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February 13, 2014

February 13, 2014

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WEATHER
TODAY High: 38 Low: 32
Central Falls’ lone Catholic school to close
Diocese leaders say lack of financial aid led to enrollment dip
By DONNA KENNY KIRWAN
dkirwan@pawtuckettimes.com
WHAT A W RLD
Local and wire reports
AT LEAST HE DIDN’T PUT HIS EYE OUT
EASTHAMPTON, Mass. (AP) — An Easthampton middle school student, in a scene straight out of the movie “A Christmas Story” got their tongue stuck to a metal pole. Fire Chief David Mottor says firefighters responded to White Brook Middle School at about 8 a.m. Wednesday, when temperatures were well below freezing. Mottor tells The Republican that firefighters poured warm water on the student's tongue, freeing it. The student was not injured. The student's age and gender were not released. In the 1983 movie, a character named Flick gets his tongue stuck to a metal pole after being triple-dog dared to do so.
CENTRAL FALLS — Due to declining enrollment and financial deficits, the Square Mile City is losing its only Catholic school. The St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Academy, located at 909 Lonsdale Ave., will close at the end of the school year, according to the Roman Catholic Diocese of Providence. The news was announced to faculty, staff and parents by letter on Tuesday, and an informational meeting for parents was scheduled for Wednesday night at the school. Operated by the Diocese of Providence, St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Academy served boys and girls from See SCHOOL, page A2
The Diocese of Providence has announced that the St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Academy, located at 909 Lonsdale Ave. in Central Falls, will close after this school year due to lack of enrollment. The school opened in 1995, combining the resources of three former parish schools in Central Falls: Notre Dame, Holy Trinity and St. Matthew.
Photo by Ernest A. Brown
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RI legislators introduce bill to legalize pot
Proposed bill would tax, regulate marijuana posession in R.I.
By JIM BARON
jbaron@pawtuckettimes.com Photo by Ernest A. Brown
Pro and con forces gearing up for fight
By JOSEPH FITZGERALD
jfitzgerald@woonsocketcall.com
YESTERDAY’S RESULTS
Should recreational pot be legal in Rhode Island? Yes No
47% 53%
ON THE WEB
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PROVIDENCE – With Colorado and Washington State having legalized the possession and sale of recreational marijuana earlier this year, and a poll of Rhode Island voters showing 53 percent of Rhode Islanders favoring the legalization, regulation and taxing of the drug for sale to adults, legislation to do just that has been introduced in the
General Assembly. The sponsors, Rep. Edith Ajello in the House of Representatives and Sen. Joshua Miller in the Senate, have both submitted similar legislation for the last three years, only to see it die in committee. But at a Statehouse press conference on Wednesday, both said that this year momentum might be on their side. “As my colleagues and children know, I do not encourage or promote mari-
Former Providence Police Officer Beth Comery, left, joins members of Regulate Rhode Island and the Marijuana Policy Project and their supporters as they listen to former high school teacher Patricia Smith, at podium, as she speaks about Rhode Island's current marijuana policy, at the Statehouse Wednesday.
juana use,” Ajello said, “however, I do believe responsible adults should not be punished because they prefer marijuana to martinis.” Ajello said 26 other House members have cosponsored her bill, which she said would “end Rhode Island’s prohibition of marijuana and replace it with a system that regulates, con-
trols and taxes marijuana for adults 21 and older. Smoking pot in public would still be illegal under their proposal, according to Ajello, as would driving while intoxicated and supplying the drug to anyone under the age of 21. Distribution would be limited to 10 retail sites See POT, page A2
Within hours after two Democratic lawmakers Wednesday introduced legislation to legalize recreational marijuana in Rhode Island, advocates and opponents had the boxing gloves on for the first round in what is likely to be a long debate over the legalization of cannabis in the union’s smallest state. The bill filed by state Rep. Edith H. Ajello (DProvidence) and Sen. Josh Miller (D-Cranston) would make marijuana legal for adults 21 and older and establish a system in which marijuana is regulated and taxed similar to alcohol. Miller and Ajello discussed the bill at a news conference Wednesday at the State House. See FIGHT, page A2
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Fairlawn residents sound off to officials on neighborhood issues
City planners seek feedback on quality of life in city
By DONNA KENNY KIRWAN
dkirwan@pawtuckettimes.com Photo by Donna Kenny Kirwan
INDEX
Amusements . . . . . . . . . .B5 Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . .A6 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . . . .A5 Opinion . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A4 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .B1 Television . . . . . . . . . . . .B5
Planning Director Barney Heath writes down a listing of the pros and cons of living in Fairlawn as provided by residents at a neighborhood meeting to develop a new Comprehensive Plan.
PAWTUCKET – They would like a grocery store and more tree-lined sidewalks, and think there are too many vacant storefronts, too much traffic and and too few parking spaces on main streets. Yet, it seems
as though most Fairlawn residents are happy with the quality of life in their neighborhood, as told to city planners Monday night. About two dozen residents attended a workshop at the Smithfield Congregational Church that was designed to give the Pawtucket Planning Department input about the positives and negatives of the 1.13square mile section called Fairlawn. It was the first of several “neighborhood outreach” meetings that are scheduled over the coming months as city planners gather input to develop a new Pawtucket Comprehensive Plan.
Vol. CXXVIII No. 38
The meeting was held by the city in conjunction with the Fairlawn Against Crime Team (FACT) and City Councilor Timothy Rudd, who represents the area. Mayor Donald Grebien and City Councilor Albert Vilati also attended. Planning Director Barney Heath told those assembled that the Comprehensive Plan will be the document that guides the city for the next 20 years – into 2035. The new plan will be completed in 2015. He said the Planning Department will start gathering data in Fairlawn and See FAIRLAWN, page A2
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THE ALL NEW
Secret pension talks continue, trial date set
Press conference updating progress scuttled Wednesday
By JIM BARON
jbaron@pawtuckettimes.com
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PROVIDENCE – First there is a settlement then there is no settlement then there is. Well, maybe there is. Wednesday was a backand-forth day in Rhode Island’s political/legal community on the issue of a proposed settlement in the lawsuit brought by public employee unions challenging the 2011 pension reform law passed by the general
Assembly and signed by Gov. Lincoln Chafee. On Monday, the federal mediator working on the case announced there would be a press conference Wednesday afternoon “to report on the ongoing courtordered mediation to resolve pension litigation.” That mediation has been going on for a year behind closed doors with all parties to it silenced by a gag order issued by Judge Sarah TaftCarter. But at 5:22 a.m. on Wednesday, the mediator sent another e-mail saying that the press conference had been postponed “as the parties continue to talk and work with federal mediators.”
Later in the morning, the Employees’ Retirement System of Rhode Island (ERSRI) board postponed what its agenda said was a discussion of a proposed settlement. Not long after that, Taft-Carter set a date for the suit to go to trial on Sept. 15. A few hours later, the ERSRI posted a new agenda, listing a “discussion and consideration of pending pension reform litigation and potential approval of a proposed settlement” in the case for 1 p.m. on Friday. After that, everyone clammed up again, pointing to the judge’s gag order. Joy Fox, spokeswoman for General Treasurer Gina Raimondo explained that the ERSRI agenda was posted in
case there was a need for the board to act. The state Open Meetings Act requires that public bodies post an agenda 48 hours before a planned meeting. Raimondo is the chairwoman of the ERSRI board. Asked about the settlement before the board meeting on Wednesday, Raimondo told reporters: “It hasn’t necessarily fallen apart. We’re still working on it. This process is too important to rush. “We need to protect the interests of all the people of Rhode Island and make sure that this comes to a conclusion that protects the people in the pension system and See PENSION, page A2
A2 THE TIMES
FROM PAGE ONE
that are working in your neighborhood? And what are those that are not working?' she said. The residents were divided into small groups and asked to talk about the assets and the challenges of Fairlawn. Listed among its assets were its recreational areas, Veterans Memorial Park and the Smithfield Avenue playground, the St. Francis and Mienral Spring Avenue cemeteries, the historical Smithfield Congregational Church, and Bishop Keough High School. Residents also mentioned the city's strong sense of community, active neighborhood crime watch, and easy access to Interstate 95. “It's just a great neighborhood. People look out for each other,” said Carol Furber, who has lived in the same house in Fairlawn for over 70 years. Others at her table agreed, and one woman, who settled in the neighborhood seven years ago from out-of-state, described living there as “delightful.” That being said, Furber mentioned that she would like to see a market, on the style of a Dave's Marketplace. “Something you could walk to when you need a pound of hamburg or fresh bread,” she stated. She also said she would like to see some type of elderly housing so people could stay in the neighborhood they enjoy so much once they decide to move from their houses. Ken Postle suggested that concerts and other public events could be held in Collyer Park, near the Mineral Spring Avenue Cemetery. He also said he would like to see some kind of cut-through street built to connect the Concord Avenue area with the other side of Mineral Spring Avenue. He said this would help improve the section of Fairlawn near Lonsdale Avenue and Mineral Spring Avenue to be less isolated. The neighborhood's disconnect between the residential area along Smithfield Avenue to the Lincoln town line and that on the other side of the Lorraine Mills and the city's waste transfer facility was noted by some. A greater effort to develop the commercial area in and around the waste transfer station so it would be more visually attractive was mentioned as a goal by numerous residents. On the plus side, a rat problem that had sprung up a couple of years ago seems to have been eradicated, several stated. Some residents spoke of the growing number of vacant storefronts, especially in the CVS Plaza as being unsightly, as well as the deteriorating condition of the old Fairlawn Pharmacy. Traffic in front of the schools and around Colfax Street, frequent dumping on Legion Drive and vandalism in some areas were also listed as challenges by residents. Mara said the next community outreach meeting will be held for residents of Woodlawn and planners will be talking with members of the Woodlawn Neighborhood Association on April 8.
Thursday, February 13, 2014
Fairlawn
work their way across the city to hear from residents in every neighborhood. “You guys know the neighborhood best,” he said. Assistant Planning Director Susan Mara said that every city and town in Rhode Island is required by state law to prepare a comprehensive plan every 10 years. She said the plan serves as a foundation for land use decisions and also informs the city's zoning ordinance, land development and subdivision review regulations. Mara said the Pawtucket Comprehensive Plan must be consistent with the State Guide Plan and is also used by the city in seeking state and federal funding. “We don't want it to sit on a shelf,” she stated. Mara said the planners were looking for feedback on two important topics: community assets and community challenges. “We want to know, 'What are some of the things
Lincoln teacher charged with DUI
BY JOSEPH B. NADEAU
jnadeau@woonsocketcall.com
LINCOLN – A teacher at the Lincoln Middle School was charged with driving under the influence after police responded a single-car accident on New River Road at just before 4 p.m. on Tuesday. Christine Clarke, 51, of Gold Star Drive, Cumberland, was charged with driving under the influence of alcohol, a first offense – breath alcohol level unknown, and also cited for refusing a breath test and chemical test for alcohol, according to police. Patrolman Richard J. Bousquet reported that he was sent to the area of 419 River Road for report of a vehicle off the road. Clarke was found at the location outside of a 2010 Volkswagen that was on the front lawn of the property, stuck in the snow. Bousquet, investigating the incident with Lt. Wayne Bouthillette and Patrolman Christopher Nightingale, reported detecting a strong smell of alcohol on the driver and also observed Clarke to have blood-shot watery eyes and mumbled speech. Clarke told the officers she was coming from the Lincoln Middle School where she teaches, Bousquet said.
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Ajello estimated it would be “tens of millions” of dollars annually. across the state, she added, “We care deeply about with an unspecified but lim- keeping people away from ited number of growers. drugs, not moving toward There would be an excise drugs,” Miller said. tax of $50 on each ounce of Referencing a common critimarijuana sold at the whole- cism of marijuana as a “gatesale level and there would be way” drug that leads users a 10 percent sales tax on toward more dangerous subretail sales. Forty percent of stances such as cocaine and the revenue from those taxes heroin, Miller said, “I feel would be diverted to drug that the drug is not the gatetreatment programs, Miller way; the drug dealer is the said. gateway.” While they did not give a Both Ajello and Miller specific number on how said legalizing and regulatmuch revenue legal marijua- ing marijuana would help na might raise, Miller and keep it out of the hands of
children, because legal sellers would lose their license and face other stiff penalties if they sold to anyone underage, while illegal “drug dealers do not card” anyone. They said nearly half of high school students surveyed said they know a student who sells drugs at their school, but only 1 percent said they know someone who sells alcohol. The lawmakers also said users who buy marijuana on the street do not know what chemicals or other adulterants it might be treated with. Miller is the chairman of the Senate Health and the citizens who will be responsible for paying the bill or the retirees whose pensions may be put at renewed risk.” He said Chafee and Raimondo are “pandering to the union bosses” behind the closed doors; Chafee for political support in his final months on the job and Raimondo in hopes of winning votes in the governor’s race.. “Any new deal that retreats from the original reform should be rejected by the is much lower for the same amount. “If we believe that legalization will eliminate or even decrease the black market, we should take a look at the situation in Colorado,” she says. “It is quite the opposite. We see that the black market there has undercut any ‘legal’ sales.” “Youth marijuana use rates continue to rise nationally and locally,” Carcifero added. “We must continue to protect our youth from the increased availability legalization will bring.” "The idea that we could tax marijuana and think that it would be the panacea to Rhode Island's economic woes is ludicrous,” said Nancy DeNuccio, chairwoman of the Ocean State Prevention Alliance, a coalition of prevention specialists and mental health professionals committed to reducing the negative impact that marijuana has on Rhode Island communities, especially among youth. “We would be putting all of Rhode Island’s youth at risk by increasing marijuana access and the expected rev-
Human Services Committee; Ajello is chairwoman of the House Judiciary Committee. Medical marijuana has been legal in Rhode Island for several years now and last year saw the opening of state-licensed “compassion centers,” to sell the drug. Possession of marijuana by someone not holding a stateissued medical marijuana card was downgraded to a civil offense comparable to a traffic infraction last April and it carries a $150 fine. Among the supporters standing behind Ajello and Miller at the press conference holding signs that read General Assembly,” Block said. Democrat Clay Pell, one of Raimondo’s opponents for the Democratic nomination for governor issued a release of his own calling on the parties to reach an agreement or give up and battle it out in court. “The secretive nature of this process has gone on for far too long,” Pell said. “This ongoing uncertainty has been a disservice to taxpayers, state workers and retirees, and members of the General Assembly. For over a year, enue would not even begin to cover the social cost of marijuana use in our small state,” she said. “In 2010, those costs were $213 million for underage drinking. Can we assume that they would be similar for underage marijuana use? You bet we can." “The Ocean State Prevention Alliance advocates for policies, practices and community programs to protect youth from the harmful effects of marijuana,” DeNuccio said. “We continue to work to address the unintended consequences of the current marijuana laws.” Marijuana advocates like Robert J. Capecchi, a legislative analyst with the Marijuana Policy Project, says most Rhode Island voters support legislation that ends marijuana prohibition and enacts a system to regulate adult sales, like alcohol. “The bill sponsored by Rep. Ajello and Sen. Miller will accomplish that goal,” Capecchi says. “The bill only changes the law for those 21 and older and has no effect on the medical marijuana program. Marijuana prohibition has been just as ineffec-
“End Prohibition, Regulate Marijuana” was Brett Smiley, a Democratic candidate for mayor of Providence. A poll of 683 Rhode Island voters conducted January 14 and 15 found that 53 percent said they supported legalization while 41 percent were opposed. Asked which is safer, marijuana or alcohol, 38 percent said marijuana is safer, 21 percent said alcohol is and 21 percent said they are equally safe. Follow Jim Baron on Twitter @Jim_Baron we’ve had mediation shrouded in secrecy. “The ongoing uncertainty of this situation is one of the factors holding back our economy,” Pell maintained. “Today, I’m calling on all parties involved in this process to set a deadline and meet it. If they can’t, hold a press conference and tell the taxpayers of the State of Rhode Island that mediation has failed.” Follow Jim Baron on Twitter @Jim_Baron tive, inefficient, and problematic as alcohol prohibition was. Polls show a majority of Rhode Islanders agree that prohibition isn’t the answer and that it is time to end this failed policy.” Capecchi says the facts are clear: marijuana is less toxic, less addictive, and less harmful to the user than alcohol. “By regulating marijuana, as proposed by Sen. Miller and Rep. Ajello, Rhode Island will actually know who is selling it, where it is being sold, when, and to whom,” he said. “Sales will then benefit regulated, legitimate, taxpaying, and job-creating businesses instead of violent criminal organizations. Capecchj believes legalization will also help boost the state economy. “Rhode Island stands to realize tens of millions annually in taxes through regulated adult marijuana sales, a significant portion of which will be used to fund programs to prevent and treat the abuse of alcohol and other drugs,” he said. Follow Joseph Fitzgerald on Twitter @jofitz7
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taxpayers and state employees to the union bosses. “Any retreat from pension protects the taxpayers, so reform, achieved in an open we’re still working on it,” and transparent process can Raimondo said, adding “we’re only cost taxpayers more and going to keep working on it sends the wrong message,” until we get it right.” Block asserted. “Closed door Inevitably, candidates in deal making is how Rhode the race for governor got Island ended up in the finaninvolved in the cancelled set- cial sink hole the state’s leadtlement affair. ers have put us in. It is simRepublican Ken Block ply wrong for these critically issued a statement accusing important decisions to be Chafee and Raimondo, who made by partisan lawyers is a Democratic candidate for acting in secret with no governor of: “selling out the opportunity for input from
the Rhode Island economy by generating tax revenue and creating jobs." Legalization advocates Not so, says Lisa M. yesterday said the bill is a Carcifero, executive director We accept these announcements sensible approach to marijua- of the Woonsocket in a number of ways: na that would create new Prevention Coalition, a non• You can Fax to 401-767-8509 industries with new jobs and profit arm of the city of • You can stop by our office raise needed revenue for the Woonsocket that advocates located at: state. healthy, drug-free lifestyles 23 Exchange St., Pawtucket, RI "Marijuana prohibition is a for youth. • You can email Birth failed policy, and when a law Carcifero says marijuana Announcements to is broken it needs to be advocates who think that advertising@pawtuckettimes.com fixed,” said Jared Moffat, legalization in Rhode Island • You can email Anniversaries, director of Regulate Rhode Engagements and Weddings to will deter crime and violent Island, a coalition of citizens criminal organizations are notices@pawtuckettimes.com who believe marijuana prohi- only fooling themselves. • You can download a form from our website: bition wastes public According to Carcifero, www.pawtuckettimes.com resources, discriminates the black market for marijuaSimply complete the form then against communities of color, na in Colorado, which legalmail, fax or scan to email the and undermines public health ized pot in 2012, is still thrivannouncement. and safety. ing, despite the existence of If you would like a copy of the “A clear majority of retail shops that sell it legally. pdf of your announcement as it Rhode Islanders think it's “Youth are gaining access appeared in the paper, we can time for a new approach to to marijuana through a variprovide you with that for $5.00 marijuana,” he said. ety of means, including the simply stop into The Times with “Regulating marijuana is the black market dealers, and the publication date and page solution because it will take they will continue to gain number in which your control away from illegal access through the black marannouncement appeared. dealers, and it will improve ket even if the state legalizes and regulates marijuana,” she says. Carcifero says the cost of retail marijuana in Colorado is high due to the sky-high sales and excise taxes. But the price on the black market 23 Exchange Street, Pawtucket, RI 02860 Newsroom fax: (401) 727-9250 www.pawtuckettimes.com e-mail: notices@pawtuckettimes.com.com sports@pawtuckettimes.com.com pre-kindergarten through SUBSCRIBER SERVICES grade 8. The school opened Delivery by 7 a.m. weekdays, 8 a.m. on weekends, holidays in 1995 and was formed Call by 10 a.m. to receive guaranteed redelivery. through the combined Home delivery or billing questions: 767-8522 resources of three former parish schools in Central For missed deliveries or damaged papers on weekends, Falls: Notre Dame, Holy call between 8 a.m. and 10 a.m. Trinity and St. Matthew. “It’s sad,” said Daniel J. ADVERTISING BUSINESS OFFICE Ferris, superintendent of Classified: 365-1438 Catholic schools for the dioClassified Billing: 767-8504 Display: 767-8505 cese. “I love this school, so Display Billing: 767-8504 Advertising FAX: 727-9250 this is very hard for me. It has a wonderful community, CIRCULATION: Per copy - $.50 daily; an incredible principal, excelweek by carrier - $3.40; By mail HE IMES Per lent teachers. It had a dual subscription - 13 weeks, $55.25; 26 weeks, $110.50; one year - $221. (These language immersion program, USPS 423-840 rates apply to mailing addresses in Published daily except an arts program with a strings the United States and Canada. Rates Sunday by section, a drama program. Rhode Island Media Group for subscription to foreign points on But the cost of keeping up a application.) POSTMASTER: Send address correction to: The Times, 23 Periodicals postage paid school with just 104 students Exchange St., Pawtucket, RI 02860. at Pawtucket, RI is just not feasible.” Ferris said that St. The Times, copyright 2011, is published daily. No articles, photographs or any editorial content may Elizabeth Ann Seton be reproduced or reprinted in whole or in part without the express permission of the publisher.
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Academy, which opened 19 years ago, has experienced a decline in enrollment in the last five years, dropping from 187 down to 101 at the start of the 2013 school year. Three more students have since enrolled, but it hasn’t been enough to change the situation. “There is no lack of demand. It’s a very special school,” said Ferris. “But it’s the economy, and there is just not enough financial aid to meet the needs of the parents.” He pointed out that the diocese already provides $1.7 million in financial aid to parents of Catholic school students. Ferris said that at the Wednesday meeting, the principals of the three Pawtucket Catholic schools offering a pre-K to grade 8 education, St. Teresa, St. Cecelia, and
Woodlawn Catholic Regional, would be on hand to talk about the opportunities available at their respective facilities as well as financial aid options. As the costs to attend these schools are all a little higher than that of Seton Academy, he said staffers will work with parents to the best of their ability to see that students receive placement for the next school year. Ferris also said that the teachers and staff at Seton Academy will be given priority hiring status at other Catholic schools in the state. Ferris said Seton Academy is the only school closure planned for this year. “All of our other schools are healthy,” he stated. He said the diocese realizes that part of the decline is due to the rising interest in local charter schools, which offer many of
the same components – smaller size, safety, discipline – as the Catholic schools, minus the “faith” piece. “It’s hard to compete with free,” he noted. With the loss of Seton Academy, the diocese has 34 remaining Catholic schools offering education from preK through grade 8 spread throughout the state. In addition to the three in Pawtucket, the Blackstone Valley area is served by Mercymount Country Day School in Cumberland, Greater Woonsocket Catholic Regional, and Msgr. Gadoury Primary Regional School (pre-K-grade 2) and Good Shepherd Catholic Regional School (grades 3-8). Follow Donna Kenny Kirwan on Twitter @KirwanDonna
Thursday, February 13, 2014
LOCAL
THE TIMES A3
Beloved Woonsocket athletic director dies 4 days after accident
Friends and family remember him as ‘a standup guy’ who touched many lives
By BRENDAN McGAIR
bmcgair@pawtuckettimes.com
and RUSS OLIVO
rolivo@woonsocketcall.com
WOONSOCKET — George Nasuti, a longtime educator and high-school athletic director in the city, died Tuesday night at Rhode Island Hospital after a sporting accident on a basketball court four days earlier. He was 52. Nasuti was remembered by friends and colleagues in Rhode Island interscholastic athletics as "a standup guy," "a very good man" and someone who always had the kids' best interests at heart. “It is with great sadness that we share with you that George passed away,” family members said in a statement released through a longtime friend, Assistant Athletics Director at Central Connecticut State University and former star Villa Novan. “He was surrounded by people that loved him,” they said. “He passed peacefully and we take great comfort in knowing that in his final days, he was doing what he loved most, and that’s being around young people and working in sports.” Educator, athlete, longtime school administrator, Nasuti was a fixture of the Woonsocket Education Department for years and
counted scores of current and former students among his friends. Some 1,300 joined a "Prayers for George Nasuti" page that popped up on Facebook since he lapsed into what would prove to be a fatal coma after he fell while refereeing a basketball game in Burrillville Friday. The heartfelt messages of condolence continued pouring in after news of Nasuti's untimely death surfaced. "My heart breaks for Woonsocket's great loss of George Nasuti," wrote Jennifer Beausoleil Abramek. "He always gave 150 percent when it involved our kids and our schools. He was a true oneof-a-kind gem and it showed in his sparkly blue eyes. May we all honor him and live by his slogan in our day-to-day lives." A former student may have summed it up best, saying that only in hindsight was he able to fully appreciate Nasuti's contributions. "I was too immature to realize at the time you cared about all of us," said Jay Picard. "You tried to teach us how to act right. Thank you. You were a great man. Prayers for your family." Nasuti had served as a principal of several elementary schools in the district as well as Woonsocket High School. He was currently the
director of health, athletics and wellness and administrator of the new teacher evaluation program that was under development after the district received federal Race to the Top funds. Workers in the McFee Administration Building were stunned and saddened by news of his death. Schools Supt. Giovanna Donoyan distributed a somber e-mail to members of the school community confirming the tragic news. "Dear friends," she said. "Today we received sad news that our beloved George Nasuti has passed. Please take a moment to honor him with your students and each other. Share with others his love of this great city, respectful nature, and honorable character. "We are all better people for having George in our life." *** Mayor Lisa Baldelli-Hunt lauded Nasuti as someone who elevated his position as an educator into a sort of ambassador for the city, a man who was equal parts public servant, role model, civic leader and mentor to the young. He was also a devoted husband to his wife, Carol, and father to their two sons,
Times Photo/Ernest A. Brown
Educator, athlete, longtime school administrator, George Nasuti was a fixture of the Woonsocket Education Department for years and counted scores of current and former students among his friends. He died Tuesday night at Rhode Island Hospital after a sporting accident on a basketball court days earlier.
