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December 3, 2013

December 3, 2013

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Tuesday, December 3, 2013
The Blackstone Valley’s Neighborhood Newspaper since 1885 www.pawtuckettimes.com Newsstand: 50 Cents
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Amusements.........................B5
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HURT HAWK
GETS HELP
NORTH KINGSTOWN
(AP) — Ared-tailed hawk is
being nursed back to health by
wildlife rehabilitators after
apparently suffering serious
burns from methane burners at
the Central Landfill in
Johnston.
Officials at the Rhode Island
Resource Recovery Corp. said
landfill workers noticed the
injured raptor that could not
fly. They brought the bird to
the Wildlife Rehabilitators
Association of Rhode Island in
North Kingstown.
Dear Abby
and today’s
horoscopes
Check out
healthy,
hearty
recipes
Wednesday
FOOD
AMUSEMENTS
By DONNA KENNY KIRWAN
dkirwan@pawtuckettimes.com
PAWTUCKET — Rhode Island
being the first state in the nation to
offer a sales tax exemption on art
was big enough news to make
Monday’s Wall Street Journal. For
a city like Pawtucket that has long
viewed the arts as an economic
engine, the news is considered as a
positive, but also something that
city officials had been already been
doing in a slightly different way
through its Arts District.
In its 2013 legislative session,
the Rhode Island General
Assembly passed a bill, which
Governor Lincoln Chafee passed
into law, to permit the sale of origi-
nal and limited edition works of art
exempt from the 7 percent state
sales tax, beginning Dec. 1. The
action makes Rhode Island the first
state in the nation to have such an
exemption on art, which includes
all original and limited edition
IT’S SANTA PAWS!
By JIM BARON
jbaron@pawtuckettimes.com
PROVIDENCE – Admitting that
“I never understood all the brouha-
ha” over the past two years about
what to call the giant decorated
evergreen in the Statehouse
Rotunda, Gov. Lincoln Chafee has
capitulated to his critics and is call-
ing it a “Christmas tree” this year.
In his first two years as gover-
nor, Chafee insisted on using the
phrase “holiday tree” in deference
to Rhode Islanders who do not cel-
ebrate the Christmas holiday. That
drew impassioned storms of protest
from Chafee’s political opponents,
talk radio, and even the Roman
Catholic Diocese of Providence,
who painted the governor as a
Grinch who would not give
By DONNA KENNY KIRWAN
dkirwan@pawtuckettimes.com
PAWTUCKET – As the
falling temperatures contin-
ue to remind us, snow sea-
son is just around the cor-
ner. For many seniors,
shoveling snow can be a
stress on their physical
capabilities or not advis-
able for a host of other rea-
sons, yet many may not have any-
one they can rely on to remove the
white stuff.
That’s where the Youth to Senior
Assistance Program, coordinated by
city Seniors Liaison Beth Roberge,
can help.
Roberge has begun her
annual rounds of contacting
local schools, churches and
other organizations to recruit
youths who volunteer for the
task of shoveling walkways,
sidewalks and driveway
frontages that abut public
roadways (not the driveways them-
selves).
A taxing dilemma
By DONNA KENNY KIRWAN
dkirwan@pawtuckettimes.com
PAWTUCKET — A
substitute teacher who
was working at Slater
Junior High School last
week was arrested on
Wednesday after a female
student alleged that he
had touched her inappro-
priately.
Warren Tassone, 22, of
180 Rounds Ave.,
Providence, was charged
with second-degree child
molestation (forcible
fondling), according to
police.
Maj. Arthur Martins
said the arrest was based
on a report made by a stu-
dent in Tassone’s class-
room that he had alleged-
ly touched her inappropri-
ately over her clothing.
He said the police had
been called by the princi-
pal to conduct an investi-
gation after a complaint
was initially made by sev-
eral students.
Tassone was arraigned
in 6th District Court
where he was released on
personal recognizance
and ordered to stay away
from the victim. He was
scheduled for a pre-
arraignment conference
on Feb. 18.
A quick check of R.I.
Volunteers still needed
for snow-shovel duty
Chafee: Statehouse will be spruced up by Christmas tree
Governor says calling it a ‘holiday tree’ sparks anger
The Times/Ernest A. Brown
Pat O’Hara, of Pawtucket, shovels the walkway in front of her house last
winter. But seniors and others unable to shovel can seek assistance from
the city.
