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January 30, 2014

January 30, 2014

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As politicians make speeches, Facebook bill to be local residents make searches... debated at
Statehouse
Proposal aims to protect profiles from prying eyes
By JIM BARON
jbaron@pawtuckettimes.com
WHAT A W RLD
Local and wire reports
911, HELP ME OUT OF THIS TICKET
ROSWELL, N.M. (AP) — Authorities say a New Mexico woman called in a fake report of a gunman near a convenience store to help a friend avoid a traffic ticket over a taillight. Roswell police say 22year-old Savana Jimenez called 911 Sunday morning hoping the officer who pulled over the car she was a passenger in would get dispatched to the fake crime. Authorities say Jimenez called 911 while the officer was checking her friend's information. Police say Jimenez later admitted making the entire story up so the officer would rush to the fake scene. Roswell police spokeswoman Sabrina Morales says Jimenez told police she thought she had warrants out for her arrest, but officials say she didn't. Jimenez was arrested and charged with obstruction.
PROVIDENCE – If you are applying for a job, should your prospective employer be able to demand the password to your Facebook or other social media account? Should schools and colleges be able to require students or applicants to allow access to restricted portions of their social media profiles? With sites like Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram and Meetup gaining popularity, and new sites finding their way onto the Internet with increasing frequency, two state legislators say employees and students should not be forced to share their online lives with people at work or school. See PRIVACY, page A5
Photos by Ernest A. Brown
Amanda Maycock, 25, of Woonsocket, lost her job about a week ago and was placing online applications at the netWORKri Career Center on Pond St. in the city Wednesday. ‘This place helps,’ she said, as she searched for work in the retail industry.
TODAY’S QUESTION
Is Facebook privacy a big issue for you? Yes No
Go to pawtuckettimes.com to answer
State’s jobless rate #1 in nation
By Russ Olivo | rolivo@woonsocketcall.com
WOONSOCKET
New court date set for alleged puppy dumper
By DONNA KENNY KIRWAN
dkirwan@pawtuckettimes.com
YESTERDAY’S RESULTS
Should the date of the Super Bowl be moved due to weather? Yes No
22% 78%
D
ON THE WEB
Follow us on Twitter: @PawtucketTimes Like us on Facebook Pawtucket Times
eolinda Sousa wouldn’t be able to get by without welfare benefits and food stamps, but she’d gladly trade them for a job that pays her for doing something productive. “I’ll do anything,” she says. “I’ll clean toilets with a toothbrush.” She’s that frustrated. The 26-year-old mother of two has been looking for a job for more than a year, but she hasn’t been able to find one. The last few weeks, looking for a job has become almost a job in itself for Sousa. She’s spent nearly six hours a day See JOBLESS, page A2

It’s starting to hurt pretty bad
Caleb Pion, 32, of Woonsocket, who is currently working part time as a grocery clerk, but is looking for something full-time, talks about his experiences.

PAWTUCKET—The woman accused of throwing her puppy in a dumpster on Harrison Street last month is scheduled to appear in District Court for a pre-trial conference related to animal cruelty and other charges on Feb. 19, police officials said. The pre-trial conference had originally been scheduled for Jan. 29. The case sparked outrage when it was first reported on See DATE, page A2
Chris Parker, a diving instructor at DiveOnIt Scuba Supply, located at 1403 Mendon Road in Cumberland, shows some of the equipment available at the shop, including regulators and weight belts, wet and dry suits, masks and fins as well as air tanks. The store, owned by Matthew and Jerika Verrier, will have its grand opening this Saturday.
Photo by Ernest A. Brown
INDEX
Amusements . . . . . . . . . .B5 Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . .A6 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . . . .A5 Opinion . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A4 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .B1 Television . . . . . . . . . . . .B5
In their business, it’s good to be underwater
DiveOnIt Scuba Supply opens in Cumberland
By JOSEPH NADEAU
jnadeau@woonsocketcall.com
CONTACT US:
Circulation: Editorial: Advertising: 401-767-8522 401-767-8550 401-767-8505
CUMBERLAND – Matthew and Jerika Verrier of Coventry started out enjoying the sport of scuba diving as a couple whenever they got the chance don their gear. The Verriers ended up liking their visits underwater so much it has now become their livelihood – the DiveOnIt Scuba Supply store in the commercial building at 1403 Mendon Road.
Vol. CXXVIII No. 26
The Verriers opened the business two weeks ago after giving the shop a coat of blue paint and setting up the shelving and racks for dive equipment ranging from wet and dry suits and mask and fins, to air tanks, regulators and weight belts. The store’s grand opening will be held on Saturday and Matthew said he is already getting plenty of people stopping by to find out more about the dive shop. See SCUBA, page A2
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A2 THE TIMES
FROM PAGE ONE
Thursday, January 30, 2014
ing, and sunken tugboats and fishing boats.. “I like rust, that is my passion,” Matthew said of his own interest in wreck diving. The store also offers rental equipment for those just learning the sport or who do not yet own their own gear and Diveonit also sells several brands of regulators and buoyancy control vests and tanks for those who are ready to own. Matthew said his goal in shop sales is to keep his customers coming back. “If you treat your customers right and give them a good price, they will come back,” he said. The store also sells dive accessories such as spear guns for fishing, catch bags for lobsters, and of course dive flags that always need to be displayed when divers are down. More about the store can be found on its website, Diveonit.com. The store’s certification opportunities through PADI are also listed and Matthew said he now has Chris Parker, his original instructor, running the store’s classes. Diveonit is open on Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday from noon to 8 p.m., on Saturday from 9-5 p.m. and on Sunday from 9-4 p.m. Dive training classes under PADI certification are conducted on Sundays at 9 a.m. and with pool time at Cumberland High School’s pool at noon. For more information about Diveonit and its programs call 333-0002.
Scuba
Matthew said the couple decided to open their shop in Cumberland since there has been a big void in the dive gear and training market since the longtime Scuba Center operation on Washington Street in Attleboro closed down. The Verriers store offers PADI dive certification instruction and is installing an air compressor and storage tank system that will allow for quick and easy air tank fills right at the shop. Matthew said the store will also be arranging dive travel trips to places like the Florida Keys, Turks and Caicos Islands in the Carribbean, and also to the North Carolina coast for wreck diving. Matthew is also planning to arrange local dive trips with two boats he has available through a dive mooring and inspection company he also runs. Wreck diving is one of Matthew’s personal dive favorites and he is certified in the use of advanced Nitrox decompression procedures so that he can dive wrecks beyond the sport diving limits. Although growing up boating on the waters of Greenwich Bay off East Greenwich, Matthew never became involved in diving until he and Jerika took a dive certification class together with Chris Parker at the
Photo by Ernest A. Brown
DiveOnIt Scuba Supply, located at 1403 Mendon Rd. in Cumberland, is set for its grand opening this Saturday. Owners Matthew and Jerika Verrier, along with Diving Instructor Chris Parker, pictured here, are excited about the new venture.
Woonsocket YMCA pool. “We took the class together and it was all downhill from there,” Matthews said while explaining he and Jerika just couldn’t seem to get enough of the sport once they started. “It’s great for couples
because you get to spend hours together but don’t have to do any talking,” he said. The view from a mask can be a stunning one depending on the condition of the ocean and the location of the dive. “There is a whole world
underwater that no one gets to see unless you scuba dive,” Matthew said. “It is relaxing and peaceful.” The sport also gives divers a chance to see objects like shipwrecks that are froze in time, he noted. “I love the
history that you can get out of it,” he said while noting he has visited wrecks like the German Uboat U853 sunk off Block Island at the end of World War II, the USS Bass, an old U.S. sub sunk by the Navy as part of weapons test-
Civic groups gear up for St. Pat’s Parade, Faces of Ireland
By DONNA KENNY KIRWAN
dkirwan@pawtuckettimes.com
focusing on something green, and nothing says green like the city's annual PAWTUCKET—One way St. Patrick's Day Parade. The parade itself, now in to get through the frigid its 32nd year, is scheduled temperatures and unwelto step off on Saturday, come “white stuff” is by March 1, at noon from Division Street near McCoy Stadium and the Jenks/JMW School. This year's grand All Readers can submit marshal will be Ray Mathieu, the longtime for• Birth Announcements mer owner of the East Side • Engagement Announcements Checker Club restaurant. • Wedding Announcements Mary Duffy Messier, a • Anniversary Announcements member of the St. Patrick's As well as email events, Day Parade Committee, said community news, Letters to the that while the parade enterEditor, submit photos and even
subscribe online at our website? www.pawtuckettimes.com
• St. Patrick’s Day Parade: Saturday, March 1, noon, Division Street • Faces of Ireland: Sunday, Feb. 16, 2 p.m., Celtic Pub, 755 Broadway
tainment has been locked in, marchers are still welcome to participate. To sign up, call Sue at (401) 578-7815. The parade will travel down Division Street and into the downtown, ending in front of Pawtucket City Hall on Roosevelt Avenue. The event always draws a crowd and this year will be
The annual “Faces of Ireland” contest will take place on Sunday, Feb. 16 at the Celtic Pub, 755 Broadway, Pawtucket, from 2 to 6 p.m. Judges will choose a male and female winner (based on applause) no exception, with marching as the 2014 “Faces of bands, bag pipers, floats, Ireland” and the winners clowns, dancers, and all will be prominently featured kinds of vehicles. “We have in the parade. three bag piper groups this The “Faces of Ireland” year, and three high school contest will also have music marching bands,” said Duffy from the Tom Lanigan Band Messier. and the Rhode Island Prior to the big day, there Professional Firefighters are a couple of other parade- Pipes and Drums as well as related events coming up. raffles, and plenty of food Wednesday, there wasn’t a seat available at any of its computer workstations, which are linked to the human resources offices of many of the state’s largest employers. Some of those whose noses were pressed against the DLT computer screens have jobs already. One of them, Caleb Pion, said he was there because he doesn’t want to become one of the statistics. Pion, 34, says he’s been working as a cashier at a discount supermarket for about two years, but he says it’s pretty obvious the company is trying to get rid of him. He says the turnover is very high where he works because the company’s tacit policy is to roll back the hours of more veteran employees who earn higher wages as they hire new workers at the minimum wage. When he started working for the company, they brought him in for over 30 hours a week. Now they’ve cut him back to 15. “It’s starting to hurt pretty bad,” said Pion. Pion says he gets some help from his father, who gets disabled veteran benefits. “But he’s struggling, too.” While the supermarket probably won’t fire him, the
(including corned beef sandwiches) and drink. Also, there will be a Grand Marshal's Reception on Friday, Feb. 28 at the Murphy's Law rIrish Pub, 2 George St., Pawtucket. At 11 a.m., before the start of the parade, there will be the 2014 “Irish 5k Race” that begins at City Hall. This event is one of three races that comprise the “Tour de Patrick” and both runners and walkers are invited to participate. For more information, visit the website: www.tourdepatrick.com. pressure to make ends meet has already forced him to start looking for another job. He says he’s looking for something in the commercial transportation industry because he’s enrolled in tractor-trailer driving school in Pawtucket. Sousa says she has been working in customer service since she was 16 years old and has extensive experience, but no one seems interested in hiring her. She’s had jobs at Dunkin’ Donuts, the AAA of Southern New England call center and the CVS Distribution Warehouse in Woonsocket. As a condition of receiving an extension of her welfare benefits recently, Sousa says she has to apply for six jobs a day for four weeks, a requirement she will fulfill shortly. She doesn’t mind – she’d be looking for a job anyway, as she has been for many, many months already. “I love working,” she says. “I don’t like being dependant on anyone. I will cover shifts, I will work double shifts, I’ll come in on a dime, but no matter how much I keep looking for a job I just can’t find anything.” Follow Russ Olivo on Twitter @russolivo animal cruelty to register in a database similar to that for a convicted sex offender. The main sponsor of the bill is Democratic State Rep. Dennis Canairo, who represents Portsmouth, Little Compton and Tiverton. Canairo cited the fact that there were currently four to five pending cases of felony animal abuse that are making their way through the courts, and said the bill would help encourage the public be on the lookout for any animal abuse taking place in their neighborhoods. John Holmes, Pawtucket's Animal Control Supervisor, has publicly indicated his support for such a law.
seasonally adjusted rate of 9.1 percent. That figure represents a filling out one job application statistical snapshot of the We accept these announcements in a number of ways: after another on computers at number of Rhode Islanders • You can Fax to 401-767-8509 the NetWORKri Career who were actively seeking • You can stop by our office Center, one of several work through December 2013, located at: “reemployment” centers which was 49,900, according 23 Exchange St., Pawtucket, RI operated by the state to DLT. • You can email Birth Department of Labor and Though the state unemAnnouncements to Training. ployment rate has improved a advertising@pawtuckettimes.com She’s come to the conclubit over the last year, Rhode • You can email Anniversaries, sion that it’s almost impossiIsland has had one of the Engagements and Weddings to ble to find a job, even one that highest unemployment rates in notices@pawtuckettimes.com only pays minimum wage. the nation for some time. • You can download a form “If I apply at Burger King In November, Rhode Island from our website: or McDonald’s, they tell me I and Nevada were tied at 9 perwww.pawtuckettimes.com have too much experience,” cent unemployment for the Simply complete the form then she says. “The places I apply mail, fax or scan to email the highest-in-the nation spot. But to that pay a little bit more say Nevada dropped to 8.8 percent announcement. I don’t have enough. I’m in December, while Rhode If you would like a copy of the stuck between a rock and a Island’s unemployment rate pdf of your announcement as it hard place.” appeared in the paper, we can edged up a tenth of a percent. She’s not alone: The U.S. provide you with that for $5.00 Nationwide, unemployBureau of Labor Statistics simply stop into The Times with ment was running at 6.7 perthe publication date and page reported Tuesday that Rhode cent in December, which was number in which your Island has the highest unem1.2 percent lower than a year announcement appeared. ployment in the nation, with a earlier. As bad as things are in Rhode Island, in Woonsocket they’re even worse. In a report released about a week ago, DLT said 10.5 percent of the city’s workforce is unemployed. At the peak of the 23 Exchange Street, Pawtucket, RI 02860 recession, about two years Newsroom fax: (401) 727-9250 ago, it was hovering in the range of 15 percent. www.pawtuckettimes.com Efforts to reach DLT e-mail: notices@pawtuckettimes.com.com Director Charles Fogarty for sports@pawtuckettimes.com.com comment on the latest jobs SUBSCRIBER SERVICES
Jobless
THE TIMES
report were not successful. But an aide e-mailed a statement from Asst. DLT Director Matthew Weldon. “This most recent report was disappointing, especially after last month’s positive report,” he said. “Unfortunately, too many Rhode Islanders continue to have difficulty finding suitable employment.” State Senator V. Susan Sosnowski of Providence says creating more jobs in Rhode Island means the state must do more to provide workers with skills that are in demand. She’s pushing a plan to free up $1.2 million a year from the general fund for training programs. “Rhode Island has a jobs crisis and addressing the skills gap needs to be our first priority,” she said in a statement. “Employers need a qualified workforce. Workers, particularly those who are unemployed and those who have been unemployed for a long period of time, need access to training programs.” Officials at the NetWORKri Center said they weren’t authorized to speak to reporters, but all that’s necessary to see how desperate people are for jobs is to look around the facility. Around mid-day
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THE TIMES
after her landlord said she wasn't allowed to have a pet. She gave police a phone Dec. 19, and a reward was number for the alleged offered for information lead- woman, but the number came ing to the arrest of the person back to a cellphone belongwho abandoned the puppy. ing to McRae, police said. Over 100 people submitted Police charged McCrae applications with the with one count each of abanPawtucket Animal Shelter to donment of animals, unnecadopt the winsome pup and essary cruelty of animals and he was eventually placed obstructing an officer in exewith a family in Lincoln. cution of duties. According On Jan. 10, Pawtucket to a court spokesman, she Police announced they had pleaded not guilty to the arrested 32-year-old Jennifer charges and was released on McRae, of Capital Street, in personal recognizance, pendconnection with the incident. ing a pre-trial conference. McCrae had come forward to Since the incident, a new police, telling them she had legislative bill is being conowned the puppy but had sidered that would require given him to another woman anyone convicted of felony
Thursday, January 30, 2014
LOCAL
BY JOSEPH B. NADEAU
jnadeau@woonsocketcall.com
THE TIMES A3
Lincoln cops nab copper thief
LINCOLN – An attentive witness helped police locate a Pawtucket man observed fleeing a vacant home at 82 Elder St. Tuesday morning after a break in which copper piping was reported stolen. Police Captain Phillip Gould said the incident came to the attention of patrol officers when the department received a report of a possible break in progress at the Elder Street residence. A man was seen walking around in the area of the boarded up home prompting the call the police, Gould said. “Patrolman Jason Bolduc made contact with the man and started speaking to him and he took off running,” Gould said. The man was holding a suitcase and when Bolduc asked him what it contained, he dropped the item and took off on foot, Gould said. The suitcase was subsequently found to contain cut up copper pipe. The suspect initially eluded Bolduc and other responding local officers but was spotted by a witness hiding under the deck of an Elder Street home. Bolduc and Patrolman Steve Tellier located David W. Veveiros, 33, of Paisley Street, Pawtucket, hiding under the deck and took him into custody without further incident, Gould said. Veveiros was charged with felony breaking and entering a house without consent in connection with the incident. Detectives investigating the break determined the residence had been entered through a side door. The suspect was alleged to have ripped out copper pipes and placed them in the suitcase. The home had been foreclosed on, police said, and the company in charge of maintaining the property was contacted and notified of the incident. The suitcase and copper piping were seized as evidence in the break, police said. Veveiros complained of back pain from a previous injury that he suspected had been re-aggravated during his flight from police and was transported by Rescue to Landmark Medical Center to be checked out, police said.
Call Photo/Ernest A. Brown
Paul Gallagher of Wesco Oil in Smithfield makes an oil delivery on Oakridge Drive in Cumberland on a frigid Wednesday. Gallagher averages 35-40 deliveries a day at this time of year. The Arctic chill is expected to last through the weekend.
Turning up the heat
Community programs helping residents stay warm this winter
BY JOSEPH B. NADEAU
PAWTUCKET — George Alessandra, 65, is a disabled retiree and counts on the state’s Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP) to help him heat his Benedict Street home through the winter. But Alessandra was getting a little worried about making it through the coldest part of the season until he received his notice of the program’s support from the Blackstone Valley Community Action Program at 32 Goff Ave. last week. It was good news for Alessandra, who had also received small deliveries of 50 gallons of oil each from Project Hope and a local church to tide him over with his own purchases from his heating oil supplier. Alessandra, who has
been disabled with a heart condition since 1992, said this year’s assistance from the state came later than usual. “It should have been in 2013 not 2014,” the resident said while noting he usually receives a response to his application for assistance much earlier. For residents like himself who get by on a limited income, the state’s heating assistance is a lifeline when the deep cold of winter arrives. Alessandra said he believes the Chafee administration took too long in providing the necessary funding for heating oil support to those who needed it. “This program helps the disabled and the handicapped, the poor and senior citizens,” he said. Although the information on the release of state funding to the program was not available from the state Department of Human Services on Wednesday, Valerie Benoit, assistant coordinator of Blackstone Valley CAP’s heating assistance program, said funding has been coming in and is
being awarded to those who qualify. “We are busy right now, but this is not our busiest time,” she said while noting applications for heating assistance usually start coming in at the end of November and are processed as the state’s financial assistance is turned over to the agency and others like it, such at the Tri-Community Action program serving residents in Glocester, Burrillville, Johnston, North Providence and Smithfield. Blackstone Valley CAP serves residents in Pawtucket, Central Falls, Cumberland, Lincoln, Woonsocket and North Smithfield. The organization also takes applications at the Woonsocket Senior Center on Social Street during business hours. Unfortunately, because of the requirements in completing applications and reviewing eligibility, obtaining heating assistance is not something that can be completed in a single day, Benoit noted. See HEAT, Page A5
WELCOME ABOARD
Submitted photo
Steven Pedro, a project manager and architect since 1981, was sworn in by Pawtucket Mayor Donald R. Grebien as a member of the City Planning Commission in a brief ceremony on Tuesday at City Hall. Pedro, of 441 Benefit St., holds a bachelor of science degree in architectural engineering technology from Wentworth Institute of Technology. He is a registered architect in five states, including Rhode Island and Massachusetts, and has worked for Pawtucket firm Ayoub Engineering since 1993.
School Committee approves drafting of RFP to aid in superintendent search
By DONNA KENNY KIRWAN
dkirwan@woonsocketcall.com
Fairlawn neighborhood meeting to discuss Pawtucket long-range plan
PAWTUCKET – The city Department of Planning & Redevelopment will hold the first in a series of neighborhood workshops on the development of Pawtucket’s 2025 Comprehensive Plan on Monday, Feb. 10, at 6 p.m. in the Smithfield Congregational Church Hall, 514 Smithfield Ave. The meeting on the socalled master plan will focus on policies and actions the city can undertake in the Fairlawn neighborhood as well as throughout Pawtucket. Planners will present a neighborhood profile and seek feedback on topics ranging from enhancing open space and recreation to improving economic development. The meeting is being held by the city in conjunction with the Fairlawn Against Crime Team (F.A.C.T.) and City Councilor Timothy Rudd, who represents the area. “Similar neighborhood meetings will be held throughout the city over the next two years, followed by general public meetings to discuss the findings,” city Planning & Redevelopment Director Barney Heath said. Following on broad goals and policies set by the State Guide Plan, municipalities are required to develop their own comprehensive plans to serve as the basis for land use regulation and to establish an implementation plan to achieve a community’s goals. The local plans, after review by the state, then become binding on state agencies by requiring conformance of their programs and projects to the local plans. Beginning in 2016, the local plans will have a 20year horizon and must be updated every 10 years. The new city master plan will be completed in 2015.