Christopher and Sean. "He was everything bundled up into one person that you'd hope your own child would become," said Baldelli-Hunt. The mayor said she's known Nasuti since they went to Pothier Elementary School together. The man who grew up to be known as a consummate gentleman
started out in life with the same reverence for fair-dealing and respect for others, she said. As a young boy in the playground or classroom, "He was always very respectful to everyone around him,” he said. "He was a friend." "George was that person who made sure everyone was
treated fairly," she said. "He was a young gentleman then, and he was a gentleman when he grew up." A 1993 graduate of Woonsocket High School, where he played baseball and football under Nasuti’s tutelage, Pincince called his former coach “a spectacular man.” See NASUTI, Page A8
Doctor linked to fatal overdoses is arrested for health care fraud
BY RUSS OLIVO
rolivo@woonsocketcall.com
Normal trash pickup schedule on Presidents Day in Pawtucket
PAWTUCKET — The Department of Public Works is reminding residents that trash and recycling pickup will be conducted on the normal schedule on Presidents Day, Monday, Feb. 17 and throughout the week till Friday, Feb. 21 with no delays. Residents are asked to place their trash and recycling out on their normally scheduled day for collection. The no-delay schedule will allow the city to take advantage of the fact that the Rhode Island Resource Recovery Center will be open on Monday, Feb. 17 (Presidents Day). For further information contact the Department of Public Works at 728-0500 ext. 282 or by email at dpw@pawtucketri.com. Pawtucket City Hall offices will be closed Monday in observance of the Presidents Day holiday.
LINCOLN – A pain medicine doctor who was suspended by the state Department of Health in 2013 after the overdose deaths of known drug abusers for whom he’d prescribed narcotics has now been arrested for Medicare fraud after an investigation by the Boston office of the FBI. Dr. Fathalla Mashali is accused of billing the government insurance program for patient visits that never took place. Mashali had an office at 6 Blackstone Valley Place and enjoyed staff privileges at Landmark Medical Center in Woonsocket. He also owns a group of pain management clinics in Rhode Island and Massachusetts that go by various names, including
New England Wellness and Pain Management and New England Pain Management Associates of Massachusetts and Rhode Island. A spokesman for the FBI confirmed Mashali’s arrest, but he referred questions to the Boston division of the U.S. Attorney’s Office. A spokeswoman there did not return phone calls. The Boston Business Journal reported that Mashali surrerendered his Drug Enforcement Administration licenses to prescribe opioid painkillers and other controlled substances in September 2013, shortly after health authorities in Rhode Island linked him to multiple deaths among his patients. The BBJ reported that several doctors hired to run his pain clinics last July triggered the fraud probe by writing a letter to the FBI accusing
Mashali of unethical and unlawful business practices. The doctors who wrote the letter later resigned. Last August, the Rhode Island Board of Medical Licensure and Discipline, an arm of the state’s health department, issued a report in which Mashali was linked to “a pattern of fatal opiate overdoses in patients” under his care. The report said Mashali had unnecessarily prescribed heroin-like painkillers or other controlled substances to patients who were abusing drugs. The health department hired an independent medical consultant with a specialty in pain management
who looked at six patients who had died while under Mashali’s care. “In my opinion, it can be stated with a reasonable degree of medical certainty that the medical care provided by (Mashali) was substantially below the standard of care,” the consultant concluded. “His prescribing practices were dangerous.” The disciplinary board suspended both Mashali’s license to practice and his controlled substances registration, calling him “an immediate threat to the health, welfare and safety of the public.” Follow Russ Olivo on Twitter @russolivo
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OPINION
Page A4 THE TIMES — Thursday, February 13, 2014
PUBLISHER: Mary Lynn Bosiak
Executive Editor: Bianca Pavoncello Managing Editor: David Pepin Sports Editor: Eric Benevides Assistant Editor/News/The Call: Russ Olivo Assistant Editor/News/The Times: Donna Kenny Kirwan Controller: Kathleen Needham Circulation Manager: Jorge Olarte
Will Obama kill unknown American with secret memo?
Every time you think the war on terror can't get any weirder, it does. In the latest manifestation, White House officials are leaking to the news media that they are considering whether to use drone strikes to kill an unnamed American in Pakistan. This behavior is bizarre as a matter of national security: If a terrorist really poses an imminent threat, how exactly does the administration have time to test the political waters before taking him out? But it is the inevitable result of a more fundamental, long-term problem with the United States's use of drone strikes. The Obama administration has kept secret the legal justification for such strikes on Americans, as well as the internal procedures to be followed in making the decision. The secrecy shrouds the drone program in a basic sense of illegitimacy. No wonder the administration feels it can't just kill our enemies, but needs to send up trial balloons first: The whole program is operating under a bad legal conscience. The backdrop to the current mess is the fundamental problem of secret legal opinions. In 2013, the Justice Department released a "white paper" — not, it must be noted, a legal term — vaguely explaining why it believed that it was constitutional and lawful to kill an American abroad if he or she was a "senior operational leader of al-Qaida." The white paper offered a kind of sketch or "framework" based on a secret Office of Legal Counsel memorandum that presumably provides the actual legal arguments on which the government relies in making such a momentous decision. But the memorandum itself has never been declassified: We have no idea what it really says, or whether the white paper accurately summarized its reasoning. The white paper argued most prominently that a citizen's due-process rights are not violated when the drone kills him, as long as a "high-level" government official deems him an imminent threat, capture is infeasible, and the strike satisfies the international laws of war. This argument may sound reasonable enough on the surface, but looked at more closely, it's full of holes. "Imminent threat" is defined incredibly broadly, and on the assumption that some parts of al-Qaida "continually" pose an imminent threat. The word "imminence" has an ordinary constitutional meaning — something is imminent if it is likely to happen soon. The white paper turns that meaning on its head. It says, for example, that if the target has in the past planned attacks and has not resigned from al-Qaida, the requirement of imminence is satisfied without evidence of, well, imminence. As for compliance with international law, the white paper essentially asks us to ignore the fact that nearly all reputable experts on international law outside the U.S. — and not a few inside — consider drone strikes already to be a violation of the law of war principles. A glance at the numbers of civilians killed by such strikes as collateral damage raises at least the possibility that the technique as practiced may be unlawful.
GUEST COMMENTARY
By Noah Feldman
Far worse, the white paper eviscerates the traditional idea of due process. Since Magna Carta in 1215, due process has meant, at a minimum, an opportunity to be heard by a neutral decision maker. The white paper claims that due process is satisfied without any opportunity to be heard — and without, you guessed it, a neutral decision maker. Instead, some unspecified, secret internal process takes place in the higher reaches of the executive branch. The president is ultimately both judge and executioner. If the Justice Department under George W. Bush had released a legal memorandum declaring that constitutional due process could be satisfied for an American through a secret, internal executive-branch process, it is hard to imagine that the community of constitutional law scholars would not have risen in revolt. (Civil libertarians, on the left and right, have been lonely voices of dissent in the debate.) Perhaps the full memorandum addresses these questions — especially the question of due process — better than the white paper does. But if so, we have no way of knowing it, because the memorandum remains secret. There is no national-security reason to justify the suppression of legal reasoning whose "framework" has already been provided. Nor has the Obama administration suggested such a justification. We are left to conclude that the supposed threat to national security is actually that Americans would be upset by the legal justifications offered. In a democracy, there can be no worse reason for keeping a secret. All this helps explain why the Obama administration apparently feels it cannot kill an American citizen without first taking the political temperature in the U.S. When a government program has the odor of illegality, no one wants to use it unless the use will not be heavily criticized. That's no way to run national security — and it's no way to run a constitutional democracy, either. Noah Feldman, a law professor at Harvard University and the author of "Cool War: The Future of Global Competition," is a Bloomberg View columnist. Follow him on Twitter at@NoahRFeldman.
A ruthless first lady
Groundhog Day isn’t just a movie. Here it is early 2014 — still almost three years away from a new presidency — but it’s high time to mention that Hillary Clinton was a “ruthless” first lady. This shocking revelation comes to us courtesy of the Washington Free Beacon — a conservative commentary/news site — which published an article based on the papers of Hillary’s good friend, Diane Blair, a University of Arkansas political scientist. Blair’s papers were handed over to the university after her death in 2000. The headline: “The Hillary Papers: Archive of Kathleen Parker ‘closest friend’ paints portrait of ruthless First Lady.” Blair’s journal included not only her own contemporaneous observations during the Monica Lewinsky saga but also the notes she took while talking on the phone with the then-first lady. One mustn’t speak ill of the dead, they say, but they were Spartans in the 6th century B.C., so whatever. One might at least wonder whether Blair told Hillary she was taking notes that she would release posthumously. That’s certainly one form of life insurance. But wouldn’t it have been more close-friendish to wait until all parties concerned were enjoying the hereafter before publishing notes that could damage the living? Hillary has been memed. Effective immediately, she is ruthless. The Beacon headline was based on a private 1992 poll about Hillary Clinton during her husband’s presidential campaign. Although respondents expressed general admiration for the Clintons, they also expressed fear that “only someone too politically ambitious, too strong, and too ruthless could survive such controversy so well.” The pollsters concluded: “What voters find slick in Bill Clinton, they find ruthless in Hillary.” Welcome to Double Standards 101. But we needn’t visit that lecture hall. Instead, let’s assume that Hillary Clinton is ambitious, strong and ruthless. Quick, the ink on my palm is fading. Please remind me who those two people are in Washington who don’t fit this description. But Hillary Clinton is sui generis, endlessly fascinating in that love-her-or-hateher way. To some, she is an intelligent woman who has weathered a 20-year assault with relative grace. To others, she’s a pushy broad whose dagger gaze reminds them of a disapproving teacher, or worse. Guess which ones are women and which are men. What Blair’s papers mostly reveal is that Hillary Clinton is a human being who was deeply hurt and humiliated by the Lewinsky affair — and that she is sometimes profane in private. Men, we admit, are less secretive, often hurling their epithets in public — even sometimes on the Senate floor. We also learn that Hillary once referred to Lewinsky as a “narcissistic loony toon,” which by most books is a charitable observation. Perhaps the more apt metaphor for this week’s buzz isn’t a movie after all but double jeopardy. The case of Hillary, Bill and Monica has been prosecuted and then some. Thus all, especially Hillary, have been politically inoculated against further prosecution on this point. Besides, as some apparently need reminding, Hillary was the victim. She wasn’t the only casualty, however. Also wounded, tragically, was Lewinsky, now 40. Forevermore, her life is a stained blue dress. Though legally of age and consensually available when she began flirting with the president, she ultimately was a naive, misguided kid barely out of college. (Depending on what is revealed in a rumored $12 million tell-all book, I reserve the right to amend the foregoing.) Meanwhile, Hillary, who has said she forgave her husband years ago, might consider also forgiving Lewinsky. There’s nothing like compassion to ruin a ruthless meme. If I were her scriptwriter, she might say something like this: Everyone is familiar with the marital difficulties Bill and I worked so hard to get through. Yet, some have seen fit to resurrect the past. As I’ve said before, I forgave my husband a long time ago. Today, I’d like to forgive someone else. Monica Lewinsky. As you’ve probably read, I once made a disparaging remark about Ms. Lewinsky in confidence to a dear friend. I’m sure you can understand why. I can’t apologize for my feelings, but I am sorry I said those things. In any case, that was also a long time ago. We’ve all matured, become wiser and moved on with our lives. It’s time to let the country move on as well. Thank you for your decency in allowing the past to rest. I’m Hillary Clinton, and I’m the one running for president. Read more from Kathleen Parker’s archive, follow her on Twitter or find her on Facebook.
As others see it: Spying
The following editorial appears on Bloomberg View: All around the world, governments are devising creative ways to torment American technology companies. It started last year after leaks revealed that the U.S. government basically uses services like Google and Facebook as arms of the surveillance state. In response, some countries — including Germany, Brazil and now France — have toyed with the idea of forcing Internet companies to route traffic or store data locally. As public policy, this is inept both technologically and economically. As symbolism, it illustrates the damage that overly ambitious espionage can cause — and reinforces, yet again, how insecure the foundations of the digital marketplace really are. Since the intelligence contractor Edward Snowden began exposing surveillance programs by the National Security Agency last June, trust in U.S. technology companies has plummeted overseas. In some cases sales have slowed. And foreign regulators have been licking their chops in anticipation of a crackdown. Estimates of the cost to these companies have ranged from $21.5 billion to $180 billion by 2016. Now, more than a dozen governments are considering laws to require Internet companies to store information collected on their citizens at onshore data centers. This is a bad idea for all the usual reasons protectionism is a bad idea: It will obstruct the free flow of trade (in this case, bits of data), inhibit innovation, increase inefficiency, raise business costs and slow economic growth. If adopted widely, it could threaten the trust and openness the Internet is built on. Not to mention the logistical inanities it will cause. One thing this idea will not do: offer much protection from spying. Quite the opposite. The NSA, under authorities granted by Executive Order 12333, has extremely broad latitude to conduct intelligence gathering outside the U.S., without oversight from the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court. And U.S. technology companies would still be required to turn over data on specific users at the government's request, regardless of where they store it. Local data storage won't offer a practical impediment to spying either. The NSA has shown itself quite capable of infiltrating foreign communications companies, and local spy agencies would undoubtedly find it very convenient to have all their citizens' data in one place. (The French government, it should be noted, is no slouch when it comes to surveilling its citizens' digital habits.) All of which suggests that the real reason governments want to require local data storage is to promote local businesses. Or, more perniciously, to control information a little more tightly within their borders. Both are provincial bureaucratic urges that should be resisted. And both should be considered more collateral damage of the NSA's poor cost-benefit calculations. This very bad idea does, however, have the virtue of illustrating a deeper problem. Many technology companies have based their businesses on collecting precisely the kind of user information that the spies are after. The architecture of the Internet makes sharing that information effortless, but protecting it effectively impossible. That dichotomy won't go away. In fact, it's going to define your life, more and more, every day.
Herb Weiss has something to say. Turn to the Opinion page on Friday and read his column.
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Thursday, February 13, 2014
OBITUARIES/STATE Father of TV sketch comedy Sid Caesar dies
LYNN ELBER
AP Television Writer
THE TIMES A5
620 city seniors haven’t met NECAP requirement
PROVIDENCE (AP) — More than 600 Providence high school seniors haven't yet met a new NECAP graduation requirement in math, reading or both. School officials announced this week 620 students have not scored at least partial proficiency or demonstrated significant improvement from their previous scores on the New England Common Assessment Program tests. Sixty-five percent of last school year's juniors scored substantially below proficient in math; 20 percent scored the same in reading. Overall, 883 students needed to retake one or both tests. The district says it's "working diligently" to help those who haven't yet met the requirement. They can take the NECAP yet again or pass an alternative test. Some students may also be given waivers. School officials also reported the graduation rate has increased to 71 percent, from 65 percent.
Bill resurfaces to make calamari RI state appetizer
PROVIDENCE (AP) — There's another call to make Rhode Island-style calamari the Ocean State's official appetizer. Rep. Joe McNamara said Wednesday that he's reintroducing the legislation, which he says honors one of Rhode Island's best dishes while highlighting its fishing industry. Similar legislation passed the House last year but died in the Senate. This year, McNamara's bill has a Senate sponsor, Sen. Susan Sosnowski, a South Kingstown Democrat. McNamara, a Warwick Democrat, says the bill is an easy way to celebrate Rhode Island's fishing and restaurant industries. He says the state should be proud to have the largest squid fleet on the East Coast. The state's squid catch is shipped to all 50 states and around the world. Rhode Island calamari consists of fresh squid, lightly fried and served with banana peppers.
LOS ANGELES — Milton Berle was the funnyman whose pioneering presence in the nation's living rooms earned him the title Mr. Television. But Berle echoed the past. His wildly popular wisecracks and cavorting were repurposed from his burlesque days for the brand-new miracle of TV. Sid Caesar was different. Arriving on Berle's heels in 1949, Caesar was the future of TV comedy — a future that was evergreen and, with his death on Wednesday at 91, is certain to survive him. To put it simply: Caesar invented TV sketch comedy and gave it stature as a funhouse mirror of the everyday. "Saturday Night Live," to name the most obvious example, is a weekly homage to his creation. To do it, Caesar gathered a dream team of fellow performers and writers — among them Carl Reiner, Mel Brooks, Neil Simon and Woody Allen — whose own impact on comedy will likewise be lasting. "From my vantage point," said Reiner, "which was sometimes no further than an inch from his face, and one time nose on nose, he was inarguably the greatest pantomimist, monologist and single sketch comedian who ever worked in television." "He was one of the truly great comedians of my time, and one of the finest privileges I've had in my entire career was that I was able to work for him," Allen said. Caesar was a brawny young man with a beetle brow, rubber face and distinctive mole on his left cheek whose first comedy-variety show, "The Admiral Broadway Revue," premiered in February 1949 and was off the air by June. Its fatal shortcoming: unimagined popularity. It was selling more Admiral television sets than the company could make. Admiral, its exclusive sponsor, pulled out. But the audience was primed for Caesar's subsequent efforts. "Your Show of Shows," which debuted in 1950, and "Caesar's Hour" three years later, drew as many as 60 million viewers weekly and earned its star $1 million annually at a time when $5, he recalled, "bought a steak dinner for two." When "Caesar's Hour" left the air in 1957, Caesar was only 34. But the unforgiving cycle of weekly television had taken a toll: He relied on booze and pills for sleep every night so he could wake up and create more comedy. It took decades for Caesar to hit bottom. Then in 1977, he went cold turkey, "which turned me into a wild turkey," he wrote in his memoir, "Where Have I Been?" With his wife, Florence (who died in 2010 after more than 60 years of marriage), by his side, recovery had begun. After his golden days of live TV, Caesar found success in films ("It's a
Photo/Wikimedia Commons
Sid Caesar in 1961.
Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World" as well as Brooks' "Silent Movie" and "History of the World: Part One," and the musical "Grease"), on Broadway (Simon's "Little Me") and even scored in a nonsinging role with the Metropolitan Opera in its 1987 production of the operetta "Die Fledermaus." On "Your Show of Shows," Caesar staged 90 minutes of skits, revues, pantomime and satire that his audience found not only hilarious, but also vividly relatable. His comedy style, while often antic, was rooted in reality. His humor — observational, humanistic — exposed the telling truths of everyday life. How friends fight over a restaurant check. How a schoolboy at his first dance musters the nerve to talk to a girl. How a gum ball machine behaves when fed a coin (one of Caesar's countless impersonations). Or how someone, like his double-talking German professor, manages to pose as an expert despite expertise in nothing. "Real life is the true comedy," he said in a 2001 interview with The Associated Press. "Then everybody knows what you're talking about." Caesar brought observational comedy to TV before the term, or such latter-day practitioners as Jerry Seinfeld, were even born. In sketches, Caesar played an unsuspecting moviegoer getting caught between feuding lovers in a theater. He dined at a health food restaurant, where the first course was the bouquet in the vase on the table. He was interviewed as an avant-garde jazz musician who seemed happily high on something. Some compared Caesar to Charlie Chaplin for his brilliance at blending humor with touches of pathos. Caesar went into left field with such co-stars as Howard Morris and Nanette Fabray, but his most celebrated collaborator was the brilliant Imogene Coca on "Your Show of Shows." Coca and Caesar performed skits that satirized marital spats, inane advertising,
strangers meeting and speaking in clichés, a parody of the Western "Shane" in which the hero was named "Strange." They staged a water-logged spoof of the love scene in "From Here to Eternity." ''The Hickenloopers" husband-and-wife skits became a staple. Caesar was born in 1922 in Yonkers, N.Y., the third son of an Austrian-born restaurant owner and his Russian-born wife. His first dream was to become a musician, and he played saxophone in bands in his teens. But as a youngster waiting tables at his father's luncheonette, he liked to observe as well as serve the diverse clientele, and he recognized the humor happening right before his eyes. His talent for comedy was discovered when he was serving in the Coast Guard during World War II and got a part in a Coast Guard musical, "Tars and Spars." He also appeared in the movie version. Wrote famed columnist Hedda Hopper: "I hear the picture's good, with Sid Caesar a four-way threat. He writes, sings, dances and makes with the comedy." Then he broke into TV. He was signed by NBC executive Pat Weaver, who later created "Today" and "Tonight." Weaver asked what he wanted to do: a half-hour, an hour or 90 minutes? "Let's do the hour-and-a-half," replied Caesar, figuring more was always better. He gave little thought to the burden he had taken on: 90 minutes live for 39 weeks a season — and, unlike the present-day "Saturday Night Live," no cue cards. "We had an hour and a half of, 'Boy, it worked!'" he later recalled. "And then, after you had a couple of drinks: 'You know, we've got to do that allllll over again (starting) on Monday.'" "Caesar's Hour" left NBC's Saturday lineup in 1957, done in by the "champagne music" of ABC's high-rated competition, "The Lawrence Welk Show." His glory years would be preserved by his former comrades in works of their own. Reiner based his 1960s "Dick Van Dyke Show" — with its fictional TV writers and their temperamental star — on his experiences with Caesar. Simon's 1993 "Laughter on the 23rd Floor" was likewise based on the Caesar show. Of course, it wasn't all laughs for Caesar, who later looked back on those years as painful ones. Demons he would wrestle with included remorse about the flared-out superstardom of his youth — and how the pressures it brought nearly killed him. But over time he learned to view philosophically his life of ups and downs. "You think just because something good happens, THEN something bad has got to happen? Not necessarily," he said with a smile in 2003, pleased to share his hard-won wisdom: "Two good things have happened in a row."
Woman dies in house fire in Scituate
SCITUATE (AP) — and couldn't make it out. Scituate officials say a Her name hasn't been woman died in a house fire released. while the rest of her family Hebert says it took about escaped to safety. an hour to get the fire under North Scituate Fire Chief control, but not before the Adam Hebert told WPRIhouse was destroyed. TV that the single-family BIRTHDAY REMEMBRANCE home on Silk Lane was 1967-2014 engulfed in flames when volunteer firefighters arrived at about 1 a.m. Wednesday. Hebert says a woman became trapped in the home
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Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
Lincoln
• A three-week Computer Basics Workshop will be held on Fridays Feb. 7, 14 & 28 from 1 to 2 p.m. at the Lincoln Public Library. Call the Reference Desk to register @ 333-2422 ext. 17. Class is limited to 10 students.
Saturday
Providence
• Festival Ballet’s chatterBOXtheatre presents “Peter and the Wolf” at 4 p.m. at FBP Black Box Theatre, 825 Hope St. Tickets: $15/children under 12, $25/adults. Call 3531129 or email info@festivalballetprovidence.org.
9
Woonsocket
• Ranger Talk lecture series being held at the Museum of Work & Culture, 1:30 p.m. Author Norman Desmarais will speak on George Washington’s Ghost Army. Free event. Public invited.
10
Central Falls
•Forand Manor holds Bingo every Monday and Wednesday, starting at 5:15 p.m.