To get on the
list call
City Hall at
401-728-0500
ext. 241
The annual Paws and Claus event was held on Saturday
at Daggett Farm in Pawtucket’s Slater Park. Pets and
their owners had a chance to meet and have a photo
taken with Santa Claus, with proceeds benefiting the
Pawtucket Dog Park.
Above, Santa poses with Willy, Riley and Tasha, three
dogs owned by Sandra Sammartano of East Providence.
Left, Matthew Jiminez, 14, of Attleboro, gets his dog Mia
ready to take a snapshot with St. Nick.
Times readers can send in their own holiday pet photos
for publication on the weekly Blackstone Valley Pets
page. Email photos to: editor@woonsocketcall.com with
the word “Pets” in the subject line. The photos are pub-
lished every Monday.
The Times/Ernest A. Brown
Teacher
accused
of sex
assault
Think of the holiday season as a journey, with only days to go.
22
651 Cottage St.,
Pawtucket, RI 02861
(401) 723-9998
• Custom Fittings
• Regripping & Reshafing
• Complete Repair Facility
• Buy & Sell New and
Used Golf Equipment
• Wedges • Hybrids
• Drivers • Fairway Metals
• Putters
HOLIDAY GIFT
Of The Day
Idea
Give Gift
Certificates
to the
Golfers
on
Your List
from
See TAX, Page A2
See TEACHER, Page A2
See TREE, Page A2
See SHOVEL, Page A2
Antiques dealer concerned with ‘very broad’ exemption on art
prior record for Tassone.
Schools Superintendent
Deborah Cylke said that
while Tassone “deserves to
get his day in court,” he
would not be invited back to
substitute in the Pawtucket
School District.
“Even with minor com-
plaints, we don’t usually
invite them back,” she said.
YONKERS, N.Y. (AP)
— A commuter train that
derailed over the weekend,
killing four passengers, was
hurtling at 82 mph as it
entered a 30 mph curve, a
federal investigator said
Monday. But whether the
wreck was the result of
human error or brake trou-
ble was still unclear, he
said.
Asked why the train was
going so fast, National
Transportation Safety Board
member Earl Weener said:
"That's the question we
need to answer."
Weener said the informa-
tion on the locomotive's
speed was preliminary and
extracted from the Metro-
North train's two data
recorders, taken from the
wreckage after the Sunday
morning accident in the
Bronx.
He also said investigators
had begun interviewing the
crew members, but he
would not disclose what the
engineer had told them.
Weener said the throttle
went to idle six seconds
before the derailed train
came to a complete stop —
"very late in the game" for a
train going that fast" — and
the brakes were fully
engaged five seconds before
the train stopped.
He said investigators
were also examining the
engineer's cellphone —
apparently to determine
whether he was operating
the train while distracted.
Asked whether the
tragedy was the result of
human error or faulty
brakes, Weener said: "The
answer is, at this point in
time, we can't tell."
As investigators mined
the data recorders for infor-
mation, workers righted the
fallen cars along the curve,
a bend so sharp that the
speed limit during the
approach drops from 70
mph to 30 mph.
The wreck came two
years before the federal
government's deadline for
Metro-North and other rail-
roads to install automatic-
slowdown technology
designed to prevent cata-
strophic accidents. But with
the cause of Sunday's wreck
unknown, it was not clear
whether the technology
would have made a differ-
ence.
The engineer, William
Rockefeller, was injured and
"is totally traumatized by
everything that has hap-
pened," said Anthony
Bottalico, executive director
of the rail employees union.
He said Rockefeller, 46, was
cooperating fully with
investigators.
"He's a sincere human
being with an impeccable
record that I know of. He's
diligent and competent,"
Bottalico said. Rockefeller
has been an engineer for
about 11 years and a Metro-
North employee for about
20, he said.
The NTSB has been urg-
ing railroads for decades to
install technology that can
stop wrecks caused by
excessive speed or other
problems. Congress in 2008
required dozens of railroads,
including Metro-North, to
install the "positive train
control" systems by 2015.
But the systems are
expensive and complicated
and cannot prevent an acci-
dent if there is a brake fail-
ure. Railroads are trying to
push back the deadline a
few years.