PAWTUCKET — In the wake of Schools Superintendent Deborah Cylke's announcement that she intends to retire on June 30, the school chief herself is proposing that school officials explore the cost of having a private company involved in the search for her replacement. At a special meeting held Tuesday night, the School Committee voted to approve that Finance Director Melissa Devine draft a request for proposals (RFP) to seek vendors to assist in the search process for a new school superintendent for the school district. Cylke said she knows of least four nationally known firms that handle this type of professional candidate search. She added that the
companies offer an array of services that range anywhere from advertising for the position to actively helping with such steps as screening, interviewing and assembling a list of top candidates. Cylke added that while the final decision is ultimately up to the School Committee, she suggested that bids be solicited from such vendors so the School Committee can decide whether or not to pursue any of their services. School Committee Chairman Michael Araujo said he agreed with the plan and the need to start the search process as soon as possible. “The end of June will be coming up quickly,” he noted. The School Committee did not discuss any details about forming a search committee on Tuesday
night. However, School Committeewoman Nicole Nordquist suggested that any search committee that is created have less members than the 22-person panel that was involved in Cylke's hiring. She said that while the School Committee members should, of course, be involved, the last search committee had proved to be “too cumbersome” during the process due to its size. Cylke, an educator who had worked in a leadership position with the Washoe County School District in Reno, Nevada, was hired in June of 2010 to replace former Schools Superintendent Hans Dellith. She was in the final year of a three-year contract when she gave her notice earlier this month to the School Committee that she intended to retire from her $159,000 position.
CUMBERLAND POLICE
St., at 7:02 a.m. Saturday, police said. Police also investigated a larceny at 935 Mendon Road at 6:09 p.m. Saturday. • An accident involving a town sanding truck and a vehicle owned by Lucille Caron of Gould Street was investigated on Gould Street at 8:44 p.m. Saturday. • A hit and run accident on Broad Street was reported by Justin Allen of Smithfield at 8:52 p.m. Saturday. • A larceny from a vehicle at the Rite Aid Pharmacy at 2136 Mendon Road was investigated by police at 11:49 a.m. on Monday. • Two people complained of pain following an accident at Lynch Memorial Park and Diamond Hill Road at 11:56 a.m. Monday. Robert Baglieri of Chestnut Street declined transport to the hospital, police said. Sandra Ryan of Little Pond County Road was transported by rescue to Pawtucket Memorial Hospital, police said. Both vehicles were reported heading south on Diamond Hill Road when the collision occurred, police said. • Police charged David Dumas, 21, of 6 Pleasant St., with domestic simple assault and battery and domestic disorderly conduct following a disturbance at 6 Pleasant St. at 3:06 p.m. Monday, police said. • Police also investigated a crash involving a 1997 Nissan operated by Jennifer A. Carrier of Maureen Drive, Smithfield, and a 2005 Subaru operated by Jeremy A. Chiappetta of High Ridge Drive at 301 Broad St. at 4:28 p.m. Monday.
• Police have identified a man injured in a two-vehicle crash at Mendon Road and Route 99 Friday evening as Karl Engles, 31, of Town Farm Road, Putnam. Engles was transported to Rhode Island Hospital in Providence for treatment of injuries he suffered when his 2010 Subaru Impreza and a 1988 Dodge Dakota pick-up operated by Robert W. Laperche, 52, of Vivian Avenue, collided near 4112 Mendon Road. The accident remains under investigation, police said. • In other matters, vehicles operated by Michael Rudolf of Alan Avenue and Denis Nault of Laurel Lane collided at 2275 Diamond Hill Road and 1 Industrial Drive at 6:05 p.m. Friday. • A larceny was investigated at D&B Machine, 53 John
OPINION
Page A4 THE TIMES — Thursday, January 30, 2014
PUBLISHER: Mary Lynn Bosiak
Executive Editor: Bianca Pavoncello Managing Editor: David Pepin Sports Editor: Eric Benevides Assistant Editor/News/The Call: Russ Olivo Assistant Editor/News/The Times: Donna Kenny Kirwan Controller: Kathleen Needham Circulation Manager: Jorge Olarte
Money made at others’ expense
"Sore winners" was the phrase critic John Powers came up with to describe the George W. Bush administration, but the term seems more lastingly applicable to those members of the 1 percent who decry the broad economic populism across the land. The most notoriously sore winners are those mega-wealthy investment bankers who have likened critics of economic inequality to the Nazis — most recently, Tom Perkins, founder of the venture capital group Kleiner Perkins Caufield Byers, who last week equated "the progressive war on the American one percent" to Kristallnacht. Perkins' parallel was quickly disavowed by sentient bankers, but there's a lessunhinged version of 1 percenters' resentments out there as well. In a Los Angeles Times op-ed last month, Richard Riordan (former L.A. mayor and leveraged-buyout whiz) and Eli Broad (the city's leading multibillionaire philanthropist) admitted that "the facts on income inequality are stark and disturbing" but also insisted that it isn't "a sin to be rich." Indeed, it's not. And when wealthy individuals are understood to have bettered most people's lives — as, say, Steve Jobs was — they win acclaim and even veneration. But the paths that many of today's wealthiest Americans have taken on their road to riches have not bettered most people's lives. Many have actually hurt most people's lives. Their riches have come at most other people's expense. Since the recession officially ended in June 2009, for instance, the wages for all private-sector jobs have fallen, on average, by 0.5 percent. The wages for jobs in financial services, however, have risen by 5.5 percent. Inasmuch as the recession was brought about by the financial services industry, it's understandable that this disparity would strike most people as unjust. Or consider the mechanisms by which some CEOs earn huge salaries. Last week, the board of directors of JPMorgan Chase voted to raise chief executive Jamie Dimon's annual pay to $20 million — up from $11.5 million — despite the fact that the bank paid the federal government around $20 billion last year to settle charges stemming from its multiple misdeeds. What could these directors have been thinking? Perhaps a better question: Who are these guys? As Occidental College politics professor Peter Dreier has documented, a number of CEOs sit on JPMorgan's board. They include Stephen Burke of NBCUniversal, who was paid $23.6 million in 2011; William Weldon, retired chief executive of Johnson & Johnson, paid $26.8 million in 2011; and Lee Raymond, retired chief executive of ExxonMobil, whose exit package came to at least $398 million. When CEOs are heavily represented on other CEOs' boards, voting one another stratospheric pay packages can be the order of the
GUEST COMMENTARY
By Harold Meyerson
day. It wasn't always thus. CEO pay before the 1980s didn't exceed the median pay of their employees by factors in the hundreds. Reginald Jones, chief executive of General Electric in the 1970s, made just a small fraction of what his successor, Jack Welch, raked in, though the company's growth rate under Jones exceeded that under Welch. But Welch changed the company's culture completely, laying off more than 100,000 workers and focusing on raising GE's share value, which his compensation reflected. Welch's way became the norm for CEOs, so much so that laying off workers and depressing their pay has become the key factor in boosting corporate profits in recent years. As Jan Hatzius, chief economist for Goldman Sachs, noted in predicting the continued growth of profits in 2014, "the key reason is the continued slack in the US labor market and the resulting weakness of nominal wage growth." With profits at a record high as a share of the nation's gross domestic product and wages at a record low, it's entirely proper that Americans question the legitimacy of the 1 percent's wealth. Many in that 1 percent argue that the root cause of this inequality is the nation's deficient schools. Granting that our schools could be improved, that hardly explains why the pay of bankers and CEOs has soared, or why corporations would rather buy back their own shares than give their employees raises. If the voluble members of the 1 percent wish to reclaim some legitimacy, they might become active in campaigns to raise the minimum wage and make it possible for workers to form unions without fear of being fired. After all, some CEOs have unions of their own devoted to boosting their pay: They're called corporate boards. Harold Meyerson is editor-at-large of The American Prospect.
Is the high cost of college tuition worth it?
President Obama is correct in wanting to make higher education more affordable and accessible, but Americans would also be correct in wondering just what they’re paying for. The need for a better-educated populace is beyond dispute. Without critical thinking skills and a solid background in history, the arts and sciences, how can a nation hope to govern itself? The problem isn’t only that higher education is unaffordable to many but that even at our highestranked colleges and universities, students aren’t getting much bang for Kathleen Parker their buck. Since 1985, the price of higher education has increased 538 percent, according to a new study from the American Council of Trustees and Alumni (ACTA), a nonprofit, nonpartisan research group that encourages trustees and alumni to foster improvement where institutions may be reluctant to go against popular trends. For perspective, compare tuition increases to a “mere” 286 percent increase in medical costs and a 121 percent increase in the consumer price index during the same period, according to the ACTA. Although the council confined its research in this study — “Education or Reputation?” — to the 29 top-ranked liberal-arts schools in the nation, where tuition, boarding and books typically run more than $50,000 per year, the trends highlighted are not confined to smaller, elite institutions. These include an increasing lack of academic rigor, grade inflation, high administrative costs and a lack of intellectual diversity. While these recent findings are not so surprising to those who follow such studies, one can still be stunned by what can only be described as a breach of trust between colleges and the students they attract with diversions and amenities that have little bearing on education and that will be of little use in the job market. One need only be reminded of the recent scandal at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where a whistleblower revealed that phony classes and fake grades have been offered, mostly to athletes, since the 1990s. UNC, one of the historically great institutions of higher learning quite apart from its legendary basketball team, is scrambling now to repair its damaged reputation with oversight and other fixes. But reputations, cultivated over decades and sometimes centuries, are like love — hard to repair once trust is broken. On the flip side, the ACTA proposes that many schools, rather than offering the educational quality that earned them a golden reputation in the first place, often depend on public reverence for the past rather than present performance. Of great concern is the diminishing focus on core curricula — the traditional arts and science coursework essential to developing the critical thinking necessary for civic participation. Among the 29 schools surveyed by the ACTA, only three require U.S. government or history, just two require economics and five colleges have no requirements at all. In a separate study, the National Assessment of Adult Literacy found that though Americans pay the highest per-pupil tuition rates in the world, most graduates fall below proficiency in such simple cognitive tasks as comparing viewpoints in two editorials or buying food when the price is given per ounce. Instead of the basics, students might look forward to more entertaining fare, such as Middlebury College’s “Mad Men and Mad Women,” an examination of masculinity and femininity in mid-20th-century America via the television show “Mad Men.” I confess I’d enjoy a dinner discussion along these lines, but as an education consumer, I’m not sure a semester-long investigation is worth even a tiny percentage of the tuition. ACTA President Anne Neal acknowledged that such courses may be interesting and even valuable. “What we do question, however, is allowing such classes to stand in lieu of a broad-based American history or government requirement,” she said, “when we know how severely lacking students’ historical literacy can be.” Given the ever-escalating tuition costs, one may wonder where all that money is going. Out of the 29 colleges evaluated, 22 have administrative budgets that are at least onethird of what the schools spend on instruction. More than a third of the college presidents earn as much or more than the president of the United States ($400,000) for running these schools, many of which have fewer than 2,000 students. Other findings of the 46-page report are equally compelling but too lengthy for this space. Summed up: American students are paying too much for too little — and this, too, should concern Obama as he examines ways to make college more affordable. Getting people into college is only half the battle. Getting them out with a useful education seems an equal challenge. Read more from Kathleen Parker’s archive, follow her on Twitter or find her on Facebook.
Notable Quotables
REACTION TO PRESIDENT OBAMA’S STATE OF THE UNION SPEECH:
“The real answer is for Obama to refocus his priorities and work with us on the things that we can achieve together to create jobs and promote greater opportunity.” — Republican House Speaker John Boehner. “Too many people are falling further and further behind because, right now, the president's policies are making people's lives harder.” — Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers said in the Republicans' official response. “The president will take action where in fact he thinks it will spur action in the state or in Congress. We're just not going to sit around and wait for the Congress if they choose not to act.” —Vice President Joseph Biden. “It's a big step in the right direction that President Obama is sounding more like Elizabeth Warren. said. It's not too little too late, but it's certainly late in his presidency that Obama is recognizing this economic populist tide.” —Adam Green, co-founder of the Progressive Change Campaign Committee, a Washington-based liberal group. “If the president is to have any credibility in talking about living wages, he needs to get his own house in order first and do everything in his power to establish $10.10 as the minimum wage for all federal hourly workers,” — J. David Cox, president of the American Federation of Government Employees. “The President gave a strong speech that emphasized the need to translate the wishes of the American public into real legislative accomplishments. The American people want to see expansion of our economy; investments in infrastructure; making work pay by increasing the minimum wage; boosting homegrown energy; reforming our immigration system; and ensuring that those that are looking sincerely for work receive unemployment insurance benefits.” — U.S. Senator Jack Reed (D-RI). “Tonight, President Obama laid out a clear set of proposals that will help strengthen the middle class, grow our economy, and ensure that all Americans who play by the rules have an equal opportunity to succeed.” — U.S. Congressman David N. Cicilline (D-RI).
The Associated Press/The Times
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Thursday, January 30, 2014
OBITUARIES/STATE
Privacy
provisions in the bill that would allow employers to seek access to the site of there Continued from page A1 is any suspected wrongdoing “As a country, we are start- on the part of the employee ing to get away from the pri- that could be demonstrated by vate aspects of individuals’ what is posted on a social lives,” Senate Majority media site. Leader Dominick Ruggerio, Kennedy said Wednesday sponsor of a bill that would that “If an individual puts prohibit employers and edusomething behind a firewall, cational institutions from there is a reason they want it demanding that such informa- behind a firewall, so the tion be turned over, said whole world is not reading Wednesday. “I just think it is what they place there.” an issue of personal privacy.” He also issued a written Ruggerio, who represents statement saying, “As more parts of North Providence and and more people use social Providence in the Senate, said media sites, it becomes even the ACLU requested that he more important that we have and Rep. Brian Patrick laws in place to ensure their Kennedy, sponsor of the privacy and prevent outside House version, submit the bill parties – such as employers again this year. and universities – from A similar bill passed in the requiring access to that perHouse last year and won sonal information. approval from the Senate “This legislation is not givJudiciary Committee last year, ing anyone a right to privacy but Ruggerio blamed a lastover the parts of social media minute snafu in end-of-sesthat are unsecured,” Kennedy sion legislative rush for it not explained, “but there is a disbeing passed by the Senate. tinct line between readily Ruggerio, who is adminis- accessible portions of social trator of the New England media pages and other inforLaborers Labor Management mation, such as passwords Co-op Trust and an officer of and one-on-one communicathe Rhode Island Laborers tion, that an individual does District Council, affiliates of not intend to be widely shared the Laborers International or made public.” Union, said he does not see “We need to spell out that the issue as a labor-managethat right to privacy is very ment question, since it also clear in our laws, especially includes educational institutoday, when there are contions, but one of privacy.” cerns that an individual’s priRuggerio said there are vacy may be more and more under attack,” he added. “If social media accounts have information or postings that an individual has created to remain private, then this information should remain private as the user meant it to be and only read or seen by those individuals the user intended.” “Even in an age of rampant social media and instant access to most everything,” Ruggerio noted, “individuals have a right to share their personal thoughts with whom they choose,” said Majority Leader Ruggerio. “There must be a presumption of privacy in certain areas of social media interaction, and account holders – whether students applying to a new school or job applicants – should not be threatened or coerced into providing certain private information. This legislation reaffirms that as an individual’s right.” In testimony given on the bills last year, the RI ACLU said, “As social media use becomes ubiquitous, so does the amount of information transmitted through and contained on these social media websites. Students and employees have a right to privacy in their non-work or non-school time, and that right extends to the passwordprotected information they have online. Just as no employer or school official has the right to access an employee or student’s personal mail at their home, they should not be able to access any information not intended to be viewed by the public at large. Neither should they have access to the personal information of an employee or student’s friends and family members, as they do when accessing a social media account. Further, accessing a protected social media site may expose significant information about an applicant which potential employers are currently not permitted to ask during a job interview, including the age and religion of an applicant. Access to this information may result in discrimination against an applicant, and a lawsuit against an employer.” The language of the legislation includes the following protections: • No educational institution can require, coerce or request a student or prospective student to disclose the password or any other means of accessing a personal social media account, or to access an account in the presence of the institution’s employee or representative or to divulge any personal account information. • No educational institution could compel a student or prospective student, as a condition of acceptance, to add anyone (coach, teacher, administrator or other school
THE TIMES A5
employee or volunteer) to their list of contacts associated with a personal social media account • No educational institution could discharge, discipline or otherwise penalize a student for refusing to disclose social media information. • No employer can require, coerce or request an employee or applicant to disclose the password or any other means of accessing a personal social media account, or to access an account in the presence of the institution’s employee or representative or to divulge any personal account information. • No employer could compel an employee or applicant, to divulge any personal social media account information except when reasonably believed to be relevant to an investigation of allegations of employee misconduct or workplace-related violation of applicable laws and regulations. • No educational institution could discharge, discipline or otherwise penalize an employee or refuse to hire an applicant for refusing to disclose social media information. The bills have been referred to the Judiciary Committees of the House and Senate. Follow Jim Baron on Twitter @Jim_Baron
ACLU opposes flu vaccine plan for Rhode Island preschoolers
ERIKA NIEDOWSKI
Associated Press
Heat
Continued from Page A3 “If someone comes in today and wants oil today, it is not that fast,” she said. Typically, a resident applying for assistance this week would be able to qualify if eligible and have their request for assistance submitted to the state for a funding award with confirmation the following week, she explained. Once the award is made, Blackstone Valley CAP notifies the resident’s designated supplier and also the customer so a delivery can be scheduled. If an applicant is denied under the income guidelines of $21,105 for a single person household, $27,600 for a two person household or $34,000 for three people, there are other options for assistance they can pursue, Benoit noted. “They can apply to the Salvation Army if they are denied, and the Diocese of Providence also has a “keep the heat” program providing 50 gallons of assistance to someone in need,” she said. Those in need of assistance can call the Community Action Program covering their community and request an application or schedule an appointment to meet with a caseworker to fill one out, according to Benoit. To contact Blackstone Valley CAP in Pawtucket, call 723-0227 and the program’s representative in Woonsocket at 765-3258. The residents of northwestern Rhode Island can contact Tri-Town Community Action at 351-2750, ext. 1117.
5th ANNIVERSARY
PROVIDENCE — The Rhode Island chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union is opposing a proposed state health department regulation that would require annual flu immunizations for children up to age 5 and would keep those with medical exemptions out of school or day care during flu outbreaks. The group called the regulation a "serious intrusion" on the ability of families to make their own health care decisions. "While we understand the frustration of public health officials who have been unable to convince parents to willingly vaccinate their children against influenza, state intervention in the medical decisions of families must be limited and rare," ACLU policy associate Hillary Davis
said at a hearing this month. Under the draft rule, annual influenza vaccination would be mandatory for all children between 6 months and 59 months before entering public or private preschool or day care programs. Even students deemed exempt from the vaccination requirement for medical or religious reasons would be forced to stay home during an outbreak of flu. Health Department spokesman Jim Palmer said Wednesday the agency is looking out for public health. "It's difficult sometimes, if you decide not to vaccinate your children, but that can't be a threat to the greater community," he said. Schools already require multiple vaccinations, including for mumps and measles, chickenpox and hepatitis B, among other diseases.
“It’s just not appropriate for the Department of Health to be saying this is a required vaccination.”
HILLARY DAVIS
ACLU policy associate
Davis said vaccines should be mandatory only when they reliably prevent the illness and when an unvaccinated child poses a high risk of infecting peers at school or day care. She noted the efficacy of the flu vaccine varies from year to year and that its protection is not lasting. "It's an annual vaccine that doesn't always work," Davis said in an interview
Wednesday. "It's just not appropriate for the Department of Health to be saying this is a required vaccination." The proposed regulation says children exempt from the vaccination requirement shall be excluded from school for however long the health department decides based on a case-by-case analysis of public health risk. Davis said that could mean some unvaccinated children are kept home for weeks. Workers in preschools and day care programs would also be required to be vaccinated against flu under the proposed rule. The health department in 2012 made flu vaccinations for health care workers mandatory. Those who do not get the shot, including for medical reasons, are required to wear a surgical mask during periods when
the state health director deems flu to be "widespread." A union representing health care workers challenged the policy in court, saying no medical evidence exists that vaccinating workers protects patients or that masks inhibit the transmission of flu. The lawsuit was later withdrawn. The health department has also proposed mandating the human papillomavirus vaccine series beginning with students entering seventh grade. The vaccine protects against cervical cancer and genital warts; the virus is passed through sexual contact.
VIEW OBITUARIES ONLINE AT pawtuckettimes.com
Former RI Housing deputy director sues over firing
ERIKA NIEDOWSKI
Associated Press
PROVIDENCE — The former deputy director of Rhode Island Housing sued the agency on Wednesday, claiming she was wrongfully fired over a probe she says uncovered financial irregularities involving federal funds at the Urban League of Rhode Island. Gayle Corrigan filed the suit in U.S. District Court, alleging breach of contract and a violation of a law protecting whistleblowers, among other things. The complaint also names the agency's director, Richard Godfrey. "No one should lose their
job for raising legitimate questions about how taxpayer money is being spent, especially when the organization they work for has a mandate to operate with transparency and fairness," Corrigan said in a statement. She said Rhode Island Housing "fell down on the job and tried to sweep its failings and those of its partner organization under the rug." Corrigan is seeking double back pay, other damages and to be reinstated. The Urban League was drawing down federal housing grant funds from Rhode Island Housing to operate the Safe Haven homeless shelter in Pawtucket. Corrigan began
investigating the Urban League's requests for money after hearing of alleged financial irregularities, she has said. The shelter had numerous problems, including employees who went unpaid for months and no heat.