11
Lincoln
• The Northern Rhode Island Chamber of Commerce will host its 23rd annual dinner at the Twin River Event Center, 100 Twin River Road. Cocktails at 5:30, dinner at 6:30. Keynote speaker will be Neil Steinberg, president/CEO of the Rhode Island Foundation. For information or to register visit www.nrichamber.com or call 334-1000.
12
Woonsocket
•The Woonsocket Knights of Columbus Council 113 will host an open house social meeting at 7 p.m. at All Saints Church Hall, Rathbun St. There will be a guest speaker. •Mended Hearts meets at the Ocean State Cardiovascular and Vein Center, 191 Social St., Suite 100, at 5:30 p.m. The public is invited to this free meeting to hear about heart health. For information call (508) 8831291.
13
Woonsocket
• Written Word Writing Group Thursdays, 7:15 p.m. at Harris Public Library. An outlet for adult writers of all leanings: poetry, journaling, prose, short story, sermon, comedy, script writing, puppets. No critiquing. All are welcome and there is no charge. • Sacred Heart Church, 415 Olo St., will hold a Holy Hour for those who are sick, at 6:30 p.m. There will be Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament, a short reflection, recitation of the Rosary and the Divine Mercy Chaplet, concluding with Benediction. Confession will also be available.
14 Valentine’s Day 15
Pawtucket
• Valentines Dinner, hosted by the Major Walter G. Gatchell VFW Post 306, 171 Fountain St., 7 p.m. Tickets must be purchased by Feb. 5 and are $20 per person. For tickets visit the post Saturdays after 4 p.m. or call Sue Bourgault, 721-5399. • Valentine’s Cupid Ball Pink Tie Event, 6 to 11 p.m. at Center By The Blackstone, 175 Main St. For tickets and details, 724-2200.
Bellingham
• Reading with Indy, 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Bellingham Public Library. Indy, a certified reading therapy dog will be at the library on Mondays. Please register only one time per month.
Cumberland
• Widow support group meets every Sunday — the first two Sundays of the month are at the Community Chapel on Diamond Hill Rd. The second two are at Emerald Bay Manor, Diamond Hill Road. All meetings 2 p.m. Call 401-333-5815.
Northbridge
• Morning of brush clearing and trash removal along the canal and trails of the Blackstone River and Canal Heritage State Park. Meet at 9 a.m. at Plummer’s Landing west parking area on Church Street.
Lincoln
• Four-week watercolor class at the Lincoln Public Library, taught by local artist Jerry Aissis, Jan. 17, Feb. 3, 10 and 24 from 6 to 8 p.m. Fee is $80 plus supplies, and is expected at time of registration. Class size is limited to 10. Register at the reference desk.
Pawtucket
• The Leon Mathieu Senior Center and Shri Studio have partnered to offer a “Yoga for Seniors” on Tuesday mornings from 9:30am-10:30am at Shri Studio, 21 Broad Street. The fee for Leon Mathieu Senior Center members is $5 per person per month. 728-7582.
Northbridge
•The Blackstone Valley Coin and Collectables Club will host a coin show at Brians Restaurant from 3 to 8 p.m.
Woonsocket
• How to Sell on Ebay, Woonsocket Harris Public Library, 2 p.m., presented by the Woonsocket Historical Society. Rain date, Feb. 22.
Lincoln
•The Lincoln Garden Club meeting will be held from 1-3 p.m. at the Chapel Street Congregational Church,185 Chapel St. For additional information contact: (401) 7264772.
Cumberland
• TOPS Club (Take Off Pounds Sensibly) meets every Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. at Filibuster Club, 25 High St. Visitors are always welcome (preteens, teens, adults, male and female). First meeting is free.
Burrillville
• The Rod and Gun Club will host its annual Game Dinner at 6 p.m., and also on Feb. 16 at 1 p.m. at th club. Tickets are $30. 568-7171 for information.
16
Woonsocket
• Mardi Gras Queen Coroniation, Our Lady Queen of Martyrs Parish Hall, 1 to 3 p.m.
17 Presidents 18 Day
Central Falls
•Forand Manor holds Bingo every Monday and Wednesday, starting at 5:15 p.m.
19
Central Falls
• Forand Manor holds Bingo every Monday and Wednesday, starting at 5:15 p.m.
20
Lincoln
• Vietnam Veterans of America – James Michael Ray Memorial Chapter #818, will meet at 7 p.m. at the Lincoln Senior Center, 150 Jenckes Hill Road. Come at 6 p.m. and have dinner with us. All Vietnam Veterans welcome. For more information call Joe Gamache at 401-651-6060.
21
Burrillville
• Pascoag Council, 383, Knights of Columbus Friday Night Bingo at the Columbus Club, 98 Roosevelt Ave. Games begin at 6:20 p.m.; doors open at 4:30 p.m.
22
Woonsocket
• Mardi Gras, St. Ann Arts and Cultural Center, 5:30 to 11:30 p.m. Music provided by Jeff Gamache and Runaway Train and Slipper sneakers. Full Cajuj buffet. Prizes for best costumes. Tickets are $30 in advance by calling 762-9072, or at the door (limited amount) for $35. NRICA.org.
Blackstone
• The Blackstone Valley Coin and Collectables Club will hold its monthly meeting at 7 p.m. in the lower level of the Blackstone Town Hall. Anyone interested in attending is welcome. Questions? Call Mike, 774-280-4333.
Cumberland
• Widow support group meets every Sunday — the first two Sundays of the month are at the Community Chapel on Diamond Hill Rd. The second two are at Emerald Bay Manor, Diamond Hill Road. All meetings 2 p.m. Call 401-333-5815.
Woonsocket
• The Knights of Columbus General Moylan Assembly meets at 7 p.m. at All Saints Parish Hall, 323 Rathbun St. • 18th annual corned beef and cabbage dinner to benefit the Martin Crowley scholarship fund, St. Ann Arts and Cultural Center, 84 Cumberland St. Tickets available at WOON, WNRI and be calling Romeo Berthiaume at 6514729.
Woonsocket
•Harris Public Library hosts Creative Writing Group Wednesdays, 7:30 p.m.
Pawtucket
• Steve Fredrick Solo Acoustic performs at East Side Checker Club, 579 Benefit St., from 7 to 11 p.m.
Pawtucket
• The Leon Mathieu Senior Center and Shri Studio have partnered to offer a “Yoga for Seniors” on Tuesday mornings from 9:30am-10:30am at Shri Studio, 21 Broad Street. The fee for Leon Mathieu Senior Center members is $5 per person per month. 728-7582.
Blackstone
•The newly formed BMR Alumni and Friends Band meets at 6:30 at BMR High School every Wednesday. All Blackstone Valley residents of all ages and experience are welcome. For details call 508-883-1291.
Pawtucket
• Chinese New Year party for children and their families at the Pawtucket Public Library, 3 to 4 p.m. in the Campbell Auditorium. Learn about the Chinese zodiac, make a craft, get a temporary tattoo, watch a karate demonstration. Refreshments will be served. Call 725-3714 ext. 209 for information.
Lincoln
• St. James Church, 33 Division St. in Manville, hosts an All-You-Can Eat Pasta and Meatball Supper from 4 to 7 p.m. in its Father Brindamour Hall. $8 per person ($5 for children 10 and under). Tickets purchased in advance by calling 766-1558, or at the door.
Providence
• Festival Ballet’s chatterBOXtheatre presents “Peter and the Wolf” at 1 p.m. at FBP Black Box Theatre, 825 Hope St. Tickets: $15/children under 12, $25/adults. Call 3531129 or email info@festivalballetprovidence.org.
Burrillville
• The Burrillville Senior Citizens Association meets at noon in the K of C hall in Pascoag. Please call 371-2737 by Thursday, Feb. 13, 2014 to make lunch reservations. All Burrillville residents age fifty-five or older are eligible to become members.
Cumberland
• TOPS Club (Take Off Pounds Sensibly) meets every Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. at Filibuster Club, 25 High St. Visitors are always welcome (preteens, teens, adults, male and female). First meeting is free.
Lincoln
•Free introductory fencing class at the Lincoln Library, 6 p.m., taught by Tim Burns, moniteur d’epee. Space is limited. Call the library at 333-2422 to register.
Smithfield
• Smith-Appleby House tours, 1 to 4 p.m., featuring demonstrations of Colonial life and fun activities for families and kids, each Saturday afternoon through March. Admission is $5 per adult and children 12 and under are free. (401) 231-7363.
Burrillville
• The Rod and Gun Club will host its annual Game Dinner at 6 p.m., and also on Feb. 16 at 1 p.m. at the club. Tickets are $30. 568-7171 for information.
Woonsocket
• Written Word Writing Group Thursdays, 7:15 p.m. at Harris Public Library. All are welcome and there is no charge.
23
Cumberland
• Widow support group meets every Sunday — the first two Sundays of the month are at the Community Chapel on Diamond Hill Rd. The second two are at Emerald Bay Manor, Diamond Hill Road. All meetings 2 p.m. Call 401-333-5815.
24
Woonsocket
• St. Joseph Church, 1200 Mendon Rd., is planning a pilgrimage to Italy, Sept. 29 to Oct. 8. Please join us for an info night at 7 p.m. at St. Joseph Church Hall. For more info, call Helene at 401-769-1720 or the Rectory at 401-766-0626. • Monthly meeting of the Knights of Columbus Woonsocket Council will be held at 7 p.m. in the All Saints Church hall, Rathbun Street.
25
Burrillville
• The Burrillville Historical and Preservation Society meets at 7 p.m. at Bridgeton School, 16 Laurel Hill Ave. in Pascoag. Following the meeting there will be a presentation by Glocester resident Jacob T. Bailey, about his book “Shadow Soldiers of the Confederacy.” 568-8449 for more information.
26
Central Falls
• Forand Manor holds Bingo every Monday and Wednesday, starting at 5:15 p.m.
27
Woonsocket
• Written Word Writing Group Thursdays, 7:15 p.m. at Harris Public Library. An outlet for adult writers of all leanings: poetry, journaling, prose, short story, sermon, comedy, script writing, puppets. No critiquing. All are welcome and there is no charge.
28
Burrillville
• Pascoag Council, 383, Knights of Columbus Friday Night Bingo at the Columbus Club, 98 Roosevelt Ave. Games begin at 6:20 p.m.; doors open at 4:30 p.m.
1 March
Pawtucket
• 32nd annual Pawtucket St. Patrick’s Day Parade, noon. pawtucketstpatsparade.com.
Woonsocket
•Harris Public Library hosts Creative Writing Group Wednesdays, 7:30 p.m.
Smithfield
• Smith-Appleby House tours, 1 to 4 p.m., featuring demonstrations of Colonial life and fun activities for families and kids, each Saturday afternoon through March. Admission is $5 per adult and children 12 and under are free. (401) 2317363, smithapplebyhouse.org/calendar.
Woonsocket
• Ranger Talk lecture series being held at the Museum of Work & Culture, 1:30 p.m. Jennifer Pustz to speak on “Voices from the Backstairs, Central Falls Lives of Domestic Service.” Free •Forand Manor holds Bingo every event. Public invited. Monday and Wednesday, starting at 5:15 p.m.
Blackstone
•The newly formed BMR Alumni and Friends Band meets at 6:30 at BMR High School every Wednesday. All Blackstone Valley residents of all ages and experience are welcome. For details call 508-883-1291.
Pawtucket
• The Leon Mathieu Senior Center and Shri Studio have partnered to offer a “Yoga for Seniors” on Tuesday mornings from 9:30am-10:30am at Shri Studio, 21 Broad Street. The fee for Leon Mathieu Senior Center members is $5 per person per month. 728-7582.
Pawtucket
• The Major Walter G. Gatchell VFW Post #306 will hold a spaghetti and meatball dinner fundraiser from 4 to 7 p.m. at the post home, 171 Fountain St. The cost is $8 per person at the door.
Central Falls
Cumberland
• Dixie Diehards Jazz Band performs at Blackstone River Theatre, 2 p.m. Mardi Grasstyle show with traditional New Orleans jazz. $10 advance/$12 at the door. www.riverfolk.org.
• Coutu Memorial Park Committee fundraising breakfast buffet, 8 to 11:30 a.m. at the Garfield Social Club, corner of Hung and High streets. Tickets are $10 and available at the door or by calling 742-3178 or 465-9285.
Bellingham
• Reading with Indy, 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Bellingham Public Library. Indy, a certified reading therapy dog will be at the library on Mondays. Please register only one time per month.
Cumberland
• TOPS Club (Take Off Pounds Sensibly) meets every Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. at Filibuster Club, 25 High St. Visitors are always welcome (preteens, teens, adults, male and female). First meeting is free.
2
Cumberland
• Widow support group meets every Sunday — the first two Sundays of the month are at the Community Chapel on Diamond Hill Rd. The second two are at Emerald Bay Manor, Diamond Hill Road. All meetings 2 p.m. Call 401-333-5815.
3
Central Falls
•Forand Manor holds Bingo every Monday and Wednesday, starting at 5:15 p.m.
4
Pawtucket
• The Leon Mathieu Senior Center and Shri Studio have partnered to offer a “Yoga for Seniors” on Tuesday mornings from 9:30am-10:30am at Shri Studio, 21 Broad Street. The fee for Leon Mathieu Senior Center members is $5 per person per month. 728-7582.
5
Burrillville
•The Parks & Recreation Department announces a St. Patrick’s Day Floral & Craft Workshop at 1 p.m. at the Community Recreation Center, 50 Lodge Road, Pascoag. A $10 materials fee will be charged. Pre-registration is required, 568-9470 or parksandrec@burrillville.org.
6
Woonsocket
• Written Word Writing Group Thursdays, 7:15 p.m. at Harris Public Library. An outlet for adult writers of all leanings: poetry, journaling, prose, short story, sermon, comedy, script writing, puppets. No critiquing. All are welcome and there is no charge.
7
Burrillville
• Pascoag Council, 383, Knights of Columbus Friday Night Bingo at the Columbus Club, 98 Roosevelt Ave. Games begin at 6:20 p.m.; doors open at 4:30 p.m.
8
Woonsocket
• Buy Local Expo and Homeshow sponsored by the Blackstone Valley Independent Business Alliance, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., St. Ann’s Art and Cultural Center, 84 Cumberland St. Home improvements, gifts, services, home decor and crafts, food and beverages, retail stores and more. Family entertainment, free raffles. $1 admission. Plenty of parking. www.buylocalbv.org.
Bellingham
• Reading with Indy, 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Bellingham Public Library. Indy, a certified reading therapy dog will be at the library on Mondays. Please register only one time per month.
Woonsocket
• Beer and dynamite dinner to benefit Leo A. Savoie Playground Fund, 6 to 10 p.m. at St. Joseph’s Veterans Hall. Tickets $20 each. Adults only.
Cumberland
• TOPS Club (Take Off Pounds Sensibly) meets every Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. at Filibuster Club, 25 High St. Visitors are always welcome (preteens, teens, adults, male and female). First meeting is free.
Pawtucket
• Family Movie Night at the Pawtucket Library, 6 p.m. “Despicable Me 2.” Rated PG. Program is free and no registration is required. Children ages 10 and older may attend without a guardian. Call 725-3714 ext. 209 for information.
Cumberland
• Rabies vaccination clinic for dogs, cats and ferrets at the Cumberland Animal Shelter, 44 Martin St. Cats and ferrets from 1 to 2 p.m., dogs from 2 to 3 p.m. $11 cash only. Animals must be in carriers or on a leash. Written proof of previous vaccinations is required to get a 3-year shot, otherwise a oneyear shot will be given. Cumberland residents only will be able to get their dog licenses at the clinic.
Blackstone
•The newly formed BMR Alumni and Friends Band meets at 6:30 at BMR High School every Wednesday. All Blackstone Valley residents of all ages and experience are welcome. For details call 508-883-1291.
Send your community events to notices@pawtuckettimes.com
Thursday, February 13, 2014
ENTERTAINMENT
THE TIMES A7
MPAC to hold auditions for ‘Anne Frank’
There’s a lot to love about ‘Hairspray’
Tony Award-winning musical opens on Valentine’s Day at Stadium Theatre
By KATHIE RALEIGH
MILFORD — The Milford Performing Arts Center's Full Circle Theatre Company presents auditions for “The Diary of Anne Frank.” In spite of her horrific circumstances, Anne Frank bravely recounts her day-today life in a journal while in hiding in Nazi Germany. The play is a dramatization by Frances Goodrich and Albert Hackett of Anne’s journal and received the Tony Award for Best Play during its original Broadway run. Actors able to play ages 13 to late 50s are needed. Bring a photo and resume and be prepared to read from the script. Auditions at the MPAC studio, 150 Main St., Milford on Monday, March 3 and Tuesday, March 4, from 7 to 9 p.m. For more information, please call MPAC at 508 473-1684 or email milfordpac@verizon.net.
Popa Chubby at Chan’s Friday
WOONSOCKET — Blues and rock artist Popa Chubby will perform at Chan’s Restaurant on Friday at 8 and 10 p.m. The cost is $20 for the first show, $15 for the second, or $23 for both shows. Also playing at Chan’s this weekend will be legendary Blues Hall of Fame member John Hammond on Saturday night at 8 p.m. for his CD release party. The cost is $25. Chan’s is located at 267 Main St. For more information visit www.chanseggrollsandjazz.com.
WOONSOCKET – Jason LeClair takes comedy seriously, and that makes him the perfect director for “Hairspray,” a silly-sweet confection of a musical with an earnest message about ending discrimination. The stage production, based on the 1988 John Waters film, won eight Tony Awards after opening on Broadway in 2002. Now the Rhode Island Stage Ensemble will perform it for local audiences at the Stadium Theatre Performing Arts Centre, starting on Valentine’s Day. “I love working on something that is so much fun and has such a great message to it,” LeClair said recently during a break from teaching at Beacon Charter High School. “The show is incredibly entertaining; you’ll walk out singing and wanting to dance. But it’s not just frivolous. There is lots of commentary about society in this fun, freewheeling play.” That starts with its heroine, the plus-sized Tracy Turnblad, a teenager who loves to dance but who is discouraged from entering a contest on television’s “Corny Collins Show” because of her size. The bubbly Tracy, however, is not to be discouraged; she not only enters but wins a spot on the show. From there, she takes on another challenge: upending the show’s rules on segregation. Despite the message, “Hairspray” is never
preachy, thanks to the writUMass Amherst and now is ing and a comic cast of char- a professional music director, acters, like Motormouth when she’s not acting. Maria Maybelle, host of the “Negro Norris, a New York Day” on the show; dancer University theater graduate, Seaweed J. Stubbs; and is Maybelle. Penny, Tracy’s Mike Harrison is taking dorky but on the loyal best friend. Joining them are highschool heartthrob Link Larkin and Corny himself. The villain is Velma Von Tussle, producer of the “Corny Collins Show,” who has her own agenda on who does Rachel and doesn’t get to MacKenzie perform on TV. plays Tracy More famous, Turnblad in RISE’s however, is Edna, production of Tracy’s shy and ‘Hairspray,’ openoverweight moth- ing at The Stadium er, whom Waters, Theatre in the creator, insists Woonsocket should be played Friday. in drag. Rounding Photo courtesy out the group is Stadium Theatre Tracy’s father, Wilbur, owner of a joke shop. Casting this multi-ethnic ensemble can be difficult for community theater groups, LeClair said. “But RISE has a good handle on a diverse community of actors. “I’m so proud of the talent in this cast,” he added. Tracy is played by Rachel MacKenzie, who was a piano and voice major at
high-profile role of Edna. Harrison is well known locally as an actor and producer with Encore Repertory Company. “We have a lot of Rhode Island College students on the technical end and as actors,” LeClair noted. They include Gian Dicostanzo, a veteran of numerous local productions, who plays Link Larkin; and Cortney Contente, who is Amber, the foil to Tracy’s character. After two seasons with RISE, LeClair also is familiar to the local theater community. A graduate of the
Massachusetts College of Art and Design, he is a professional set designer and illustrator. He earned a teaching certificate at Providence College and now is studying for a master’s degree in art education
from the University of Florida. Because of his background in the visual arts, LeClair said, “I have a specific idea of how I want things to look,” so he also is serving as the set designer for “Hairspray.” But as director, he makes sure all his actors share his serious approach to being funny. “We have spent whole rehearsals sitting down and exploring who these characters are and what brought them here. The actors who play Edna and Wilbur (Harrison and John Pacheco) have really dug very deep,” he added. “They decided the characters met in high school and even know what classes they sat together in. They talk about what works in Edna’s and Wilbur’s relationship, and what it was like when Tracy was born.” The benefit of all this introspection pays off, as he expected, in the comedy. “It becomes so much more natural,” LeClair said. “Instead of saying a line for an effect, they say the line and the effect happens. “It’s the difference between a good community theater production – and a fantastic production.” The RISE production of “Hairspray” will be on stage Friday and Saturday, Feb. 14 and 15, at 7:30 p.m., and Sunday, Feb. 16, at 2 p.m., at the Stadium Theatre, 28 Monument Square. Tickets are $19 and available at the box office, by calling (401) 762-4545 and online at www.stadiumtheatre.com.
‘Man of La Mancha’ returns to PPAC this weekend
Quixote and Sancho taking to the road, to restore the age of chivalry, to battle evil, and right all wrongs. “Man of La Mancha” runs Feb. 14 through 16 for five performances only and is part of the Contemporary Classics Series, sponsored by Cox Communications. Tickets are on sale now at the PPAC Box Office (220 Weybosset Street in downtown Providence), online at www.ppacri.org, and by phone at (401) 421ARTS (2787). Tickets are $69 - $32; all ticket prices include a $3 per ticket restoration charge. Follow the Providence Performing Arts Center on Facebook at www.facebook.com/ProvPacRI , on Twitter @ProvPacRI, and on Instagram @provpacri.
PROVIDENCE — “Man of La Mancha” returns to the Providence Performing Arts Center in an all-new production of the Tony Award-winning musical that has inspired audiences since the very first notes of “The Impossible Dream” were heard on opening night. “Man of La Mancha” is the winner of five Tony Awards including Best Musical, along with the New York Drama Critics Circle Award for Best Musical and the Outer Critics Circle Award. This play-within-a-play is based on Cervantes's “Don Quixot”e and tells the story of a man who, against all odds, sees good and innocence in a world filled with darkness and despair. Enter the mind and the world of Don Quixote as he pursues his quest for the impossible dream: Miguel de Cervantes, aging and an utter failure, has been thrown into a dungeon in Seville to await trial by the Inquisition for an offense
Join Family!
Photo/Carol Rosegg
‘Man of La Mancha’ will be at the Providence Performing Arts Center from Feb. 14 through 16.
against the Church. But first he must face a kangaroo court of his fellow prisoners: thieves, cutthroats and trollops who propose to steal his meager possessions, including the unfin-
ished manuscript of a novel called Don Quixote. Cervantes, seeking to save it, proposes a form of an entertainment. The ‘court’ agrees and before their eyes, Cervantes
and his faithful manservant transform themselves into Don Quixote and Sancho Panza. They proceed to play out the story with the participation of the prisoners as other characters,
We are asking you to please submit any newsworthy content, photos, press releases, etc. directly to us by email at: notices@pawtuckettimes.com We are excited to add your community news to
READER’S REWARDS
GET YOUR NAME IN THE HAT
READER’S REWARDS
Enter to win 2 tickets to:
A Tequila Sunrise: An Eagles Tribute
Enter to win 2 tickets
GET YOUR NAME IN THE HAT
Macbeth
Fri., February 28 at 8:00pm
6 Pairs of tickets will be awarded. (ticket value: $19.00)
An eerie prophecy and unchecked greed lead to an ambitious couple’s downfall in the Bard’s timeless tale of absolute power that corrupts absolutely.
Friday, March 14 8:00pm
Pairs of tickets will be awarded.
Entries must be received by Wednesday, February 19, 2014 at noon. Winners will be posted in The Call & The Times on Thursday, February 20, 2014.
No Purchase Necessary. Employees of The Call & The Times and their families are not eligible.
ENTRY FORM: A Tequila Sunrise
Name:________________________________________________ Street Address:__________________________________________ City:_______________________________________State:______ Phone Number:_________________________________________ Must be 18 years old to enter.
ENTRY FORM: Macbeth
Entries must be received by Thursday, February 13, 2014 at noon. Winners will be posted in The Call & The Times on Friday, February 14, 2014.
No Purchase Necessary. Employees of The Call & The Times and their families are not eligible.