The Metropolitan
Transportation Authority,
which runs Metro-North,
awarded $428 million in
contracts in September to
develop the system for
Metro-North and its sister
Long Island Rail Road. But
the MTA has asked for an
extension on the deadline to
2018, saying it faces techno-
logical and other hurdles in
installing such a system
across more than 1,000 rail
cars and 1,200 miles of
track.
While the train's seven
cars and locomotive were
gradually returned to their
tracks Monday, the 26,000
weekday riders on the rail-
road's affected Hudson Line
faced a complicated com-
mute.
Many used shuttle buses
and cars to get to work. But
no major delays were
reported during the early
rush hour, railroad
spokesman Aaron Donovan
said.
Marketing worker
Leanne Bloom normally
takes the Hudson Line to
work but drove to a stop on
another line instead. She
was surprised to find the
train nearly empty.
"I was expecting long
lines" at the station, she
said. "But I made it very
easily."
On Sunday, the train was
about half full, with about
150 people aboard, when it
ran off the rails around 7:20
a.m. while rounding a bend
where the Harlem and
Hudson rivers meet. The
lead car landed inches from
the water.
In addition to the four
people killed, more than 60
were injured.
works of art sold in the
state, according to a list of
guidelines..
The move came out of a
2013 Arts Charrette in
which over 100 people from
the arts community, govern-
ment and business came
together to discuss the role
the arts and culture could
play in the state’s economic
development strategy.
Making the sale of art
throughout the state exempt
from state sales tax was one
of the recommendations of
the charrette.
According to Randy
Rosenbaum, executive
director of the Rhode Island
State Council on the Arts
(RISCA), by declaring
Rhode Island the “State of
the Arts,” state policymak-
ers seek to promote the
state as a cultural destina-
tion. The idea, he said, is
that the exemption encour-
ages consumers to buy
more Rhode Island made
art, which will also translate
to increased visitors and
tourism dollars in general.
Rosenbaum noted that
the city of Pawtucket,
which is mentioned in the
Wall Street Journal article,
“has been a leader in its
effort to use the arts as part
of its economic develop-
ment strategy. And, the city
has gotten national attention
because of it.”
For the past 15 years,
Pawtucket city officials
have made strides to
encourage artists to both
come to Pawtucket to work
and to take up residences in
its vacant mills. With the
establishment of its Arts
District that runs through
the downtown, artists who
live and work in property
that is located there could
enjoy an exemption from
the state sales tax on their
works, and only have to pay
a federal sales tax.
The initiative had been
so successful, other mill
owners located outside of
the Arts District boundary
lines had been lobbying the
city to extend the Arts
District to encompass a
wider area, as had city lead-
ers in some other Rhode
Island communities. Now,
with the legislative change,
the entire state is essentially
an arts district and anyone
who produces original art,
no matter where they live or
work, can sell it sales tax
free.
Herb Weiss, Pawtucket’s
economic and cultural
affairs officer and a key
proponent in the city’s arts-
friendly initiatives, said,
“We’re happy that the state
ratcheted it up. It will put
the state on the map as an
arts destination. More peo-
ple will spend their vaca-
tions here and if they come
to Rhode Island to buy art,
they will also be spending
money on hotels, in restau-
rants and retail stores, buy-
ing gas, etc.
Weiss added that the
exemption “will most defi-
nitely help Pawtucket.” He
noted that other developers,
particularly with mills on
Mineral Spring Avenue and
in other parts of the city,
had been trying to get an
expansion of the Arts
District, in part, so the artist
tenants could enjoy the tax
free sales on their work.
Weiss added that while
the sales tax exemption is
statewide, Pawtucket still
offers an added benefit to
those who live in the city’s
designated Arts District
because they are eligible to
apply for a program where
they don’t have to pay taxes
to the state on any original
work that they sell, but only
pay federal taxes.
The new sales tax
exemption covers a wide
range of items that are con-
sidered “works of art,”
including paintings, limited
edition prints, photographs,
sculptures, and crafts, along
with books, plays, musical
and compositions, and
films. An “original work of
art” is defined as “the cre-
ation of a solitary work,
conceived and produced by
the artist or under their
direction, not intended for
multiple or mass produc-
tion.” Limited editions are
allowed if they are “signed
and numbered by the
artist.”