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PRESENTS YOUR COMMUNITY CALENDAR
Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday
26
Cumberland
• Widow support group meets every Sunday — the first two Sundays of the month are at the Community Chapel on Diamond Hill Rd. The second two are at Emerald Bay Manor, Diamond Hill Road. All meetings 2 p.m. Call 401-333-5815.
27
Central Falls
•Forand Manor holds Bingo every Monday and Wednesday, starting at 5:15 p.m.
28
Pawtucket
• The Leon Mathieu Senior Center and Shri Studio have partnered to offer a “Yoga for Seniors” on Tuesday mornings from 9:30am-10:30am at Shri Studio, 21 Broad Street. The fee for Leon Mathieu Senior Center members is $5 per person per month. 728-7582.
29
North Smithfield
•Public flu clinic from 6 to 9 p.m. at North Smithfield High School, Greenvill Road. The North Smithfield Emergency Management Agency is seeking volunteers to assist. Call Peter Branconnier at 767-2260.
30
Woonsocket
• Written Word Writing Group Thursdays, 7:15 p.m. at Harris Public Library. An outlet for adult writers of all leanings: poetry, journaling, prose, short story, sermon, comedy, script writing, puppets. No critiquing. All are welcome and there is no charge.
31
Burrillville
• Pascoag Council, 383, Knights of Columbus Friday Night Bingo at the Columbus Club, 98 Roosevelt Ave. Games begin at 6:20 p.m.; doors open at 4:30 p.m.
1 February
Providence
• Festival Ballet’s chatterBOXtheatre presents “Peter and the Wolf” at 4 p.m. at FBP Black Box Theatre, 825 Hope St. Tickets: $15/children under 12, $25/adults. Call 3531129 or email info@festivalballetprovidence.org.
Bellingham
• Reading with Indy, 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Bellingham Public Library. Indy, a certified reading therapy dog will be at the library on Mondays. Please register only one time per month.
Woonsocket
• Our Saviour’s Church, 500 Smithfield Road, will hold a meat raffle. Doors open at 6:15 p.m. A free light supper with coffee and dessert will be served. Raffle begins at 7 p.m. There will also be split-the-pot, a gift card raffle, a penny social and consolation prizes. Call Pat at 766-5998 for information.
Woonsocket
• Annual Catholic Schools Week Mass, 10 a.m. at St. Joseph Church, 1200 Mendon Road. Public invited. Open house, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Monsignor Gadoury Catholic Regional School, grades pre-K to 2, Park Avenue, and Good Shepherd Catholic Regional School, grades 3 to 8, 1210 Mendo Road. Call 762-1095 for information.
Burrillville
•Valentine’s Day Floral and Craft Workshop, 1 p.m. at the Burrillville Community Recreation Center, 50 Lodge Road, Pascoag. $10 materials fee. Contact the Parks and Recreation at 568-9470 or email parksandrec@burrillville.org to pre-register.
West Warwick
• 38th annual Cranston Sports Collectors Show at the West Valley Inn, 4 Blossom St., from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., sponsored by the St. Joseph Men’s Guild of Immaculate Conception Parish. Admission is $3.
West Warwick
• Monthly meeting of the Sampson Air Force Base Veterans, 1 p.m. All Air Force veterans, especially Sampson AFB vets, are welcome. The Squadron holds monthly meetings on the fouth Tuesday of each month at Pinelli’s Italian Cafe, 107 Quaker Lane.
Pawtucket
• The Major Walter G. Gatchell VFW Post #306 will hold a spaghetti and meatball dinner fundraiser from 4 to 7 p.m. at the post home, 171 Fountain St. Cost is $8 per person at the door.
Woonsocket
• The monthly meeting of the Knights of Columbus Woonsocket council will be held at 7 p.m. in the All Saints Church Hall on Rathbun Street.
Lincoln
• Four-week watercolor class at the Lincoln Public Library, taught by local artist Jerry Aissis, Jan. 17, Feb. 3, 10 and 24 from 6 to 8 p.m. Fee is $80 plus supplies, and is expected at time of registration. Class size is limited to 10. Register at the reference desk.
Blackstone
•The newly formed BMR Alumni and Friends Band meets at 6:30 at BMR High School every Wednesday. All Blackstone Valley residents of all ages and experience are welcome. For details call 508-883-1291.
East Providence
• Introduction to Homeschooling, 6:30 p.m. at the Riverside Branch Library, 475 Bullocks Point Ave. Sponsored b ENRICHri. Free and open to all. No registration required.
Pawtucket
• Art appreciation program at the Leon Mathieu Seinor Center, 1 p.m. Art educator Toba Weintraub will be the guest speaker. Light refreshments. Free and open to people 55 and older. 728-7582 for information.
Lincoln
• The Cumberland Public Library invites families with young children to Take Your Child to the Library Day, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. This is a drop-in event that will include an opportunity to have your child’s picture taken with Scooby Doo as well as a makeand-take craft session. This special program will take place from 10 am to 1 pm.
Cumberland
• TOPS Club (Take Off Pounds Sensibly) meets every Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. at Filibuster Club, 25 High St. Visitors are always welcome (preteens, teens, adults, male and female). First meeting is free.
2
Cumberland
• Widow support group meets every Sunday — the first two Sundays of the month are at the Community Chapel on Diamond Hill Rd. The second two are at Emerald Bay Manor, Diamond Hill Road. All meetings 2 p.m. Call 401-333-5815.
3
Central Falls
•Forand Manor holds Bingo every Monday and Wednesday, starting at 5:15 p.m.
4
Pawtucket
• The Leon Mathieu Senior Center and Shri Studio have partnered to offer a “Yoga for Seniors” on Tuesday mornings from 9:30am-10:30am at Shri Studio, 21 Broad Street. The fee for Leon Mathieu Senior Center members is $5 per person per month. 728-7582.
5
Central Falls
• Forand Manor holds Bingo every Monday and Wednesday, starting at 5:15 p.m.
6
Woonsocket
• Written Word Writing Group Thursdays, 7:15 p.m. at Harris Public Library. An outlet for adult writers of all leanings: poetry, journaling, prose, short story, sermon, comedy, script writing, puppets. No critiquing. All are welcome and there is no charge.
7
Burrillville
• Pascoag Council, 383, Knights of Columbus Friday Night Bingo at the Columbus Club, 98 Roosevelt Ave. Games begin at 6:20 p.m.; doors open at 4:30 p.m.
8
Woonsocket
• Valentine’s Dinner Dance will be held at the Elks Hall, Social St., 6 to 11 p.m. All proceeds to benefit Elks Club #850 and Emblem Club #27 charities. Tickets $15 per person available at the Elks Lodge or by calling Helene at 765-1036.
Bellingham
• Reading with Indy, 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Bellingham Public Library. Indy, a certified reading therapy dog will be at the library on Mondays. Please register only one time per month.
Woonsocket
•Harris Public Library hosts Creative Writing Group Wednesdays, 7:30 p.m. •St. James Episcopal Church, 24 Hamlet Ave., hosts a free concert by the African Children’s Choir at 7 p.m.The public is welcome.
Lincoln
• A three-week Computer Basics Workshop will be held on Fridays Feb. 7, 14 & 28 from 1 to 2 p.m. at the Lincoln Public Library. This class is an orientation to computers for those who haven’t spent much time using computers. Call the Reference Desk to register @ 333-2422 ext. 17. Class is limited to 10 students.
Providence
• Festival Ballet’s chatterBOXtheatre presents “Peter and the Wolf” at 1 and 4 p.m. at FBP Black Box Theatre, 825 Hope St. Tickets: $15/children under 12, $25/adults. Call 353-1129 or email info@festivalballetprovidence.org.
Pawtucket
• Valentine drop-in craft program at the Pawtucket Public Library, 2:30 to 4 p.m. Children of all ages invited to make Valentines. No registration for this free program.
Cumberland
• TOPS Club (Take Off Pounds Sensibly) meets every Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. at Filibuster Club, 25 High St. Visitors are always welcome (preteens, teens, adults, male and female). First meeting is free.
Pawtucket
• St. Teresa Church Seniors meet at 1 p.m., followed by refreshments. New members, 55 and older, are welcome and may sign up at the meeting. Annual dues are $10 and meetings are held in the church hall, 358 Newport Ave.
Lincoln
• Four-week watercolor class at the Lincoln Public Library, taught by local artist Jerry Aissis, Jan. 17, Feb. 3, 10 and 24 from 6 to 8 p.m. Fee is $80 plus supplies, and is expected at time of registration. Class size is limited to 10. Register at the reference desk.
Blackstone
•The newly formed BMR Alumni and Friends Band meets at 6:30 at BMR High School every Wednesday. All Blackstone Valley residents of all ages and experience are welcome. For details call 508-883-1291.
Providence
• Festival Ballet’s chatterBOXtheatre presents “Peter and the Wolf” at 4 p.m. at FBP Black Box Theatre, 825 Hope St. Tickets: $15/children under 12, $25/adults. Call 3531129 or email info@festivalballetprovidence.org.
Seekonk
• The Kiwanis Club of Greater Seekonk presents the 18th Taste of the Towns, 6 to 9 p.m. at the Pawtucket Country Club, 900 Armistice Blvd. Tickets are $25. For more information call Edith Krekoriane at (508) 3368130.
Attleboro
• The P.E.A.L. Club will meet at noon at Morin’s Restaurant, 16 South Main St., folllowed by lunch.There will be a board meeting at 11 a.m. Members are asked to bring in Valentine’s themed items for the raffle. Call John at (508) 222-2541 for information.
9
Woonsocket
• Ranger Talk lecture series being held at the Museum of Work & Culture, 1:30 p.m. Author Norman Desmarais will speak on George Washington’s Ghost Army. Free event. Public invited.
10
Central Falls
•Forand Manor holds Bingo every Monday and Wednesday, starting at 5:15 p.m.
11
Lincoln
• The Northern Rhode Island Chamber of Commerce will host its 23rd annual dinner at the Twin River Event Center, 100 Twin River Road. Cocktails at 5:30, dinner at 6:30. Keynote speaker will be Neil Steinberg, president/CEO of the Rhode Island Foundation. For information or to register visit www.nrichamber.com or call 334-1000.
12
Woonsocket
•The Woonsocket Knights of Columbus Council 113 will host an open house social meeting at 7 p.m. at All Saints Church Hall, Rathbun St. There will be a guest speaker.
13
Woonsocket
• Written Word Writing Group Thursdays, 7:15 p.m. at Harris Public Library. An outlet for adult writers of all leanings: poetry, journaling, prose, short story, sermon, comedy, script writing, puppets. No critiquing. All are welcome and there is no charge. • Sacred Heart Church, 415 Olo St., will hold a Holy Hour for those who are sick, at 6:30 p.m. There will be Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament, a short reflection, recitation of the Rosary and the Divine Mercy Chaplet, concluding with Benediction. Confession will also be available.
14 Valentine’s Day 15
Lincoln
• A three-week Computer Basics Workshop will be held on Fridays Feb. 7, 14 & 28 from 1 to 2 p.m. at the Lincoln Public Library. Call the Reference Desk to register @ 333-2422 ext. 17. Class is limited to 10 students.
Providence
• Festival Ballet’s chatterBOXtheatre presents “Peter and the Wolf” at 4 p.m. at FBP Black Box Theatre, 825 Hope St. Tickets: $15/children under 12, $25/adults. Call 3531129 or email info@festivalballetprovidence.org.
Bellingham
• Reading with Indy, 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Bellingham Public Library. Indy, a certified reading therapy dog will be at the library on Mondays. Please register only one time per month.
Cumberland
• Widow support group meets every Sunday — the first two Sundays of the month are at the Community Chapel on Diamond Hill Rd. The second two are at Emerald Bay Manor, Diamond Hill Road. All meetings 2 p.m. Call 401-333-5815.
Northbridge
•The Blackstone Valley Coin and Collectables Club will host a coin show at Brians Restaurant from 3 to 8 p.m.
Pawtucket
• Valentines Dinner, hosted by the Major Walter G. Gatchell VFW Post 306, 171 Fountain St., 7 p.m. Tickets must be purchased by Feb. 5 and are $20 per person. For tickets visit the post Saturdays after 4 p.m. or call Sue Bourgault, 721-5399. • Valentine’s Cupid Ball Pink Tie Event, 6 to 11 p.m. at Center By The Blackstone, 175 Main St. For tickets and details, 724-2200.
Northbridge
• Morning of brush clearing and trash removal along the canal and trails of the Blackstone River and Canal Heritage State Park, sponsored by the Blackstone Canal Conservancy. Meet at 9 a.m. at Plummer’s Landing west parking area on Church Street.
Lincoln
• Four-week watercolor class at the Lincoln Public Library, taught by local artist Jerry Aissis, Jan. 17, Feb. 3, 10 and 24 from 6 to 8 p.m. Fee is $80 plus supplies, and is expected at time of registration. Class size is limited to 10. Register at the reference desk.
Pawtucket
• The Leon Mathieu Senior Center and Shri Studio have partnered to offer a “Yoga for Seniors” on Tuesday mornings from 9:30am-10:30am at Shri Studio, 21 Broad Street. The fee for Leon Mathieu Senior Center members is $5 per person per month. 728-7582.
Lincoln
•The Lincoln Garden Club meeting will be held from 1-3 p.m. at the Chapel Street Congregational Church,185 Chapel St. For additional information contact: (401) 7264772.
Woonsocket
• How to Sell on Ebay, Woonsocket Harris Public Library, 2 p.m., presented by the Woonsocket Historical Society. Rain date, Feb. 22.
Cumberland
• TOPS Club (Take Off Pounds Sensibly) meets every Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. at Filibuster Club, 25 High St. Visitors are always welcome (preteens, teens, adults, male and female). First meeting is free.
Blackstone
•The newly formed BMR Alumni and Friends Band meets at 6:30 at BMR High School every Wednesday. All Blackstone Valley residents of all ages and experience are welcome. For details call 508-883-1291.
16
Woonsocket
• Mardi Gras Queen Coroniation, Our Lady Queen of Martyrs Parish Hall, 1 to 3 p.m.
17
Central Falls
•Forand Manor holds Bingo every Monday and Wednesday, starting at 5:15 p.m.
18
Blackstone
• The Blackstone Valley Coin and Collectables Club will hold its monthly meeting at 7 p.m. in the lower level of the Blackstone Town Hall. Anyone interested in attending is welcome. Questions? Call Mike, 774-280-4333.
19
Central Falls
• Forand Manor holds Bingo every Monday and Wednesday, starting at 5:15 p.m.
20
Lincoln
• Vietnam Veterans of America – James Michael Ray Memorial Chapter #818, will meet at 7 p.m. at the Lincoln Senior Center, 150 Jenckes Hill Road. Come at 6 p.m. and have dinner with us. All Vietnam Veterans welcome. For more information call Joe Gamache at 401-651-6060.
21
Burrillville
• Pascoag Council, 383, Knights of Columbus Friday Night Bingo at the Columbus Club, 98 Roosevelt Ave. Games begin at 6:20 p.m.; doors open at 4:30 p.m.
22
Woonsocket
• Mardi Gras, St. Ann Arts and Cultural Center, 5:30 to 11:30 p.m. Music provided by Jeff Gamache and Runaway Train and Slipper sneakers. Full Cajuj buffet. Prizes for best costumes. Tickets are $30 in advance by calling 762-9072, or at the door (limited amount) for $35. NRICA.org.
Cumberland
• Widow support group meets every Sunday — the first two Sundays of the month are at the Community Chapel on Diamond Hill Rd. The second two are at Emerald Bay Manor, Diamond Hill Road. All meetings 2 p.m. Call 401-333-5815.
Bellingham
• Reading with Indy, 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Bellingham Public Library. Indy, a certified reading therapy dog will be at the library on Mondays. Please register only one time per month.
Woonsocket
•Harris Public Library hosts Creative Writing Group Wednesdays, 7:30 p.m.
Pawtucket
• The Leon Mathieu Senior Center and Shri Studio have partnered to offer a “Yoga for Seniors” on Tuesday mornings from 9:30am-10:30am at Shri Studio, 21 Broad Street. The fee for Leon Mathieu Senior Center members is $5 per person per month. 728-7582.
Blackstone
•The newly formed BMR Alumni and Friends Band meets at 6:30 at BMR High School every Wednesday. All Blackstone Valley residents of all ages and experience are welcome. For details call 508-883-1291.
Woonsocket
• The Knights of Columbus General Moylan Assembly meets at 7 p.m. at All Saints Parish Hall, 323 Rathbun St.
Woonsocket
• Written Word Writing Group Thursdays, 7:15 p.m. at Harris Public Library. An outlet for adult writers of all leanings: poetry, journaling, prose, short story, sermon, comedy, script writing, puppets. No critiquing. All are welcome and there is no charge.
Smithfield
• Smith-Appleby House tours, 1 to 4 p.m., featuring demonstrations of Colonial life and fun activities for families and kids, each Saturday afternoon through March. Admission is $5 per adult and children 12 and under are free. (401) 2317363, smithapplebyhouse.org/calendar.
Providence
• Festival Ballet’s chatterBOXtheatre presents “Peter and the Wolf” at 1 p.m. at FBP Black Box Theatre, 825 Hope St. Tickets: $15/children under 12, $25/adults. Call 3531129 or email info@festivalballetprovidence.org.
Cumberland
• TOPS Club (Take Off Pounds Sensibly) meets every Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. at Filibuster Club, 25 High St. Visitors are always welcome (preteens, teens, adults, male and female). First meeting is free.
Send your community events to notices@pawtuckettimes.com
Thursday, January 30, 2014
ENTERTAINMENT
THE TIMES A7
Get ready to laugh
Neil Simon’s ‘Laughter on the 23rd Floor’ opens at OSTC
Legendary DJ Carter Alan, right, is pictured with Aerosmith frontman Steven Tyler.
Legendary DJ Carter Alan to be at Chan’s
WOONSOCKET — Carter Alan, WZLX and WBCN legendary DJ, will be making a special appearance at Chan's Restaurant, 267 Main St., signing his new book “Radio Free Boston: The Rise and Fall of WBCN” on Monday, Feb. 3, from 6 to 8 p.m. Alan's critically acclaimed book on the history of Boston's premiere rock station WBCN will be available for purchase. Listen to Alan's show weekdays 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on 100.7 WZLX. He also hosts “Sunday Morning Blues,” Sundays 9 a.m. to noon. After the book signing, enjoy an inspired blend of blues, R&B, soul and roadhouse rock with Tommy Castro and the Painkillers. Award-winning guitarist, singer, songwriter Castro has been nominated as B.B. King Entertainer of the Year and Contemporary Blues Male Artist of the Year. He will be celebrating the release of his new CD, “The Devil You Know.” Shows will be performed at 8 and 10 p.m. The cost is $25 for the first show, $20 for the second, or $28 for both. Also performing this weekend at Chan’s are:
WARWICK — Ocean State Theatre Company, which recently launched its first full season in its new state-of-the-art theatre in Warwick, is proud to present Neil Simon’s Broadway hit, “Laughter on the 23rd Floor” no through Feb. 16. Chaos is king backstage at “The Max Prince Show,” a popular 1950s comedy-variety TV series. The stress of slipping ratings is eating Max alive, but his harried writing staff frantically scrambles to top each other with gags, while competing for the attention of the star madman. Inspired by the playwright's youthful experience as a staff writer on Sid Caesar's “Your Show of Shows,” Neil Simon re-creates the mayhem, neuroses, nonstop gags and constant one-upmanship of a team of brilliantly funny social misfits. Contains adult language. Ocean State Theatre Company is thrilled to welcome Brad Van Grack, a well-known actor/director/writer on the Washington, D.C. theatre scene, who will be making his directing debut with
OSTC. Van Grack has been a long-time member of The Capitol Steps, a musicalpolitical satire group, for which he was named by Playbill Online as Best Featured Actor in a Musical Off-Broadway. Trinity Repertory Company’s Fred Sullivan, Jr., who recently won rave reviews for his portrayal as Scrooge in Trinity Rep’s “A Christmas Carol,” will star as Max Prince. He will be joined by Producing Artistic Director Amiee Turner, who will be making her Ocean State Theatre debut as the lone female writer, Carol Wyman. “Laughter on the 23rd Floor” will be presented at Ocean State through Feb. 16,
Photo/Ocean State Theatre Company
The cast of Neil Simon’s Broadway hit “Laughter on the 23rd Floor” at Ocean State Theatre in Warwick takes a break from rehearsal to ham it up for the camera.
Wednesday (except Feb. 5) through Saturday evenings at 7:30 p.m., with matinees on Thursdays (except Feb. 13), Saturdays at 2 p.m. (except Feb. 15) and Sundays at 2 p.m. The new post show Piano Bar Series, will contin-
ue with “My Funny Valentine” and will be held following Friday and Saturday evening performances, beginning at approximately 9:45 p.m., in the theatre’s lobby on Feb. 7, 8, 14 and 15.