Name:________________________________________________ Street Address:__________________________________________ City:_______________________________________State:______ Phone Number:_________________________________________ Must be 18 years old to enter.
Please mail or drop off entry form or 3x5 index card to: The Call - Reader’s Rewards 75 Main St., Woon., RI 02895
Please mail or drop off entry form or 3x5 index card to: The Call - Reader’s Rewards 75 Main St., Woon., RI 02895
OR
The Times - Reader’s Rewards 23 Exchange St., Pawt., RI 02860
OR
The Times - Reader’s Rewards 23 Exchange St., Pawt., RI 02860
Visit www.stadiumtheatre.com for more information
Visit www.gammtheatre.org for more information
A8 THE TIMES
LOCAL
Today’s Forecast
Narragansett Bay Weather Wind (knots) Seas (feet) Visibility (miles) E-NE 15-30+ 2-4 0-2 Buzzards Bay E-NE 15-30+ 2-3 0-2
Thursday, February 13, 2014
Merrimack to Chatham E-NE 15-30+ 2-7 0-3
Chatham to Watch Hill E-NE 20-35 3-7 0-3
..............Snow to Rain, Very Windy........
THU
FRI
SAT
SUN
MON
Mark Searles’s Southern New England Area Forecast
34-39 36-40 20-25 28-33
Snow to Rain AM Snow Shwr
30-34 25-29
Ch SN Shwrs
26-30 12-17
Sunny
28-33 10-15
Sunny
Five Day Forecast data supplied by Storm Team 10
Strong, developing low pressure will move over SE Massachusetts later this afternoon bringing a variety of weather to the area. Frist snow develops with a gradual change to rain from the coast up through the metro area before noon. Areas well N&W of Providence may stay as wet snow into the early afternoon but even those spots should go to rain and gusty wind this afternoon & evening. A few inches of snow this morning followed by an inch of rain & NE gusts to 50mph this afternoon!
THU
FRI
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PAWTUCKET
MON
Nasuti
Continued from Page A3 “He went about his business making sure we did what we were supposed to do,” he said. “We learned accountability from him and how to do things the right way.” His finest hour may have been when high school sports were on the chopping block during the summer of 2009. Ultimately, they were spared thanks to Nasuti’s ability to mobilize support in the city “The amazing thing about George is that he was so immersed in the community. He would have done anything to make sure that sports weren’t eliminated,” said George Coderre, who was the head girls’ basketball coach at Woonsocket High during that tumultuous time. “He took on the responsibility while he was principal at Bernon Elementary School. It was extremely time consuming, but there’s probably no one else who could have done all that responsibility. He went over and above.” In May 2012 at Ciro’s Tavern on Cherry, Nasuti orchestrated what he hailed as the first-ever all-encompassing fundraising effort geared to specifically benefit all Woonsocket public school sports from varsity and junior varsity down to the middle school level. Nasuti’s second crack at raising funds for the athletic department he oversaw was held this past September, a 5K road race appropriately dubbed “Novans Pride.” A onetime Woonsocket High athletic director who also coached on the same Villa Novan football staff as Nasuti during the late 80s, Mike Watters expressed, “Everything comes in cycles. Coaches and players may leave after a couple of years, but George was always the one constant. He’s touched so many lives because he’s worn so many hats for that school department. Everyone who has gone through the system since he started at the high school in 1983 has benefited from George being there. “What made George so special is that he had a keen sense of history of the high school and Woonsocket in general. When you talk about Woonsocket High School, George always seems to be in the picture,” Watters added. “If you wanted to know what was going on with Woonsocket athletics, just call George.” *** Fello athletic directors shared similar sentiments of loss and expressed sympathies for Nasuti's family. "First of all, his family has suffered a terrible loss," said Cumberland High School Athletic Director Frank Geiselman. "He was a super family man. Beyond that, the Woonsocket school community - it's just tough to replace people like George, people who go out of their way just to do whatever they can and put the time in," said Geiselman when contacted on Wednesday. "He didn't do it for any awards, Geiselman said. “He did it because he loved it." Geiselman got to know Nasuti even better in conjunction with the annual Woonsocket-Cumberland Thanksgiving Day football game. "You couldn't have asked for anyone better to work with. Just a super guy who was easy to deal with and get along with," said Geiselman. "We talked often before the game and how we wanted to do things. He was always enthusiastic and just loved sports and athletics. It was always for the kids." Added John Scanlon, Director of Athletics at Pawtucket's Tolman High, "He was always a standup guy and always had the kids' best interests at heart." In addition to his Woonsocketbased duties, Nasuti also served on several Interscholastic League-related committees. He was involved with the baseball and football committees and part of the groups that helped streamline the divisional realignment process and procedures having to do with cooperative sports. RIIL Executive Director Tom Mezzanotte passed along his department’s well wishes in a statement: "No words can adequately express the sorrow we all feel, but we can take solace in the friendship we shared with George and acknowledge the good and lasting work that he did in his too-brief lifetime. For all it was an honor and privilege to have known and worked with George. “As a coach, educator, and administrator George had many proud moments. He loved his family and, of course, his students,” Mezzanotte went on to say. “For all, it was an honor and privilege to have known and worked with George. As a coach, educator and administrator, he had many proud moments.” Geiselman echoed Mezzanotte’s sentiments. “He was into improving athletics not only in Woonsocket, but across the state.” Follow Brendan McGair on Twitter @BWMcGair03, Russ Olivo @russolivo
POLICE LOG
• Amilcar M. Cabral, of 131 Harrison St., apt. 3FL, Pawtucket, was arrested on charges of domestic — simple assault, domestic — vandalism, domestic — disorderly conduct and refusal to relinquish or to damage or to obstruct telephone stemming from an incident at his apartment on Saturday at around 11:05 p.m., police said. • Joao P. Dalomba, of 125 Maryland Ave., Pawtucket, was arrested on charges of driving under the influence of liquor or drugs — first offense, and refusal to submit to a chemical test, following a traffic stop near 100 main Street on Sunday shortly after midnight, police said. • Jonathan Miranda, of 5 Nickerson St., brockton, Mass., was arrested on charges of obstructing a police officer, possession of Schedule I-V, driving under the influence of liquor or drugs — first offense, and refusal to submit to a chemical test following a traffic stop near 804 Mineral Spring Ave. on Sunday at around 4:19 a.m., police said. • Michael Dalba, of 444 Smithfield Ave., was arrested on charges of domestic — simple assault and domestic — disorderly conduct following an incident at his apartment on Sunday at around 9:39 a.m., police said. • Joseph A. Catarius, of 208 Ellis Rd., North Attleborough, Mass., was arrested on charges of possession of heroin and driving in possession of a controlled substance following an incident at 181 Sabin St., on Sunday at around 1:46 p.m., police said. • Jose P. Dalomba, of 150 Dartmouth St., apt. B305, Pawtucket, was arrested on charges of shoplifting, fighting and simple assault following an incident at the Family Dollar, 502 Broadway, on Sunday at around 6:15 p.m., police said. • Crystal L. Rathbone, of 2928 Pawtucket Ave., Riverside, was arrested on charges of attempt to elude and reckless driving following a traffic stop at 272 Broadway on Tuesday at around 1:14 p.m., police said. • Steven M. Walsh, of 103 Terrace Ave., Pawtucket, was arrested on charges of domestic — simple assault, domestic — disorderly conduct and domestic-vandalism following an incident at his his home on Tuesday at around 1:07 p.m., police said. • Juan G. Sierra, of 882 York Ave., apt. 2nd, Pawtucket, was arrested on Tuesday at around 3:09 p.m. near Lilac Street on warrant charges of failure to appear for felony assault, violation of probation on drug possession, and two other warrant charges, police said. • Patrick S. O'Neill, of 150 Hanover Ave., Pawtucket, was arrested on charges of driving under the influence of liquor or drugs, refusal to submit to a chemical test, and driving with a suspended license following a traffic stop at 588 Pawtucket Ave. on Tuesday at around 3:35 p.m., police said.
The Times & The Call present…
Canyon Country
A journey through Canyon Country brings you into a colorful world of stunning southwestern vistas and the unique topography of three national parks: Zion, Bryce and the Grand Canyon. Roll up your sleeves for a good old-fashioned Chili CookOff. Take time to shop in Sedona's marketplace and travel through Kaibab National Forest. Luxuriate at the Lake Powell Resort for two nights. Enjoy the stark beauty of Monument Valley during a jeep ride narrated by a Navajo tribal member. Then it’s off to the neon-lit spectacle of Las Vegas.
Canyon Country
featuring Arizona & Utah
9 Days - 12 Meals October 16 - 24, 2014
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Highlights: Scottsdale, Oak Creek Canyon, Kaibab National Forest, Grand Canyon, Lake Powell, Monument Valley, Bryce Canyon National Park, Zion National Park, Las Vegas
See the amazing spires and canyons of three great national parks: Zion, Bryce and the Grand Canyon. Stay two nights at a hotel that overlooks stunning Lake Powell. End your vacation with a two-night stay in Las Vegas where you can relax or join in the round-the-clock activities.
For more information call Therese Harvey at 401.765.1100
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*Rate is per person and includes roundtrip air from T. F. Green Airport, air taxes and fees/surcharges, and hotel transfers. Early Bookings Savings is valid on air-inclusive packages only. Pricing is based on a minimum of 10 passengers traveling on the same air schedule from the same gateway. Airfare: For your convenience, we offer airfare for purchase with all vacation packages. If you purchase an air-inclusive program, your airfare will be quoted inclusive of all fuel, taxes and fees. Your rates are subject to change until paid in full. Seats are limited and may not be available on every flight or departure date. Checked Baggage Charges: some airlines may impose additional charges if you choose to check any baggage. Please contact your airline or refer to its website for detailed information regarding your airline’s checked baggage policies.
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SPORTS
Blackstone Valley
THE TIMES, Thursday, February 13, 2014 — B1
Swimming
Eagles spoil ‘Senior Night’ for Clippers
Barrington takes two in spirited Div. I finale
By JON BAKER jbaker@pawtuckettimes.com
CUMBERLAND — A strange, emotional thing happened to Cumberland High swimming standout Kenzie McCormick eight days ago while driving to school. “I was on the highway (I-295), and I merged in front of a tractor trailer truck,” McCormick stated during a Division I dual-meet clash with always-stellar Barrington on Wednesday afternoon. “The car in front of me started to slow down, so I did, too. All of a sudden, the guy driving the truck hit me, and I got rearended. “He told me later that the load he was (transporting) was too heavy, and he didn’t have time to stop,” she added. “I ended up pulling some muscles in my lower back and neck, so I couldn’t practice for over a week. This is my first day back in the pool.” Despite the accident, McCormick didn’t disappoint. After placing a close second in the 200-yard freestyle (2:07.85), she captured the 100-yard butterfly with what she called a decent clocking of 1:05.69. The Clippers nevertheless sustained a 54-40 loss in their dual-meet finale, and closed that “regular-season” campaign at 3-5 overall. “My muscles aren’t so Jack Bauer much sore as they are tight,” she confessed after taking the butterfly event. “While I was swimming, I was hurting, especially during the fly. I don’t know how I won, except that I just didn’t want to lose. “Coach (Kyle Black) didn’t want me to swim (Wednesday), but I told him I was going to anyway,” she continued. “I mean, it’s Senior Night, and I’ve been waiting for this for four years.” As for the boys’ contest, the visiting Eagles mustered eight triumphs on the 11-event program to snag a 59-35 win, pushing Cumberland to 2-6 overall. Neither of McCormick’s individual races came with lifetime-best clockings, but Black didn’t care. “Kenzie sent me a text after the accident; she told me she wouldn’t be at practice that afternoon,” Black noted. “I thought it was a joke. Kenzie’s the type who would come to train even if there was a major catastrophe. In her next one, she told she had been rear-ended. “She also said the doctor had told her to stay out of the water for a couple of days, but she still came to help me out almost as an assistant coach. She kept them ‘up,’ and used her experience to help the other kids.” Following her win in the 100 butterfly, CHS trailed by only four (23-19), but Barrington’s Danielle Gibalerio and Alicia Vesey took 1-2 in the 100 freestyle, then swept the top two spots in the 500 freestyle. With those placements, the Eagles pushed the lead to 33-25, and the Clippers never got closer. Sophomore Kayleigh Canavan nevertheless provided a pair of splendid outings, reigning in the 200 individual medley (2:24.94) and the 100 breaststroke (1:11.57). She also swam on the winning 200 medley relay team (including freshman Andrea Ronan, McComrick and Chopy) and the runner-up 400 freestyle relay (with the same). ”In the IM, I knew the girl I was swimming against had the same time I had, so I knew it was going to be close,” she stated. “Overall, I’m pleased with both times, but not thrilled. I was happier because I won both.
See CLIPPERS, page B3
ERNEST A. BROWN / Blackstone Valley Sports photo
Top, Woonsocket junior Avi Osagie (33) gets ready to sink a pullup jumper among three Cranston East defenders during the opening minutes of Wednesday night’s Division I contest at the Villa Novans’ gymnasium. Osagie scored 16 points and played well on the boards, but the Thunderbolts still came away with a 47-29 victory. Bottom, Woonsocket’s Lexus Thomas drives to the hoop between two defenders.
Girls’ basketball
Heavy hearts: Villa Novans bring out their best, but bow to Thunderbolts
WOONSOCKET — On behalf of his father, Woonsocket High Athletic Director George Nasuti, who died tragically late Tuesday night, eldest son Chris decided to deliver a pre-game speech to the Lady Villa Novans on Wednesday evening. “I would just like to say my dad would want you to play your hearts out tonight, and know that he’s proud of each and every one of you,” he said. “He’s looking down on you tonight.” Taylor Dandy canned four treys en route to 16 points and Aveanne Osagie chipped in 13, but Woonsocket dropped a 47-29 Division I crossover verdict to the Thunderbolts. In the process, it fell to 0-13 overall. Sarah Coutu led the visitors with 18 points, while Molly Phillips added 11. See NOVANS, page B3
2014 WINTER OLYMPIC GAMES
Farrington strikes gold for U.S. in women’s halfpipe
peting in three events — slopestyle, halfpipe and, next, snowboardcross. Then came Clark. She's been the most consistent, best-prepared rider over the past four years, a favorite to win another gold 12 years after she burst onto the scene with her first Olympic title in Salt Lake City. But her evening went down in much the same manner as Shaun White's did 24 hours earlier. Like White, Clark had a first run that included a nasty fall; her board careened off the lip of the pipe, bending hard when it hit, then sending her free-falling to her back, 20 feet below. "I work hard in the offseason to be able to get up from that," Clark said. She did. But, also like White, she had a second run that included a mistake on her signature trick. White couldn't land the four-rotation "Yolo" jump. Clark couldn't quite master a 1080-degree spin that only she attempts. Her spin really went about 1040 degrees, and she traveled too far down the halfpipe while doing it. And so, the real drama came while the judges added things up, knowing they had three Olympic gold medalists sitting on that bench — and deciding if they should make it four. Farrington, a natural-born dancer, sat there and shook her shoulders. Bright patted her good friend Clark on the thigh. See FARRINGTON, page B4
KRASNAYA POLYANA, Russia (AP) — It was one of those Olympicstyle pauses. Two minutes. Three minutes. To the four women sitting on the bench at the bottom of the halfpipe, it felt even longer. In the end, the cowgirl won the gold. Kaitlyn Farrington, the 24-year-old from Idaho whose parents sold off their cattle to bankroll her career, sparked the second upset on the halfpipe in two nights. She smoothed out a nearflawless run Wednesday to edge Aussie Torah Bright and take down the American favorite, Kelly Clark. "I'm sure they do not miss those cows today," Farrington said of her folks. The running joke in her family comes when her parents tell her to "Cowgirl Up," and over a long day that included six runs — two each in qualifying, semifinals and finals — Farrington did just that. The winning run earned a score of 91.75. It included one of the tougher combinations in the sport — a double-twisting jump with a near-blind landing, followed by a 2½-spin jump. It closed with a twisting, head-over-heels flip at the bottom. Superb, though certainly beatable by three of the women still at the top for Run 2, all of whom had Olympic gold medals back at home. Hannah Teter, the 2006 champion who wound up fourth, couldn't do it. Neither could Bright, who ended up .25 points from her second straight gold, but viewed this as nothing less than a victory considering she's com-
R.I.’s Castelli cops ninth in figure skating event
SOCHI, Russia (AP) — Maxim Trankov hopes young figure skaters all over Russia will take inspiration from what he and Tatiana Volosozhar accomplished at the Olympics. The two restored the country to the pinnacle of pairs Wednesday, and their teammates made it almost total domination. Volosozhar and Trankov won gold, while Ksenia Stolbova and Fedor Klimov took silver. "I think tonight all of the country will celebrate this beautiful victory," Trankov said. Russia or the Soviet Union had won gold in 12 straight Olympics in pairs before the streak ended four years ago, when the Russians failed to take home any medal in the event. In the stands for both days of the competition in Sochi was the pair who started it all: Ludmila Belousova and Oleg Protopopov, the Olympic champions in 1964 and '68.
See CASTELLI, page B4
B2 THE TIMES
SPORTS
Girls’ basketball
Thursday, February 13, 2014
REGIONAL Quakers snap Lions’ six-game win streak SCOREBOARD
PROVIDENCE — Lincoln saw its six-game win streak come to a halt on Wednesday night, as Moses Brown held off a secondhalf comeback by the visiting Lions to score a 38-37 crossover victory. The Lions, who are 9-5 overall and 6-3 in Division II action, did their best to come back from a 23-15 deficit, but the Quakers got the job done in the end to raise their league mark to 7-2. Shirley Carrington scored 15 points to propel the Lions. Casie Beauchemin was the next highest scorer with seven. ***
LINCOLN (37): Casie Beauchemin 3 0-0 7, Kellyn Dyer 1 2-4 4, Shirley Carrington 6 3-6 15, McKenzie Cavanaugh 0 2-4 2, Megan Chatowsky 1 1-4 3, Bethany Denio 2 2-4 6. Totals: 13 10-22 37. MOSES BROWN (38): Addie Gilson 5 2-4 12, Alexandra Pinsky 3 0-0 7, Allison McPherson 1 0-0 2, Lydia DeAngelo 5 1-2 11, Claudia Marzec 1 2-4 4, Victoria Caruolo 0 2-2 2. Totals: 15 7-12 38. Three-point field goals: Lincoln 1 (Beauchemin), Moses Brown 1 (Pinsky). Halftime: Moses Brown, 23-15.
R.I. HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS SCHEDULE
THURSDAY BOYS Basketball Mount St. Charles at Toll Gate, 7 p.m. Wrestling Tolman, Burrillville at Pilgrim, 5 p.m.; Ponaganset, West Warwick at Lincoln, 5:30 p.m.; Cranston West at Cumberland, Chariho at Woonsocket, 7 p.m. GIRLS Basketball Davies at Hope, 4 p.m.; North Smithfield at Juanita Sanchez, Middletown at Shea, 6 p.m.; Burrillville at Warwick Vets, Toll Gate at Tolman, 7 p.m.; Cumberland at Smithfield, 7:15 p.m. FRIDAY BOYS Basketball Burrillville at Pilgrim, Johnston at Mount St. Charles, 6:30 p.m.; La Salle at Woonsocket, Lincoln at Exeter/West Greenwich, Cumberland at Shea, North Smithfield at Warwick Vets, Central Falls at West Warwick, Davies at Juanita Sanchez, 7 p.m.; North Providence at Tolman, 7:30 p.m. Hockey Barrington at Burrillville, 6 p.m.; La Salle at Mount St. Charles, Portsmouth vs. North Smithfield, (at Levy Rink), 7:30 p.m.; Narragansett vs. Woonsocket, (at Smithfield Rink), 9:30 p.m. GIRLS Basketball Narragansett at Tolman, 4:30 p.m.; Woonsocket at Cumberland, West Warwick at Central Falls, Lincoln at St. Raphael, 7 p.m. Hockey Smithfield/North Smithfield/Coventry Co-op vs. Lincoln/Cumberland Co-op, (at Benny Mageria Rink, West Warwick), 8:30 p.m.; La Salle at Mount St. Charles, 9 p.m. CO-ED Swimming Westerly at Mount St. Charles, (at Woonsocket YMCA), 4 p.m. SATURDAY BOYS Hockey Middletown vs. Lincoln, (at Levy Rink), 7 p.m.; North Smithfield vs. Pilgrim, (at Thayer Arena), 7:30 p.m.; Smithfield at Cumberland, 8 p.m.; Scituate/Tolman Coop vs. East Providence, (at Levy Rink), St. Raphael/PCD/Wheeler Co-op vs. South Kingstown, (at Boss Arena), 8:30 p.m. GIRLS Basketball Shea vs. Bishop Keough, (at St. Raphael Academy), 1 p.m. Hockey Narragansett/North Kingstown/South Kingstown Co-op vs. Lincoln/Cumberland Co-op, (at Lynch Arena), 7 p.m.; Burrillville/Ponaganset Co-op vs. Bay View, (at Lynch Arena), 8:30 p.m. CO-ED Indoor Track & Field R.I. State Championships, (at Providence Career & Technical Academy), noon. SUNDAY GIRLS Hockey Bay View vs. Smithfield/North Smithfield/Coventry Co-op, (at Portsmouth Abbey), 4 p.m.
Boys’ basketball
Unbeaten West Warwick downs Cumberland
CUMBERLAND — Unbeaten West Warwick continued its dominance of the Division II ranks on Wednesday night by posting its 14th victory, downing Cumberland, 70-58, in their crossover meeting at the Clippers’ Wellness Center. The Clippers, who are 5-9 in the league, received 11 points from Chris Gomes and 10 each from Nick Poli and Brandon Kolek. Jared Talbert added eight and Tyler Calabro had seven.
WEST WARWICK (70): Austin Paygai 2 0-0 4, Trevor Lawton 9 1-1 19, Brad Young 6 5-7 18, Kevin Paygai 1 1-3 3, Gregg D’Ambrosca 2 0-0 4, Dave LaMountain 0 2-2 2, Kody Greenhalgh 6 0-0 15, Brian Moretti 0 2-2 2, Matt Grenier 1 0-0 3. Don Chambers 0 0-2 2. Totals: 27 11-17 70. CUMBERLAND (58): Chris Gomes 3 2-2 11, Nick Poli 4 2-5 10, Brandon Kolek 4 22 10, Grant Osmundson 1 0-0 2, Tyler Calabro 3 1-1 7, Joe Fine 2 0-0 4, Josh Rampone 1 0-0 3, Jared Talbert 3 2-6 8, Trevor Lee 1 1-1 3. Totals: 22 10-17 58. Three-point field goals: Greenhalgh 3, Gomes 3, Young, Rampone. Halftime: West Warwick, 43-21.
R.I. GIRLS’ INDOOR TRACK & FIELD
RIIL JUNIOR VARSITY STATE CHAMPIONSHIP MEET Tuesday – Providence Career & Technical Academy field house Team Scores 1, N. Kingstown 64; 2, La Salle 58; 3, Central Falls 29; 4, Westerly 28; 5, Moses Brown 26; 6, Barrington 24; 7, (tie) Mt. Pleasant and Cr. West 22; 9, Bay View 19; 10, Central 17; 11, (tie) Woonsocket and Coventry 14; 13, Chariho 12.33; 14, (tie) Cumberland and Portsmouth 12; 16, Toll Gate 11; 17, Pilgrim 10; 18, (tie) MSC and Lincoln 9; 20, Juanita Sanchez 8.33; 21, Warwick Vets 8; 22, W. Warwick 4.33; 23, Mt. Hope 1. Individual results WT - 2, Tara Rochefort, Woon. 38-10.75 (11.85); 3, Ashley Martinez, Woon. 379 (11.50); 6, Megan Cummins, Linc. 34-5 (10.49). LJ - 5, Milucy Fernandes, CF 15-5.50 (4.71). 3000 - 2, Sam Leal, Linc. 12:00.4. 1500 - 4, Hannah Tavares, Cumb. 5:17.4; 6, Julia Dempsey, Cumb. 5:18.2. 600 - 2, Adamaris Villar, CF 1:48.46. 55m - 1, Davecilla Artey, CF 7.67; 4, Morgan Patras, Cumb. 8.01; 6, Stephanie Sarza, MSC 8.03. 55mH - 5, Julianna Restropo, Cumb. 9.99. 4x200 - 2, Central Falls 1:55.99; 3, MSC 1:57.01. 4x400 - 5, MSC 4:34.69; 6, Central Falls 4:38.56. 4x800 - 6, Cumberland 10:48.68.