The law covers the sale
of art in Rhode Island, in
both traditional spaces such
as an art gallery studio or
coffee shop, of temporary
spaces such as pop-up gal-
leries or art festivals.
Because of the wide
range of items in the law
defined as “original works
of art,” the exemption also
extends to antiques.
Looking at the issue from a
different perspective is
Scott Davis, owner of
Rhode Island Antiques Mall
in Pawtucket. Davis oper-
ates one of the largest vol-
ume antiques dealerships in
New England, where he
rents space to dealers, and
handles all of the transac-
tions, including the charg-
ing of sales tax, as a serv-
ice.
Davis said that while he
agrees the sales tax exemp-
tion is a positive for the arts
community, he wonders if
legislative leaders have
fully thought it through
with the loss of revenue.
He said he found the rules
to be “very broad” and that
half of the inventory sold
under his roof could likely
fit under the current defini-
tion.
However, he notes that
between his high volume of
sales and the high prices
that many of his artwork
commands, he will be pay-
ing the state far less in sales
tax revenue than he has
been doing.
Davis also noted that
since he is responsible for
the paperwork involved in
the sales tax exemptions, he
is concerned that he is
going to be deluged with
record-keeping tasks that
could be required under
future tax audits. “It’s good
for me because it will help
me retain renters, and if
they sell more, then I have
happier dealers. But, if this
is going to require all kinds
of documentation, they are
going to run me for broke,”
he commented.
Davis credited Randy
Rosenbaum for meeting
with him in person at his
business to answer his
questions and allay his con-
cerns. Rosenbaum assured
him that many of the
antiques being sold at
Rhode Island Antiques Mall
do, indeed, meet the sales
tax exemption criteria.
Davis noted, however,
that on Sunday, the first day
of the sale, a customer
came to buy a $1,500 Etres
sculpture and said he knew
that he didn’t have to pay
any sales tax on it. Davis
said he expects the payment
of $6,000 to $10,000 in
annual sales tax that he typ-
ically makes to the state
will drop to something like
$2,000 or $3,000 under the
new exemption, and won-
ders if this is “a law of
unintended consequences.”
However, Rosenbaum
said that while the loss of
sales tax revenue from orig-
inal art might be felt in the
short-term, “the long-term
benefit will be positive for
our state.”
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FROMPAGE ONE/NATION
A2 THE TIMES Tuesday, December 3, 2013
LOTTERY
R.I. Daily
8-7-2-8
Mass. Daily
7-9-4-5
Megabucks
12/1
4-21-25-28-35
Check tomorrow’s
paper for late lotteries.
She said now is the time for
seniors who can use the assistance
to get on the list and be assigned a
volunteer by contacting her at
City Hall at 401-728-0500 ext.
241 (with voicemail available) or
by email at broberge@pawtuck-
etri.com.
The service will be provided on
a first-come basis pending avail-
ability of the youth volunteers,
whose parent or guardian must
sign a permission slip allowing
them to participate.
Approximately 50 seniors have
been provided snow-shoveling
help in each of the past two win-
ters, said Roberge, whose volun-
teer position was created by
Mayor Donald R. Grebien in 2011
as a go-to resource for seniors
seeking assistance and informa-
tion.
The youth snow-shovelers will
be assigned a senior in their local
neighborhood to whom they will
be committed through the winter
months.
Come spring, the volunteers
will be recognized with mayoral
citations at a ceremony in City
Hall.
“Every winter we’ve been able
to help a lot of seniors who might
otherwise have had nowhere to
turn,” Roberge said. “It’s also a
great program for the youths who
volunteer and take a lot of satis-
faction from helping out older
people in the community.”
According to the city snow
removal ordinance, snow must be
removed from sidewalks no more
than 12 hours of daylight after a
storm has ended, subject to fines
of $25 for a first offense.
Shovel
Tax
Teacher
NTSB: Train going too fast before it derailed on curve
Need an event pub-
lished? Have a holiday
fundraiser that needs
some attention? Send
the information to:
notices@pawtuckert-
times.com and The
Times will post it in the
“Community Calendar,”
“Holiday Bazaars” list
or “The Giving Season
feature.” For more infor-
mation call 401-767-
8550. Only events open
to the public will be
printed free of charge.