The theatre is located at 1245 Jefferson Blvd, Warwick. Tickets are $34$49 and are on sale at the box office, online at www.OceanStateTheatre.org or by calling (401) 9216800.
Blackstone River Theatre ‘The John Denver Experience’ comes to the presents Ken Lyon and Stadium Theatre Saturday the Maui Night Hawks
CUMBERLAND — Blackstone River Theatre will present an evening with Ken Lyon and the Maui Night Hawks on Saturday at 8 p.m. In 2012, Ken Lyon became the first inductee into the Rhode Island Music Hall of Fame. A Lincoln resident, Lyon has recorded for five major labels – Dot, Epic, Decca, MCA, and Columbia – as well as half a dozen independent companies. Whether on the road Photo courtesy of Blackstone River Theatre with the legendary Ken Lyon performs at Blackstone River Theatre in Tombstone Blues Band Cumberland Saturday at 8 p.m. opening for Queen, Aerosmith, Elton John, tional renown. Like Ken, Chris Albert Collins, James Cotton, and lived on the Hawaiian Islands for many others, or playing on someseveral years, and his Hawaiian one’s back porch, Ken has brought pedal-steel guitar talents began his huge repertoire of traditional, while living in the Aloha State. blues, and original songs to audiMike Gornstein completes this ences for more than five decades. power trio with driving percussion Lyon will perform a solo set of skills that he honed while playing acoustic folk and blues before with national touring bands for 30 bringing out his new band, The years. Maui Night Hawks, who perform The theatre is located at 549 Americana songs including counBroad St., Cumberland. Admission try, blues, swing, jazz, and blueis $12 in advance and $15 on the grass. Joining Lyon will be Chris day of the show. For reservations Brooks, a country, blues, and jazz call Blackstone River Theatre at pedal-steel player, who is a world (401) 725-9272 or visit www.rivertraveler and a musician of internafolk.org for information. WOONSOCKET — The Stadium Theatre presents “The John Denver Experience” by Chris Collins and the Boulder Canyon Band on Saturday at 8 p.m. During the 1970s, John Denver was the most popular entertainer in the world. He sold more albums for RCA than any other artist in their history. But to say he was an icon would be to sell him short. Denver was also a voice for the environment and a leader in global problem solving. There was something in Denver's music that transcended great melodies and poetic lyrics into an underlying sense of the human condition, and the longing we all feel for love and home. Chris Collins exhibits some of the same dynamic qualities that made John Denver so popular. Collins is an accomplished guitarist and vocalist. But besides having a vocal tone and natural delivery close to Denver's, Collins is a natural entertainer who has an uncanny ability to deliver John's music with authenticity and musical integrity. Musicians from John Denver's band have joined Collins in his concerts in Aspen and other locations. Collins and Jim Connor, songwriter of “Grandma's Feather Bed,” have written and recorded new music together. Collins has also performed with Cassandra Denver. He has twice been a regional
Friday, Jan. 31, 8 p.m. Who: Commander Cody What: Blues/Rock Cost: $20
Saturday, Feb. 1, 8 p.m. Who: Debra Mann. Join jazz vocalist/pianist Debra Mann in her annual birthday tribute to Antonio Carlos Jobim. What: Jazz Cost: $15
Photo courtesy of the Stadium Theatre
Chris Collins will perform ‘The John Denver Experience’ at the Stadium Theatre on Saturday.
For more information about entertainment at Chan’s, visit chanseggrollsandjazz.com.
Festival Ballet presents ‘Peter and the Wolf’
PROVIDENCE — Festival Ballet’s chatterBOXtheatre will present “Peter and the Wolf,” from Feb. 1-16 at FBP Black Box Theatre, 825 Hope St., Providence The popular chatterBOXtheatre series returns with one of its most popular productions. “Peter and the Wolf” is set to Prokofiev’s famously interactive score in which each instrument represents a character. In this adaptation, the dance mirrors the music with each character bringing a different, uniquely appropriate style of dance to the choreography. Showtimes are Feb. 1 at 4 p.m.; Feb. 2 at 1 and 4 p.m.; Feb. 8 at 4 p.m.; Feb. 15 at 4 p.m.; and Feb. 16 at 1 p.m. Tickets are $15 for children under 12 and $25 for adults. Call (401) 353-1129 or email info@festivalballet.org for tickets and information.
finalist at the Kerrville Folk Festival, the most prestigious songwriting competition in the U.S. He is also the recipient of the Golden Eagle award for community service in Aspen. Collins’ concerts, have been sought after by private and non-profit organizations. The show will be held at The Stadium Theatre in Woonsocket. Admission is $26 and $31. Tickets are available at the Stadium Theatre box office, by calling 401762-4545 and online at www.stadiumtheatre.com.
Some of our favorite photos include our loving pets! The Call is publishing
every Monday beginning on April 1st, 2013. Give your furry friend a day in the spotlight! We encourage our readers to grab your camera and capture your furry friends in pictures. All photo entries are FREE of charge. It’s our pleasure to feature your furry friends weekly.
Please be sure to submit the highest quality photos possible. PDF copies of your pet appearing in our newspaper can also be purchased for $6.00
PETS
READER’S REWARDS
Enter to win 2 tickets
GET YOUR NAME IN THE HAT
Macbeth
An eerie prophecy and unchecked greed lead to an ambitious couple’s downfall in the Bard’s timeless tale of absolute power that corrupts absolutely.
Friday, March 14 8:00pm
Pairs of tickets will be awarded.
Entries must be received by Wednesday, February 19, 2014 at noon. Winners will be posted in The Call & The Times on Thursday, February 20, 2014.
No Purchase Necessary. Employees of The Call & The Times and their families are not eligible.
ENTRY FORM: Macbeth
Name:________________________________________________ Street Address:__________________________________________ City:_______________________________________State:______ Phone Number:_________________________________________
When people start reading the Yellow Pages every morning We’ll start placing “BIG ADS” in them!
401-722-4000
Must be 18 years old to enter.
For display advertising please call
Your Name: Address: Phone#: Email: Pet’s Name: Age:
Mail to: C/O Pet Page 23 Exchange Street Pawtucket, RI 02860 or email editor@pawtuckettimes.com
Please mail or drop off entry form or 3x5 index card to: The Call - Reader’s Rewards 75 Main St., Woon., RI 02895
OR
The Times - Reader’s Rewards 23 Exchange St., Pawt., RI 02860
401-727-9262
Visit www.gammtheatre.org for more information
A8 THE TIMES
ENTERTAINMENT
Today’s Forecast
Narragansett Bay Weather Wind (knots) Seas (feet) Visibility (miles) W-SW 5-10 2 5 Buzzards Bay W-SW 5-10 2 5
Thursday, January 30, 2014
Merrimack to Chatham W-SW 10 2-3 5
Chatham to Watch Hill W-SW 5-10 3 5
..............Mostly Sunny........
THU
FRI
SAT
SUN
MON
Mark Searles’s Southern New England Area Forecast
26-30 36-40 8-14 20-25
Sunny M. Cloudy
38-42 24-28
Ch RN/SN Shwr
40-45 32-35
Few Shwrs
33-37 20-25
P. Sunny
Five Day Forecast data supplied by Storm Team 10
After a very cold start start this morning, temperatures will rise into the upper 20s to near 30° this afternoon as a light west wind shifts into the southwest. Overall the sky will be mostly sunny through this afternoon. More clouds roll in tomorrow as milder air begins to return to the area. The weekend will feature a lot of clouds as well with the chance of a snow or rain shower Saturday...a cold front comes through Sunday with some rain too.
THU
FRI
SAT
SUN
MON
‘Hours’: Paul Walker gives touching Miley Cyrus duets performance in one of his final roles with Madonna
By MICHAEL O'SULLIVAN
The Washington Post
for MTV special
SANDY COHEN
AP Entertainment Writer
"Hours" is a small film, and would likely not be getting the modest attention it is were it not for the untimely death of its star, Paul Walker, who was killed in a car crash last November at age 40. Best known for his participation in the "Fast and Furious" action franchise — the seventh installment of which is reportedly being rewritten to accommodate the actor's death — Walker always has projected a stolid, if less than electrifying, presence. That remains the case in "Hours," in which he portrays a frantic new father in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. In his quiet, workmanlike way, however, the performer creates a stirring portrait of paternal devotion. Set in a New Orleans hospital, "Hours" is the story of Nolan Hayes (Walker) and his attempt to keep his newborn daughter alive after he is left alone to tend to her malfunctioning ventilator when the entire staff and all other patients are evacuated. Aside from some brushes with armed looters, a stray dog and a rescue helicopter scared off by snipers, Nolan literally spends most of the film, which spans about two days, cooped up in a hospital room cranking a manual generator to keep his child breathing. In between cranks, he talks to the baby, who can't breath on her own
Photo/Skip Bolen
The late Paul Walker makes one of his final film appearances in a touching performance in “Hours.”
yet, about her mother (Genesis Rodriguez). Mom, who has died in childbirth, appears in flashbacks and as a ghostly apparition. Nolan also rushes around the abandoned building looking for medical supplies, growing increasingly desperate as time passes. As it does, Walker's performance — along with the film — gets more and more engrossing. Sure, the setup is kind of gimmicky. The ventilator's balky battery will only hold a charge for a few minutes, which means that Nolan must constantly rush back
and forth between his infant's side and whatever mission he's on: tracking down more saline, flagging down help, trying to fire up the ignition of an ambulance with a flooded engine. The fact that the character also has to provide a running commentary on the action is also a bit annoying, especially when the similarly themed "All Is Lost" proved that a spoken monologue under emergency circumstances is not just unrealistic, but dramatically unnecessary. Still, the gimmick works, thanks to Walker's surprising
ability to explore — and to reveal — his character's interior life. Compared to the "Fast and Furious" films, "Hours" is a chamber piece, but Walker wrings real pathos out of his instrument. Two stars. PG-13. Also available on demand through Amazon Instant, iTunes and cable outlets. Contains brief violence, drug abuse, mild sensuality, some crude language and mature thematic material. 97 minutes. Ratings Guide: Four stars masterpiece, three stars very good, two stars OK, one star poor, no stars waste of time.
LOS ANGELES — Miley Cyrus mashes it up with Madonna, twerks with her tongue out and drops a bunch of F-bombs on her upcoming MTV special, and she's in fine voice while doing it. While her whittled stomach and occasional crotch-grabs compete for attention, Cyrus really can sing, and it shows on her episode of "MTV Unplugged," airing Wednesday. Cyrus taped the acoustic concert Tuesday on a Hollywood soundstage, performing stripped-down versions of selected songs from her latest album, "Bangerz," and closing with a booty-slapping duet with Madonna. "So, it sounds super lame, but as a pop star it's pretty cool performing with Madonna," the 21-year-old said after singing a mash-up of Madonna's 2000 track "Don't Tell Me" and Cyrus' hit "We Can't Stop." Cyrus spanks the 55-year-old Queen of Pop during the duet, which made Madonna's Britney Spears kiss feel like it was way more than 10 years ago. This is Cyrus' show, and it's a hoedown. Backed by a seven-piece band on a stage decorated with hay bales,
Miley Cyrus
Cyrus gives her acoustic songs a country touch, adding a twang to "4x4" and
Madonna
"Bangerz." "I'm from Nashville," she said. "And since I couldn't make all of you guys go back home with me, I tried to bring Nashville here for the night." Cyrus also includes elements from her more recent shows: a little person, a giant woman and two men in a horse costume. She works in a fair amount of curse words, tongue extensions and sultry moves as she performs songs including "Wrecking Ball," ''Adore You" and "Drive." "I feel like I'm at karaoke, but it's only my turn," she said, "which is what I really like."
Vanessa Williams to sing anthem at Duke-Syracuse
SYRACUSE, N.Y. (AP) — Vanessa Williams is returning to her alma mater to sing the national anthem before Saturday night's highly anticipated basketball game between No. 17 Duke and second-ranked Syracuse. More than 35,000 fans are expected to attend the game, which tips off at 6:30 p.m. in the Carrier Dome. To share her excitement, Williams posted a photo of a Syracuse basketball jer-
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sey signed by Orange coach Jim Boeheim for Brian Edwards, who represents Williams and other celebrities. "I'll be there Saturday to perform the National Anthem!! #BeatDuke" Williams wrote on Facebook. Williams graduated from Syracuse in 2008, more than two decades after leaving school to become the first African-American Miss America winner in 1983.
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SPORTS
Blackstone Valley
THE TIMES, Thursday, January 30, 2014 — B1
Broncos on the upswing Turner’s layup
NBA
helps 76ers edge Celtics
Moses Brown sophomore Luis Hernandez lifts Burrillville’s Travis Pare during the 145-pound match Wednesday.
ERNEST A. BROWN / Blackstone Valley Sports photo
BOSTON (AP) — Evan Turner sank a layup at the buzzer to give the Philadelphia 76ers a 9594 win over the Boston Celtics in a matchup of the two worst teams in the Atlantic Division on Wednesday night. The 76ers rebounded the ball after Kris Humphries missed a jumper with 12 seconds left. They hurried up court and Turner released his shot just in time to give the 76ers only their third win in 13 games. The Celtics lost for the 19th time in 22 games and dropped behind the 76ers in the standings by one game. Spencer Hawes led Philadelphia with 20 points and tied his career high with four 3pointers. Turner had 16 points and eight assists and Thaddeus Young added 16 points. Jared Sullinger led Boston with 24 points and 17 rebounds and Jeff Green had 18 points, but just five after the first quarter. Sullinger had broken a 90-90 tie with two free throws, putting Boston ahead with 3:06 left. Then both teams had trouble connecting from the line. Michael Carter-Williams missed one of two for the 76ers, Jerryd Bayless missed two for the Celtics and Young also missed two. CarterWilliams missed another one before sinking his second, tying the game at 92 with 1:01 remaining. Humphries put Boston back on top when he tipped in Sullinger's missed layup. Philadelphia's free throw troubles seemed to end when Turner made one, cutting Boston's lead to 94-93. But he missed the second and Bayless rebounded. That possession ended when Humphries missed his jumper, setting up the 76ers for the winning shot.
Wrestling
College basketball
Young squad snags two wins against Quakers, Kilties
By JON BAKER jbaker@pawtuckettimes.com BURRILLVILLE — When former Woonsocket High All-Stater Justin Switzer took over as the new head coach at Burrillville High last September, he had no clue what to expect. “I had coached as an assistant at Cranston East last year, but I wanted to have my own team, one I could work with and mold,” Switzer stated. “I came back from (U.S. Army) basic training in Fort Leonard Wood, Mo. in August, and I went back to coaching at the North-East Elite Youth Wrestling Club. Some parents had told me that there was an opening at Burrillville, and they asked me to try ERNEST A. BROWN / Blackstone Valley Sports photo taking the job.” He did, then got more good news. Former Burrillville sophomore Greg LaCroix, top, moves to pin Moses Brown opponent Broncos’ grappler Bob Kimatian, who graduated Bryan McAdams during Wednesday’s 182-pound match. The pin gave the Broncos See BRONCOS, page B3 a 48-28 win over the Quakers.
Friars doing their best to tune out hype
Recent success hasn’t turned PC complacent
NFL
Playing with a chip on their shoulders
Super Bowl features plenty of inspirational tales
By RACHEL COHEN AP Sports Writer NEWARK, N.J. — Danny Trevathan won't forget the doubters, no matter how many plays he makes or games he wins. The linebacker will start in the Super Bowl at age 23, the Denver Broncos' leading tackler in just his second season in the league. Yet he can still recite the knocks on his pro potential from before the draft, saying he wants to "show them up." This is the seemingly contradictory mentality of a successful NFL player — a simultaneous superiority and inferiority complex. To Richard Sherman's peers, his televised rant moments after the NFC championship game makes perfect sense. These guys require supreme self-assurance to do their job, but they also need motivation to push themselves through the grind of workouts and the strain of games. "When you're playing against athletes like this who could really take your head off or really outrun you, if you're not confident, you ain't going to last long in this league," said Sherman's counterpart on the Seahawks'
File photo
defense, linebacker Bobby Wagner. "At the same time, a lot of players, they've got a story. Somebody has told them they couldn't do something, so that's the chip on their shoulder." Sherman, a 2011 fifth-round draft pick, lugs around one of the biggest chips on a unit loaded with them. The cornerback's outburst after making the win-clinching play against the 49ers was partly sparked by something the receiver he was defending, Michael Crabtree, said to him during the offseason, though Sherman wouldn't reveal exactly what infuriated him. Real or perceived, past slights can fuel the kind of passionate play it takes to win in a hard-hitting game. "You need that edge," Seattle offensive tackle Russell Okung said. "That's what makes us so good. Guys are very resilient. They've come through a lot." Trevathan, a sixth-round pick, remembers that scouts deemed him too small. Wagner, a second-rounder, supposedly wasn't tough enough. Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie recalls the skepticism he had to overcome as a player See PLAYERS, page B4
Last Saturday at the Dunkin’ Donuts Center was the first significant clue. Ed Cooley had just watched his Providence College squad push aside Xavier for its fifth straight Big East victory. As he delivered his postgame soliloquy inside a crowded media room – one that also contained administrators and adoring wellwishers – the head coach took the opportunity to give Bryce BRENDAN Cotton with what he McGAIR feels are this valuable senior’s just desserts. “He is so undervalued by the national people, but he’s definitely not undervalued in this room,” Cooley rhapsodized. See McGAIR, page B3
Sports writer
ERNEST A. BROWN / Blackstone Valley Sports photo
A fifth-round selection, Seattle cornerback Richard Sherman has used his draft status as a primary source of motivation.
Seahawks once pursued Manning Page B4
LaDontae Henton (23) and the Providence Friars have been the subject of some national attention recently. Winners of five straight Big East games, PC looks to make it six in a row tonight at Marquette.
B2 THE TIMES
SPORTS
Thursday, January 30, 2014
REGIONAL SCOREBOARD
R.I. HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS SCHEDULE
Steer clear of these bad habits when tip-toeing down the bowling alley
very sport can be played using various techniques and methods. Some athletes employ a classic or orthodox style, while others are considered unorthodox or even awkward performers. Bowling has its own set of poor habits which can detract from your scores. As we move forward in our winter league competitions, it might be useful to consider (and address) some of the ulcer-inducing habits we have created for ourselves. You may want to grade yourself in terms of what you are doing right verWAYNE sus wrong in your bowling LIMA game. The idea is to recognize the “worst” bowling habits and wean you off, or at least away from them. Answering yes or no to the following “worst bowling habits” can reveal plenty about your potential. And by visiting the truth about your game will allow you to make adjustments and progress. Or you can continue to suffer as you grind-out mediocre scores. The following represents some of the most common (and repairable) bad habits bowlers develop. And in the grand scheme of things, if you can correct at least one of the following (assuming you are “not” the perfect bowler) your scores have a chance to improve. Each of these bad habits holds equal score damaging possibilities for you, the bowler: Not keeping your eye on your ball reaction Realizing that focus from the release to the point of ball to pin impact is critical, can only help your scores. Taking your eyes off the rack (pins) before your ball even hits is a disservice to you and your game. The way your ball reactions tells you everything from oil conditions to adjustments which should be made. Turning your back on the pins, before your ball hits the pins, is like ripping a treasure map in half and only keeping one of the halves. Over throwing your bowling ball Bowling is a game of “consistency” and “accuracy” while speed is actually a
E
THURSDAY BOYS Basketball Woonsocket at La Salle, Cumberland at Rogers, Tolman at Tiverton, 7 p.m. Wrestling Woonsocket, Warwick Vets vs. Middletown, (at Gaudet MS), 5 p.m.; South Kingstown at Cumberland, Lincoln at East Greenwich, 7 p.m.; Moses Brown at Tolman, 7:30 p.m. GIRLS Basketball Tolman at Shea, 6 p.m.; Mount St. Charles at Toll Gate, 7 p.m. Hockey La Salle at Burrillville/Ponaganset Co-op, 6:30 p.m. CO-ED Swimming South Kingstown at Lincoln, 3:30 p.m. FRIDAY BOYS Basketball Mount St.. Charles at Mount Hope, Burrillville at Moses Brown, 6:30 p.m.; Lincoln at Tiverton, Central Falls at Barrington, North Smithfield at Middletown, Chariho at Shea, Narragansett at Tolman, 7 p.m. Hockey Toll Gate vs. St. Raphael/PCD/Wheeler Co-op (Thayer Arena), 6 p.m.; Burrillville at Coventry, 6:30 p.m.; East Providence at Woonsocket, Lincoln at Pilgrim (Thayer Arena), 7:30 p.m.; West Warwick/EWG vs. Scituate/Tolman (Smithfield Rink), 8:30 p.m.; Prout vs. North Smithfield (Adelard Arena), 9 p.m. GIRLS Basketball Block Island at Davies, 3 p.m.; Shea at Hope, 4 p.m.; North Smithfield at Central, 4;15 p.m.; Pilgrim at Lincoln, Barrington at Woonsocket, Central Falls at Mount Hope, 7 p.m. SATURDAY BOYS Basketball Davies Tech vs. St. Patrick (at St. Raphael), 4;30 p.m. Hockey Woonsocket vs. Scituate/Tolman (Thayer Arena), 6 p.m.; South Kingstown vs. North Smithfield (Levy Rink), 7 p.m.; Burrillville at Bishop Hendricken, 9 p.m. GIRLS Basketball Juanita Sanchez at Bishop Keough (at St. Raphael) 1 p.m. Hockey Narragansett/North Kingstown/South Kingstown Co-op vs. Smithfield/North Smithfield/Coventry Co-op (Smithfield Rink); Barrington/Mount Hope/Portsmouth Co-op vs. Lincoln/Cumberland Co-op (Adelard Arena), 7:30 p.m.; Burrillville/Ponaganset Co-op at Mount St. Charles, 9 p.m. CO-ED Indoor track Rhode Island Class Championships (at Providence Career & Technical Academy field house), 9 a.m.