Swimming
Portsmouth sweeps MSC
WOONSOCKET — Portsmouth took both ends of its Division II swim meet with Mount St. Charles on Wednesday afternoon at the Woonsocket YMCA, as the MSC boys suffered a 52-40 defeat and the Mount girls fell by a 52-42 score. The boys’ squad, which fell to 1-5, was led by Jonathan Dow, who seized the 100-yard freestyle in 55.07 seconds, Liam DeBeasi, who won the 100-yard breaststroke in 1:15.7, and Carl Ciullio, who captured the 500-yard freestyle in 5:48.7. Ciullio and Dow also teamed up with Greg Iovanel and John Cutler to win the 400-yard freestyle relay in 4:02.25. For the girls, who are 2-5, Elizabeth Gross won a pair of events, the 100-yard butterfly (1:08.07) and 200-yard individual medley (2:28.75). The 200-yard freestyle relay team of Erin MacNeil, Jillian Barnabe, Sarah Gardella, and Lexa Lauzier also won in a 2:03.62 time. The Mounties will wrap up their dual meet season on Friday at 4 p.m. back at the YMCA with a meet against Westerly.
RIIL INDOOR TRACK & FIELD RANKINGS
GIRLS Team Pts. Prev. 1. LaSalle (10) 127 1 2. Classical (3) 120 2 3. Hope 82 6 4. Barrington 78 4 5. No. Kingstown 74 3 6. Cranston West 66 5 7. Pilgrim 42 8 8. Cumberland 41 7 9. Smithfield 16 — 10. Portsmouth 14 9 Other teams — Toll Gate 13; Exeter/W. Greenwich 10; Narragansett 5; East Greenwich and West Warwick 3; Chariho and Moses Brown 2; Mount Hope and Coventry 1. BOYS Team Pts. Prev. 1. N. Kingstown (5) 113 2 2. Hendricken (5) 109 1 3. La Salle (1) 95 3 4. Classical 83 4 5. Central 53 5 6. Barrington 46 6 7. E. Greenwich 37 9 8. E. Providence (1) 30 7 9. Moses Brown 12 — 10. Cumberland 10 10 10. Chariho 10 8 Other teams — Hope 9; Woonsocket 7; Mount St. Charles and Mount Pleasant 4; Rogers 3; Lincoln 2; Coventry and W. Warwick 1.
On The Banner
PHOTO FEATURED IN PIC OF THE DAY LAST WEEK
December 27, 2013 - Cumberland junior gurad Tyler Calabro (20) drives against Lincoln defender Will Britt during second half of the Cumberland-Lincoln game during the 2013 Roadshow Holiday Classic at Cumberland Wellness Center Friday night. Lincoln prevailed in overtime 57-53 final. Ernest A. Brown/RIMG photo.
PINEVIEW LITTLE LEAGUE SCHEDULES FEBRUARY REGISTRATION DATES FOR UPCOMING BASEBALL SEASON
PAWTUCKET — The Pineview Little League has scheduled its registration dates for the upcoming season at the Ken Ryan Baseball Academy on 413 Central Ave. in Pawtucket. The dates are Saturday, Feb. 22, from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. and Wednesday, Feb. 26, from 6-8 p.m. For more information, visit Facebook under Pineview Little League or contact league president Bob Brown at 692-9139.
TOLMAN BASKETBALL TEAMS WILL HOLD “PINK OUT GAMES” ON FRIDAY TO BENEFIT THE AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY
PAWTUCKET — The boys’ and girls’ basketball programs at Tolman High School will stage “Pink Out Games” next Friday, Feb. 14 at the James W. Donaldson Gymnasium. All donations raised at the two games will go directly to the American Cancer Society. The Tolman girls square off against Narragansett at 4:30 p.m. At 7:30, the Tolman boys will take to the floor against North Providence.
PAWTUCKET YOUTH SOCCER ASSOCIATION PLANS SPRING ACADEMY
PAWTUCKET — The Pawtucket Youth Soccer Organization is accepting registrations for its Spring Soccer Academy for boys and girls ages 3-10 from Pawtucket and its surrounding communities. Walk-in registrations will take place at the PYSA building on 52 Plain St. in Pawtucket on Tuesday, Feb. 18, and Thursday, Feb. 20, from 6-8 p.m. The six-week session will begin at the end of April. The fee is $65 per child (with a family discount after the second child in each family) and will cover each player receiving a shirt, shorts, and socks. For more information, visit www.pawtucketsoccer.org or call (401) 729-9565.
FAIRLAWN LITTLE LEAGUE SCHEDULES REGISTRATION DATES
PAWTUCKET — The Fairlawn Little League will be holding registrations for the upcoming baseball and softball seasons at the Smithfield Avenue Fire Station (on Smithfield Avenue) on Tuesday, Feb. 18 from 6:30-8 p.m. and Saturday, March 1 from 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Fairlawn Little League will once again offer a softball program this year and is looking for girls between the ages of 4-18 to register to play T-Ball (ages 4-6), Instructional (ages 6-8), Minors (ages 810), Majors (ages 11-13) and Seniors (ages 13-18). Registrations are open to girls who live in the city of Pawtucket, as this is a Little League affiliated fast-pitch softball program. Registrations can also be done online. At the end of the registration, applicants will be able to print out a copy of the registration form and mail in payment, or drop off payment at the fire station during the registration dates listed above. The league is not accepting credit card registrations at this time. If you have any questions, contact league president Tammy Ward at 401-413-5323 or visit the Fairlawn Little League website at www.fairlawnlittleleauge.com.
GREATER PAWTUCKET UMPIRES ASSOCIATION SEEKS UMPIRES, PLANS SIX-WEEK TRAINING COURSE FOR NEW RECRUITS
PAWTUCKET — The Greater Pawtucket Umpires Association (G.P.U.A.) is looking for men and women interested in umpiring youth baseball games during the coming season. Veteran umpires are welcome; however, no prior experience is necessary, only a general knowledge of the game of baseball and a willingness to learn the basics of becoming an umpire. New recruits will be required to complete a six-hour training course (an hour per week for six weeks). Weekly meetings will begin on Feb. 24. All participants must be at least 16 years of age and have reliable transportation available. The G.P.U.A. serves several youth baseball organizations in the Northern Rhode Island Area. If interested, call Paul Blake at 401-316-0039, or the GPUA Hotline at 401-722-6849 for more details.
DARLINGTON GIRLS SOFTBALL LEAGUE POSTS SIGNUPS ON FEB 15 & 22 AT ST. TERESA’S CHURCH
PAWTUCKET — The Darlington Girls Softball League, a fast-pitch league that serves all of Pawtucket and its surrounding communities, will conduct registration for the upcoming season on Saturday, Feb. 15, and Saturday, Feb. 22 from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. at St. Teresa's Church on 358 Newport Ave. (across from Slater Park) in Pawtucket. The divisions are Instructional Division 1 T-Ball (ages 4-6), Instructional Division 2 Machine Pitch (ages 6-8), Minors (ages 9-10), Juniors (ages 11-13), and Seniors (ages 13-18). New players must show a valid birth certificate at the time of registration. The fees are: Instructional Division 1 & 2 ($35, or $60 for 2 or more players in a family), Minors, Junior, and Senior Divisions ($60 or $95 for 2 or more players). Registration can also be done online at www.DGSoftball.com with a major credit card.
PAWTUCKET GIRLS SOFTBALL LEAGUE TO CONDUCT OPEN REGISTRATIONS ON WEDNESDAY NIGHTS
PAWTUCKET — Officials with the Pawtucket Girls Softball League will conduct open registrations for their upcoming spring and summer seasons for players between the ages of 7-18 every Wednesday from 7-9 p.m. at DH Hitting on 70 Vineyard St. in Pawtucket. Those sign-up sessions will be held now through the end of March, stated PGSL President Scott Cooper. The league will be divided into appropriate age divisions. For more information, call Cooper at (401) 338-1127 or e-mail him at dramainccoop@verizon.net.
TICKETS ARE STILL ON SALE FOR DARLINGTON BRAVES’ BANQUET
PAWTUCKET — The Darlington Braves’annual awards banquet will be held on Sunday, March 2 from noon-4 p.m. at the Venus De Milo Restaurant in Swansea, Mass. Tickets are still available on Sunday, Feb. 16 and Sunday, Feb. 23, any time after 3 p.m. at The Braves Hall on 92 East Ave. in Pawtucket. All cheerleaders and football players are free, but must come to the hall to receive their ticket. Children under the age of 2 are also free, but the ticket price for everyone else is $23. All children must be accompanied to the banquet by an adult, and no tickets will be sold at the door.
TICKETS FOR OAKWOOD RAIDERS BANQUET WILL GO ON SALE
PAWTUCKET — The Oakwood Raiders are selling tickets to their annual awards banquet on Saturday, Feb. 15 and Saturday, Feb. 22 from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. at the Woodlawn Community City on 210 West Ave. in Pawtucket. The banquet will take place on Sunday, March 2 from 5-7 p.m. at the Pawtucket YMCAon 660 Roosevelt Ave. in Pawtucket. The league will also be holding an early-bird registration at the banquet, and the fees will be $60 for tackle football and cheerleading and $40 for flag football. Tickets are $15 for adults, $10 for children under the age of 18, $2 per athlete, and free for children 2 and under. The league will also launch its “Express” cheerleading team this year for boys and girls with special needs. Registration for the “Express” team is free. For more information, contact the league through its Facebook page.
DARLINGTON NATIONAL BABE RUTH/CAL RIPKEN BASEBALL LEAGUES SCHEDULE FEBRUARY REGISTRATION DATES
PAWTUCKET — The Darlington National Babe Ruth/Cal Ripken Baseball Leagues will be holding signups for the 2014 baseball season on Friday, Feb. 14, Wednesday, Feb. 19, and Friday, Feb. 28 from 6-8 p.m. at KR Baseball Academy on 413 Central Ave. Players ages 4-15 from Pawtucket, Central Falls, East Providence, and Rumford are welcome. Players who are new to the league must bring a copy of their birth certificate. The fees for the season will be Rookie, $45; Minor, $75, Major, $80, and Babe Ruth, $120. There is no fee for T-Ball players. For more information, contact Ray at 401-339-3579 after 5 p.m. or see the league’s web site to print out a registration form (darlingtonnational.baberuthonline.com). Cash, checks, and money orders will be accepted.
DARLINGTON GIRLS SOFTBALL LEAGUE HOSTS WINTER CLINICS
PAWTUCKET — The Darlington Girls Softball League will conduct its winter clinics for new and returning instructional division players every Tuesday night in February from 6-7 p.m. -- and every Friday night in March from 6-7 p.m. -- at the Fallon Memorial School gymnasium on Lincoln Avenue. For more information, send an email to contactmem@verizon.net.
Thursday, February 13, 2014
SPORTS
THE TIMES B3
NBA
Clippers drop ‘Senior Night’ Duncan, Spurs defeat Celtics dual-meet finales to Eagles
BOSTON (AP) — Tim Duncan scored 23 of his 25 points in the second half, powering the injury-depleted San Antonio Spurs to a 104-92 win over the Boston Celtics on Wednesday night. Marco Belinelli added 16 points, 11 rebounds and eight assists for the Spurs, who were without guards Tony Parker and Manu Ginobili and forward Tiago Splitter — all sidelined with injuries. Boris Diaw added 18 points and Duncan grabbed nine rebounds to lead the Spurs to their fifth win in seven games. Rajon Rondo led Boston with 16 points and Kris Humphries and rookie Kelly Olynyk had 15 apiece. The Celtics fell to 4-18 against Western Conference teams. Boston was minus guard Avery Bradley, who was sidelined with a sprained right ankle. After the Celtics scored the first points of the fourth quarter on Humphries' jumper, San Antonio went on a 12-4 run. The Spurs went 6 of 8 to start the period, keyed by Green's 3 from the left corner that made it 79-70 with just under 10 minutes to play. After a foul-line jumper by Humphries, Duncan had consecutive baskets, the second a jumper that pushed the Spurs' lead to 85-74 with 8:06 left. San Antonio broke it open with a 11-0 run midway into the quarter that was capped by Belinelli's 3-pointer with 4 minutes left. The Spurs used a 9-2 run late in the third to take a 71-66 lead heading into the fourth. Duncan, who didn't score his first points until a basket late in the first half, had 11 points in the quarter. The Celtics went on a 12-0 run, bridging the end of the first quarter and the start of the second to pull to their first lead of the game, 26-25, on Phil Pressey's 3-pointer. San Antonio led 48-44 at halftime. Boston coach Brad Stevens said before the game that Bradley re-sprained the ankle that cost him five games at the end of January. Stevens said he could be out after the All-Star break.
Continued from page B1
Girls’ basketball
13-20 40. PILGRIM (37) — Claire Birney 1 0-2 3, Haley Donahay 0 0-2 0, Maddie Craik 1 22 4, Megan St. Jacques 4 1-4 9, Hannah Page 2 4-12 8, Alex Annotti 4 0-1 8, Alexia Martins 2 1-4 5. Totals: 14 8-27 37. Three-point field goals: Cadden, Birney. Halftime: Mount St. Charles, 17-7.
MSC wins close duel with Pilgrim
Juanita Sanchez tops Davies
LINCOLN — Juanita Sanchez High jumped out to a 48-12 halftime advantage and sailed to a 71-37 Division III crossover triumph over Davies Tech at Gaskin Alumni Hall on Wednesday night. Elfreda Hoff paced the unbeaten Cavs with 27 points, and D’Asia Allen chipped in 19 with Keyshia Negron and Willcia McBorrough mustering
WARWICK — Mount St. Charles allowed Pilgrim to score just seven first-half points and also won the battle from the free-throw line on Wednesday night in the Mounties’ 40-37 victory over the host Patriots in their Division II crossover affair. The Mounties, who are 4-6 in the league, shot 13-for-20 from the stripe, while the Patriots ended up going 8-for-27. Noreen Mulledy and Emi Cadden each netted 11 points to lead the way for the Mounties. ***
MOUNT ST. CHARLES (40) — Noreen Mulledy 3 5-7 11, Ally Goralski 1 1-2 3, Emi Cadden 4 2-3 11, Amy Schmitt 2 0-0 4, Tori Dill 0 1-2 1, Emily D'Abrosca 3 0-0 6, Julia Laquerre 0 4-6 4. Totals: 13
On the guys’ side, nobody could outrace junior Jack Bauer, who claimed the 200 individual medley with a PR of 2:06.16, then cruised to a time of 58.76 in the 100 butterfly. Bauer and his 200 medley relay teammates almost pulled off an upset victory over the Eagles, but lost by less than a second. Bauer, though, loved his 50 butterfly split of 23.9. “I was pumped by that; that’s my best 50 ever, and I felt great,” he said. “I also felt good in the 200 IM, but I did cruise the final 50 because I was out in front. It was just all the adrenaline I felt because it was Senior Night, our last home meet of the season. I figured I’d attack it, and the butterfly, too.” When asked if his decision to swim the individual medley could be a statement prior to Sunday’s R.I. Division I Championships (at Roger Williams University) or the state meet at Brown a week later, Bauer – a top-five state placement a year ago in the 100 butterfly and 100 backstroke – grinned. “Maybe. I may swim the IM, but I have to look at the cheat sheets,” he offered, referring to the premier IMers in Rhode Island, and the times they’ve posted. Jay Rossi manufactured the only other victory for the Clippers, that in the 50 freestyle (54.76). eight each. He also placed second in the 100 freestyle For the Patriots (4-7 overall, (54.74). 2-5 in III-North), Gina Miranda “The only things I said to the guys before the netted 13 and Joneilly Alicea meet was to swim as well as they could here, eight. and to focus on this Sunday, and also the states,” Davies had sustained a tough Black noted. “This meet originally was sched43-41 non-league loss to uled for Jan. 3, but – because of the weather – it Seekonk 48 hours before. was postponed. “We were out of the water a couple of days *** JUANITA SANCHEZ (71) – Elfreda last week because of more snow; I had wanted
Hoff 10 4-8 27, D’Asia Allen 6 7-9 19, Keyshia Negron 3 0-0 8, Willcia McBorrough 4 0-0 8, Natasha Villa 3 1-2 7, Azereia Randall 1 0-0 2; totals 27 1219 71. DAVIES TECH (37) – Tiana DaSilva 0 1-2 1, Laura Sylvestre 0 0-0 0, Jackie Sequin 2 1-2 5, Joneilly Alicea 3 0-0 8, Kebblin Toloza 0 0-0 0, Maddie Bator 2 0-0 4, Jasmine Ayala 2 2-3 6, Gina Miranda 6 1-3 13; totals 15 5-10 37. Three-point field goals: Hoff 3, Negron 2, Alicea 2. Halftime: Sanchez, 48-12.
this week to have the kids practicing to prepare for the big (championship) meets coming up,” he added. “Still, I thought we swam very well. “Jack swam the 200 IM so he could see where he was at in comparison to the rest of the state, but Eli Dias, our lone senior male, is new to the sport. He had a PR in the 100 free (1:02.37), and he had (previously) qualified for states in the 50 (26.80), so he’s psyched.” ***
GIRLS Barrington 54, Cumberland 40 Cumberland placements 200y medley relay – 1. Andrea Ronan, Kayleigh Canavan, Kenzie McCormick, Jill Chopy 2:02.61. 200y freestyle – 2. Kenzie McCormick 2:07.85. 200y individual medley – 1. Kayleigh Canavan 2:24.94; 3. Jaycie Columbo. 50y freestyle – 2. Andrea Ronan 27.80. 100y butterfly – 1. Kenzie McCormick 1:05.69. 100y freestyle – 3. Jill Chopy. 500y freestyle – 3. Amelia Holton 7:10.41. 200y freestyle relay – 2. Lauren Marcello, Lexi Emery, Seana Pomfret, Emiliy O’Neill; 3. Jaycie Columbo, Cassandra Estrella, Stepfanie Gregory, Merri LeBeau. 100y backstroke – 2. Andrea Ronan 1:06.60. 100y breaststroke – 1. Kayleigh Canavan 1:11.57; 3. Jill Chopy 1:18.60. 400y freestyle relay – 2. Andrea Ronan, Jill Chopy, Kayleigh Canavan, Kenzie McCormick 4:06.40.
BOYS Barrington 59, Cumberland 35 Cumberland placements 200y medley relay – 2. Harry Kent, Colin Froment, Jack Bauer, Jay Rossi 1:50.70. 200y freestyle – 2. Killian Canavan 2:06.85. 200y individual medley – 1. Jack Bauer 2:06.16. 50y freestyle – 1. Jay Rossi 24.76; 3. Eli Dias. 100y butterfly – 1. Jack Bauer 58.76; 3. Eric Henderson 1:03.99. 100y freestyle – 2. Jay Rossi 54.74. 500y freestyle – 3. Harry Kent 6:08.41. 200y freestyle relay – 3. Eli Dias, Logan Crooks, Colin Froment, Killian Canavan. 100y backstroke – 2. Killian Canavan 1:05.30; 3. Harry Kent. 100y breaststroke – 2. Colin Froment 1:15.10. 400y freestyle relay – 2. Killian Canavan, Eric Henderson, Jay Rossi, Jack Bauer.
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Novans fall at home to Thunderbolts
Continued from page B1
Coutu 7 1-2 18, Kalisha Marquez 1 0-0 2, Mariah Baguyot 1 00 3, Gabrielle Dayacap 1 0-0 2, Molly Phillips 3 3-3 11, Kyla Depina 1 0-0 2; totals 18 4-6 47. WOONSOCKET (29) – Lexus Thomas 0 0-2 0, Aveanne Osagie 5 3-6 13, Taylor Dandy 6 0-0 16, Madison MitchellLaplante 0 0-0 0, Tayla Sevigny 0 0-0 0, Varsana Schobel 0 0-0 0, Kaila Acheson 0 0-0 0, Marie Saine 0 0-0 0, Hannah Upshur 0 0-0 0, Zippie Velasco 0 0-0 0; totals 11 3-8 29. Three-point field goals: Gonzales, Coutu 3, Baguyot, Phillips 2, Faye 4. Halftime: Cranston East, 29-16.
WHS head football coach and assistant principal Carnell Henderson greeted some of the hoopsters and families after the tilt with hugs, and for good reason: George Nasuti will forever be a Villa Novan. ***
CRANSTON EAST (47) – Lyset Gonzales 4 0-0 9, Sarah
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SPORTS
SPORTS ON THE AIR
TODAY NBA BASKETBALL 8 p.m. — Brooklyn at Chicago, TNT. 10:30 p.m. — Oklahoma City at L.A. Lakers, TNT. MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 5 p.m. — Boston College at Georgia Tech, NESN. 7 p.m. — Louisville at Temple, ESPN. 7 p.m. — Arkansas at Missouri, ESPN2. 7 p.m. — UNC Asheville at Radford, ESPNU. 7 p.m. — Drexel at Charleston, NBC Sports. 9 p.m. — Minnesota at Wisconsin, ESPN. 9 p.m. — Colorado at UCLA, ESPN2. 9 p.m. — Tennessee St. at Belmont, ESPNU. 9 p.m. — St. John's at Seton Hall, FS1. 11 p.m. — San Diego at Saint Mary's, Calif., ESPNU. WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. — West Virginia at Oklahoma, FS1. 7 p.m. — Creighton at Butler, CBS Sports. 7 p.m. — Southern Methodist at Rutgers, ESPNews. 8:30 p.m. — Virginia Tech at Wake Forest, NESN. 9 p.m. — Charlotte at Louisiana Tech, FSN. GOLF 9 a.m. — European PGA Tour, Africa Open, first round, at East London, South Africa (same-day tape), TGC. 5 p.m. — PGA Tour, Northern Trust Open, first round, at Pacific Palisades, Calif., TGC. WINTER OLYMPICS (At Sochi, Russia) All events taped unless noted as (Live) 7:30 a.m. — Men's Hockey: Slovakia vs. United States (Live), NBC Sports. 7:30 a.m. — Men's Hockey: Russia vs. Slovenia (Live), MSNBC. 10 a.m. — Men's Curling: Canada vs. Denmark, MSNBC. 10 a.m. — Men's Figure Skating: Short Program Part 1 (Live), NBC Sports. 11:45 a.m. — Men's Figure Skating: Short Program Part 2 (Live), NBC Sports. Noon — Men's Hockey: Canada vs. Norway (Live), USA. Noon — Women's Hockey: Sweden vs. Russia (Live), MSNBC. 3 p.m. — Men's Biathlon: 20km Individual Gold Medal Final; Luge: Team Relay Gold Medal Final Runs, NBC. 5 p.m. — Women's Curling: United States vs. Japan, CNBC. 5 p.m. — Game of the Day: Hockey, NBC Sports. 8 p.m. — Men's Figure Skating: Short Program; Men's Freestyle Skiing: Slopestyle Gold Medal Final; Women's Speedskating: 1,000 Gold Medal Final; Women's Skeleton: Competition, NBC. Midnight — Women's Short Track: 500 Gold Medal Final; Men's Short Track: 5,000 Relay Competition, NBC.