NEWS TO US
Christmas official recogni-
tion. Both he and his critics
showed up on the Fox
News Channel talking
about the curious controver-
sy.
Chafee acknowledged
that he just wants to get the
contentious quarrel behind
him.
“I want to get the focus
back on real issues that peo-
ple care about,” Chafee told
reporters on Monday.
For the first time in
recent memory, however, it
will not be the governor
who flips the switch at the
ceremonial lighting of the
tree this year. That responsi-
bility will be carried out by
Secretary of State Ralph
Mollis. Whether intentional
or not, the tree lighting this
year has been scheduled for
a date – Thursday at 5 p.m.
– when Chafee will be giv-
ing a speech at Princeton
University in New Jersey.
In a written statement
issued Monday morning,
Chafee said, “Despite the
myriad pressing issues fac-
ing Rhode Island and the
nation, this presumably
happy event became a focal
point for too much anger.
Strangely lost in the
brouhaha was any intellec-
tual discussion of the liber-
ties pioneered here in
Rhode Island 350 years ago
in our Charter. Because I do
not think how we address
the State House tree affects
our ‘lively experiment,’ this
year’s invitation calls the
tree a Christmas tree.”
All along, Chafee has
claimed he merely contin-
ued a tradition set by his
predecessors in using the
term “holiday tree,”
nonetheless it has burst into
headlines each yuletide sea-
son of his administration.
One of Chafee’s harshest
tormentors on the tree issue
was WPRO-AM talk host
John DePetro, who two
years ago convened an ad-
hoc chorus to sing “O
Christmas Tree” during the
lighting ceremony when a
children’s choir was singing
other carols.
“It looks like after two
years my work has finally
paid off,” DePetro told The
Times Monday. “It’s a step
in the right direction for the
state. Gov. Chafee has final-
ly found the Christmas spir-
it. There is still hope for
him left.” Up until now, he
said, “the governor has had
a tin ear on this issue that is
so easy to understand and
people are overwhelmingly
against.”
The fight over what to
call the tree, “really hin-
dered his ability to govern,”
DePetro said “because it is
one of those things people
are going to remember
about him.”
Tree
BOSTON (AP) — In the
five years since the
"Octomom" case, big multi-
ple births have gone way
down but the twin rate has
barely budged. Now fertility
experts are pushing a new
goal: One.
A growing number of
couples are attempting preg-
nancy with just a single
embryo, helped by new
ways to pick the ones most
likely to succeed. New
guidelines urge doctors to
stress this approach.
Twins aren't always twice
as nice; they have much
higher risks of prematurity
and serious health problems.
Nearly half of all babies
born with advanced fertility
help are multiple births, new
federal numbers show.
Abigail and Ken Ernst of
Oldwick, N.J., used the one-
embryo approach to con-
ceive Lucy, a daughter born
in September. It "just
seemed the most normal, the
most natural way" to con-
ceive and avoid a high-risk
twin pregnancy, the new
mom said.
Not all couples feel that
way, though. Some can only
afford one try with in vitro
fertilization, or IVF, so they
insist that at least two
embryos be used to boost
their odds, and view twins as
two for the price of one.
Many patients "are telling
their physicians 'I want
twins,'" said Barbara
Collura, president of
Resolve, a support and advo-
cacy group. "We as a society
think twins are healthy and
always come out great.
There's very little reality"
about the increased medical
risks for babies and moms,
she said.
The 2009 case of a
California woman who had
octuplets using IVF focused
attention on the issue of big
multiple births, and the num-
bers have dropped, except
for twins.
The Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention's
most recent numbers show
that 46 percent of IVF
babies are multiples— most-
ly twins —and 37 percent
are born premature. By com-
parison, only 3 percent of
babies born without fertility
help are twins and about 12
percent are preterm.
It's mostly an American
problem — some European
countries that pay for fertili-
ty treatments require using
one embryo at a time.
The American Society for
Reproductive Medicine is
trying to make it the norm in
the U.S., too. Its guidelines,
updated earlier this year, say
that for women with reason-
able medical odds of suc-
cess, those under 35 should
be offered single embryo
transfer and no more than
two at a time. The number
rises with age, to two or
three embryos for women up
to 40, since older women
have more trouble conceiv-
ing.