Bowler’s Edge
On The Banner
PHOTO FEATURED IN PIC OF THE DAY LAST WEEK
December 18, 2013 - Lincoln’s Molly Westrick wins the girls 200 yard freestyle with a time of 2:09:08 during a co-ed meet with Mount St. Charles at the Woonsocket YMCA Wednesday. Ernest A. Brown/RIMG photo
potential threat to these two vital ingredients. A fast ball is not ideal in bowling. According to ball manufacturing engineers, the perfect speed for a 14-16 pound ball is 14 to 15 miles per hour. Throwing a bowling ball at excessive speeds simply does not allow the ball to “work” and “splatter” the pins. With too high a ball speed, upon impact the pins merely jump to the rear of the pit; not allowing the pins to “dance” and take out their friends. Reduce power and replace it with accuracy. Setting the land speed record does not promote consistent, higher scores. Psychologically allowing yourself to become upset; because of your poor bowling scores If your emotions are out of control, your ability to “relax” and “focus” are significantly diminished. Rather than getting upset, it is suggested that you review what might be going wrong so you can prevent it in your future bowling adventures. If you brain is fixated on what is going wrong, you likely will never figure what to do to get back on track. Anger is simply a major distraction to corrective bowling effort. Compensating for improper bowling equipment If you are struggling because your bowling ball or even shoes are old, outof-date, improperly balanced, or ill fitting, you can rest assured that your numbers are going to decline. Sure, you start to compensate for the “ball that doesn’t work.” But that compensation creates all sorts of bad habits including poor timing, improper and exaggerated release styles, and unnatural bowling positions for your body. You begin to “force” the ball, or “point the ball”, or even “muscle the ball.” Why? Typically because you are in the habit of using bowling gear that is passé or improperly fit and balanced. A simple solution is to invest a little into your equipment. Get it up-to-date, with the proper drilling fit and balance allowing you to bowl comfortably and naturally. Excuse making It is easy to blame anything but yourself. But since bowling is an individual sport, where “you” throw the ball, there really is nothing else to point the accusing finger at but yourself. Regularly making excuses for yourself (per your low or unacceptable bowling scores) is a way of scapegoating the real problem…you. Excuses actually allow you to drop in score because in your mind you
couldn’t possibly be responsible for bowling so poorly. Taking responsibility for your good and meager scores will afford you the opportunity to understand and embrace the fact that “the ball doesn’t throw itself”. The bowler who accepts and challenges lane conditions is best prepared to outscore his competition. The reality is simple, low scores are not a result of the lanes, the lane conditions, your equipment, your competition…rather it is all YOU. Listening to other bowlers While most bowlers genuinely offer friendly advice to fellow bowlers it is not a good habit to take everything that is suggested as gospel. We all bowl differently and we all have unique, natural styles. Keeping your game “simple” will always lead you in the right direction. Listening to multiple pieces of advice from several bowlers can only lead to confusion. The result? Rather than improving, you get so mixed up your scores start to plummet. Advice should be welcomed during practice and avoided during competition. Allowing yourself to get distracted I always thought that league bowling (or any form of competitive bowling) deserved my full attention. But I have witnessed so many bowlers doing everything “except” pay attention to their game. Are we here to bowl or yack, yack, yack? Are you paying more attention to the competition than the execution of your own throws? Are you more interested in baseball or football scores? Are you doing just a little bowling to accompany your drinking? If your answer to any of these is yes, you are likely hurting your game because of lack of concentration and focus. The sole reason for being on the lanes is to bowl. Remember, there is plenty of time “later” for blah, blah, blah. Enjoy bowling If bowling gets you so riled up, why bother getting involved. Unless you are planning on making the Pro Tour and making a livelihood out of bowling, you should be having a good time. It is recreation, it is competition, it is a game of inconsistency. So accept the bad with the good, and maybe you’ll prevent a vein from bursting in your head from all the pressure and anger. Have fun! Wayne Lima is the owner and operator of The Bowler’s Edge pro shop located at 110 Smithfield Ave., Pawtucket, RI. Wayne is an AMF and IPBA certified ball driller and is a former Professor and head Bowling Coach for Bryant University.
PINEVIEW LITTLE LEAGUE SCHEDULES FEBRUARY REGISTRATION DATES FOR UPCOMING BASEBALL SEASON
PAWTUCKET — The Pineview Little League has scheduled its registration dates for the upcoming season at the Ken Ryan Baseball Academy on 413 Central Ave. in Pawtucket. The dates are: Saturday, Feb. 8, from 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; Wednesday, Feb. 12, from 6-8 p.m., Saturday, Feb. 22, from 10 a.m.-2 p.m., and Wednesday, Feb. 26, from 6-8 p.m. For more information, visit Facebook under Pineview Little League or contact league president Bob Brown at 692-9139.
FAIRLAWN LITTLE LEAGUE SCHEDULES REGISTRATION DATES
PAWTUCKET — The Fairlawn Little League will be holding registrations for the upcoming baseball and softball seasons at the Smithfield Avenue Fire Station (on Smithfield Avenue) on Saturday, Feb. 1 from 11 a.m.-2 p.m., Tuesday, Feb. 18 from 6:30-8 p.m. and Saturday, March 1 from 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Fairlawn Little League will once again offer a softball program this year and is looking for girls between the ages of 4-18 to register to play T-Ball (ages 4-6), Instructional (ages 6-8), Minors (ages 810), Majors (ages 11-13) and Seniors (ages 13-18). Registrations are open to girls who live in the city of Pawtucket, as this is a Little League affiliated fast-pitch softball program. Registrations can also be done online. At the end of the registration, applicants will be able to print out a copy of the registration form and mail in payment, or drop off payment at the fire station during the registration dates listed above. The league is not accepting credit card registrations at this time. If you have any questions, contact league president Tammy Ward at 401-413-5323 or visit the Fairlawn Little League website at www.fairlawnlittleleauge.com.
PAWTUCKET YOUTH SOCCER ASSOCIATION PLANS SPRING ACADEMY
PAWTUCKET — The Pawtucket Youth Soccer Organization is accepting registrations for its Spring Soccer Academy for boys and girls ages 3-10 from Pawtucket and its surrounding communities. Walk-in registrations will take place at the PYSAbuilding on 52 Plain St. in Pawtucket on Wednesday, Jan. 29, Tuesday, Feb. 18, and Thursday, Feb. 20, from 6-8 p.m. The six-week session will begin at the end of April. The fee is $65 per child (with a family discount after the second child in each family) and will cover each player receiving a shirt, shorts, and socks. For more information, visit www.pawtucketsoccer.org or call (401) 729-9565.
DARLINGTON GIRLS SOFTBALL LEAGUE POSTS SIGNUPS ON FEB 15 & 22 AT ST. TERESA’S CHURCH
PAWTUCKET — The Darlington Girls Softball League, a fast-pitch league that serves all of Pawtucket and its surrounding communities, will conduct registration for the upcoming season on Saturday, Feb. 15, and Saturday, Feb. 22 from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. at St. Teresa's Church on 358 Newport Ave. (across from Slater Park) in Pawtucket. The divisions are Instructional Division 1 T-Ball (ages 4-6), Instructional Division 2 Machine Pitch (ages 6-8), Minors (ages 9-10), Juniors (ages 11-13), and Seniors (ages 13-18). New players must show a valid birth certificate at the time of registration. The fees are: Instructional Division 1 & 2 ($35, or $60 for 2 or more players in a family), Minors, Junior, and Senior Divisions ($60 or $95 for 2 or more players). Registration can also be done online at www.DGSoftball.com with a major credit card. The league is also conducting a used softball clothing and equipment drive. Bring the items to one of the registrations and the league will donate them to a player whose family is in need.
TICKETS FOR MARCH’S DARLINGTON BRAVES’ FOOTBALL & CHEERLEADING BANQUET GO ON SALE SATURDAY, FEB. 1
PAWTUCKET — The Darlington Braves will hold its annual awards banquet on Sunday, March 2 from noon-4 p.m. at the Venus de Milo in Swansea, Mass., and tickets will go on sale on Saturday, Feb. 1 from 10 a.m.-noon at the Darlington Braves Hall on 92 East Ave. in Pawtucket. All cheerleaders and football players are free, but must come to the hall to receive their ticket. Children under the age of two are also free, but for everyone else, the ticket price is $23 (cash only). All children must be accompanied to he banquet by an adult. No tickets will be sold at the door. For more information, email bravesprez@aol.com.
PAWTUCKET GIRLS SOFTBALL LEAGUE TO CONDUCT OPEN REGISTRATIONS ON WEDNESDAY NIGHTS
PAWTUCKET — Officials with the Pawtucket Girls Softball League will conduct open registrations for their upcoming spring and summer seasons for players between the ages of 7-18 every Wednesday from 7-9 p.m. at DH Hitting on 70 Vineyard St. in Pawtucket. Those sign-up sessions will be held now through the end of March, stated PGSL President Scott Cooper. The league will be divided into appropriate age divisions. For more information, call Cooper at (401) 338-1127 or e-mail him at dramainccoop@verizon.net.
DARLINGTON GIRLS SOFTBALL LEAGUE HOSTS WINTER CLINICS
PAWTUCKET — The Darlington Girls Softball League will conduct its winter clinics for new and returning instructional division players every Tuesday night in January and February from 6-7 p.m. at the Fallon Memorial School gymnasium on Lincoln Avenue. In March, the clinics will run every Friday night from 6-7 p.m. For more information, send an email to contactmem@verizon.net.
ANNUAL CRANSTON SPORTS COLLECTORS SHOW IS SLATED FOR SATURDAY, FEB. 1 AT WEST VALLEY INN
WEST WARWICK — The 38th annual Cranston Sports Collectors Show will be held on Saturday, Feb. 1 at the West Valley Inn from 8:30 a.m. until 4 p.m. Admission is $3. Sponsored by the St. Joseph’s Men’s Guild of the Immaculate Conception Church, over 1,800 dealers, collectors and sports fans attend the show. Regarding as the face of the sports memorabilia hobby, Alan “Mr. Mint” Rosen will once again be in attendance. In addition, the R.I. Reds Heritage Society will have display space and local sports cartoonist Frank Galasso will be in attendance.
PAWTUCKET & PROVIDENCE FIGURE SKATING CLUB ACCEPTING REGISTRATIONS FOR BASIC SKILLS SKATING PROGRAM
PAWTUCKET — The Pawtucket & Providence Figure Skating Club is now accepting registrations for the Olympic Session of its Basic Skills Skating Program. Skaters can either take advantage of our 2-for-1 pricing or save $10 off the price of one skater. Lessons are appropriate for either hockey or figure skating and are available for skaters ages three through adult. Classes start on Saturday, Feb. 8, and are held at Lynch Arena. Classes for beginning skaters will be held from 12:10-1:00 p.m. Lessons for skaters with more experience will take place from 11:10 a.m.-12 noon. Participants must have their own skates. For more information, go to ppfsc.org and click on "Basic Skills", email ppfscbasicskills@earthlink.net, or call 508 212-2611.
Thursday, January 30, 2014
SPORTS
THE TIMES B3
Wrestling
Broncos building for what they hope is strong future
Continued from page B1
in 1980 and spent the next 30-plus years as an assistant and later the chief before stepping down earlier this year, would remain with the squad as his assistant. “Once I got to know the kids, I knew we were very young – I mean, we only had two seniors and a junior, with a lot of sophomores and one freshman,” Switzer explained. “I knew it would take a lot of time to get them seasoned.” Chipped in Kimatian: “The big thing was, when Justin came in, I let him do his own thing, establish his ground and do what he wanted to make the team his own. I’m actually bringing his material, his methods, over to the middle school so those kids will become familiar with his system. They’ll know what he’ll expect from them. “We’ve got about 12 kids who will be here as freshmen next year, and 13 more who should be here the following year,” he added. “I’m trying to get those middle schoolers to go to North-East Elite so they can learn more about their coach, about the nuances of the sport and help them gain more experience.” Based on the Broncos’ collective performance in a pair of Division II meets against Moses Brown and Mount Pleasant on Wednesday afternoon, Switzer has plowed the
right path. Despite several forfeits on both sides, Burrillville escaped with a 48-28 win over the Quakers, then rattled off six straight victories in the upper weight divisions to claim a thrilling 42-36 verdict over the Kilties. With the two triumphs, the hosts improved to 3-5-1 in II-South. The Broncos had trailed 12-0 entering the 120-pound match of the latter meet against Mount Pleasant, that between Burrillville sophomore Francisco Bell and frosh Anthony Lugo. The visitors seemed destined to snatch at least a 16-0 advantage after Lugo produced a 16-5 cushion with only 1:47 remaining in the bout. Bell, though, had other ideas; he scored a two-point reversal with 1:16 left, then pinned his opponent five seconds later to grab not only his first victory of the campaign, but also close the team gap to 12-6. The winless Kilties then assembled 18 straight points due to a forfeit and three straight pins through the 126, 132, 138 and 145 classes. When junior Jeremy Arroyo pinned sophomore Travis Pare at 1:32, MP had increased its lead to a demonstrative 30-6. But that’s when Burrillville began to roll. At 152, sophomore Brandon Lapierre needed only 57 seconds to pin junior Jasmin Urquilla, and junior 160-pounder Dan Stone worked harder while dropping Anthony Ipina’s shoulders to the floor at 4:37. Sophomore Greg LaCroix fol-
lowed suit with a pin of Anthony Rivera at 3:35 of the 170-pound clash, while senior Doug Davis needed just one tick less to fell Jason Melgar at 182. In that battle, Davis had built a 7-2 advantage with a three-point nearfall with 54 seconds left in the middle period, then took just 40 more to apply the pin to knot the overall match at 30all. Sophomore Nick Samek then earned a forfeit win at 195, and classmate Rob Tufano claimed a pin of sophomore Jeremiah Ledesma at 1:55. With those two triumphs, the Broncos had sealed the win, despite having to forfeit the heavyweight category to Cedrick Hall. The only repeat victor for Burrillville – competitively speaking – during the contest against Moses Brown came at 182, with LaCroix pinning Bryan McAdams at 2:41. The Broncos had captured six of the final 10 bouts (with two no-matches) by forfeit, to overcome a 28-0 deficit. “For Francisco, that was his first win all year,” Switzer grinned. “I had told him before that if he had lasted the six (full) minutes, he’d outlast the kid and win. That’s just what he did. He got the kid tired, overcame the lead (Lugo) had and ended up winning. “This year, we’re focused more on the individual matches, not so much the team results
due to the small number on the team,” he continued. “My plan right now is to get most, if not all, of our kids to follow me to the North-East Elite club. I did that my sophomore year (back in 2007) at Woonsocket, and I won the state championship at 140 as a senior (in 2009). “I believe a lot of these kids can do the same thing.” ***
Burrillville 42, Mount Pleasant 36 106 – No match. 113 – Danny Martinez (MP) won by forfeit. 120 – Francisco Bell (B) pinned Anthony Lugo, 4:49. 126 – Ariel Lara (MP) won by forfeit. 132 – Jeremy Ledesma (MP) pinned Ryan Peck, 3:01. 138 – Mike Fuentes (MP) pinned Andrew Braddock, 1:19. 145 – Jeremy Arroyo (MP) pinned Travis Pare, 1:32. 152 – Brandon Lapierre (B) pinned Jasmin Urquilla, :57. 160 – Dan Stone (B) pinned Anthony Ipina, 4:37. 170 – Greg LaCroix (B) pinned Anthony Rivera, 3:35. 182 – Doug Davis (B) pinned Jason Melgar, 3:34. 195 – Nick Samek (B) won by forfeit. 220 – Rob Tufano (B) pinned Jeremiah Ledesma, 1:55. HVY – Cedrick Hall (MP) won by forfeit. Burrillville 48, Moses Brown 28 106 – Nick Teves (MB) won by forfeit. 113 – Abe Bloom (MB) won by forfeit. 120 – Thomas Harden (MB) pinned Francisco Bell, 1:18. 126 – Zach Levine (MB) won by forfeit. 132 – Peck (B) won by forfeit. 138 – Andrew Braddock (B) won by forfeit. 145 – Luis Hernandez (MB) def. Travis Pare, 12-4. 152 – Brandon Lapierre (B) won by forfeit. 160 – Dan Stone (B) won by forfeit. 170 – No match. 182 – Greg LaCroix (B) pinned Bryan McAdams, 2:41. 195 – Nick Samek (B) won by forfeit. 220 – Rob Tufano (B) won by forfeit. HVY – No match.
Clippers cruise past Rams
Burrillville sophomore Francisco Bell, bottom, battles Moses Brown’s Thomas Harden during the 120pound match on Wednesday afternoon. Harden succeeded in pinning Bell.
PROVIDENCE — Between 113 and 170 pounds, Cumberland High manufactured eight of nine victories, including five by pin, to crush La Salle, 57-17, in a Division I-North clash on Wednesday night. After Kam Porcaro’s 5-1 victory over James Mountain at 113, Cody Beaudette (120), Kris Nordby (132), Kyle Durkin (138), Nick Tribelli (152) and Chris Hayes (170) all mustered pins for the Clippers (8-0). At 160, Nate Skawinski added a 5-3 triumph over Chris Francis. Cumberland now will take on South Kingstown (8-1) in a crossover clash at its own Wellness Center tonight at 7. ***
Cumberland 57, La Salle 17 106 – Noah Williams (L) def. Harry Travers, 16-1. 113 – Kam Porcaro (CUMB) def. James Mountain, 5-1. 120 – Cody Beaudette (CUMB) pinned Eric Dench, :39. 126 – Kylie Creamer (CUMB) def. Derek Forand, 7-4. 132 – Kris Nordby (CUMB) pinned Alex Martinez, 2:36. 138 – Kyle Durkin (CUMB) pinned Chris Charleson, 2:47. 145 – Aaron Wolfang (L) pinned Steve Masi, 3:25. 152 – Nick Tribelli (CUMB) pinned Ben Miller, 1:01. 160 – Nate Skawinski (CUMB) def. Chris Francis, 5-3. 170 – Chris Hayes (CUMB) pinned Matt Beudrai, 1:47. 182 – Onassis Valario (L) pinned Dylan Faria, :57. 195 – Nick Giorgio (CUMB) pinned Matt Accinno, :21. 220 – Dylan Herrera (CUMB) won by forfeit. HVY – Matt Riley (CUMB) won by forfeit.
ERNEST A. BROWN / Blackstone Valley Sports photo
College basketball
McGair: Friars remain grounded, focused
Continued from page B1
What’s ironic is that representatives from two wellknown media outlets were on the premises to hear Cooley utter those words, among them Pete Thamel from Sports Illustrated and ESPN’s Jeff Goodman. Cooley comes across as the type of person who is on top of every last detail. He must have seen Goodman or Thamel from his podium view, hence the decision to strike while the iron was hot and provide a juicy-enough sound bite that would succeed in shining some light on Cotton and his Friar teammates. It’s funny what can result when teams string together several wins a row. You see bold headlines that include “hottest team in the Big East” or “bubble team.” PC fans are out of practice when it comes to seeing their beloved Friars in the thick of the March Madness discussion, and now probably can’t help but to dream big. The attention surrounding PC nowadays can be viewed in the most positive sense. As Cooley and Co. pack their bags for a two-game Midwest swing that begins Thursday night at Marquette, players and coaches do so with extreme tunnel vision. They certainly aren’t working themselves into a deep lather just because ESPN’s famed bracketologist Joe Lunardi is including them in his latest NCAA Tournament projections – Lunardi has PC duking it out with Southern Mississippi in a play-in game. What the national pundits are touting is nothing more then feathers in one’s cap that can just as easily be plucked. In a nutshell, PC is looking to stay grounded and remain humbled in the face of getting noticed on bigger platforms. “Attention is a byproduct of winning or losing. We just want to stay focused and go 10 today. When we’ve kept to that motto, it’s put us in a pretty good space,” said Cooley earlier this week. “You’re supposed to win, and I think our players have embraced that.” PC’s current winning streak has changed the equation for the 2013-14 squad. Only a few weeks ago, Cooley’s third Providence squad seemed destined to win only a handful of games, limp into the Big East
Tournament, perform its usual one-and-done act at Madison Square Garden and start dreaming about next season. The scuttlebutt no longer centers on players not suiting up due to injury or suspension, or wondering if this shorthanded deck Cooley has been dealt can close out games. What was viewed in many corners as a lost year can now be branded as encouraging, with hopefully the best yet to come. As junior Carson Desrosiers noted, PC hasn’t even reached the midpoint of the 18-game Big East grind. A 5-2 record is eye-catching, but these Friars would prefer to fly under the radar rather than get drowned in a sea of hoopla.