Thursday, February 13, 2014
SCOREBOARD
NBA
Utah 18 33 .353 22½ Pacific Division W L Pct GB L.A. Clippers 36 18 .667 — Golden State 31 21 .596 4 Phoenix 30 21 .588 4½ L.A. Lakers 18 34 .346 17 Sacramento 18 35 .340 17½ ——— Tuesday's Games Cleveland 109, Sacramento 99 Charlotte 114, Dallas 89 Chicago 100, Atlanta 85 Memphis 92, Washington 89 Miami 103, Phoenix 97 Oklahoma City 98, Portland 95 Utah 96, L.A. Lakers 79 Wednesday's Games Memphis 86, Orlando 81 Dallas 81, Indiana 73 Toronto 104, Atlanta 83 Brooklyn 105, Charlotte 89 San Antonio 104, Boston 92 Cleveland 93, Detroit 89 Sacramento 106, New York 101, OT Minnesota 117, Denver 90 New Orleans 102, Milwaukee 98 Washington at Houston, (n) Philadelphia at Utah, (n) Miami at Golden State, (n) Portland at L.A. Clippers, (n) Thursday's Games Brooklyn at Chicago, 8 p.m. Oklahoma City at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m. Friday’s Games No games scheduled
EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Pct GB Toronto 28 24 .538 — Brooklyn 24 26 .480 3 New York 20 32 .385 8 Boston 19 35 .352 10 Philadelphia 15 38 .283 13½ Southeast Division W L Pct GB Miami 36 14 .720 — Washington 25 26 .490 11½ Atlanta 25 26 .490 11½ Charlotte 23 30 .434 14½ Orlando 16 38 .296 22 Central Division W L Pct GB Indiana 40 12 .769 — Chicago 26 25 .510 13½ Detroit 22 30 .423 18 Cleveland 20 33 .377 20½ Milwaukee 9 43 .173 31 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division W L Pct GB San Antonio 38 15 .717 — Houston 35 17 .673 2½ Dallas 32 22 .593 6½ Memphis 29 23 .558 8½ New Orleans 23 29 .442 14½ Northwest Division W L Pct GB Oklahoma City 42 12 .778 — Portland 36 16 .692 5 Minnesota 25 28 .472 16½ Denver 24 27 .471 16½
Farrington wins gold in women’s halfpipe
Continued from page B1
NHL
60 35 11 14 84 207 163 58 37 16 5 79 174 153 59 31 21 7 69 145 147 58 27 21 10 64 164 164 60 28 26 6 62 168 175 59 25 24 10 60 146 180 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Anaheim 60 41 14 5 87 196 147 San Jose 59 37 16 6 80 175 142 Los Angeles 59 31 22 6 68 139 128 Phoenix 58 27 21 10 64 163 169 Vancouver 60 27 24 9 63 146 160 Calgary 58 22 29 7 51 137 179 Edmonton 60 20 33 7 47 153 199 NOTE: Two points for a win, one for OT loss. ——— Tuesday's Games No games scheduled Wednesday's Games No games scheduled Thursday's Games No games scheduled Friday's Games No games scheduled Chicago Colorado Minnesota Dallas Winnipeg Nashville
EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Boston 57 37 16 4 78 176 125 Tampa Bay 58 33 20 5 71 168 145 Montreal 59 32 21 6 70 148 142 Toronto 60 32 22 6 70 178 182 Detroit 58 26 20 12 64 151 163 Ottawa 59 26 22 11 63 169 191 Florida 58 22 29 7 51 139 183 Buffalo 57 15 34 8 38 110 172 Metropolitan Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Pittsburgh 58 40 15 3 83 186 138 N.Y. Rangers 59 32 24 3 67 155 146 Philadelphia 59 30 23 6 66 162 167 Columbus 58 29 24 5 63 170 161 Washington 59 27 23 9 63 171 175 Carolina 57 26 22 9 61 144 158 New Jersey 59 24 22 13 61 135 146 N.Y. Islanders 60 22 30 8 52 164200 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA St. Louis 57 39 12 6 84 196 135
Teter, who also won silver in 2010 and would've completed a full set with a bronze, sort of knew where things were going to end up. "I love it when they play it out like that," she said. "I was hoping they wouldn't give it to her. But whatever. She did a 1080. That's why they gave it to her." The bronze, that is. Clark insisted she wasn't disappointed. This bronze goes with the one she took in Vancouver under very similar circumstances — falling on the first run, making it through less than perfectly on the second. "I had a less-than-ideal practice. I fell every run," she said, a nod to a frequently changing halfpipe that nobody really mastered. "Not just falls, but pretty epic falls. To come back, it was a huge accomplishment to get on the podium today." Farrington had at least one thing in common with the men's winner, Iouri Podladtchikov: Neither rider made it straight to the final by finishing in the top three during the qualifying round. That meant both had to compete in semifinals. That gave them both two extra chances to feel the changing bumps on the halfpipe. "I told Kelly yesterday that I planned on riding all day," Farrington said. "So, the semis were like extra practice for me. I kind of felt more comfortable in the pipe." Still, she conceded, "I don't think I knew I was going to come here and get a gold medal. I still don't really believe it." It provided a much-needed dose of good news for the Americans, who came into the Sochi Games having won 14 of the 24 halfpipe medals in Olympic history but went a shocking 0 for 3 in the men's contest. Going 2 for 3 in the women's event was more like it — even if the order might have turned some heads. "A loose cannon," is how Teter described Farrington. "But when she's on, she's really on. She styles for days. She looks good. Very clean. Judges like that." The moves don't stop when the snowboard comes off. With the camera in her face after her winning run, she shook and shimmied her shoulders. Also in her repertoire: The worm. The sprinkler. "Wild style," she calls it. And so, it came as no surprise how the cowgirl with the gold nose ring planned to celebrate the gold medal she never saw coming. "Dancing," she said. "I'm going to dance my face off tonight."
THIS WEEK IN GOLF
PGA TOUR NORTHERN TRUST OPEN
AHL
EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA Manchester 52 31 14 2 5 69 158 132 St. John's 49 28 18 1 2 59 155 132 Providence 51 26 18 1 6 59 163 147 Worcester 46 23 19 3 1 50 118 131 Portland 47 17 21 2 7 43 131 163 East Division GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA Binghamton 48 29 15 1 3 62 177 151 WB/Scranton 49 28 16 2 3 61 139 118 Hershey 48 26 16 3 3 58 150 132 Norfolk 48 25 15 1 7 58 128 123 Syracuse 47 18 21 3 5 44 122 148 Northeast Division GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA Springfield 49 31 13 1 4 67 151 129 Albany 48 25 16 3 4 57 142 127 Adirondack 47 22 23 0 2 46 114 126 Bridgeport 49 20 24 1 4 45 128 156 Hartford 47 18 24 0 5 41 120 151 WESTERN CONFERENCE Midwest Division GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA Grand Rapids 49 30 15 2 2 64 163 123 27 16 3 2 59 138 124 22 14 6 5 55 125 129 24 21 4 2 54 152 167 20 17 5 4 49 116 131 North Division GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA Toronto 48 28 16 2 2 60 139 127 Rochester 46 23 17 3 3 52 131 129 Hamilton 48 22 22 0 4 48 118 139 Lake Erie 47 20 23 0 4 44 121 148 Utica 47 18 22 3 4 43 114 141 West Division GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA Abbotsford 50 31 15 3 1 66 156 136 Texas 50 29 15 2 4 64 184 144 Oklahoma City 49 21 22 1 5 48 148 169 Charlotte 47 22 23 1 1 46 141 152 San Antonio 48 19 21 3 5 46 134 151 NOTE: Two points for a win, one for OT or SO loss. ——— Tuesday’s Games No games scheduled Wednesday's Games No games scheduled Thursday's Games No games scheduled Chicago Milwaukee Rockford Iowa 48 47 51 46
Site: Los Angeles. Schedule: Thursday-Sunday. Course: Riviera Country Club (7,349 yards, par 71). Purse: $6.7 million. Winner's share: $1,206,000. Television: Golf Channel (Thursday, 5-8 p.m., 8:30-11:30 p.m.; Friday, midnight-3 a.m., 5-8 p.m., 8:30-11:30 p.m.; Saturday, 2-5 a.m., 1-2:30 p.m., 9:30 p.m.-2 a.m.; Sunday, 1-2:30 p.m., 8 p.m.-1 a.m.) and CBS (Saturday, 3-6 p.m.; Sunday, 3-6:30 p.m.). Last year: John Merrick won his first PGA Tour title, beating Charlie Beljan with a par on the second hole of a playoff. Merrick is from Long Beach and played at UCLA. Last week: Jimmy Walker won the Pebble Beach National Pro-Am for his third victory in eight starts in the wraparound season. He closed with a 2-over 74 and won by a stroke. Notes: Walker is in the field. He opened the season in October with a victory in the Frys.com Open and won the Sony Open in Hawaii last month. He's the fourth player in the last 20 years to win three times in his first eight starts to a season, following Tiger Woods (who has done it eight times), Phil Mickelson and David Duval. ... Woods and Mickelson are skipping the tournament and the World Golf Championships-Match Play Championship next week in Arizona. Woods last played his hometown event in 2006. ... U.S. Open champion Justin Rose is returning from a right shoulder injury. ... Fred Couples, the 1990 and 1992 champion, is making his record 32nd start in the event. ... Ben Hogan won three times at the course in a 17-month span, taking the 1947 and '48 Los Angeles Opens and '48 U.S. Open. Online: http://www.pgatour.com ——— LPGA TOUR/LADIES EUROPEAN TOUR/AUSTRALIAN LADIES PROFESSIONAL GOLF WOMEN'S AUSTRALIAN OPEN Site: Melbourne, Australia. Schedule: Thursday-Sunday. Course: Victoria Golf Club (6,480 yards, par 72). Purse: $1.2 million. Winner's share: $195,000. Television: Golf Channel (Thursday, 1-4 p.m.; Saturday, 5-9 p.m.; Sunday, 5-7 p.m.). Last year: South Korea's Jiyai Shin won by two strokes at Royal Canberra. Yani Tseng was second and teen star Lydia Ko finished third as an amateur. Last event: Jessica Korda won the season-opening Bahamas LPGA Classic on Jan. 26 for her second tour title. She birdied the final hole to beat Stacy Lewis by a stroke. Notes: Second-ranked Suzann Pettersen, making her first start of the year, tops the field along with No. 3 Lewis and No. 4 Ko. The 16-year-old Ko turned professional late last season. She won the Canadian Women's Open the last two years. ... Cheyenne Woods, Tiger Woods' niece, won the Australian Ladies Masters on Sunday. The event was sanctioned by the European and Australian tours. ... Korda won the 2012 tournament at Royal Melbourne. ... The LPGA Thailand is next week, followed by the HSBC Women's Champions in Singapore. Online: http://www.lpga.com ——— CHAMPIONS TOUR ACE GROUP CLASSIC Site: Naples, Fla. Schedule: Friday-Sunday. Course: The TwinEagles Club, Talon Course (7,193 yards, par 72). Purse: $1.6 million. Winner's share: $240,000. Television: Golf Channel (Friday, 2:30-4:30 p.m.; Saturday, midnight-2 a.m., 3-5 p.m.; Sunday, 2:30-4:30 a.m., 3-5 p.m.; Monday, 2-4 a.m.). Last event: Bernhard Langer won the event for the second time in three years, beating Jay Don Blake by a stroke for the first of his two 2013 titles. Last week: Michael Allen won the Allianz Championship in Boca Raton for his sixth tour title, beating Duffy Waldorf with a birdie on the second hole of a playoff. Allen matched the tour record with an opening 60. Notes: Langer won the season-opening event in Hawaii on Jan. 19. He shot 66-64-64 for a threestroke victory. ... In 2012, Kenny Perry won by five strokes, closing with a 70 after opening with rounds of 64 and 62. ... The tour is off the next three weeks. Online: http://www.pgatour.com ——— EUROPEAN TOUR/SUNSHINE TOUR AFRICA OPEN Site: East London, South Africa. Schedule: Thursday-Sunday. Course: East London Golf Club (6,571 yards, par 72). Purse: $1.36 million. Winner's share: $215,960. Television: Golf Channel (Thursday, 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; Friday, 9 a.m.-noon; Saturday-Sunday, 5:309:30 a.m.). Last year: South Africa's Darren Fichardt won his fourth European Tour title. France's Gregory Bourdy and South Africa's Jaco Van Zyl tied for second, two strokes back. Last week: South Africa's George Coetzee won the Joburg Open by three strokes for his first European Tour title and a spot in the British Open. Notes: South Africans players have 35 victories in the 57 events co-sanctioned by the European and Sunshine tours. ... The course is the shortest on the European Tour. ... The WGC-Match Play Championship is next week in Arizona, followed by the Tshwane Open at Copperleaf in Centurion, South Africa Online: http://www.europeantour.com
Castelli finishes ninth in figure skating event
Continued from page B1
TRANSACTIONS
Wednesday's Sports Transactions By The Associated Press BASEBALL COMMISSIONER'S OFFICE — Suspended Seattle OF Cavan Cohoes 50 games and Detroit C Ronny Paulino 100 games for violating the Minor League Drug Prevention and Treatment Program. American League CLEVELAND INDIANS — Agreed to terms with RHP Kyle Davies on a minor league contract. HOUSTON ASTROS — Named Nolan Ryan executive advisor. KANSAS CITY ROYALS — Agreed to terms with RHP Greg Holland on a one-year contract. NEW YORK YANKEES — Announced the retirement of SS Derek Jeter, effective at the end of the 2014 season. National League ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS — Agreed to terms with RHP Bronson Arroyo on a two-year contract. CINCINNATI REDS — Designated INF Henry Rodriguez for assignment. Claimed RHP Brett Marshall off aivers from the Chicago Cubs. MIAMI MARLINS — Designated RHP Chris Hatcher for assignment. Agreed to terms with RHP Carlos Marmol. NEW YORK METS — Agreed to terms with RHP Jose Valverde on a minor league contract. American Association WINNIPEG GOLDEYES — Signed LHP Chris Salamida. Atlantic League LONG ISLAND DUCKS — Signed OF Adam Bailey and INF Ryan Strieby. Frontier League EVANSVILLE OTTERS — Traded LHP Matt Zielinski to Somerset (Atlantic) for a player to be named. JOLIET SLAMMERS — Signed RHP Matt Dillon to a contract extension. Signed 3B Barrett Serrato. RIVER CITY RASCALS — Signed UT Shane Brown. SCHAUMBURG BOOMERS — Released RHP Adam Tollefson. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association ATLANTA HAWKS — Signed F Cartier Martin to a second 10-day contract. SAN ANTONIO SPURS — Signed G Shannon Brown to a second 10-day contract. FOOTBALL National Football League CHICAGO BEARS — Promoted Pat Meyer to offensive line coach. Named Joe Kim assistant strength/skill development coach. CLEVELAND BROWNS — Signed DB Royce Adams. DENVER BRONCOS — Signed executive vice president John Elway to a three-year contract extension and added general manager to his title. GREEN BAY PACKERS — Released OL Greg Van Roten. NEW ORLEANS SAINTS — Released S Roman Harper, LB/DE Will Smith and CB Jabari Greer. OAKLAND RAIDERS — Signed RB Kory Sheets. ST. LOUIS RAMS — Named Gregg Williams defensive coordinator. Canadian Football League EDMONTON ESKIMOS — Signed DB Patrick Watkins. TORONTO ARGONAUTS — Signed PK/P Swayze Waters to a two-year contract. Released PK/P Noel Prefontaine. HOCKEY Central Hockey League CHL — Suspended Rapid City F Kevin Harvey one game. BRAMPTON BEAST — Signed F Ahmed Mahfouz. SOCCER Major League Soccer COLORADO RAPIDS — Traded M Hendry Thomas to FC Dallas for allocation money. COLLEGE CINCINNATI — Announced the NCAA has approved hardship waivers to QB Munchie Legaux and WR Shaq Washington. DELAWARE — Named Bryan Bossard wide receivers coach. GEORGIA SOUTHERN — Named Bob Connelly offensive line coach. KENT STATE — Suspended wrestler Sam Wheeler indefinitely for making a derogatory comment on his Twitter account about former Missouri football player Michael Sam. NJIT — Named Peter Volkert women's volleyball coach. STANFORD — Named Lance Taylor running backs coach.
Trankov and Volosozhar rose to the top of the sport at the perfect time, winning the 2013 world championship. A new generation of Russian figure skating hopefuls will now look up to the two pairs who stood atop the podium Wednesday. Volosozhar and Trankov scored 152.69 points to finish with 236.86, 18.18 ahead of their teammates. Stolbova and Klimov had a near-flawless free skate to move up from third. Four-time world champions Aliona Savchenko and Robin Szolkowy of Germany had to settle for bronze for the second straight Olympics. Pang Qing and Tong Jian, the 2010 silver medalists, were fourth. Tong said this was probably their final competition. Four years ago, the U.S. had its worst showing ever in pairs with a 10th- and 13th-place finish. The outcome in the standings was only slightly better this time: two-time national champions Marissa Castelli of Rhode Island and Simon Shnapir of Massachusetts took ninth, while Felicia Zhang of New Jersey and Nathan Bartholomay of Pennsylvania moved up to 12th from 14th after the short program. But it was a much more encouraging performance this time, with both pairs skating four solid programs despite little experience in major international competitions. Castelli and Shnapir also won a bronze medal in the team event. She landed upright on their throw quad salchow Wednesday, though she stepped out. That still earned them big points, and they set a personal best in international competition with 120.38. "We got four season's bests out of four performances, four great programs," Shnapir said. "I don't think we can ask for anything more."
THIS DATE IN SPORTS
By The Associated Press Feb. 13 1923 — The New York Renaissance, the first all-black pro basketball team, is organized. Rens become one of the dominant basketball team of the 1920s and 1930s. 1937 — Maribel Vinson wins her ninth and final U.S. figure skating singles championship. Robin Lee wins his third straight men's title. 1937 — The NFL Redskins move from Boston to Washington. 1948 — Dick Button, the Olympic gold medalist, beats Hans Gerschwiler again to win the men's World Figure Skating championship in Davos, Switzerland. 1954 — Furman's Frank Selvey scores 100 points in a 149-95 victory over Newberry. Selvey breaks the record of 73 points, set by Temple's Bill Mlkvy in 1951, with 41 field goals and 18 free throws. 1973 — Frank Mahovlich of the Montreal Canadiens scores his 1,000th career point with an assist in a 7-6 loss to the Philadelphia Flyers. 1977 — Julius Erving, playing in his first NBA All-Star Game, is voted MVP, despite his East team losing 125-124. Erving scores 30 points and grabs 12 rebounds. 1990 — Bryan Trottier of the New York Islanders becomes the 15th player in NHL history to reach the 500-goal mark, scoring in the second period of a 4-2 loss to the Calgary Flames. 1994 — Tommy Moe wins the men's downhill over local hero Kjetil Andre Aamodt at the Winter Olympics in Lillehammer, Norway. Moe won by 0.04 seconds, the closest Alpine race in Olympic history. Norwegian speed skater Johann Olav Koss has a world record-setting gold medal performance in the 5,000 meters in 6 minutes, 34.96 seconds. 1994 — Chicago's Scottie Pippen scores a game-high 29 points to lift the East to a 127-118 win over the West at the 44th annual NBA All-Star Game in Minnesota. Pippen captures MVP honors for his performance. 1995 — Connecticut is voted No. 1 in The Associated Press Top 25 and joins the school's women's team at the top. It is the first time teams from one school were ranked No. 1 in the men's and women's college basketball polls. 1999 — Steve Jaros rolls the 13th televised 300 game in PBA history en route to winning the Chattanooga Open. 2000 — In St. Anton, Austria, Fritz Strobl and Werner Franz finish with identical times of 1 minute, 20.72 seconds to win an icy and treacherous super-G, the second tie in World Cup history.
2014 WINTER OLYMPIC GAMES
Winter Olympic Medals Table
By The Associated Press Through Wednesday, Feb. 12 (32 of 98 medal events) Nation G S B Tot Norway 4 3 5 12 Canada 4 4 2 10 Netherlands 4 2 4 10 United States 3 1 5 9 Russia 2 4 3 9 Germany 6 1 1 8 Austria 1 4 0 5 Switzerland 3 0 1 4 Slovenia 1 1 2 4 Sweden 0 3 1 4 France 1 0 2 3 Czech Republic 0 2 1 3 Japan 0 2 1 3 Italy 0 1 1 2 Belarus 1 0 0 1 Poland 1 0 0 1 Slovakia 1 0 0 1 South Korea 1 0 0 1 Australia 0 1 0 1 China 0 1 0 1 Finland 0 1 0 1 Britain 0 0 1 1 Latvia 0 0 1 1 Ukraine 0 0 1 1 ing the top two spots. Tatiana Volosozhar and Maxim Trankov won the gold medal, while Ksenia Stolbova and Fedor Klimov had a near-flawless free skate to move up from third after the short program and capture silver in front of the ecstatic home fans. Soviet or Russian skaters had won pairs gold in 12 straight Olympics until the streak ended in Vancouver. HALFPIPE HEROICS One day after Shaun White's disappointing run in the halfpipe, Kaitlyn Farrington of the United States won the women's title, edging defending champion Torah Bright of Australia and American teammate Kelly Clark. It was just the third gold medal of the Sochi Games for the Americans — all of them at the Rosa Khutor Extreme Park. FIT TO BE TIED An Alpine skiing race ended in a tie for the first time in Olympic history when Tina Maze of Slovenia and Dominique Gisin of Switzerland both finished the downhill in 1 minute, 41.57 seconds. They will both get a gold medal — the eighth time at a Winter Games that two top medals have been awarded. Gisin's teammate Lara Gut got the bronze, 0.10 behind the winners. "TWO TOBIS" ARE TERRIFIC Tobias Wendl and Tobias Arlt won doubles gold, keeping Germany on track for a sweep of the luge events at the Sochi Games. Their run of 1 minute, 38.933 seconds gave Germany its 10th gold in 14 doubles races since 1964. The sliding superpower has now won 70 of 120 luge medals awarded in the past 50 years. HEAT IS STILL ON Sochi was bathed in sunshine and warm temperatures amid the palm trees in the resort city next to the Black Sea. Highs hit 63 degrees (17 degrees C). The heat made life difficult for skiers and snowboarders in the nearby mountains, where local organizers have stored surplus snow, but they have yet to tap into it. DUTCH DELIGHT By The Associated Press Stefan Groothuis, a 32-year-old Dutchman, became the oldRUSSIA’S BACK ON TOP IN PAIRS est gold medalist ever in the 1,000 — the fourth gold medal Russia reclaimed its dominance of pairs figure skating by tak- in five speedskating events for the Netherlands. The victory Norway vs. Sweden, 2 a.m. Britain vs. United States, 2 a.m. Women’s Curling Sweden vs. Denmark, 7 a.m. Russia vs. South Korea, 7 a.m. Switzerland vs. Canada, 7 a.m. Japan vs. United States, 7 a.m. Men’s Curling Sweden vs. Canada, 9 p.m. United States vs. Germany, 9 p.m. Canada vs. Norway, 9 p.m. Figure Skating Men's short program, 7 a.m. Freestyle Skiing Men's Slopestyle Finals, 1:30 a.m. Men’s Ice Hockey Group B: Finland vs. Austria, 12 Mid. Group A: Russia vs. Slovenia, 4:30 a.m. Group A: Slovakia vs. United States, 4:30 a.m. Group B: Canada vs. Norway, 9 a.m. Women’s Ice Hockey Group B: Japan vs. Germany, 12 Mid. Group B: Sweden vs. Russia, 9 a.m. Luge Team Relay, 8:15 a.m. Short Track Speedskating Women's 500 Quarterfinals, 2 a.m. Men's 1000 Heats, 2:25 a.m. Women's 500 Semifinals, 3:10 a.m. Men's 5000 Relay Semifinals, 3:35 a.m. Women's 500 Final, 4:05 a.m. Skeleton Women's (Run 2), 12:40 a.m. Speedskating Women's 1000, 6 a.m. ended Shani Davis' shot at becoming the first male speedskater to capture the same event at three consecutive Olympics. It was a bitter disappointment for a U.S. speedskating team that came to Sochi with high hopes but has yet to earn a spot on the podium. MEDALS RACE Norway held the overall medals lead with 12, including four gold. Canada had the same number of gold and 10 medals overall — as did the Netherlands. The United States and Russia both had nine medals overall, but the Americans had three golds, while the hosts had two. Germany had eight medals overall — but six of them were gold. NEIGHBORS AND RIVALS A controversial goal gave Canada a 3-2 win over the United States in women's hockey — a third consecutive victory. A shot by Hayley Wickenheiser trickled through the pads of U.S. goalie Jesse Vetter, and a video review confirmed that the puck went into the net before the referee's whistle blew. The tense game was a preview of the expected gold medal match. THURSDAY'S HIGHLIGHTS Norway's Emil Hegle Svendsen and Tarjei Boe have good chances of adding to Norway's medal haul at the Sochi Olympics when they compete in the men's 20-kilometer individual biathlon, one of six medals being contested..
Today’s Schedule
Alpine Skiing Men's Super Combined (downhill), 11 p.m. Biathlon Men's 20km Individual, 6 a.m. Cross-Country Skiing Women's 10km classic, 2 a.m. Men’s Curling Switzerland vs. Russia, 2 a.m. Canada vs. Denmark, 2 a.m.