To add heft to the advice,
the guidelines say women
should be counseled on the
risks of multiple births and
embryo transfers and that
this discussion should be
noted in their medical
records.
"In 2014, our goal is real-
ly to minimize twins," said
Dr. Alan Copperman, med-
ical director of Reproductive
Medicine Associates of New
York, a Manhattan fertility
clinic. "This year I'm talking
about two versus one.
Several years ago I was talk-
ing about three versus two"
embryos.
The one-at-a-time idea is
catching on. Only 4 percent
of women under 35 used sin-
gle embryos in 2007 but
nearly 12 percent did in
2011. It's less common
among older women, who
account for fewer IVF preg-
nancies, but it is gaining
among them, too.
"Patients don't really want
multiples. What they want is
high delivery rates," said Dr.
Richard T. Scott Jr., scientif-
ic director for Reproductive
Medicine Associates of New
Jersey, which has seven clin-
ics in that state.
Better ways to screen
embryos can make success
rates for single embryos
nearly as good as when two
or more are used, he con-
tends. The new techniques
include maturing the
embryos a few days longer.
That improves viability and
allows cells to be sampled
for chromosome screening.
Embryos can be frozen to
allow test results to come
back and more precisely
time the transfer to the
womb.
Taking these steps with
single embryos results in
fewer miscarriages and tubal
pregnancies, healthier babies
with fewer genetic defects
and lower hospital bills from
birth complications, many
fertility specialists say.
Multiple studies back this
up. In May, doctors from the
New Jersey clinics did the
kind of research considered
a gold standard. They ran-
domly assigned 175 women
to have either a single
embryo transferred after
chromosome screening or
two embryos with no screen-
ing, as is done in most IVF
attempts now. Delivery rates
were roughly equivalent —
61 percent with single
embryos and 65 percent with
doubles.
More than half of the
double transfers produced
twins but none of the single
ones did. Babies from dou-
ble transfers were more like-
ly to be premature; more
than one-third spent time in
a neonatal intensive care unit
versus 8 percent of the oth-
ers.
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HEALTH
Tuesday, December 3, 2013 THE TIMES A3
Whitehouse feeling optimistic on Obamacare
By JIM BARON
jbaron@pawtuckettimes.com
EAST PROVIDENCE – Sen.
Sheldon Whitehouse has been
touting Rhode Island’s progress
with implementing the Affordable
Care Act – better known as
Obamacare – with Obama admin-
istration officials “to not only let
them know that Rhode Island is
getting it right, but to let them
know that’s a signal that they
should put more emphasis on dif-
ferent parts of the health care
equation.
“I have been all over the presi-
dent’s chief of staff (Denis
McDonough), I’ve raised it with
the president himself, I’ve been
after Chris Jennings, who is the
White House health care person,
and we’re having better and better
discussions.”
“While Washington is trans-
fixed by a botched website
launch, Rhode Island health care
leaders are steadily implementing
reforms that improve the quality
of care and can lower the cost for
Rhode Island patients,”
Whitehouse said. “Our state’s
leadership on health care reform
will help make health care more
efficient and affordable.”
The state’s junior senator is
convinced that, despite the shaky
start of the president’s signature
domestic initiative, Americans
will come to embrace it over
time.
“On the patients’ rights side,
like getting rid of the pre-existing
conditions limits, we’re already
there, nobody is ever going to go
back on that,” Whitehouse told
The Times Monday after conduct-
ing a roundtable discussion at
Coastal Medical on how reforms
have already improving health
care quality whole at the same
time lowering health care spend-
ing in the Ocean State.
“On the website,” — which
has been plagued with problems
since its scheduled Oct. 1 rollout
and is just now, according to
administration officials, ready to
allow large numbers of people to
choose a health insurance plan
online – “I think people have
short memories.” As soon as it is
working properly, the senator
said, people will forget about the
startup difficulties.
But it could be a couple of
more years, Whitehouse said,
before the third part of the plan,
the quality improvement reforms,
become apparent to patients. That
will be when every patient, “when
they see their doctor, when they
go to the hospital, can take a look
at the way they are treated and
think back to five, six or seven
years ago and say things have
really changed and I love it.”
Whitehouse said, “it is hard to
guess” what the political ramifi-
cations of the balky startup of
Obamacare might be. Republicans
see an opportunity to have an
advantage in the 2014 midterm
elections of senators and con-
gresspeople because of the diffi-
culties in implementing the law.