“We’re still taking the underdog role,” Desrosiers said. “To see our names in articles, it just gives us credibility as far as where we are and where we want to go in these next 11 games.” Echoed classmate LaDontae Henton, “We’re not where we want to be. We’ve still got to play with a chip on our shoulder. That’s what got us here and that’s what is going to keep getting us wins in the Big East. If we keep playing hard and keep playing like the underdog, we’ll keep winning.” Say PC takes care of business at Marquette – the Friars have never won in Milwaukee and have claimed just one of
the 11 matchups against the Golden Eagles since the latter joined the Big East ranks in 2005-06 – and on Saturday against DePaul. A 7-2 league record could result in some love from Associated Press voters with even more bouquets of adoration to – perhaps – follow. Just don’t utter that special, four-letter word around the Friars, or tell them that their name is going up on a billboard in neon lights. “We’re not paying attention to the press,” said Henton. “We’re just trying to get better every day and ignoring the other things.” Follow Brendan McGair on Twitter @BWMcGair03
Boys’ swimming
MSC unable to hang with E.G.
WOONSOCKET — East Greenwich High claimed 10 of the 11 events on the program to snare a 63-31 Division II triumph over host Mount St. Charles at the Woonsocket YMCA natatorium on Wednesday. The lone breakthrough for the Mounties came from senior captain Jonathan Dow, who took the 100 freestyle with a superlative clocking of 54.13.
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B4 THE TIMES
SPORTS
SPORTS ON THE AIR
TODAY MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. — Providence at Marquette, FS1, WEEI-FM (103.7). 7 p.m. — Cincinnati at Louisville, ESPN. 7 p.m. — Florida at Mississippi St., ESPN2. 8 p.m. — Bryant at Robert Morris, ESPNU, WOON (1240). 9 p.m. — Purdue at Michigan, ESPN. 9 p.m. — UCLA at Oregon, ESPN2. 10 p.m. — Saint Mary's (Cal) at San Diego, ESPNU. NHL HOCKEY 7 p.m. — Montreal at Boston, NESN, WBZ-FM (98.5). NBA BASKETBALL 8 p.m. — Cleveland at New York, TNT. 10:30 p.m. — L.A. Clippers at Golden State, TNT. BOXING 9 p.m. — Super welterweights, Eddie Gomez (15-0-0) vs. Daquan Arnett (11-0-0); champion Luis Collazo (34-5-0) vs. Victor Ortiz (294-2), for WBA International welterweight title, at New York., FS1. GOLF 3 p.m. — PGATour, Phoenix Open, first round, at Scottsdale, Ariz., Golf Channel.
Thursday, January 30, 2014
SCOREBOARD
NBA
L.A. Clippers Phoenix Golden State L.A. Lakers Sacramento 32 15 .681 — 26 18 .591 4½ 27 19 .587 4½ 16 30 .348 15½ 15 29 .341 15½ ——— Tuesday's Games New Orleans 100, Cleveland 89 Detroit 103, Orlando 87 New York 114, Boston 88 Houston 97, San Antonio 90 Memphis 98, Portland 81 Washington 88, Golden State 85 Indiana 104, L.A. Lakers 92 Wednesday's Games Oklahoma City at Miami, (n) Orlando at Toronto, (n) Philadelphia at Boston, (n) Detroit at Atlanta, ppd. New Orleans at Minnesota, (n) Phoenix at Milwaukee, (n) Houston at Dallas, (n) Charlotte at Denver, (n) Chicago at San Antonio, (n) Memphis at Sacramento, (n) Washington at L.A. Clippers, (n) Thursday's Games Phoenix at Indiana, 7 p.m. Cleveland at New York, 8 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Golden State, 10:30 p.m. Friday's Games Milwaukee at Orlando, 7 p.m. Atlanta at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m. Memphis at Minnesota, 8 p.m. Oklahoma City at Brooklyn, 8 p.m. Sacramento at Dallas, 8:30 p.m. Toronto at Denver, 9 p.m. Charlotte at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m. Golden State at Utah, 10:30 p.m.
NFL
EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Pct GB Toronto 23 21 .523 — Brooklyn 20 23 .465 2½ New York 18 27 .400 5½ Boston 15 32 .319 9½ Philadelphia 14 31 .311 9½ Southeast Division W L Pct GB Miami 32 12 .727 — Atlanta 23 21 .523 9 Washington 22 22 .500 10 Charlotte 19 27 .413 14 Orlando 12 34 .261 21 Central Division W L Pct GB Indiana 35 9 .795 — Chicago 22 22 .500 13 Detroit 18 27 .400 17½ Cleveland 16 29 .356 19½ Milwaukee 8 36 .182 27 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division W L Pct GB San Antonio 33 12 .733 — Houston 30 17 .638 4 Dallas 26 20 .565 7½ Memphis 23 20 .535 9 New Orleans 19 25 .432 13½ Northwest Division W L Pct GB Oklahoma City 36 10 .783 — Portland 33 13 .717 3 Denver 22 21 .512 12½ Minnesota 22 22 .500 13 Utah 16 29 .356 19½ Pacific Division W L Pct GB
How Manning nearly became a Seahawk
TRANSACTIONS
Wednesday's Sports Transactions By The Associated Press BASEBALL Major League Baseball OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER — Suspended Philadelphia LHP Christopher O'Hare (LakewoodSAL) 50 games after a second positive test for a drug of abuse under the Minor League Drug Prevention and Treatment Program. American League KANSAS CITY ROYALS — Acquired OF Carlos Peguero from Seattle for a player to be named or cash considerations. Designated LHP Everett Teaford for assignment. LOA ANGELES ANGELS — Announced the additions of orthopaedic surgeons Dr. Robert Grumet and Dr. Michael F. Shepard to its medical staff. MINNESOTA TWINS — Agreed to terms with RHP Matt Guerrier on a minor league contract. NEW YORK YANKEES — Agreed to terms with RHP Bruce Billings, INF Russ Canzler, RHP Robert Coello, RHP Brian Gordon, RHP Chris Leroux, OF Antoan Richardson, INF Scott Sizemore, INF Yangervis Solarte and INF Zelous Wheeler on minor league contracts. SEATTLE MARINERS — Agreed to terms with RHP Scott Baker on a minor league contract. TEXAS RANGERS — Claimed LHP Pedro Figueroa off waivers from Tampa Bay. Designated RHP Chaz Roe for assignment. National League CINCINNATI REDS — Agreed to terms with INF Ramon Santiago on a minor league contract. ST. LOUIS CARDINALS — Agreed to terms with INF Daniel Descalso on a one-year contract. Pacific League (Japan) ORIX BLUEWAVE — Signed INF Yuniesky Betancourt. American Association AMARILLO SOX — Traded RHP Cephas Howard and RHP Jorge L. Vasquez to Lancaster for future considerations. LAREDO LEMURS — Signed INF Robbie Rea. ST. PAUL SAINTS — Signed INF Joey Becker and C Jake Taylor. WINNIPEG GOLDEYES — Signed INF Jake Blackwood. Can-Am League TROIS-RIVIERS AIGLES — Released C Bubby Williams. Frontier League WINDY CITY THUNDERBOLTS — Signed LHP James Ferguson. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association CLEVELAND CAVALIERS_Assigned G/F Sergey Karasev to Canton (NBADL). NEW YORK KNICKS — Assigned C Cole Aldrich, G Toure' Murry and F Jeremy Tyler to Erie (NBADL). FOOTBALL National Football League BALTIMORE RAVENS — Named Steve Spagnuolo secondary coach and Brian Pariani tight ends coach. MIAMI DOLPHINS — Announced assistant general manager Brian Gaine and the team have mutually parted ways. NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS — Named Brendan Daly defensive assistant coach. SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS — Named Ethan Casson chief revenue officer. ST. LOUIS RAMS — Fired defensive coordinator Tim Walton. Canadian Football League TORONTO ARGONAUTS — Released QB Zach Collaros. WINNIPEG BLUE BOMBERS — Acquired DB Matt Bucknor from Hamilton for the rights to WR Giovanni Aprile. HOCKEY National Hockey League DALLAS STARS — Signed F Ryan Garbutt to a three-year contract extension. PHOENIX COYOTES — Announced the team will officially change their franchise name to the Arizona Coyotes beginning at the start of the 201415 season. WINNIPEG JETS — Assigned D Paul Postma to St. John's (AHL) on a conditioning loan. American Hockey League ALBANY DEVILS — Loaned F Artem Demkov to Elmira (ECHL). HAMILTON BULLDOGS — Signed D Myles Harvey to a professional try out contract. ECHL GWINNETT GLADIATORS — Traded F Brett Lyon to Ontario for D Art Bidlevskii and D Eric Springer. SOCCER Major League Soccer LA GALAXY — Formed LA Galaxy II to compete in USL PRO. NEW YORK RED BULLS — Re-signed D Jamison Olave. PHILADELPHIA UNION — Announced the resignation of assistant coach Brendan Burke. COLLEGE FLORIDA — Announced men's freshman basketball F Chris Walker was cleared to play by the NCAA. SAGE — Named Kristin Brown assistant softball coach. SYRACUSE — Announced the resignation of women's tennis coach Luke Jensen. WAGNER — Named Jason Houghtaling associate head coach/offensive coordinator. YESHIVA — Named Ira Miller men's tennis coach.
NHL
Edmonton 55 17 32 6 40 144 190 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. ——— Tuesday’s Games Boston 6, Florida 2 Toronto 3, Tampa Bay 2 Philadelphia 5, Detroit 0 Ottawa 3, Columbus 2 Washington 5, Buffalo 4, OT Montreal 3, Carolina 0 St. Louis 3, New Jersey 0 Nashville 4, Winnipeg 3 Phoenix 3, Los Angeles 0 Calgary 5, Chicago 4, OT Minnesota 4, Anaheim 2 Wednesday's Games N.Y. Rangers vs. N.Y. Islanders at Bronx, NY, (n) San Jose at Edmonton, (n) Chicago at Vancouver,(n) Thursday's Games Montreal at Boston, 7 p.m. Florida at Toronto, 7 p.m. Washington at Columbus, 7 p.m. Tampa Bay at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m. New Jersey at Dallas, 8:30 p.m. Minnesota at Colorado, 9 p.m. San Jose at Calgary, 9 p.m. Buffalo at Phoenix, 9 p.m. Philadelphia at Anaheim, 10 p.m. Pittsburgh at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m. Friday's Games N.Y. Islanders at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m. St. Louis at Carolina, 7 p.m. Washington at Detroit, 7:30 p.m. New Jersey at Nashville, 8 p.m. Vancouver at Winnipeg, 8:30 p.m.
EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Boston 52 34 15 3 71 159 115 Tampa Bay 53 31 17 5 67 157 131 Toronto 55 28 21 6 62 158 170 Montreal 53 28 20 5 61 131 134 Detroit 53 23 19 11 57 135 149 Ottawa 53 23 20 10 56 150 167 Florida 53 21 25 7 49 129 164 Buffalo 52 14 30 8 36 101 152 Metropolitan Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Pittsburgh 53 37 14 2 76 171 128 N.Y. Rangers 54 28 23 3 59 139 138 Philadelphia 54 26 22 6 58 147 158 Carolina 53 24 20 9 57 134 150 Columbus 53 26 23 4 56 154 151 Washington 53 24 21 8 56 153 158 New Jersey 54 22 21 11 55 127 135 N.Y. Islanders 55 21 26 8 50 157 185 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA St. Louis 52 36 11 5 77 180 119 Chicago 55 32 10 13 77 194 154 Colorado 52 33 14 5 71 153 137 Minnesota 55 29 20 6 64 133 135 Dallas 53 24 21 8 56 154 157 Nashville 55 24 23 8 56 136 166 Winnipeg 55 25 25 5 55 155 162 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Anaheim 55 39 11 5 83 184 134 San Jose 53 34 13 6 74 165 126 Los Angeles 55 30 19 6 66 133 116 Vancouver 54 27 18 9 63 137 138 Phoenix 53 25 18 10 60 154 160 Calgary 53 19 27 7 45 124 169
AHL
EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OL SL PtsGF GA Manchester 47 28 12 2 5 63140121 St. John's 43 24 16 1 2 51132115 Providence 45 22 17 1 5 50143131 Worcester 41 20 17 3 1 44101114 Portland 41 16 16 2 7 41115134 East Division GP W L OL SL PtsGF GA Binghamton43 27 13 0 3 57158132 WB/Scranton4325 14 1 3 54123105 Norfolk 43 22 13 1 7 52120114 Hershey 42 22 14 3 3 50134116 Syracuse 41 17 18 2 4 40108127 Northeast Division GP W L OL SL PtsGF GA Springfield 43 28 10 1 4 61134111 Albany 43 23 14 3 3 52134115 Adirondack 41 21 18 0 2 44 98 103 Bridgeport 45 18 22 1 4 41119147 Hartford 41 14 22 0 5 33100137 WESTERN CONFERENCE Midwest Division GP W L OL SL PtsGF GA Grand Rapids4428 12 2 2 60152106 Chicago 42 23 15 2 2 50117107 Milwaukee 42 20 13 6 3 49113 115 46 20 20 4 2 46130151 41 19 16 3 3 44103111 North Division GP W L OL SL PtsGF GA Toronto 42 25 13 2 2 54120104 Rochester 40 19 15 3 3 44113117 Hamilton 42 20 18 0 4 44102112 Lake Erie 42 18 20 0 4 40111136 Utica 41 15 20 2 4 36 98 127 West Division GP W L OL SL PtsGF GA Texas 44 27 12 2 3 59161123 Abbotsford 44 26 14 3 1 56130122 Charlotte 41 21 19 0 1 43124125 San Antonio43 16 21 2 4 38116138 Oklahoma City441622 1 5 38119152 NOTE: Two points are awarded for a win, one point for an overtime or shootout loss. ——— Wednesday's Games Adirondack at Hartford, (n) Binghamton at Worcester, (n) Chicago at Rochester, (n) Syracuse at Wilkes-Barre/Scranton, (n) San Antonio at Texas, (n) Thursday's Games Toronto at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m. Rockford Iowa
Boys’ basketball
PAWTUCKET — After suffering a disgruntling 80-76 doubleovertime loss at Westerly on Tuesday night, Shea High took out its collective aggression with a 76-55 trouncing of non-league foe Johnston at “The Cage” on Wednesday evening. With four Raiders notching double-figure outings, senior Armani Baker closed with a “double-double,” 17 points and 16 boards, while classmate Armani Luciano managed 18 points (12 via the trey) and five steals. Dom Fernandes and Devin DoCoutoFernandes chipped in 16 and 11 points, respectively for Shea (2-10 overall). Head coach Matt Pita’s bunch now will prepare for a Friday night Division II-Central battle with Chariho, that slated for 7 o’clock. ***
JOHNSTON (55) – Mark Breton 4 1-2 9, Ryan McKeon 4 1-2 10, Zach Coro 2 0-0 6, Joe
JERSEY CITY, N.J. (AP) — They sat on the tarmac just hoping for the chance at a meeting. Pete Carroll and John Schneider waited in the private plane in Denver, wondering if Peyton Manning would accept a request to meet with the brain trust of the Seattle Seahawks to see if that could be a potential landing spot for the free agent quarterback. This was March of 2012, before Manning decided Denver would become his permanent address and before Russell Wilson took up residency in Seattle. And as Carroll recalled on Wednesday, the entire process was "brief." "We tried to get involved with that to see if there was a next stage to the process and there wasn't," Carroll said. The fact the paths of Manning and the Seahawks intersect in Sunday's Super Bowl is no coincidence. The decision to bring Manning to Denver was the catalyst for the Broncos becoming an offensive marvel that set records on its way to an AFC championship. And his decision not to seriously consider Seattle as a landing point also was hugely important in the Seahawks finding the pieces both in free agency and the draft to build a team that was the class of the NFC. Manning recalled Wednesday how he wanted privacy in the process of figuring out his next team after being released by Indianapolis. "I remember it wasn't very private. It was quite a public spectacle," Manning said. "I could have done without that." Manning eventually signed with Denver in late March. The process leading to his decision included a number of other franchises, including an early morning phone call that awoke Carroll. Manning had heard Seattle was interested and thus the process started. Seattle was in the market for quarterbacks at that point. They had gone through the trio of Matt Hasselbeck, Charlie Whitehurst and Tarvaris Jackson without satisfaction during Carroll's first two seasons and now stood the chance to possibly make a pitch to Manning. They had yet to draft Wilson — who Carroll said he now would have selected much higher than the third round — so it made sense for the Seahawks to try and get involved. "We talked about the basics of what it might mean for him coming to us and the process was underway," Carroll said. "It was very early and he had said he didn't know what he was going to do, where he was going to visit and what was going to come up and he wanted to gage what our interest was." Seattle's limited pursuit ended in Denver. Manning never took the meeting with Schneider and Carroll. Manning went on to have conversations with the 49ers, Cardinals, Dolphins and Titans before making the choice to join the Broncos. How the Seahawks are currently constructed would have drastically changed had the talks with Manning progressed beyond just those initial conversations. A number of roster moves the Seahawks have made — signing Cliff Avril and Michael Bennett as free agents, trading for Percy Harvin as examples — might not have happened if Manning had opted for Seattle. Seattle would have been limited with its salary cap space because of the money Manning would have commanded. Some of those moves are at the root of why Seattle is in the Super Bowl and are the ones Schneider said he thinks about when recollecting about their efforts with Manning. "I just think that we would have continued to do things the way we do it all the time," Schneider said last week. "I know that we wouldn't have been able to afford several players but we would have competed in other areas to compensate for it in where we were deficient in our roster. It's a daily process."
Raiders run past Panthers Players always feel they have something to prove
Continued from page B1
Girls’ basketball
Saints, Lions post wins
NORTH PROVIDENCE — St. Raphael Academy built an Bongiovanni 1 0-0 2, Larry Dureault 6 0-0 12, Chris Vizzacco 0 0-2 0, Chris Cotoia 0 6-6 6, Matt 3 0-0 6, Ed Gallucci 1 0-0 2, Ryan Yankee 1 0-0 2; totals 22 8-12 55. 18-7 cushion by intermission, but then had to hold on tight Paquin SHEA (76) – Armani Luciano 7 0-0 18, Dan Pires 1 1-2 3, Dom Fernandes 5 5-8 16, Devin through the final 16 minutes to snag a 41-30 Division II DoCouto-Fernandes 5 0-0 11, Jamiel Rodrigues 0 0-0 0, Armani Baker 7 3-8 17, Jarrod Mainville 1 crossover triumph over North Providence on Wednesday 0-0 2, Aaron Jeffries 4 1-3 9; totals 30 10-21 76. Three-point field goals: McKeon, Coro 2, Luciano 4, Fernandes, DoCouto-Fernandes. evening. The Cougars eventually sliced that deficit to just one Halftime: Shea, 42-30. midway through the second session, but sharpshooter Kaylee Oliver canned three of her five treys in the half to seal the win Scituate cools off Davies and push the Saints to 7-0 in II-East and 7-1 overall. Becca LINCOLN – Davies Tech landed a whopping 12 three-point Gonzalez contributed nine more for SRA in the victory. bombs, but still fell victim to Scituate’s like assault, 63-57, during a *** Division III-North showdown at Gaskin Alumni Hall on Wednesday ST. RAPHAEL (41) – Kaylee Oliver 5 0-0 15, Becca Gonzalez 3 3-7 9, Felicia Baccari 1 0-1 2, Danyel Gonzalez 2 0-2 4, Seun Shittu 1 3-6 5, Lauren Taylor 0 0-0 0, Jackie Lopes night. 1 0-0 3, Olivia Janetta 1 1-2 3; totals 14 7-19 41. Junior Brandon Bernard netted six treys to finish with 27 points, NORTH PROVIDENCE (30) – Katherine DeCorte 1 0-0 2, Maddie Jamack 0 0-1 0, Gianna Gigliotti 3 2-5 8, Ashley VanBemmelen 4 0-1 9, Julianna Polselli 1 4-7 6, Kelsey while classmate Rico Dominicci chipped in four more for 18 for the Burgess 1 0-1 2, Michaela DeAngelis 1 0-0 3; totals 11 6-15 30. Patriots (3-5 overall, 2-5 league). Three-point field goals: Oliver 5, Lopes, VanBemmelen, DeAngelis. The Spartans, however, took advantage of 11 treys to claim the Halftime: St. Raphael, 18-7. triumph. Brian Heston hit seven to register a tilt-leading 28, while Nick Pietrantozzi added four to garner 18. Lincoln makes short order of Warwick Vets Davies actually went into the break with a 35-31 cushion, but LINCOLN — Lincoln High erupted for a 19-point lead at succumbed during the final 16 minutes. halftime, then cruised to a 46-25 Division II crossover victo*** ry over Warwick Vets at the “Lions’ Den” on Wednesday SCITUATE (63) – Nick Pietrantozzi 7 0-0 19, Collins Amallo 1 3-3 5, Brian Heston 11 0-0 28, night. No one posted double digits in the win, though seven Wyatt Laprade 1 7-8 9, James Gianquitto 1 0-0 2, Austin Barkley 0 0-0 0, Justin Mink 0 0-0 0; totals 63. Lions scored at least four points. Senior quad-captain Shirley 21 10-11 DAVIES TECH (57) – Keron Aird 2 0-0 6, Brandon Bernard 11 0-0 27, Rigo Dominicci 7 0-0 18, Carrington led the surge with eight, while fellow captains Alain Audette 1 0-0 2, David Delgado 0 0-0 0, Tarik Rodriques 1 0-1 2, Dom Nickel 1 0-0 3, Larry Kellyn Dyer and Casie Beauchemin each notched seven and Defay 0 0-0 0; totals 23 0-1 57. Three-point field goals: Pietrantozzi 5, Heston 6, Aird 2, Bernard 5, Dominicci 4, Nickel. Maddie Georgeu six for Lincoln (5-3 overall, 3-2 league). Halftime: Davies, 35-31. ***
WARWICK VETS (25) – Casey Bennett 1 3-4 6, Emily Almonte 0 1-2 1, Ricki Beaufort 2 1-2 7, Jenna Fontaine 1 2-4 4, Kat Raposo 1 0-2 2, Elizabeth Iadevaia 1 0-0 3, Victoria Ferri 1 0-4 2; totals 7 7-18 25. LINCOLN (46) – Shirley Carrington 4 0-3 8, Casie Beauchemin 3 0-0 7, Kellyn Dyer 2 2-4 7, McKenzie Cavanaugh 2 0-2 4, Maddie Georgeu 3 0-0 6, Megan Chatowsky 2 1-2 5, Ana Fernandez 1 0-4 2, Bethany Denio 2 0-1 4, Emma Gilbert 0 1-2 1, Hayley Veiga 1 0-2 2; totals 20 4-20 46. Three-point field goals: Beauchemin, Dyer, Bennett, Beaufort 2, Fontaine, Iadevaia. Halftime: Lincoln, 28-9.