Wednesday’s Highlights at Sochi Olympics
may, Newtown, Pa. (14, 56.90; 12, 110.31), 167.21. MEN’S LUGE Doubles 11. United States 2 (Christian Niccum, Woodinville, Wash., Jayson Terdiman, Berwick, Pa.), 1:40.945. 14. United States 1 (Matt Mortensen, Huntington Station, N.Y., Preston Griffall, Salt Lake City), 1:41.703. NORDIC COMBINED Individual (Normal Hill) (Jump and 10km race in parentheses) 24. Billy Demong, Vermontville, N.Y., (31, 108.2, +1:33; 21, 24:06.8, +1:19.3) 25:39.8, +1:49.6. 26. Bryan Fletcher, Steamboat Springs, Colo., (41, 105.6, +1:44; 19, 24:01.7, +1:14.2) 25:45.7, +1:55.5. 33. Taylor Fletcher, Steamboat Springs, Colo., (46, 92.9, +2:34; 11, 23:48.9, +1:01.4) 26:22.9, +2:32.7. NR. Todd Lodwick, Steamboat Springs, Colo., DNS. WOMEN’S SNOWBOARD Final Run 1 1. (9) Hannah Teter, South Lake Tahoe, Calif., 90.50. 2. (6) Kaitlyn Farrington, Sun Valley, Idaho, 85.75. 10. (12) Kelly Clark, West Dover, Vt., 48.25. Run 2 1. (6) Kaitlyn Farrington, Sun Valley, Idaho, (85.75; 91.75) 91.75. 3. (12) Kelly Clark, West Dover, Vt., (48.25; 90.75) 90.75. 9. (9) Hannah Teter, South Lake Tahoe, Calif., (90.50; WOMEN’S ALPINE SKIING 26.75) 26.75. Downhill Final Ranking (Start position in parentheses) 1. Kaitlyn Farrington, Sun Valley, Idaho, (85.75; 91.75) 8. (12) Julia Mancuso, Squaw Valley, Calif., 1:42.56. 91.75. — GOLD 11. (7) Laurenne Ross, Bend, Ore., 1:42.68. 3. Kelly Clark, West Dover, Vt., (48.25; 90.75) 90.75. 17. (10) Stacey Cook, Mammoth, Calif., 1:43.05. 4. Hannah Teter, South Lake Tahoe, Calif., (90.50; 26.75) 26. (2) Jacqueline Wiles, Aurora, Ore., 1:44.35. 90.50. — BRONZE FIGURE SKATING SPEEDSKATING Pairs Men's 1000 (Short and free programs in parentheses) 8. Shani Davis, Chicago, 1:09.12. 9. Marissa Castelli, Cranston, R.I., and Simon Shnapir, Sud- 9. Brian Hansen, Glenview, Ill., 1:09.21. bury, Mass. (9, 67.44; 9, 120.38), 187.82. 15. Joey Mantia, Ocala, Fla., 1:09.72. 12. Felicia Zhang, Plainsboro, N.J., and Nathan Bartholo- 28. Jonathan Garcia, Houston, 1:10.74.
Wednesday’s U.S. Olympic Athletes Fared
Thursday, February 13, 2014
AMUSEMENTS
THE TIMES B5
Woman stays quiet about breast exam to ease her family’s woes
DEAR ABBY:
Earlier this year, my sister “Kathy” was diagnosed with breast cancer. She underwent a double mastectomy, chemo and radiation, and will begin reconstructive surgery soon. Because of her diagnosis she encouraged me to visit my doctor for an exam. When I did, they found a lump, which needs further testing. I have chosen not to share this with my family because my sisters and parents have been deeply affected by Kathy’s diagnosis, and I don’t want to cause them needless worry. My husband is angry and he said that because Kathy is their favorite they wouldn’t be concerned anyway. I thought it was insensitive and cruel to me, but more to the point, I felt he wasn’t thinking about how upset my doing so might make my family. Am I wrong to feel this way? — NEEDS FURTHER TESTING DEAR NEEDS FURTHER TESTING: Certainly not. Your husband’s comment illustrates the importance of keeping one’s mouth firmly shut if one can’t think of something helpful or supportive to say. It almost appears that he is angry at you for the questionable test result. I can’t blame you for not wanting to upset your already stressed family at this point, but if more testing confirms that you, too, have breast canDEAR SO SORRY: The first thing you must do is talk with a mental health professional about your suicidal thoughts. Once you have been stabilized, you should then understand that you may have been forbidden to contact your former friend because what you did was so traumatic that it could cause her to relive the incident, which could further victimize her. If you’re looking for forgiveness, forgive YOURSELF and move on — but leave her out of it. or her accent, and you can’t know the political situation in the person’s country of origin or whether he or she has encountered bias because of where he or she came from. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Abby shares more than 100 of her favorite recipes in two booklets: “Abby’s Favorite Recipes” and “More Favorite Recipes by Dear Abby.” Send your name and mailing address, plus check or money order for $14 (U.S. funds) to: Dear Abby, Cookbooklet Set, P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. (Shipping and handling are included in the price.)
DEAR ABBY
Jeanne Phillips cer, I think it’s important that you let them know — especially your sisters, who might want to be screened sooner than later. I hope your husband’s apparent inability to support you emotionally during this difficult time is an aberration, but if it’s not, you will need to find support elsewhere.
DEAR ABBY:
Is there some sort of etiquette regarding inquiring about someone’s country of origin? While making polite conversation with a customer in my retail shop, I noticed she had an accent and asked where she was from. She became very evasive and seemed offended that I had asked. She actually refused to answer my question. I tried to recover from the awkward situation, but I can’t help but feel I insulted her somehow. Was I wrong to ask? — FRIENDLY RETAILER IN KANSAS CITY DEAR RETAILER: Perhaps. Some immigrants to this country feel the question you asked is a very personal one. There can be various reasons for it. The person may feel self-conscious about his
DEAR ABBY:
About 15 years ago I committed a crime against a woman I cared about. I have felt guilt and remorse about it ever since. I can’t speak to her or have any contact with her. I would like to tell her I’m sorry for what happened. I have beaten myself up over this and thought about suicide. What do I do? Please help, Abby. — SO SORRY IN ST. JOSEPH, MO.
Sudoku solution
Horoscope
By HOLIDAY MATHIS
ARIES (March 21-April 19). The hype around Valentine’s Day is something you’re not entirely fine with, and yet if you don’t do a bit of planning now, you’re likely to regret it. It will take you less than an hour to get this together. TAURUS (April 20-May 20). Who needs your attention? Who deserves it? These may be two different people, and today you’ll have to choose between them. You’ll do the honorable thing, as long as you take the time to consider what that is. GEMINI (May 21-June 21). It’s your day to generate ideas, brainstorm and participate in other people’s ideas — not to the point of making promises, but just to the point of feeling kinship. CANCER (June 22-July 22). Retain hours of your life by casting the right person for the job. What takes one experienced person but a few minutes will take a newbie days, if not weeks and months. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). Days of doing nothing at all are extremely valuable, especially during a Mercury retrograde such as this. Such days are a luxury to most people. If you are lucky enough to have this luxury, you’ll feel the value of it today. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). The current cosmic backdrop highlights the dichotomies of your personality. You are becoming kinder and gentler, though you will fight ferociously for the circumstances that allow you to be that way. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). You’ll meet with people. A good close is the sign of a good meeting. Recap the information that has come to light, and confirm the agreements that have been made. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21). Dysfunction within a group may be the norm. Each person has their strengths and weaknesses, and those do not always mesh well in a group setting. Luckily, minimizing dysfunction is a talent of yours. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21). Make sure you know what people really want before you give your opinion. Most people who ask for feedback are actually seeking attention and praise. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19). Is there someone who stands to lose if your venture is successful? If so, this is best rooted out and dealt with immediately so it doesn’t foul you up when you’re closer to victory. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18). You’ll be interacting in a group. It will benefit you to address certain members privately first. Ask about issues that might possibly arise and address them preemptively. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20). Complaining is useless. You’d rather spend your time finding ways to make things better. However, it may feel necessary to note problems privately to yourself so you can address them in an organized way.
A - Cox B - Uxbridge, Millville Comcast C - Blackstone, Franklin Comcast D - Bellingham Comcast
A B C D
THURSDAY EVENING FEBRUARY 13, 2014
7:30
Pioneers of Television “Late American Masters “Lennon NYC” John Lennon’s life in New York. Charlie Rose (N) Å Night” Å Å The Big Bang (:31) The Mill- (:01) The Crazy (:31) Two and a (:01) Elementary A former WBZ News Late Show W/ Theory Å ers Å Ones Half Men assassin is killed. Å (N) Å Letterman Scandal Cyrus realizes he may NewsCenter 5 (:35) Jimmy The Taste “Good With Beer” (N) Å have gone too far. Å Late (N) Kimmel Live Scandal Cyrus realizes he may ABC6 News at (:35) Jimmy The Taste “Good With Beer” (N) Å have gone too far. Å Eleven (N) Kimmel Live XXII Winter Olympics Figure Skating, Freestyle Skiing, Speed Skating, Skeleton. From Sochi, Russia. Figure skating; 7 News at freestyle skiing; speed skating; skeleton. (N Same-day Tape) Å 11PM (N) XXII Winter Olympics Figure Skating, Freestyle Skiing, Speed Skating, Skeleton. From Sochi, Russia. Figure skating; NBC 10 News at freestyle skiing; speed skating; skeleton. (N Same-day Tape) Å 11pm (N) The Big Bang (:31) The Mill- (:01) The Crazy (:31) Two and a (:01) Elementary A former News at 11 Late Show W/ Theory Å ers Å Ones Half Men assassin is killed. Å Letterman American Idol The top semifinal- Rake “Cannibal” Ben asks Fox 25 News at TMZ (N) Å Fox 25 News at 10 (N) Å ists are announced. (N) Keegan to take over his case. 11 (N) The Originals Hayley has to Arrow “The Scientist” A seemTwo and a Half Two and a Half The Office Å The Office “Getmake a difficult decision. ingly impossible robbery. Men Men tysburg” The Amish Shunned: American Experience Former members of (Off Air) Urban Rez Urban Relocation BBC World the Amish community. Å (DVS) Program. News Å House Exceptionally brilliant House “Wilson” Cuddy searches WBZ News Seinfeld “The Seinfeld “The The Office Å physicist. Å for real estate. (N) Å Soup” Å Raincoats” The This Old House Hour Selec- NOVA Experimental mini-Duomo. Frontline Rebels unify against PBS NewsHour (N) Å tive tree pruning. (N) Å Å (DVS) Islamist group. (N) Å The Originals Hayley has to Arrow “The Scientist” A seem7 News at 10PM on CW56 (N) Å The Arsenio Hall Show Å make a difficult decision. ingly impossible robbery. American Idol The top semifinal- Rake “Cannibal” Ben asks Eyewitness (:45) Sports Seinfeld “The Family Guy Å ists are announced. (N) Keegan to take over his case. News at 10 Wrap Soup” Å Law & Order: Criminal Intent Law & Order: Criminal Intent Criminal Minds The mind of a Criminal Minds A girl is abduct“Self-Made” Å “Offense” Å psychotic killer. Å ed in broad daylight. Law & Order: Criminal Intent Law & Order: Criminal Intent Criminal Minds The mind of a Criminal Minds A girl is abductpsychotic killer. Å ed in broad daylight. “Self-Made” Å “Offense” Å
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2 4 5
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DISH DTV P-VF BrVF BuVF
6 7 7 7
10 10 10 12 6 13 13 9 8 15 9 9
8 14 14 21 21 16 16 9 12 12 11 20 15 15 7
Greater BosRick Steves’ ton Å Europe Å WBZ News CBS Evening Wheel of For- Jeopardy! (N) Å News/Pelley tune (N) (N) Å NewsCenter 5 ABC World Inside Edition Chronicle Å at Six (N) News (N) Å ABC6 News at 6 ABC World The Insider Inside Edition (N) Å News (N) Å (N) Å 7 News at 6PM NBC Nightly Access HolThe Olympic (N) News (N) lywood (N) Zone (N) NBC 10 News at NBC Nightly NBC 10 News at Extra (N) Å 6pm (N) News (N) 7pm (N) 12 News at 6 CBS Evening Wheel of For- Jeopardy! News/Pelley tune (N) (N) Å Fox 25 News at Fox 25 News at TMZ (N) Å Dish Nation 6 (N) Å 6:30 (N) (N) Å Modern Fam- Modern Fam- The Big Bang The Big Bang ily Å ily Å Theory Å Theory Å World News Nightly BusiCook’s Country Are You Being America ness Report Served? Two and a Half Two and a Half The Big Bang The Big Bang Men Men Theory Å Theory Å Sara’s Week- America’s Test Well Read Å Nightly Business Report night Meals Kitchen The Middle Å The Middle Å Modern Fam- Modern Family Å ily Å Entertainment Eyewitness Access HolTMZ (N) Å Tonight (N) News lywood (N) Law & Order: Criminal Intent Law & Order: Criminal Intent “Depths” Å “Courtship” Å Law & Order: Criminal Intent Law & Order: Criminal Intent “Depths” Å “Courtship” Å
2
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6
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10 12
10 12
10 12
10 12 8
28 36
28 36
9 8
9 8 3 18 3 44 26 12
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64
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CABLE
37 64 37 37 42 56 63 63 25 71 59 59 79 67
6 PM
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CABLE
265 118 181 181 181 282 184 130 130 130 254 130 231 231 231 329 124 270 270 270 273 129 185 185 185 355 208 102 102 102 202 200 100 100 100 249 107 190 190 190 77 77 77
70 63 57 57 48 44 46 46 49 41 42 42 58 67 61 61 55 36 52 52 24 59 39 39 34 53 24 24 63 72 34 34 30 34 49 49 29 132 22 38 28 53 44 41 40 60 56 35 69 26 39 27 36 43 52 45
The First 48 A victim’s car may Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Surprise wedding Wahlburgers Discussing plans Wahlburgers Å Wahlburgers Å (:01) Bad Ink Å (:31) Bad Ink Å reveal his killer. Å for Phil and Kay. Å for the restaurant. Å Å Finding Bigfoot: Further EviTo Be Announced Wild West Alaska Ken makes a Wild West Alaska (N) Alaska: The Last Frontier Wild West Alaska dence “Badlands Bigfoot” custom shotgun. Å “Spring Has Sprung” Å } #### } ### (5:00) The Shawshank Redemption (1994, Drama) The Green Mile (1999, Drama) Tom Hanks, David Morse, Michael Clarke Duncan. A guard thinks an inmate has a supernatuTim Robbins, Morgan Freeman, Bob Gunton. Å ral power to heal. Å 106 & Park: BET’s Top 10 Live } ### Eve’s Bayou (1997, Drama) Jurnee Smollett, Meagan Good, Samuel L. Jackson. A girl’s Scandal “Icarus” Olivia faces a Scandal Mellie does a hard-hit“Top 10 Countdown” (N) family life unravels in 1960s Louisiana. Å difficult decision. Å ting interview. Å The Millionaire Matchmaker The Millionaire Matchmaker The Millionaire Matchmaker The Millionaire Matchmaker The Millionaire Matchmaker Watch What Vanderpump Adam Gaynor looks for love. “The Red-Headed Mixer” Patti plans a Valentine’s Ball. Patti plans a Valentine’s Ball. Happens: Live Rules (5:00) XXII Winter Olympics Curling. From Sochi, Russia. Curling, American Greed A twist on one American Greed A massive auto American Greed Lee Farkas American Greed Solomon Dwek women’s: USA vs. Japan. (N Same-day Tape) of the oldest crimes. insurance fraud scheme. invents fake loans. becomes an informant. (5:00) The Situ- Crossfire (N) Erin Burnett OutFront (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Å Piers Morgan Live (N) AC 360 Later (N) Erin Burnett OutFront ation Room South Park Tosh.0 Å The Colbert Daily Show/Jon Chappelle’s Chappelle’s Tosh.0 Å Tosh.0 Å It’s Always It’s Always Daily Show/Jon (:31) The Col“Freak Strike” Report Å Stewart Show Å Show Å Sunny Sunny Stewart bert Report SportsNet Cen- Early Edition SportsNet Early Edition Inside N.D. The Game 365 Unfiltered 2013 Best of Felger Sports Tonight SportsNet Cen- Sports Tonight SportsNet Central (N) (N) Central Basketball & Mazz (N) tral (N) tral (N) The Devils Ride “Brothers in Lone Target “Hiding in Plain The Fighters Å The Fighters (N) Å Saint Hoods (N) Å The Fighters Å Arms” Restoring reputations. Sight” The KNP Swat Unit. } ### Enchanted (2007) Amy Adams. Live action/animated. A Jessie “Star Good Luck Good Luck Good Luck Good Luck Gravity Falls Austin & Ally Å Dog With a Charlie Å Charlie Å Charlie Å Charlie princess from a fairy-tale world lands in the Big Apple. ‘PG’ Wars” Å “Little Dipper” Blog Å RichKids of RichKids of E! News (N) Keeping Up With the Kardashi- Keeping Up With the KarKeeping Up With the KarChelsea Lately E! News Beverly Hills Beverly Hills ans “How To Deal” dashians dashians (N) SportsCenter (N) Å College Basketball Teams TBA. (N) College Basketball Teams TBA. (N) SportsCenter (N) Å
278 182 120 120 120 290 172 250 250 250 236 114 196 196 196 206 140 209 144 208 143 70 74 71 70 74 71 70 74 71
Around the Pardon the College Basketball Teams TBA. (N) College Basketball Teams TBA. (N) Å Olbermann (N) Å 35 50 50 Horn (N) Interruption (N) (5:00) College Basketball Taped Global Supercard Wrestling Å Global Supercard Wrestling Å Friday Night Lights “There Goes Friday Night Lights Colleges Global Supercard Wrestling Å 309 258 258 from 2/27/01. Å the Neighborhood” pressure Brian. Å Authentically Puerto Rico: Daily Mass Å World Over Live (N) Crossing the Rosary Life on the Rock The Faithful Defending Women of 96 56 56 Free at Last Son By Four Goal Å Traveler. (N) Life Å Grace } } The Middle Å The Middle Å A Cinderella Story: Once Upon a Song (2011) Lucy Hale. A Another Cinderella Story (2008) Selena Gomez. A young man The 700 Club Å 50 26 26 teenage singer must contend with her wicked stepfamily. falls in love with a pretty dancer at a masked ball. Cupcake Wars Match.com’s Stir Donut ShowDonut ShowChopped Chicken tenderloin; Chopped Canada A creative use Cutthroat Kitchen Shopping Diners, Drive- Diners, Drive62 53 53 Event in Los Angeles. down (N) down (N) hanger steak. of rambutan. (N) without a basket; bent pan. Ins and Dives Ins and Dives How I Met Your How I Met Your Two and a Half Two and a Half } ### Crazy, Stupid, Love. (2011) Steve Carell, Ryan Gosling, Julianne Moore. } ### Crazy, Stupid, Love. (2011, Romance30 30 30 Mother Mother Men Men A suddenly single 40-something needs help finding his groove again. Comedy) Steve Carell, Ryan Gosling. House HuntHouse HuntHunters Int’l House HuntRehab Addict Rehab Addict Rehab Addict Rehab Addict House Hunters Hunters Int’l House HuntHunters Int’l 61 32 32 ers Å ers Å ers Å (N) Å ers Å Å Å Å Å Pawn Stars Å Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Å Pawn Stars Å Pawn Stars Å Pawn Stars Å Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Appalachian Outlaws “The Last (:02) The Curse of Oak Island 69 58 58 “Family Feud” (N) Å (N) Å Stand” Å “The Find” Å Wife Swap “Baur/Fine” Pirate Project Runway: Under the Project Runway: Under the Gunn Project Runway: Under the Gunn Kim of Queens Å (:01) Dance Moms Å 28 36 36 mother; organized mother. Gunn Å Vampire-inspired looks. (N) Å (5:00) } ## Bring It On: Fight Ridiculousness Ridiculousness Dyrdek’s Fan- Dyrdek’s Fan- Ridiculousness Ridiculousness Ridiculousness Jerks With Dyrdek’s Fan- Ridiculousness 76 28 28 to the Finish (2009) tasy Factory tasy Factory (N) Cameras (N) tasy Factory Golf Destina- Women’s College Basketball North Carolina State at Clemson. (N) Women’s College Basketball Virginia Tech at Wake Forest. (N) Sports Today Sports Today Sports Today 37 51 51 tion (N) LIVE (N) LIVE LIVE } ### SpongeBob SpongeBob Rugrats in Paris: The Movie (2000) SpongeBob Full House Å Full House Å Full House Å Full House Å Friends Å (:36) Friends Å 52 25 25 SquarePants SquarePants Voices of E.G. Daily, Michael Bell. Å SquarePants } American Horror House (2012, Horror) Morgan Fairchild. } ## The Mothman Prophecies (2002, Suspense) Richard Gere, Laura Linney. } # Mothman (5:00) } House of Bones 73 62 62 (2010) Charisma Carpenter. Å Ghosts invade a sorority house on Halloween night. Å Premiere. A reporter investigates strange phenomena in a small town. (2010) Cops Å Jail Å Cops Å Cops “Street Cops Å Cops Å iMPACT Wrestling (N) Å Cops “Coast to Cops Multi-car 74 55 55 Arrests No. 3” Coast” collision. Here Comes Honey Boo Boo Here Comes Here Comes Here Comes Here Comes Here Comes Here Comes Welcome to Myrtle Manor Here Comes Here Comes 55 38 38 June is a bundle of stress. Honey Honey Honey Honey Honey Honey “Peggy Get Your Gun” (N) Honey Honey Castle A model’s corpse appears NBA Tip-Off (N) Å NBA Basketball Brooklyn Nets at Chicago Bulls. From the United Center in Chicago. NBA Basketball Oklahoma City Thunder at Los 32 33 33 in a fountain. (N) Å Angeles Lakers. (N) Å Johnny Test Å Regular Show World of Gum- Steven UniTeen Titans Go! Johnny Test Å King of the The Cleveland American American Family Guy Å Family Guy Å 51 60 60 ball verse Hill Å Show Dad Å Dad Å The Andy The Andy Gilligan’s Gilligan’s Gilligan’s (:36) Gilligan’s (:12) Everybody Loves Raymond Everybody-Ray- Everybody-Ray- Everybody-Ray- Everybody-Ray48 64 64 Griffith Show Griffith Show Island Island Island Island “Getting Even” Å mond mond mond mond Law & Order: Special Victims Law & Order: Special Victims Law & Order: Special Victims Law & Order: Special Victims Law & Order: Special Victims NCIS: Los Angeles Callen works 31 35 35 Unit “Strain” Å Unit Murder of a teenage girl. Unit Missing boy is found. Unit “Game” Å Unit “Ghost” Å (DVS) a kidnapping case. Seinfeld “The Seinfeld “The Seinfeld “The Family Guy Å Family Guy Å Family Guy Å The Big Bang The Big Bang King of the Nerds The teams Conan (N) Å 33 31 31 Apartment” Stranded” Statue” Å (DVS) (DVS) Theory Theory must build their own robots.
