
Only 31,000 Miles, iPod/MP3 Player, Automatic, Loaded!! #S113133A
2011 TOYOTA RAV4 4X4 2013 CHEVY MALIBU ECO
List Price: $24,977 List Price: $27,577
2013 CADILLAC ATS PREMIUM
List Price: $24,977
.
List Price: $20,977
Navigation, Sunroof, All Wheel Drive, Leather. #35038
2013 CHEVY MALIBU ECO
Save $7,000! $16,977 Save 6,200! $
$
List Price: $45,977
Hybrid, Alloy Wheels, 6,500 Miles, Loaded #S13331A
List Price: $27,977
Only 13,000 Miles! V6, Full Power Package #35061
2011 CHEVY CAMARO LS
List Price: $24,577
Barnett, a professor and graduate program coordinator at Kansas State University's department of psychological sciences. A child's trust in his parents shouldn't be trifled with, he said. "A parent who would violate this trust for a big laugh or 15 minutes of fame is, in my opinion, acting irresponsibly and not looking out for the best interests of the child," Barnett said. No one from Kimmel's show, broadcast on a network owned by the traditionally kid-friendly Walt Disney Co., was available to comment, representatives said Wednesday. A YouTube posting of Kimmel's on-air highlights was viewed more than 7 million times through late Wednesday, with
Steve Jionzo
Save $4,000! $16,977
Save 9,000! $
$
36,977
2013 FORD EXPEDITION LTD.
All Wheel Drive, Nav. Heated Leather, Tow Pkg. #P8155 Leather, Sunroof, Alloy Wheels, Rear Spoiler, Loaded!! #P8183L
Save 5,300! $
$
22,677
2012 FORD FUSION SPORT
List Price: $21,877
4x4,Heated Leather, 4 cyl., Loaded! #P8146R
Dennis Leoleis
Save 5,300! $
$
19,277
2013 FORD ESCAPE SEL
List Price: $44,877
List Price: $28,877
Save $5,300! $22,277
18,777
Al Antolini
2012 LINCOLN MKZ
All Wheel Drive, Moonroof, Leather Seats. #P8165R
List Price: $26,877
Titanium Edition, Sunroof, Leather, Loaded!! #P8171R
2013 FORD FIESTA
List Price: $19,577
Titanium, All Wheel Drive, Nav., Moonroof, Leather #P8168
2012 FORD FUSION
2013 FORD TAURUS SEL
Sunroof, Alloy Wheels, Full Power Package. #P8164R
Save 5,300! $ Save $4,600! $17,277
Only 3,700 Miles!, Heated Leather, Alloys #P8110
$
21,577
Save $4,600! $24,277
Navigation, Heated Leather, Absolutely Loaded! #P8126L
Save 4,200! $
$
List Price: $34,777
List Price: $25,877
15,377 38,677
2013 FORD ESCAPE SEL
List Price: $28,977 List Price: $34,977
3rd Row Seating, Alloys, All Wheel Drive! #D5979
Save 5,500! $
$
29,277
2013 FORD ESCAPE SEL 2013 DODGE DURANGO SXT
Save $7,100! $27,877
List Price: $28,977
Save 5,000! $
$
20,877
Save 6,200! $
$
Joel Cohen
Titanium Edition, Heated Leather, Nav., Loaded! #P8148
2013 FORD ESCAPE 4X4
Save $4,200! $24,777
List Price: $33,877
4x4, Heated Leather, Moonroof, Navigation! #P8173L
2010 LINCOLN NAVIGATOR
List Price: $41,877
3rd Row, Heated Leather, All Wheel Drive, Loaded! #P8147
2013 LINCOLN MKT
List Price: $41,877
4x4, Sunroof, Heated Leather, V6 economy. #P8143L
2012 FORD ESCAPE LTD.
Robert Fink
List Price: $26,877
more than 45,000 giving it a "thumbs up" and 2,191 offering a "thumbs down." Since starting the feature in 2011, Kimmel's Jimmy Kimmel show said the postHalloween videos have been viewed more than 106 million times online. Kimmel said this year he received an "avalanche" of great responses and it took much of last