Boys’ hockey
Clippers top Lions, remain perfect
WOONSOCKET — For the first time in a long while, Cumberland High actually defeated archrival Lincoln. It happened on Wednesday night at Adelard Arena, with the still-undefeated Clippers edging the previously-unbeaten Lions, 2-1, in a Division II-North showdown. Sophomore Jake Salisbury notched the game winner with 3:58 remaining in regulation. After a scoreless initial stanza, Cumberland took a 1-0 advantage on Salisbury’s unassisted tally just 1:01 into the second. Lincoln, however, knotted it at 1-1 when senior Mike Enos converted Aaron Fiske’s feed at 9:44. That just set up Salisbury’s heroics. CHS netminder Leo Lake closed with 18 saves, while Lincoln mainstay Chris Leclaire mustered 28. With the win, the Clippers improve to 11-0-0 in league play, while Lincoln fell to 11-1-0 in II-North (12-3-0 overall).
Quakers pull away from Broncos
PROVIDENCE — Burrillville High kept the score respectable at the break, losing to Moses Brown by a mere seven (28-21). But the Quakers slowly pulled away, in part due to Ogechi Ezeema’s game-high 23 points, to seal a 54-40 Division II crossover victory over the Broncos on Wednesday night. Tori Libby and Samantha Liberty posted 12 and 10 points, respectively, for the Broncos (2-7 overall, 1-6 league). ***
from a Football Championship Subdivision school. "That's always going to stick with me," the Broncos cornerback said. And he was a first-round selection. Big contracts, postseason honors, championships — for many players, none of that wipes out their conviction that they have something to prove. "A lot of people say we're supposed to be all this and that," Trevathan said. "But you've got to play with a burden that this could be taken away from you at any time." It's true in all sports, but especially so in the NFL. There are the non-guaranteed contracts, the physical demands of every snap. "Basketball, you can play a game and walk away with nothing," Wagner said. "Football, I don't know a player — unless you're the quarterback — that walks away not hurting, not bruised. ... People think we're one of the (physically) strongest people in the world. But we have to be mentally strong to take the hits that we take, to give the hits that we take and still come back the next day, do the same thing all over again. "That takes a lot of you." It helps explain the two sides to Sherman. He makes a choke sign toward the San Francisco bench and bellows into the camera about his own dominance. But in Super Bowl week interviews, he is laid-back, friendly, philosophical. For his fellow players, the contrast between their on-field and off-field personas is natural. "Especially at linebacker, you can't take crap from nobody," Trevathan said. "You've got to be an animal out there. But you've got to be a leader and be smart as well." Before games, Seahawks safety Kam Chancellor "goes to a dark place," Sherman said. "I don't know if I want to go to that place," he added. "But I do go to a place with a lot of animosity." Cornerback demands a special sort of personality, which may seem bewildering to those folks watching at home who have never covered a receiver one on one in the final seconds of a one-score affair. "As a corner in this game, you've got to have that mentality. When that ball goes on top of your head, everybody sees that," Rodgers-Cromartie said. "When you make a play like that at the end of the game, your emotions are high. Ain't no telling what comes out of your mouth."
BASEBALL
Baseball Calendar
BURRILLVILLE (40) – Tori Libby 4 4-5 12, Samantha Liberty 5 0-0 10, Catherine Keable 4 1-2 9, Lauren LaMontagne 0 2-2 2, Betsy Dumais 1 0-1 3, Caitlin Libby 0 0-0 0, Mikaela Messier 1 2-2 4; totals 15 9-12 40. MOSES BROWN (54) – Ogechi Ezemma 10 3-6 23, Isabelle Robinson 4 0-0 11, Addie Gilson 1 0-2 2, Alex Pinsky 3 0-0 6, Lydia DeAngelo 1 0-0 2, Claudia Marzec 1 0-0 2, Caroline Farber 1 0-0 2, Victoria Caruolo 2 0-0 6; totals 23 3-8 54. Three-point field goals: Dumais, Robinson 3, Caruolo 2. Halftime: Moses Brown, 28-21.
By The Associated Press Feb. 4-21 — Salary arbitration hearings, St. Petersburg, Fla. Feb. 6 — Voluntary reporting date for Arizona and Los Angeles Dodgers pitchers, catchers and injured players. Feb. 11 — Voluntary reporting date for Arizona and Los Angeles Dodgers other players. Feb. 13 — Voluntary reporting date for other team's pitchers, catchers and injured players. Feb. 18 — Voluntary reporting date for other team's other players. Feb. 25 — Mandatory reporting date. March 12 — Last day to place a player on unconditional release waivers and pay 30 days termination pay instead of 45 days. March 22-23 — Los Angeles Dodgers vs. Arizona, Sydney.
Thursday, January 30, 2014
AMUSEMENTS
THE TIMES B5
Daughter acts like a winner, but still feels like a loser
DEAR ABBY:
I’m a 27-year-old woman who still lives at home. I do it so I can help my mom with my five nieces and nephews. Their mother passed away suddenly in 2009 at the age of 30. My mom and stepdad kept them rather than scatter them to fathers who don’t appear very interested in them. Since my sister’s death I have earned two degrees, entered the health care field and have lost almost 140 pounds. Despite what I have accomplished, I feel I have nothing to show for myself. When I point my accomplishments out to myself, they don’t seem like a heck of a lot. What can I do so I can stop feeling like a loser? — LOST IN THE NORTHEAST DEAR LOST: A loser? From where I sit, you appear to be not only a caring daughter, but also an intellectually accomplished young woman who is being very hard on herself. If you feel you haven’t accomplished a lot, I have to question the yardstick you’re using. It’s time you discussed your feelings with a licensed mental health professional who can help you understand what is causing your low self-esteem. If you do, it may help you be kinder to yourself, because what’s currently going on in your head is unfair to you and destructive. people in this world are hungry. I have seen children run around, making a mess of the dessert bar, and especially the ice cream and drink stations. Their parents seem to think it’s “cute.” I wish you would remind your readers to use common sense when dining out and to PLEASE control their children. The parents should serve food to their little ones who don’t know better. — FRUSTRATED BUFFET WORKER, PUEBLO, COLO. DEAR FRUSTRATED: Children can’t practice behavior they haven’t been taught, and parents who don’t take the time to explain proper behavior to their little ones are shirking their responsibility. As to adults who have so little understanding of hygiene — or consideration for others — that they put their hands or used utensils into food that is meant for others, well — perhaps after being reminded that it raises the prices they have to pay, they’ll think twice about it. But don’t bet on it. DEAR JAKE: There is give and take in all healthy relationships. A “balance is reached” when you can give without feeling used, and take without feeling guilty that you’re being given too much. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. For an excellent guide to becoming a better conversationalist and a more sociable person, order “How to Be Popular.” Send your name and mailing address, plus check or money order for $7 (U.S. funds) to: Dear Abby, Popularity Booklet, P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL 610540447. (Shipping and handling are included in the price.)
DEAR ABBY
Jeanne Phillips
DEAR ABBY:
I work in a buffet restaurant. I wish you would alert your readers to how waste increases the costs at restaurants like this one. And then people complain because the cost of the food goes up! I have seen customers stick their fingers or used utensils into pans of food to taste it before serving themselves. And instead of the tongs we provide, they use their hands to help themselves to chicken, bread, etc. The fact is that once anyone touches the food with his or her hands or eating utensil, the restaurant is required by the health code to dispose of the entire pan of food. This causes tremendous waste. Customers also overfill their plates only to throw half the food away. It makes me sad because so many
Sudoku solution
DEAR ABBY:
I was wondering what is the appropriate level of give and take in a friendship? I notice that in some relationships I am always giving and never receiving, where in others I am always receiving. How do you know when a balance is reached? — JAKE IN ALBANY, GA.
Horoscope
By HOLIDAY MATHIS
ARIES (March 21-April 19). There’s a fine line between expressing your own individuality and rejecting the group culture of those around you. Put the group culture first and you’ll have no trouble finding windows of opportunity to be unique. TAURUS (April 20-May 20). You like to concentrate on what needs to be done and can’t see the point of dwelling on what you’ve already accomplished. It’s necessary to compartmentalize the past, but don’t forget it. GEMINI (May 21-June 21). It’s only natural to leave the door of your heart open around loved ones. Being so emotionally vulnerable is not always best for your relationships. To protect your heart’s treasures, you must sometimes lock them up. CANCER (June 22-July 22). Your neighborhood is really only as good as your neighbors. Taking care of those who live around you will be part of today’s work and in doing this, you’ll be improving the domestic life of many. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). Misinformation will provide a test of your inner guidance system. You are not likely to believe something just because it’s what you’re asked to believe. You have to feel the truth of things at a bone level. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). Today, you will have to bend to avoid breaking. Flexibility is not one of your main strengths and yet, you will be willing to do whatever it takes to help your plans bear fruit. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). You have one style of doing things, and someone close to you has a completely different approach. The two styles may clash, and someone will have to back down. If this person is you, you won’t be sorry. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21). Your love takes work now, and your work takes love. It feels so worthwhile though as today’s project will provide you with excitement on par with romantic rapture. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21). You strive to be selfsufficient emotionally, financially and physically. For you, being sure of this is your freedom. It allows you to say “no” and “yes” to whomever you want. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19). You are now doing the work that once seemed so beyond your capabilities. Backing out was never an option for you, and now you and your crew will benefit from your perseverance. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18). You’ll enjoy the challenge of being a stranger in a new land for a few hours today, and this experience will teach you something about your confidence, defense mechanisms and social strengths. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20). Thinking ahead is your talent now. You’ve witnessed the kinds of difficulties and delays that are caused by a lack of preparation, and you’re determined to do everything you can to get ready for what’s to come.
A - Cox B - Uxbridge, Millville Comcast C - Blackstone, Franklin Comcast D - Bellingham Comcast
A B C D
THURSDAY EVENING JANUARY 30, 2014
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Makers: Women Who Make America How women have helped shape America. Å
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The Big Bang (:31) The Mill- (:01) The Crazy (:31) Two and a (:01) Elementary “Dead Clade WBZ News Late Show W/ Theory (N) ers (N) Å Ones Half Men Walking” (N) Å (N) Å Letterman Shark Tank A product that identi- NewsCenter 5 (:35) Jimmy The Taste “Go Green” (N) Å fies home visitors. Å Late (N) Kimmel Live Shark Tank A product that identi- ABC6 News at (:35) Jimmy The Taste “Go Green” (N) Å fies home visitors. Å Eleven (N) Kimmel Live Community Parks and Rec- Saturday Night Live Presents a SNL Sports Spectacular Fan favor- 7 News at Tonight Show (N) Å reation (N) ite sports-themed sketches. (N) Å 11PM (N) w/Jay Leno Community Parks and Rec- Saturday Night Live Presents a SNL Sports Spectacular Fan favor- NBC 10 News at Tonight Show (N) Å reation (N) ite sports-themed sketches. (N) Å 11pm (N) w/Jay Leno The Big Bang (:31) The Mill- (:01) The Crazy (:31) Two and a (:01) Elementary “Dead Clade News at 11 Late Show W/ Theory (N) ers (N) Å Ones Half Men Walking” (N) Å Letterman American Idol Hopefuls audition Rake Keegan represents three Fox 25 News at TMZ (N) Å Fox 25 News at 10 (N) Å in Omaha, Neb. (N) Å Amish bakers. (N) 11 (N) The Vampire Diaries “The Devil Reign Queen Catherine comes Two and a Half Two and a Half The Office Å The Office Å Inside” (N) Å under suspicion. (N) Men Men URI Today BBC World (Off Air) Salinger: American Masters Author J.D. Salinger’s life and work. Å “Baby Talk” News Å House “Instant Karma” A busi- House “Brave Heart” House con- WBZ News Seinfeld “The Seinfeld Å The Office Å nessman’s teenage son. fronts some of his ghosts. (N) Å Boyfriend” Frontline The NFL and brain Frontline The NFL and brain The This Old House Hour (N) Å NOVA Victims unearthed in Ireland’s bogs. Å injuries in players. Å injuries in players. Å The Vampire Diaries “The Devil Reign Queen Catherine comes 7 News at 10PM on CW56 (N) Å The Arsenio Hall Show Å Inside” (N) Å under suspicion. (N) American Idol Hopefuls audition Rake Keegan represents three Eyewitness (:45) Sports Seinfeld “The Family Guy Å in Omaha, Neb. (N) Å Amish bakers. (N) News at 10 Wrap Boyfriend” Law & Order: Criminal Intent Law & Order: Criminal Intent Criminal Minds Reid connects Criminal Minds Prentiss is sus“On Fire” Å Couple bludgeoned to death. with an autistic child. Å picious of a nemesis. Law & Order: Criminal Intent Law & Order: Criminal Intent Criminal Minds Reid connects Criminal Minds Prentiss is suspicious of a nemesis. “On Fire” Å Couple bludgeoned to death. with an autistic child. Å
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The First 48 Witness is shot Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Crazy Hearts: Nashville “All (:01) Crazy Hearts: Nashville before his court date. Å “Plan Bee” “Going Si-ral” Å Trucked Up” (N) Å “All Trucked Up” Å Å Å Å Finding Bigfoot: Further EviWild West Alaska Wild West Alaska: Grizzly Sized Wild West Alaska Ken makes a Cold River Cash Eelinators go far Wild West Alaska Ken makes a dence “Big Rhodey” Å “Episode 10” (N) custom shotgun. (N) out and hit jackpot. (N) custom shotgun. (5:30) } ## Four Brothers (2005) Mark Wahlberg. Siblings seek } ### I Am Legend (2007, Science Fiction) Will Smith, Alice (:01) } ### Batman Begins (2005, Action) Christian Bale. revenge for their adoptive mother’s murder. Å Braga. Bloodthirsty plague victims surround a lone survivor. Bruce Wayne becomes Gotham City’s Dark Knight. Å 106 & Park: BET’s Top 10 Live The Game Å } ## Black Dynamite (2009) Michael Jai White, Kym Whitley. Premiere. A kung Scandal A philandering senaScandal The team investigates “Top 10 Countdown” (N) fu fighter wages war on “The Man” after his brother’s murder. Å tor. Å Josie Marcus. Å The Millionaire Matchmaker The Millionaire Matchmaker The Millionaire Matchmaker The Millionaire Matchmaker Toned Up (N) Toned Up (N) Watch What Matchmaker Patti’s friend needs her help. “Workaholics” (N) Happens: Live Mad Money (N) The Kudlow Report (N) American Greed Michael Mas- American Greed An attorney American Greed A businessman Mad Money tromarino. takes advantage of couples. buys big companies. (5:00) The Situ- Crossfire (N) Erin Burnett OutFront (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Å Piers Morgan Live (N) AC 360 Later (N) Erin Burnett OutFront ation Room It’s Always It’s Always The Colbert Daily Show/Jon It’s Always It’s Always Tosh.0 Å Tosh.0 Å It’s Always It’s Always Daily Show/Jon (:31) The ColSunny Sunny Report Å Stewart Sunny Sunny Sunny Sunny Stewart bert Report SportsNet Cen- Early Edition Women’s College Basketball Northeastern at Delaware. (N) The Mountain Cross Check Sports Tonight SportsNet Cen- Sports Tonight SportsNet Central (N) (N) Report (N) (N) tral (N) tral (N) Saint Hoods Å Fast N’ Loud Richard over-buys The Fighters Å The Fighters Young fighters with Lone Target “Swim to Survive” The Fighters Young fighters with at an auction. Å explosive styles face off. Anti-drug trafficking unit. explosive styles face off. } ### Wizards of Waverly Place: The Movie (:10) Liv & Jessie Å Austin & Ally Å A.N.T. Farm Jessie Å Good Luck (:35) Dog With A.N.T. Farm Austin & Ally Å “unwANTed” Charlie Å (2009) Selena Gomez. ‘NR’ Å Maddie Å a Blog Å “endurAnts” Keeping Up With the KarE! News (N) RichKids of RichKids of Keeping Up With the Kardashi- Keeping Up With the KarChelsea Lately E! News dashians Beverly Hills Beverly Hills ans “How To Deal” dashians (N) SportsCenter (N) Å College Basketball Teams TBA. (N) College Basketball Teams TBA. (N) SportsCenter (N) Å College Basketball Teams TBA. (N) SportsCentury Å College Basketball Teams TBA. (N) Olbermann (N) Å
278 182 120 120 120 290 172 250 250 250 236 114 196 196 196 206 140 209 144 208 143 70 74 71 70 74 71 70 74 71
Around the Pardon the 35 50 50 Horn (N) Interruption (N) (5:00) College Basketball From 309 258 258 Jan. 1, 2008. Å It’s a Miracle Saint Gianna 96 56 56 Berretta Mola Å The Middle Å The Middle Å 50 26 26
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SportsCentury Profile of football SportsCentury Å SportsCentury Profile of football SportsCentury Å great Jim Brown. Å great Chuck Bednarik. Olam Daily Mass The Franciscan World Over Live (N) Crossing the Rosary Life on the Rock “Bryan KemDefending Women of Missionaries. Å Goal Å per” (N) Life Å Grace } ## 17 Again (2009, Comedy) Zac Efron, Leslie Mann. A 37} ## The Pacifier (2005, Comedy) Vin Diesel, Lauren Graham. The 700 Club Å year-old man miraculously transforms into a teenager. A Navy SEAL becomes the guardian of five siblings. Cupcake Wars “Derby Dolls” Los Donut ShowDonut ShowChopped “Hoofin’ It!” Making pie Chopped Canada Seafood in the Cutthroat Kitchen Chicken soup Diners, Drive- Diners, DriveAngeles Derby Dolls. down (N) down work with venison. appetizer round; quail. (N) on a cookie sheet. Ins and Dives Ins and Dives Two and a Half Two and a Half Anger Manage- } ## Underworld: Awakening (2012, Horror) Kate Beckinsale, Anger Manage- } # The Waterboy (1998, Comedy) Adam Sandler, Kathy Bates. Men Men ment Stephen Rea. Humans wage war on vampires and lycans. ment (N) A simpleton’s angry outbursts lead to gridiron glory. Income Property A house with a Hunters Int’l House HuntRehab Addict Rehab Addict Rehab Addict Rehab Addict House Hunters Hunters Int’l The Brian Boi- The Brian Boibasement apartment. ers Å (N) Å tano Project tano Project Å Å Å Å Pawn Stars Å Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Å Pawn Stars Å Pawn Stars Å Pawn Stars Å Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Appalachian Outlaws (N) Å (:02) The Curse of Oak Island Å “Out of Gas” (N) Å (N) Å Wife Swap Traditional mom; Project Runway: Under the Project Runway: Under the Gunn Project Runway: Under the Gunn (:01) Kim of Queens Kim is frus- (:02) Dance Moms Holly worries modern wife and mother. Gunn Å “The Mentor Face Off” (N) Å trated with her girls. about Nia’s role. Å Nick Cannon: Nick Cannon: Ridiculousness Ridiculousness Ridiculousness Ridiculousness Ridiculousness Ridiculousness Ridiculousness Jerks With Dyrdek’s Fan- Ridiculousness Wild ’n Out Wild ’n Out (N) Cameras (N) tasy Factory Golf Destina- Bruins FaceNHL Hockey Montreal Canadiens at Boston Bruins. From TD Garden in Boston. (N Bruins OverSports Today The Instigators Sports Today Sports Today tion (N) Off (N) Subject to Blackout) time Live (N) LIVE (N) (N) SpongeBob SpongeBob Sam & Cat Å Every Witch The Thunder- The Thunder- Full House Å Full House Full House Å Full House Å Friends Å (:36) Friends Å SquarePants SquarePants Way (N) mans Å mans Å “Mad Money” } ## } ## (5:30) The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn 2012 (2009, Action) John Cusack, Chiwetel Ejiofor, Amanda Peet. A global cataclysm nearly wipes out human- } Stonehenge Treader (2010) Georgie Henley, Skandar Keynes. Å ity. Apocalypse Cops Å Cops Å Cops Screams. Cops Å Cops Å Cops “Coast to iMPACT Wrestling (N) Å Cops “Couples Cops Å Coast” in Crime” Sister Wives The wives take a Welcome to Myrtle Manor “The Here Comes Here Comes Here Comes Here Comes Welcome to Myrtle Manor Here Comes Here Comes road trip without Kody. Handyman Can” Å Honey Honey Honey Honey Amanda tries to get in shape. Honey Honey Castle Murder investigation leads NBA Tip-Off (N) Å NBA Basketball Cleveland Cavaliers at New York Knicks. From Madison Square Gar- NBA Basketball Los Angeles Clippers at Golden to the mayor. den in New York. (N) Å State Warriors. (N) Å NinjaGo: Mas- The Powerpuff World of Gum- Steven UniTeen Titans Go! Johnny Test Å King of the The Cleveland American American Family Guy Å Family Guy Å ters Girls ball verse “Frybo” Hill Å Show Dad Å Dad Å The Andy The Andy Gilligan’s Gilligan’s Gilligan’s (:36) Gilligan’s (:12) Everybody Loves Raymond Everybody-Ray- Everybody-Ray- Everybody-Ray- Everybody-RayGriffith Show Griffith Show Island Island Island Island “Captain Nemo” Å mond mond mond mond Law & Order: Special Victims Law & Order: Special Victims Law & Order: Special Victims White Collar Finding hidden (:01) Law & Order: Special Vic- Law & Order: Special Victims Unit “Reparations” Å Unit “Hooked” Å Unit “Lessons Learned” treasure. (N) Å (DVS) tims Unit Å (DVS) Unit “Bang” Å Seinfeld “The Seinfeld “The Seinfeld “The Family Guy Å Family Guy Å Family Guy Å The Big Bang The Big Bang King of the Nerds “Weird...Sci- Conan (N) Å Smelly Car” Butter Shave” Voice” Å Theory Theory ence?” (N)
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299 170 252 252 252 244 122 180 180 180 262 168 54 54 54
280 183 139 139 139 245 138 51 51 51
296 176 257 257 257 301 106 244 244 244 242 105 247 139 50 52 50 52 50 52
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} ## Mr. 3000 (2004) Bernie Mac. A baseball (:45) } ### Hitch (2005) Will Smith, Eva Mendes. A smooth(5:05) } # My (:40) } # Inspector Gadget (1999, Comedy) (:45) } # My Baby’s Daddy Matthew Broderick, Rupert Everett. ‘PG’ Å star comes out of retirement. ‘PG-13’ Å talker helps a shy accountant woo an heiress. ‘PG-13’ Å Baby’s Daddy } ## Oblivion (2013) Tom Cruise. A stranger’s arrival triggers (5:45) } ## Red Tails (2012) Cuba Gooding Jr. The U.S. military Girls “Deep Looking Å Cathouse: Wel- (:45) True forms the first all-black aerial-combat unit. ‘PG-13’ Å Inside” Å one man’s battle to save mankind. ‘PG-13’ Å come Detective Å (5:30) } ### Primary Colors (1998) John Travolta. A smooth- } ## Snitch (2013) Dwayne Johnson. A man infiltrates a drug } ## Taken 2 (2012) Liam Neeson. A vengeful (:40) Zane’s the talking Southern governor runs for president. ‘R’ cartel to save his son from prison. ‘PG-13’ Å father abducts Bryan Mills and his wife. Jump Off (5:30) The World According to Dick Cheney The (:20) } ## The Words (2012, Drama) Bradley } ### Silver Linings Playbook (2012, Comedy-Drama) Bradley Gigolos (N) Å } ### life of the former vice president. Å Cooper, Jeremy Irons. ‘PG-13’ Å Cooper, Jennifer Lawrence, Robert De Niro. ‘R’ Å Unhung Hero } ### The Incredibles (2004) Voices of Craig T. Nelson. Ani} ## The Odd Life of Timothy Green (2012) Jennifer Garner. A (10:50) } ### This Is the (5:00) } ### Drumline (2002) Nick Cannon. ‘PG-13’ Å mated. A former superhero gets back into action. ‘PG’ Å boy brings magic into the lives of a married couple. ‘PG’ End (2013) James Franco. ‘R’ (:05) } ### The Rundown (2003) The Rock. A bounty hunter } ## W. (2008, Docudrama) Josh Brolin. The life and controver- (:10) } ### Elizabeth (1998) Cate Blanchett. An account of must find his boss’ son in the Amazon. ‘PG-13’ sial presidency of George W. Bush. ‘PG-13’ Å Queen Elizabeth’s ascendency to the throne. ‘R’ Å
B6 THE TIMES
COMICS
By Norm Feuti
Thursday, January 30, 2014
Retail
Lio
By Mark Tatulli
For Better or Worse
By Lynn Johnston
Crankshaft
By Tom Batiuk
Blondie
By Dean Young & Denis Lebrun
Garfield
By Jim Davis
Mother Goose & Grimm
By Mike Peters
Gasoline Alley
By Jim Scancarelli
Baby Blues
By Rick Kirkman & Jerry Scott
Zits
By Jerry Scott & Jim Borgman
Rose Is Rose
By Pat Brady
Marvin
By Tom Armstrong
Funky Winkerbean
By Tom Batiuk
Pearls Before Swine
By Stephan Pastis
B.C.