422 261 285 285 285 311 180 199 199 199 231 110 164 164 164 248 137 53 53 53
229 112 165 165 165 269 120 128 128 128 252 108 140 140 140 331 160 210 210 210 623 434 76 76 76
299 170 252 252 252 244 122 180 180 180 262 168 54 54 54
280 183 139 139 139 245 138 51 51 51
296 176 257 257 257 301 106 244 244 244 242 105 247 139 50 52 50 52 50 52
PREMIUM
ENC HBO MAX SHOW STARZ TMC 292 630 326 326 200 400 301 301 220 450 341 341 240 500 361 361 280 600 321 321 260 550 381 381
6 PM
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526 340 350 350 350 501 300 400 400 400 512 310 420 420 420 537 318 365 365 365 520 350 340 340 340 544 327 385 385 385
} ## Major Payne (1995) Damon Wayans. A (:10) } ## The Village (2004) Bryce Dallas Howard. Strange (:40) } ### The Amazing Spider-Man (2012, Action) Andrew Garfield, Rhys creatures menace a 19th-century community. ‘PG-13’ Å gung-ho Marine commands young recruits. Ifans. Peter Parker investigates his parents’ disappearance. ‘PG-13’ Å } # The Return (2006, Suspense) Sarah } ### 42 (2013, Biography) Chadwick Boseman. Jackie Robin- (:15) Real Sex “Stocks Down, (5:30) QuesGirls “Free Looking Å tioning Darwin Michelle Gellar, Peter O’Brien. ‘PG-13’ Å Snacks” son breaks baseball’s color barrier. ‘PG-13’ Å Sex Up” Å } ## Ted (2012) Mark Wahlberg. Live action/animated. A grown (5:15) } ### Dodgeball: A (6:50) } ## Transit (2012, Suspense) Jim (:25) } ## Ace Ventura: When Nature Calls True Underdog Story (2004) Caviezel, James Frain, Diora Baird. ‘R’ Å (1995, Comedy) Jim Carrey. ‘PG-13’ Å man has a live teddy bear as a constant companion. } Lenny Cooke (2012) A high-school basketball } ### Byzantium (2012) Gemma Arterton. Fugitive female } Butcher Boys (2013) Ali Faulkner. Friends go Gigolos (N) Å } # Halloween: player’s shot at fame falls short. ‘NR’ vampires take refuge at a seaside British community. ‘R’ Å head-to-head with a group of cannibals. ‘R’ Resurrection (4:45) } ## (:45) } ## Oz the Great and Powerful (2013, Fantasy) James Franco, Mila Kunis. } ### Iron Man 3 (2013, Action) Robert Downey Jr. A powerful (:15) } ### Before Midnight A circus magician is hurled into the magical land of Oz. ‘PG’ Å enemy tests Tony Stark’s true mettle. ‘PG-13’ Å (2013) Ethan Hawke. ‘R’ Å Ladder 49 } ### Do the Right Thing (1989) Danny Aiello. A race riot } ## Lawless (2012) Shia LaBeouf. The Bondurant brothers } ### Killing Them Softly (2012, Crime (:40) } # Origistarts at Sal’s pizza parlor on a hot day in Brooklyn. ‘R’ Å become bootleggers in Depression-era Virginia. ‘R’ Å Drama) Brad Pitt, Scoot McNairy. ‘R’ Å nal Sin (2001)
B6 THE TIMES
COMICS
By Norm Feuti
Thursday, February 13, 2014
Retail
Lio
By Mark Tatulli
For Better or Worse
By Lynn Johnston
Crankshaft
By Tom Batiuk
Blondie
By Dean Young & Denis Lebrun
Garfield
By Jim Davis
Mother Goose & Grimm
By Mike Peters
Gasoline Alley
By Jim Scancarelli
Baby Blues
By Rick Kirkman & Jerry Scott
Zits
By Jerry Scott & Jim Borgman
Rose Is Rose
By Pat Brady
Marvin
By Tom Armstrong
Funky Winkerbean
By Tom Batiuk
Pearls Before Swine
By Stephan Pastis
B.C.
By Johnny Hart
Get Fuzzy
By Darby Conley
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Jumble puzzle magazines available at pennydellpuzzles.com/jumblemags
Cryptoquote
Su Do Ku Tips and computer program at www.sudoku.com.
For solutions, check “JRC Publications” on the solutions page of www.sudoku.com.
Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.
© Puzzles by Pappocom
TIVDO
©2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved.
GOCLI
FILRYM
GEGENA
Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.
A:
Yesterday’s
IN
(Answers tomorrow) QUEST OBJECT DISCUS Jumbles: OBESE Answer: Casper and his wife shopped in a — “BOO-TIQUE”
Thursday, February 13, 2014
Annoucements
Blackstone es u l Valley Va
Employment
208 Technical Help Wanted 265 Furniture Household
THE TIMES B7
Real Estate-Rent
304 Apartments Unfurnished
304 Apartments Unfurnished
107 Personals
CREDIT FOR ERRORS Each advertiser is asked to check his/her advertisement on the first day of publication and to report any error to the Times classified department (7224000) as soon as possible for correction. No adjustment will be given for typographical errors, which do not change the meaning or lessen the value of the advertisement. Credit will be allowed only to that portion of the advertisement where the error occurred.
200 Employment Services
The Times does not knowingly accept advertisements in the Employment classifications that are not bonafide job offers. Classification 200 is provided for Employment Information, Services and Referrals. This newspaper does not knowingly accept Employment ads that indicate a preference bases on age from employees covered be Age Discrimination In Employment Act. Nor do we in any way condone employment based solely upon discrimination practices.
111 Special Notices
DID YOU KNOW that the Classified Section is filled with lots of interesting information? You can find a house, an apartment, a cat, a job and lots more!! The Times Classifieds are loaded with "local" information and merchandise that you will find useful. Be in the know....read the classified section every day.
204 General Help Wanted
DISMANTLER experienced READ THE TIMES EVERY in the removal of car DAY...to find out what's parts, must have your Buying US coins dated behappening in your neigh- own tools, applications fore 1965: dimes $1.20, borhood. You'll find taken at K & R Auto Sal- quarters $3.00, halves school news, employ- vage, 950 Smithfield Rd., $6.00. Woonsocket 401ment news, health news, No. Providence, RI 597-6426 sports, who's getting married, who's getting Buying US coins dated bepromoted, who's running fore 1965: dimes $1.25; for office and much quarters $3.12; halves more. If it's important to $6.25 Woonsocket 401you, it'll probably be in 597-6426 The Times. To get The Times delivered to your Walking Liberty Halves: home every day, call 401- Operations Assistant Man- 1929-S Fine, 1934-S Very ager. Must have at least 2 Fine, 722-4000. 1946-D F-VF. yrs managerial experi- $42.00 Woonsocket 597ence. Full time with bene6426 fits. No phone calls, must apply in person. Advanced Auto Recycling, 265 Furniture 290 Curran Road, Cumberland, RI. 02864 Household
DESIGN & DEVELOPMENT Oak hutch. 2 glass doors, Pawtucket. 109 Benefit St. 1 BED efficiency, S. ENGINEER 2 shelves, mirror backed, 1 bed, heat/hot water, off Main St. Woonsocket. Zebra Technologies Corpo- two draws with skeleton st. parking, 1st. Walk out $160 wk. w/all utilities. living. Sm. pets ok. $700 ration is seeking a Design key, 7 feet tall. $99. 401No pets Security $320. mo. 508-699-4476 and Development Engi- 603-7519 568-3478 neer in Lincoln, RI with the following requirements: Masters degree (2) NORTH-END Pawtucket. Charming stu300 Rental Agencies APTS in Information Systems, WOONSOCKET dios and 1 bed apts., Information Technology #1) 6-room, 3 bed, 1st fl, starting at $650 mo. Free or related field plus 3 newly remodeled, dish- heat and hot water. Move years OR a Bachelors dewasher granite counter in special. $250 off first gree in Information Sys- READ THE TIMES EVERY tops, $925+sec months rent. Ample parktems, Information Tech- DAY...to find out what's #2) 1 bed, off-street ing, secured entrance. happening in your neighnology or related field parking, recently remod- Call 401-725-5660 borhood. You'll find Readers of The Times are eled, 1st fl, $700+sec; plus 5 years experience including: create, support school news, employ- advised The Times does 401-636-1727 and document windows ment news, health news, not knowingly accept adbased software utilizing sports, who's getting vertisements that are in C, C++ technologies; married, who's getting violation of the Federal 100 Legals 100 Legals design and develop com- promoted, who's running Fair Housing Law and the plex business compo- for office and much Rhode Island Fair Housmore. If it's important to ing Practices Act. The nents using .NET Class NOTICE OF MORTGAGEE'S SALE Library assemblies and you, it'll probably be in Federal Fair Housing Law 16 Aetna Street Central Falls, integrate them in a multi- The Times. To get The and Rhode Island Fair Rhode Island Assessor's Plat 7 Lot 173 tier environment; design, Times delivered to your Housing Practices Act are home every day, call 401designed to prevent disdevelop and implement crimination in the purmulti-threaded and net- 722-4000. chase and rental of hous- Will be sold, subject to any and all prior liens working applications. ing. Refusal to rent, and encumbrances, at public auction on FebruPlease submit resume to lease, or sell property to https://jobs-zebra.icims.anyone due to age, race, ary 27, 2014 at 11:00 AM Local Time, on the com/jobs/10216/designcolor, religion, sex, sexu%26-development-engineer%2c/job and refer273 Miscellaneous al orientation, marital sta- premises by virtue of the Power of Sale contus, disability, familial tained in the certain Mortgage Deed made and ence Job ID 10216. Merchandise status, or country of an- executed by Domingas G. Xavier dated July 18, cestral origin is in violation of the Fair Housing 2003 and recorded in Book 503 at Page 253, et Law. If you have a com- seq. with the Records of Land Evidence of the plaint, contact the Rhode City of Central Falls, County of Providence, State LOOKING FOR SOME- Island Commission for THING HARD TO FIND? Human Rights. They will of Rhode Island, the conditions of said Mortgage Be sure to look in the help any person that has Deed having been broken. FIVE THOUSAND discriminated classified pages of The been TImes every day. Surely against in the rental of DOLLARS ($5,000.00) down payment in cash, housing, the sale of you'll find interesting bank check or certified check at time of sale; oththings that you may want housing, home financing or need. The Times is the or public accommoda- er terms will be announced at time of sale. tions. Call the Rhode Isperfect marketplace you enjoy in the comfort land Commission for Hu261 Coins & Stamps can Marinosci Law Group, P.C. of your own home. There man Rights, 401-222is something for every- 2661. 275 West Natick Road, Suite 500 one in The Times classi1942&1944 Walking LiberWarwick, RI 02886 ty silver half dollars, bril- fieds! Attorney for the present liant uncirculated. $60 for both. Woonsocket, 597Holder of the Mortgage 6426
Merchandise
100 Legals
100 Legals
MLG File # 13-11965 A-4437095 02/06/2014, 02/13/2014, 02/20/2014
CITY OF PAWTUCKET 137 ROOSEVELT AVENUE PAWTUCKET, RI 02860
PUBLIC NOTICE OF DRAFT PHASE II STORM WATER ANNUAL REPORT PREPARED IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE RHODE ISLAND POLLUTANT DISCHARGE ELIMINATION SYSTEM (RIPDES) PROGRAM GENERAL PERMIT FOR STORM WATER DISCHARGES FROM SMALL MUNICIPAL SEPARATE STORM SEWER SYSTEMS AND FROM INDUSTRIAL ACTIVITY AT ELIGIBLE FACILITIES OPERATED BY REGULATED SMALL MS4s. DATE OF NOTICE: February 13, 2014 RIPDES PERMIT NUMBER: RIR040024 NAME AND MAILING ADDRESS OF SMALL MS4 OPERATOR: City of Pawtucket 250 Armistice Boulevard Pawtucket, RI 02860
Vehicles
4 PIECE bedroom set, light wood, double bed, excellent condition $175.00. 508-883-9323
123 Autos For Sale
02 Honda Accord LX. 4Dr, loaded, auto, 4cly. (32 MPG) CD player, inspected $1950. 401-241-0354 1985 CHEVY Monte Carlo, V6, 50k original miles, runs great, $2,000/best. 401-265-2616 1994 Crown Victoria- Runs excellent, very well maintained. Pawtucket. $850. 465-1500 1996 TOYOTA Camry LE 4 door, loaded, auto, 130k, 4 cyl. white, gray interior, low miles, inspected
$1,950. 200-0079
100 Legals
100 Legals
MORTGAGEE'S NOTICE OF SALE OF REAL ESTATE 464-466 BENEFIT STREET, PAWTUCKET, RI 02861
The premises described in the mortgage will be sold subject to all encumbrances and prior liens on February 21, 2014 at 12:00 PM on the premises, by virtue of the power of sale contained in a mortgage by Maria Felix dated February 23, 2005 and recorded in the Pawtucket Land Evidence Records in Book L2304 Page 300 , the conditions of said mortgage having been broken. FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT THE DRAFT ANNUAL REPORT
Pursuant to the requirements established in the Rhode Island Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (RIPDES) General Permit for Storm Water Discharge from Small MS4s and from Industrial Activity at Eligible Facilities Operated by Regulated Small MS4s (General Permit), The City of Pawtucket submitted an application package, including Notice of Intent and Storm Water Management Program Plan (SWMPP) to the Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management (RIDEM) for authorization of the storm water discharges from the City of Pawtucket MS4. In accordance with Part IV.E of the General Permit, the operator must annually evaluate the compliance of the SWMPP with the conditions of the permit, as well as the appropriateness of the selected Best Management Practices and efforts towards achieving the Measurable Goals. An annual report prepared in accordance with Part IV.G of the general permit must be submitted to RIDEM by March 10th for each year after the permit is issued. Notice is hereby given of the intent to receive public comment and to hold a public meeting, if requested, on the City of Pawtucket Phase II Storm Water Annual Report.
1997 TOYOTA Camry, LE, wagon, limited, 4 dr. moon roof, auto, V6, low miles, mint, 1 owner, $1,800. 401-301-0056 1999 Buick Century LS 4 dr, loaded, V6, auto, nice, runs new, must see. $1450firm 401-241-0413 1999 Jeep Wrangler Sahara Limited Edition. 2Dr, loaded, 6 cyl., 4.0, 5 spd, 3 tops, mint, $3950. 1 owner. 401-301-0056 2000 DODGE RAM 4x4, 1500 series, five speed transmission, inspected. $2,000 /best 401-7874764
TERMS OF SALE: Copies of the Phase II Storm Water Annual Report may be obtained at no cost by writing or calling A deposit of FIVE THOUSAND DOLLARS AND 00 the City Department of Public Works as noted below: CENTS ($5,000.00) in the form of a certified check or bank treasurer's check will be required Andrew Silvia, Chief of Project Development to be delivered at or before the time the bid is ofCity of Pawtucket fered. The description of the premises contained Public Works Department in said mortgage shall control in the event of an 250 Armistice Boulevard error in this publication. Other terms will be anPawtucket, RI 02860 nounced at the sale. (401) 728-0500, Extension 279 ORLANS MORAN PLLC Attorney for the Present Holder of the Mortgage P.O. Box 540540 Waltham, MA 02454 Phone: 781-790-7800 231.6914
The administrative record containing all documents is on file and may be inspected, by appointment, at the City's office mentioned above between 8:30AM and 4:00PM, Monday through Friday, except holidays. PUBLIC COMMENT AND REQUEST FOR PUBLIC MEETING:
Pursuant to the requirements of the Phase II Small MS4 General Permit, a public meeting has been tentatively scheduled to consider the City of Pawtucket Phase II Storm Water Annual Report, if re2000 JEEP Cherokee Larequested. Requests for a Public Meeting must be submitted in writing to the attention of Andrew do, LT, 4 dr, loaded, auto, Notice of Sale / Auction Silvia at the address indicated above. Notice should be taken that if the City of Pawtucket receives 6 cyl. 4.0, like new, 1 owner, must see! $2000. Storage America a request from twenty-five (25) people, a governmental agency or subdivision, or an Association 401-241-0413 In accordance with Rhode Island statues 34 having no less that twenty-five (25) members on or before 4:00PM, February 24, 2013 (two days 42-4 the following units before scheduled public meeting), the public meeting will be held at the following time and place: 2000 OLDSMOBILE section ALERO, hand & foot con- will be sold in its entirety to the highest bidder. trols, 2 door, 90,000 February 26, 2014 @ 7PM miles. $3,100/best offer. Central Falls 10:00AM 401-294-6311 558 Roosevelt Ave Central Falls RI 02863 Pawtucket City Hall Unit # Tenants Name 137 Roosevelt Avenue 2000 VOLKSWAGON Jetta Dino E Marini Pawtucket, RI 02860 GXE edition, 4 dr, loaded, CF nd auto, 32MPG, mint 2 CF Celeste A Perry owner, low miles $1,900. CF Roland P Sarrazin Interested persons should contact the City of Pawtucket in advance to confirm if a meeting will be 401-426-0975 CF Luis Blanco held at the time and location noted above. 2002 MURCURY Grand CF John W OConnor Marquis LS 4dr, auto, Brandi Whitelaw Interested parties may submit comments on the draft Annual Report and amendments to the loaded, showroom, 1 CF owner, must see $2.500. CF George Spinola SWMPP and the administrative record to the Public Works Department at 250 Armistice Boulevard 401-585-9483 Pawtucket 10:45 am by the close of the public comment period, which ends 4:00PM February 27, 2014 (following day after proposed meeting date). Commenters may request a longer comment period if necessary to SELL YOUR CAR, VAN OR 37 Freight St. Pawtucket RI 02860 TRUCK THE EASY WAY. PT Scott P Arrighi provide a reasonable opportunity to comply with these requirements. Call the classified team at Christopher M The Times today. Tell PT more than 40,000 adult Chapman If, during the public comment period, significant comments are received concerning the draft Anreaders in the are about Diane M Durda nual Report or amendments to the SWMPP, the City of Pawtucket will provide a written response your vehicle. It's easy to PT do, just dial 401-722- PT Tracy Miller to comments to all persons that submitted comments and all members of the public that request a 4000. or visit us at www.PT Nicole L Riley copy of the response. The response will include a final Annual Report and identify what changes to pawtuckettimes.com PT Justin D Berg the SWMPP have been made if any. PT Leo R Bourdeau Business Services PT Benjamin I Garcia FINAL ANNUAL REPORT AND AMENDMENTS TO THE SWMPP: PT Abel S Mejia PT Andre J Richard Pursuant to the Phase II Small MS4 General Permit, the City of Pawtucket will submit the final AnPT Francisco L nual Report and a copy of amendments to the SWMPP to the RIDEM. All records relating to this Santiago permit are available for review by the public. The public may view the records during normal busiPT Mark T Santos ness hours at the Public Works Department. Changes adding (but not subtracting or replacing) PT Denise Sawicki components of the SWMPP may be implemented immediately upon written notification to RIDEM. PT Raymond A Unless denied, changes replacing ineffective or infeasible six minimum measure best management Sojo-Nieves practices specifically identified in the SWMPP shall be deemed approved and may be implemented 159 General PT Carlos M Sousa within sixty (60) days from submittal of the request. Changes replacing ineffective or infeasible Services PT Laura G Sy storm water controls specifically identified in the SWMPP or in an approved scope of work intendPT Tasha A Thibeault ed to meet the requirements of a Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) or other Water Quality DeterPT Stephanie K Work mination may be implemented only upon receipt of written approval from RIDEM ATTENTION Advertised Dates: 02/5/14, 2/13/14, 2/21/14, TO ADVERTISE YOUR 2/27/14 _______________________ BUSINESS IN THIS SECTION Auction date March 11 ,2014 Date CALL THE TIMES These Units Contain: Household items, ClothLance Hill, Director of Public Works CLASSIFIED DEPT 401-722-4000 ing, Boxes, Furniture, Bedding Appliances, Public Works Department Paid Thru 08/31/13 & 09/30/13 City of Pawtucket
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Yanks’ Jeter plans to retire after season
NEW YORK (AP) — To Derek Jeter, it was just another day to get ready for spring training. On a minor league field at the New York Yankees' complex in Florida, he took batting practice, fielded grounders and chatted with teammates. And then he drove away in his Mercedes, offering no hint that the countdown to his retirement had already begun. Hours later, Jeter alerted the sports world: This will be his final season. "I know it in my heart. The 2014 season will be my last year playing professional baseball," Jeter posted Wednesday in a long letter on his Facebook page. "I have gotten the very most out of my life playing baseball, and I have absolutely no regrets," the shortstop wrote. While it was no secret the team captain was getting close to the end of his brilliant career as he neared 40 — especially after injuries wrecked him last season — Jeter's announcement caught many by surprise. In fact, some people wondered whether his account had been hacked. But it was quickly confirmed that one of the greatest players in the history of baseball's most storied franchise was serious. A 13-time All-Star shortstop who led the Yankees to five World Series championships, Jeter was the last link to the powerful Yankees teams that won three straight crowns from 1998-2000. Longtime teammates Mariano Rivera and Andy Pettitte retired after last year. "Derek Jeter is Mr. Yankee of his era," Yankees co-chairman Hank Steinbrenner told The Associated Press. "He was the face of one of the greatest teams ever." Jeter was limited to 17 games last season while trying to recover from a broken left ankle sustained during the 2012 playoffs. He hit only .190 with one homer and seven RBIs. "Last year was a tough one for me. As I suffered through a bunch of injuries, I realized that some of the things that always came easily to me and were always fun had started to become a struggle," Jeter wrote. "The one thing I always said to myself was that when baseball started to feel more like a job, it would be time to move forward." "So really it was months ago when I realized that this season would likely be my last. As I came to this conclusion and shared it with my friends and family, they all told me to hold off saying anything until I was absolutely 100 percent sure," he wrote. "And the thing is, I could not be more sure," he wrote. His agent, Casey Close, said Jeter wanted to declare his intentions before the Yankees start spring training later this week so that his future status wouldn't be a Derek Jeter distraction. The Yankees open camp for pitchers and catchers on Friday. Jeter has said he's healthy and ready to go — at 39, his next birthday is in June. "Derek called me this morning to tell me that he planned to retire following the season," Yankees Managing General Partner Hal Steinbrenner said. Said Los Angeles Dodgers manager Don Mattingly, a former Jeter teammate: "I'm excited for him. It's kind of nice to see him go out on his own terms." Jeter is the Yankees' career hits leader with 3,316. He's ninth on the all-time list; a 200-hit season would put him in fifth place. Jeter is a lifetime .312 hitter in 19 seasons, with 256 home runs and 1,261 RBIs. He has scored 1,876 runs, stolen 348 bases and is a five-time Gold Glove winner. Added up, his numbers put him among the greats in Yankees history, with fans often invoking the names of Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig, Joe DiMaggio, Mickey Mantle when mentioning Jeter's legacy. But No. 2 is defined by so much more than his numbers. His backhanded flip in the playoffs, his diving catch into the stands, his speech to close old Yankee Stadium and his home run for career hit No. 3,000. An October presence for so many years — Jeter is a career .321 hitter in seven World Series — he also became Mr. November in 2001. His winning, 10th-inning homer came shortly after midnight in a Game 4 that began on Halloween. Jeter was the AL Rookie of the Year in 1996, the season the Yankees won their first World Series since 1978 and re-established themselves as a major force. He was the MVP of the 2000 World Series. Commissioner Bud Selig said during his tenure, "Major League Baseball has had no finer ambassador than Derek Jeter." A staple for so long in the Yankees' lineup, Jeter missed the first 91 games last year. He felt pain in his right quadriceps when he returned July 11 and again went on the disabled list. Jeter came back for three games but strained his right calf. In early September, he was done for the year. The Yankees will open the 2014 regular season on April 1 in Houston. Their final game is scheduled to be at Fenway Park, against the longtime rival Boston Red Sox. Rivera announced a year in advance that he would retire, and was saluted everywhere he played last season. Jeter is sure to get a similar farewell tour. "I wish everybody does it like that," Rivera told ESPN radio. "I think that would be the right thing for him to do." Jeter wrote that he wants to pursue business and other interests "in addition to focusing more on my personal life and starting a family of my own." "And I want the ability to move at my own pace, see the world and finally have a summer vacation," he said. "But before that, I want to soak in every moment of every day this year, so I can remember it for the rest of my life. And most importantly, I want to help the Yankees reach our goal of winning another championship," he said.
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Source: Burnett, Phillies agree to contract
PHILADELPHIA (AP) — On the day Cole Hamels announced he won't be ready for the season opener, the Philadelphia Phillies helped their ailing starting rotation. A person familiar with the deal said that A.J. Burnett agreed to a one-year contract with the Phillies on Wednesday. The person spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because the Phillies haven't made an official announcement. Burnett's deal reportedly is worth $16 million. If Hamels is healthy, he gives the Phillies a formidable top three along with Cliff Lee. Kyle Kendrick is slotted to be fourth in the rotation. Roberto Hernandez, formerly known as Fausto Carmona, and Cuban righty Miguel Alfredo Gonzalez will compete for the fifth spot. Youngsters Jonathan Pettibone and Ethan Martin provide insurance. Hamels told reporters in Clearwater, Fla., that he has left biceps tendinitis, but expects to pitch in April. Burnett was 10-11 with a 3.30 ERA for Pittsburgh last season. The 37-year-old right-hander is 147-132 with a 3.99 ERA in 15 major league seasons. He helped the New York Yankees beat the Phillies in the 2009 World Series, winning Game 2 of the six-game series. Hamels initially said he felt discomfort in his shoulder. He called the ailment a "kink in the system" after he rebooted his throwing program in mid-to-late November. "It was cranking back up on top of the weightlifting I was doing," Hamels said. "I think it was just getting into the exercises too fast, too soon." A three-time All-Star and MVP of the 2008 World Series and NLCS, Hamels is coming off a poor year. He was 8-14 with a 3.60 ERA in his first full season after signing a $144 million, six-year contract in July 2012. Hamels, who made his first opening day start last year, said he no longer is feeling pain or discomfort, but is "eight to 10 days" behind the rest of the pitchers in camp.
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