“A year is a long time,”
Whitehouse said. “If it is up and
running, it’s hard to see what a
big deal it is once the problem is
over. I think people looking
around at the Affordable Care Act
by that time will be much more
used to their kids being able to
stay on their policies after they
get out of college, their grand-
mother not having the dreaded
(Medicare Part D) doughnut hole
for pharmaceutical costs to face.
“The things that people see in
their lives, I think, are really
starting to sink in,” he added.
“Those reforms are lasting and
valuable and not to be taken
away.”
He said Monday’s roundtable
discussion was about “the silent
third” of the Affordable Care Act
which is actually improving the
quality of care for people. That is
going very, very well, and Rhode
Island is showing a lot of leader-
ship on that. I am proud of Rhode
Island.”
Follow Jim Baron on Twitter
@Jim_Baron
Says initial problems
will soon be forgotten
U.S. Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse
Women & Infants oncologist publishes ovarian cancer paper
Richard G. Moore, MD,
director of the Center for
Biomarkers and Emerging
Technologies and a gyneco-
logic oncologist with the
Program in Women’s
Oncology at Women &
Infants Hospital of Rhode
Island, is part of a team of
researchers publishing an
article this month on the use
of a chemoresponse assay to
guide the treatment of
women with persistent or
recurrent ovarian cancer.
The article was published
in the November issue of
the professional journal
Gynecologic Oncology and
illustrates how the team’s
use of a chemoresponse
assay on tissue samples
from ovarian tumors can
help tailor the most effective
treatment for them.
Dr. Moore, who is also a
professor of obstetrics and
gynecology at The Warren
Alpert Medical School of
Brown University, and the
team spent eight years
studying the assay’s effec-
tiveness in choosing course
of treatment in women with
platinum-sensitive and plat-
inum-resistant tumors.
Such tumors do not
respond to many types of
treatment and are labeled
“persistent,” or they return
after treatment, making
them “recurrent.”
The publication capped
the release of the results of
the eight-year study, which
showed that women diag-
nosed with ovarian cancer
who undergo cancer tumor
testing to determine the best
treatment have better sur-
vival rates than women who
do not.
“We demonstrated that
using a tissue sample from
the woman’s tumor and a
chemoresponse assay can
help us determine the best
treatment for her,” Dr.
Moore says. “Such testing
allows us to identify the
chemotherapeutics that are
active against the individual
patient’s disease and those
that are not, which would
result in decreased toxicity
from ineffective treatments.”
The use of such personal-
directed therapies increases
overall survival, making the
results of this work by Dr.
Moore and his team the first
in two decades to show a
significant impact on ovari-
an cancer survival. The
work was key in light of the
fact that epithelial ovarian
cancer is the leading cause
of gynecologic cancer
deaths in the United States.
“Despite the achievement
of high response rates,
improvements in survival
with aggressive surgical
debulking and the use of
platinum/taxane combina-
tion chemotherapy, the dis-
ease recurs in the majority
of the patients,” Dr. Moore
explains.
The study – which has
also been published in the
trade magazine Cure and
presented at a meeting of
the Society of Gynecologic
Oncology - was launched in
2004 and included 262
evaluable women. Their
biopsies were successfully
treated in vitro, or in a test
tube. The assay ChemoFx®
by Precision Therapeutics
tested up to 15 approved
treatment regimens on the
samples, identifying
chemotherapy drugs and
regimens to which each
tumor might be sensitive.
The study was non-interven-
tional, meaning that physi-
cians chose the treatment
regimens without knowing
the assay results.
“The assay identified at
least one treatment to which
the tumor would be sensi-
tive in 52% of patients in
the study,” Dr. Moore says.
“At the same time, it is
interesting to note that no
single treatment accounted
for more than 30% of the
treatments assessed in this
study, demonstrating the
lack of a standard care in
this patient population.”
Median survival for the
women in the study was
37.5 months for patients
with treatment-sensitive
tumors, compared to 23.0
months for intermediate and
resistant tumors.
For more information on
cancer treatment or appoint-
ments with Dr. Moore, call
the Program in Women’s
Oncology at (401) 453-
7520.