By Johnny Hart
Get Fuzzy
By Darby Conley
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Jumble puzzle magazines available at pennydellpuzzles.com/jumblemags
Cryptoquote
Su Do Ku Tips and computer program at www.sudoku.com.
For solutions, check “JRC Publications” on the solutions page of www.sudoku.com.
Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.
© Puzzles by Pappocom
TMAID
©2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved.
NEAAR
CAILIT
PENWEH
Print your answer here:
Yesterday’s
Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.
(Answers tomorrow) IRONY MOTION THEORY Jumbles: AWOKE Answer: When Tabitha Spruce met Stephen King in college, she met — MR. “WRITE”
-
Thursday, January 30, 2014
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123 Autos For Sale
“There’s More $$$ In That Old Car, Truck, Van or Motorcycle That You Thought.”
Buying US coins dated be1998 TOYOTA Corolla LT, 126 Trucks fore 1965: dimes $1.20, 4 door, loaded, auto, 4 quarters $3.00, halves cyl. (32 MPG) Inspected, blk. Nice, one owner 2000 FORD F250 XLT 3 $6.00 Woonsocket 597Quarter ton, 4x4, with 6426 $1,250. 401-426-1054 plow attachment, low 2000 DODGE RAM 4x4, miles, nice, must see, 1 03 FORD EXPLORER LTD, 1500 series, five speed owner $3,950. 241-0354 265 Furniture 4x4, garaged, all records, transmission, inspected. classified@pawtuckettimes.com Household single owner, excellent $2,000 /best 401-787$3,100. 401-391-9939 4764 Complete instructions 3 LIVING ROOMS chairs 2000 JEEP Cherokee Lareshould include: $30.00 each. 508-8831985 CHEVY Monte Carlo, do, LT, 4 dr, loaded, auto, 9323 V6, 50k original miles, 6 cyl. 4.0, like new, 1 Publication dates, runs great, $2,000/best. owner, must see! $2000. Oak hutch. 2 glass doors, Billing information and 401-265-2616 401-241-0413 2 shelves, mirror backed, the Name and Phone two draws with skeleton OLDSMOBILE 1991 JAGUAR XJS sport 2000 key, 7 feet tall. $99. 401- 330 Brokers - Agents number of individual to coupe, V12, gold with ALERO, hand & foot con603-7519 contact if necessary. saddle interior, auto, only trols, 2 door, 90,000 ROCKING chair Hi Back 87k original miles, needs miles. $3,100/best offer. 401-294-6311 with padded seat, darkV-gasket. $4,500. 769-0516 141 Appliance LEGAL NOTICES wood, brand new $95.00. FIND A HOME. Sell a 2000 VOLKSWAGON Jetta Services MUST BE RECEIVED 401-762-3682 home. Find a tenant. Call 1994 Crown Victoria- Runs GXE edition, 4 dr, loaded, nd the classified team at The 3 BUSINESS DAYS excellent, very well main- auto, 32MPG, mint 2 APPLIANCE REPAIR. Times to place your adtained. Pawtucket. $850. owner, low miles $1,900. 273 Miscellaneous PRIOR TO Appliance Repair. Applivertisement. Call 401401-426-0975 465-1500 ance Repair. Fast and 722-4000 PUBLICATION Merchandise 2002 MURCURY Grand Friendly Service. 4011994 FORD Crown Victo- Marquis LS 4dr, auto, 523-5554 For further information ria. Runs excellent, very loaded, showroom, 1 LOOKING FOR SOMECall 722-4000 Monday well maintained, receipts. owner, must see $2.500. THING HARD TO FIND? thru Friday; $950. 401-465-1500 159 General Be sure to look in the 401-585-9483 100 Legals classified pages of The 8:30 a.m. To 4:30 p.m. Services TImes every day. Surely you'll find interesting MORTGAGEE'S SALE things that you may want 35 and 37 Sumner St Cumberland, RI or need. The Times is the ATTENTION perfect marketplace you TO ADVERTISE YOUR can enjoy in the comfort BUSINESS IN THIS of your own home. There The premises described in the mortgage will be SECTION is something for every- sold subject to all encumbrances and prior liens CALL THE TIMES one in The Times classiCLASSIFIED DEPT on February 13, 2014 at 11:00 a.m. on the fieds! 401-722-4000 SMITH CORONA typewrit- premises, by virtue of the power of sale coner, with spell right dictio- tained in a mortgage by Marian E. Sherman datnary, auto memory correction, word eraser. ed December 8, 2006 and recorded in the Cum-
Real Estate-Sale
LEGAL NOTICE INFORMATION Legal Notices may be mailed to: The Times, P.O. Box 307, Pawtucket, RI 02860 Faxed to: (401) 727-9250 or Emailed to:
MORTGAGEE'S SALE 44B PHEASANT RUN, SMITHFIELD, RI 02917
The premises described in the mortgage will be sold subject to all encumbrances and prior liens on February 14, 2014 at 01:00 PM on the premises, by virtue of the power of sale contained in a mortgage by Carolyn Colaluca dated December 17, 2010 and recorded in the Smithfield Land Evidence Records in Book 779 Page 323 , the conditions of said mortgage having been broken. $5,000.00 in cash, certified or bank check required to bid. Other terms will be announced at the sale. ORLANS MORAN PLLC Attorney for the Present Holder of the Mortgage P.O. Box 540540 Waltham, MA 02454 Phone: 781-790-7800 703.2453 MORTGAGEE'S SALE 394 Central Street Central Falls, RI
Business Services
The premises described in the mortgage will be sold subject to all encumbrances and prior liens on February 13, 2014 at 10:00 a.m. on the premises, by virtue of the power of sale contained in a mortgage by Maritza Objio and Joseph Izzo dated July 26, 2007 and recorded in the Central Falls Land Evidence Records in Book 712, Page 318, the conditions of said mortgage having been broken.
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The Times does not knowingly accept advertisements in the Employment classifications that are not bonafide job offers. Classification 200 is provided for Employment Information, Services and Referrals. This newspaper does not knowingly accept Employment ads that indicate a preference bases on age from employees covered be Age Discrimination In Employment Act. Nor do we in any way condone employment based solely upon discrimination practices.
$5,000.00 in cash, certified or bank check is required to bid. Other terms will be announced at $50.00 like new 769-5887 berland Land Evidence Records in Book 1363, the sale. Page 717, the conditions of said mortgage havReal Estate-Rent ing been broken. HARMON LAW OFFICES, P.C. Attorney for the Holder of the Mortgage $5,000.00 in cash, certified or bank check is re150 California Street quired to bid. Other terms will be announced at Newton, MA 02458 the sale. (617) 558-0500 201311-0006 - TEA HARMON LAW OFFICES, P.C. Attorney for the Holder of the Mortgage MORTGAGEE'S SALE 150 California Street 300 Rental Agencies 46 Fillmore Street Pawtucket, RI Newton, MA 02458 Readers of The Times are (617) 558-0500 The premises described in the mortgage will be advised The Times does 201310-1030 - GRY not knowingly accept adsold subject to all encumbrances and prior liens
vertisements that are in violation of the Federal Fair Housing Law and the Rhode Island Fair Housing Practices Act. The Federal Fair Housing Law and Rhode Island Fair Housing Practices Act are designed to prevent discrimination in the purchase and rental of housing. Refusal to rent, lease, or sell property to anyone due to age, race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, disability, familial status, or country of ancestral origin is in violation of the Fair Housing Law. If you have a complaint, contact the Rhode Island Commission for Human Rights. They will help any person that has been discriminated against in the rental of housing, the sale of housing, home financing or public accommodations. Call the Rhode Island Commission for Human Rights, 401-2222661.
Call one of our Classified Customer Service Reps
The Call - 767-8503 or The Times - 365-1438
MORTGAGEE'S SALE 24 Barber Ave Central Falls, RI
on February 6, 2014 at 12:00 p.m. on the premises, by virtue of the power of sale contained in a mortgage by David G. Cimini dated May 29, 2007 and recorded in the Pawtucket Land Evidence Records in Book 2876, Page 274, the conditions of said mortgage having been broken.
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PAWTUCKET: Near center, laundry facilities, wall to wall carpets. $100 & up 401-726-0995.
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The premises described in the mortgage will be sold subject to all encumbrances and prior liens $5,000.00 in cash, certified or bank check is reon February 6, 2014 at 1:00 p.m. on the premis- quired to bid. Other terms will be announced at es, by virtue of the power of sale contained in a the sale. mortgage by Celestino Ribeiro and Ilda Ribeiro HARMON LAW OFFICES, P.C. dated November 8, 2005 and recorded in the Attorney for the Holder of the Mortgage Central Falls Land Evidence Records in Book 150 California Street 637, Page 74, the conditions of said mortgage Newton, MA 02458 having been broken. (617) 558-0500 200907-2708 - TEA $5,000.00 in cash, certified or bank check is required to bid. Other terms will be announced at NOTICE OF MORTGAGEE'S SALE the sale. 476-478 Lonsdale Avenue Pawtucket, Rhode Island HARMON LAW OFFICES, P.C. Attorney for the Holder of the Mortgage The premises described in the mortgage will be 150 California Street sold, to all encumbrances, prior liens and such Newton, MA 02458 matters which may constitute valid liens or en(617) 558-0500 cumbrances after sale, at public auction on 201210-0714 - TEA February 6, 2014 at 1:00 PM, on the premises by virtue of the power of sale in said mortgage made by Hector Santos, dated December 20, 2006, and recorded in the Pawtucket, RI Land Evidence Records in Book 2789 at Page 141, the NOTICE OF MORTGAGEE'S SALE conditions of said mortgage having been broken. 22 Dewey Avenue $5,000.00 in cash, certified or bank check reNorth Providence, Rhode Island quired to bid. Other terms to be announced at the sale. The premises described in the mortgage will be sold, subject to all encumbrances, prior liens SHECHTMAN HALPERIN SAVAGE, LLP and such matters which may constitute valid 1080 Main Street liens or encumbrances after sale, at public aucPawtucket, Rhode Island tion on February 6, 2014 at 12:00 PM, on the Attorney for the present premises by virtue of the power of sale in said Holder of the Mortgage mortgage made by Christine J. Thorn, dated MORTGAGEE'S SALE June 29, 2007, and recorded in the North Provi77 Farrell Street Pawtucket, RI dence, RI Land Evidence Records in Book 2421 at Page 52, the conditions of said mortgage having been broken. $5,000.00 in cash, certified or The premises described in the mortgage will be bank check required to bid. Other terms to be sold subject to all encumbrances and prior liens on February 6, 2014 at 2:00 p.m. on the premisannounced at the sale. es, by virtue of the power of sale contained in a mortgage by Justin L. Acosta and Lisa M. SHECHTMAN HALPERIN SAVAGE, LLP Blangeard dated June 16, 2008 and recorded in 1080 Main Street the Pawtucket Land Evidence Records in Book Pawtucket, Rhode Island 3031, Page 17, the conditions of said mortgage Attorney for the present having been broken. Holder of the Mortgage $5,000.00 in cash, certified or bank check is required to bid. Other terms will be announced at the sale. MORTGAGEE'S NOTICE OF SALE OF REAL ESTATE 464-466 BENEFIT STREET, PAWTUCKET, RI 02861 HARMON LAW OFFICES, P.C. Attorney for the Holder of the Mortgage 150 California Street Newton, MA 02458 (617) 558-0500 201307-0413 - TEA MORTGAGEE'S SALE 353 HIGH STREET, CUMBERLAND, RI 02864
The premises described in the mortgage will be sold subject to all encumbrances and prior liens on February 21, 2014 at 12:00 PM on the premises, by virtue of the power of sale contained in a mortgage by Maria Felix dated February 23, 2005 and recorded in the Pawtucket Land Evidence Records in Book L2304 Page 300 The premises described in the mortgage will be , the conditions of said mortgage having been sold subject to all encumbrances and prior liens broken. on February 14, 2014 at 09:00 AM on the premises, by virtue of the power of sale conTERMS OF SALE: tained in a mortgage by Antonio J. Soares and A deposit of FIVE THOUSAND DOLLARS AND 00 Carolina M. Soares dated December 8, 2010 and CENTS ($5,000.00) in the form of a certified recorded in the Cumberland Land Evidence check or bank treasurer's check will be required Records in Book 001521 Page 000805 , the to be delivered at or before the time the bid is of- conditions of said mortgage having been broken. fered. The description of the premises contained in said mortgage shall control in the event of an $5,000.00 in cash, certified or bank check reerror in this publication. Other terms will be an- quired to bid. Other terms will be announced at nounced at the sale. the sale. ORLANS MORAN PLLC Attorney for the Present Holder of the Mortgage P.O. Box 540540 Waltham, MA 02454 Phone: 781-790-7800 231.6914 ORLANS MORAN PLLC Attorney for the Present Holder of the Mortgage P.O. Box 540540 Waltham, MA 02454 Phone: 781-790-7800 703.3282
B8 THE TIMES
NATION
Thursday, January 30, 2014
Visit us online at www.pawtuckettimes.com
Obama executive omissions leave some allies angry
JULIE PACE
AP White House Correspondent
WASHINGTON — For some White House allies, the long list of executive actions President Barack Obama announced in his State of the Union address was marred by a few glaring omissions. Gay rights advocates are seething over Obama's refusal to grant employment discrimination protections to gays and lesbians working for federal contractors, safeguards they have been seeking for years. And some immigration overhaul supporters were disappointed that he did not act on his own to halt deportations, which have soared during his presidency and angered many Hispanics. On both issues, White House officials say the place for action is in Congress, where successful legislation would be far more sweeping than the steps the president could take by himself. But work on an employment non-discrimination bill and an overhaul of the nation's immigration laws is stalled on Capitol Hill, leaving advocates perplexed as to why their calls for executive action did not fit into Obama's vow to act "whenever and wherever" Congress will not. "In the absence of congressional action, an executive order that prohibits discrimination by contractors is a tailor-made solution to the president's expressed aims," said Fred Sainz, vice president of Human Rights Campaign, the nation's largest gay advocacy organization. Sainz said his frustration with the White House's inaction on the issue was "growing by the day." Ben Monterroso, executive director of the immigration organization Mi Familia Vota, said: "The president said he is going to use executive orders to act where Congress fails, and we expect him to do the same with immigration reform."
The criticism is particularly striking given that it is coming from two constituencies that have reliably supported the president. More than 70 percent of Hispanic voters backed Obama in the 2012 presidential election, and the gay community has consistently praised him for his unprecedented support. For gay advocates, the frustration that followed the State of the Union was compounded by the fact that the president announced a minimum-wage executive order that in many ways mirrored the action they are seeking. The order raises the minimum hourly pay for new federal contractors from $7.25 to $10.10. Obama cast the move as an opportunity to make at least some progress on the issue while he pushes Congress to pass legislation extending the minimum to all workers. Gay rights proponents have asked Obama to sign an executive order prohibiting discrimination by federal contractors on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity. At the same time, they want Congress to pass the broader Employment NonDiscrimination Act, which has the backing of the White House. That measure passed the Senate last year but is stalled in the Republican-led House. Heather Cronk, co-director of the organizations GetEqual, said Obama's declining to sign the executive order means he is "actively choosing to permit discrimination against LGBT workers." Obama spokesman Jay Carney said the executive actions the president outlined in Tuesday night's address were not an exhaustive list of his plans for this year. But Carney also cautioned that he was not implying there would be any future action on the LGBT order. While leading gay rights supporters were largely united in their reactions following the State of the Union, the view among
immigration advocates was more fractured. Some of those seeking an overhaul of the nation's immigration laws fear that unilateral action by the president would upend the fragile legislative maneuvering on Capitol Hill. A Senate-approved bill is languishing in the House, but GOP leaders are currently working on another set of immigration principles to secure the national border and extend legal status to many of the estimated 11 million people already in the U.S. illegally. But other immigration backers say there is more that Obama can — and should — do immediately, regardless of what's happening on Capitol Hill. Their demands center in particular on deportations, which has hit about 400,000 annually during Obama's presidency, according to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement. In 2012, Obama suspended deportations of some of the "Dreamers" — immigrants brought to the U.S. illegally as children. Advocates, as well as some Democratic lawmakers, want the president to expand that order to cover those children's parents and other immigrant groups. Lorella Praeli, advocacy and policy director for the group United We Dream, welcomed Obama's renewed call in the State of the Union for passing comprehensive legislation, but she still singled out the president's resistance to take executive action to end more deportations. "While he's willing to take action singlehandedly on other political issues, he so far refuses to stop deporting people who would be granted legal status and a chance for citizenship under legislation he champions," Praeli said in a statement. The White House argues that not only would such unilateral action destabilize the debate on Capitol Hill but it also could be difficult to legally defend.
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