Dave Bertulli
Tim Donohue
Save $5,000! $28,877
Save $4,600! $37,277
Save $10,300! $31,577
Save $5,200! $21,677
Save $3,000! $25,977
ENTERTAINMENT
Rick Panorese
Only 8,300 Miles, Heated Leather, 3rd Row, Navigation, Alloys #D6095
2012 VW ROUTAN SE
Rubicon Edition, Leather, Targa Roof, Alloy Wheels #D6013
List Price: $26,977
Nav. System, Heated Leather, Alloys, Loaded! #D6007L
2012 TOWN & COUNTRY LTD.
List Price: $32,977
List Price: $21,977
Moonroof, Back-Up Camera, Nav., Loaded! #BBD109
List Price: $32,977
Sport Trim, Alloy Wheels, Only 14,000 Miles! #BBD110
2012 JEEP LIBERTY 4X4 2012 JEEP WRANGLER 2013 DODGE DART RALLYE
$
36 MPG Highway, Bluetooth, Alloys, Loaded! #D6005L
2013 DODGE DART RALLEY
Save 5,600! $16,377
$
Leather, Moonroof, Multi-CD player, Keyless start, Loaded! #D6019L
2012 CHRYSLER 200 LIMITED
Heated Leather, Alloys, Absolutely Loaded! #D6016
List Price: $22,977
List Price: $22,977
List Price: $19,977
Dean Childs
Save 4,500! $22,477
$
Save 7,500! $25,477
$
Save 5,400! $17,577
$
Save 4,700! $18,277
$
Save 5,700! $27,277
$
Save 4,600! $15,377
Sunroof, Heated Leather, Navigation, Back-Up Camera, Loaded! #D6022L
Chris Gates
2013 CHRYSLER 200 TOURING
Convertible, Alloy Wheels, Absolutely Loaded! #D5983R
DVD Entertainment, Back-Up Camera, Loaded! #D5893R
2018 CADILLAC CTS 2010 LEXUS ES 350
List Price: $23,977 List Price: $27,977
List Price: $24,977
All Wheel Drive, Sunroof, Loaded, Leather #D5927A
2012 TOWN & COUNTRY
List Price: $22,977
DVD Entertainment, Back-Up Camera, Loaded! #D5970
2012 DODGE CHALLENGER
2011 CHRYSLER 200 TOURING
List Price: $26,977
Rallye Redline, Leather, Nav, Moonroof, Loaded! #BBD107
2011 NISSAN JUKE SL “AWD”
Mike Walsh Jr.
List Price: $31,977
weekend to work through them all. This year's videos include two blond boys who break out in uncontrolled tears when their father tells them, "it's all gone." An empty candy wrapper is on the table in front of them. One girl, still in costume, tells her mother that "you ruined my whole day." Children throw stomping tantrums, one so vigorous the toddler's pants fall down. One angry girl throws an envelope at her parents. Another bawling child is hardly mollified by news that it's a prank: "Well, that's not very kind," the boy said. Kimmel's studio audience laughs at most of the reactions. Jane Annunziata, a McLean,
David Masters Jr.
Save $8,000! $16,977
Save $4,500! $18,477
Save $5,200! $21,777
Save $6,200! $25,777
Save $5,600! $18,377
List Price: $22,977
Save $5,000! $22,977
Save $5,000! $17,977
Shawn Goulet
Sharon Reed
Chris McIntyre Brian Martin Mike Brown
Edward Kelly
Andy Clair
Marc Mastroianni
Jason Burt
Frank Dumas
Tom Sollecito
Bruce D’Ambra
Elian Khouri
Ahmad Al-Jallad Speaks Arabic
Omar Ihjul
Mohamed Alomar Speaks Arabic
Dave Cap
Willie Landry
Michel Ghalbouni Speaks Arabic
John Pyne
Steve Miller
Tony Candolfi Speaks Español
Mark Walker
Bob Newell
Joel Bourget
Nick Massucco
S.K. Mark Rossi Santos Cruzado Harry Johnson Speaks Español
Sean Ewing
Brian Rishe
Jonathan Filleul
Justin Surtel
Mike Peters
Doug Hood
Ali Kehail Speaks Arabic
On the
NEW
Auto Mile, Rte. 16, Mendon, MA
Jimmy Kimmel prank brings tears to eyes of kids
Prices valid on vehicles indicated only and cannot be combined with any other discounts, promotions or previous sales. Sale ends November 13, 2013. Some pictures for illustration purposes. Tax, title, registration, doc. fee not included. Financing rates based on 75 months, 5.65% APR with credit approval and may require dealer financing. Must present ad and pay in full same day to get the advertised price.
888-355-1739
Open Daily 9-9 Sat. 9-6, Sun 11-6
Our Call Center Now Open at 7am !
Call us at 800-526-AUTO, or email or chat li Monday-Saturda ve y!
We’re he re to help you .
Va.-based psychologist who deals with family issues and is the author of the book, "Sometimes I'm Scared...," said she thought the prank was inappropriate parental behavior. "Parents should always serve as role models for their children, role modeling most appropriate behaviors and the most constructive ways to express feelings," Annunziata said. Kimmel, 46, said on the air two years ago when introducing the first round of stolen candy videos that "I guess I didn't expect so much crying" in response. "To the children whose fears are about to be immortalized on television, I apologize in advance," he said.
Friday, November 8, 2013
IMPERIAL CARS.COM
AD IS A COUPON AND MUST BE PRESENTED AT TIME OF SALE TO GET SALE PRICE. SALE END FRIDAY, MAY 30, 2008 AT 9 PM.
This document is © 2013 by editor - all rights reserved.
AttachmentSize
TIM-110813.pdf29.25 MB
View more articles in:
Premium Drupal Themes by Adaptivethemes