Women & Infants has
been designated as a Breast
Center of Excellence from
the American College of
Radiography; a Center for
In Vitro Maturation
Excellence by SAGE In
Vitro Fertilization; a Center
of Biomedical Research
Excellence by the National
Institutes of Health; and a
Neonatal Resource Services
Center of Excellence. It is
one of the largest and most
prestigious research facili-
ties in high risk and normal
obstetrics, gynecology and
newborn pediatrics in the
nation, and is a member of
the National Cancer
Institute’s Gynecologic
Oncology Group and the
National Institutes of
Health’s Pelvic Floor
Disorders Network.
Discusses survival
rates for women
with the affliction
Dr. Richard G. Moore
Robert McBroom has
been named Fatima
Hospital's 2013 Employee of
the Year. Robert is an operat-
ing room technician who has
been with Fatima since June
1987. A colleague described
him as: "knowledgeable,
precise, caring, very hard
working and a treasured
asset in our organization."
On Nov. 20, he was rec-
ognized along with other
hospital Employees of the
Year at the "Celebration of
Excellence" hosted by the
Hospital Association of
Rhode Island. Robert was
chosen for this honor after
having been named
Employee of the Quarter
earlier in the year.
Robert lives in North
Kingstown.
McBroom honored by Fatima Hospital
Stacey DelSasso, RN, has
been named Roger Williams
Medical Center's 2013
Employee of the Year.
Stacey is a surgical oncology
nurse known for delivering
excellent care while includ-
ing patients and families in
care planning to help speed
up the recovery process.
On Nov. 20, she was rec-
ognized along with other
hospital Employees of the
Year at the "Celebration of
Excellence" hosted by the
Hospital Association of
Rhode Island. Stacey was
chosen for this honor after
having been named
Employee of the Quarter
earlier in the year. Stacey
lives in Coventry with her
husband and their two chil-
dren.
DelSasso saluted at Roger Williams
Fertility doctors are attempting to lower rate of twin births
OPINION
THE TIMES — Tuesday, December 3, 2013
Page A4
PUBLISHER: Mary Lynn Bosiak
Executive Editor: Bianca Pavoncello
Managing Editor: David Pepin
Sports Editor: Eric Benevides
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Controller: Kathleen Needham
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Christianity has been used over the cen-
turies to prop up the powerful. But, from the
beginning, the Christian message has been
subversive of political systems, judgmental
toward those at the top
and demanding of all
who take it seriously.
Pope Francis has sur-
prised the world because
he embraces the
Christian calling to desta-
bilize and to challenge.
As the first leader of the
Catholic Church from the
Southern Hemisphere, he
is especially mindful of
the ways in which unregu-
lated capitalism has failed the poor and left
them “waiting.”
His apostolic exhortation, “The Joy of the
Gospel,” is drawing wide and deserved
attention for its denunciation of “trickle-
down” economics as a system that “express-
es a crude and naive trust in the goodness of
those wielding economic power.” It’s a view
that “has never been confirmed by the facts”
and has created “a globalization of indiffer-
ence.” Will those conservative Catholics
who have long championed tax-cutting for
the wealthy acknowledge the moral conun-
drum that Francis has put before them?
But American liberals and conservatives
alike might be discomfited by the pope’s
criticism of “the individualism of our post-
modern and globalized era,” since each side
defends its own favorite forms of individu-
alism. Francis mourns “a vacuum left by
secularist rationalism,” not a phrase that will
sit well with all on the left.
And in light of the obsessive shopping on
Cyber Monday and Black Friday, here is a
pope who paints consumerism in the darkest
of hues. “We are thrilled if the market offers
us something new to purchase,” he writes.
“In the meantime all those lives stunted for
lack of opportunity seem a mere spectacle;
they fail to move us.”
Yet this critic of our age refuses to be
gloomy, scolding “querulous and disillu-
sioned pessimists,” whom he labels “sour-
pusses.” I like a pope who takes a stand
against sourpusses.
Francis makes many liberals swoon, even
though he is not, in a conventional sense, a
liberal. He also has split American conserva-
tives between those trying to hold fast to
him and those who believe he is, from their
perspective, up to something dangerous.
All sides realize where the energy of
Francis’s pontificate lies. He’s not the first
pope to denounce our unjust economic sys-
tem. Pope John Paul II regularly decried
“imperialistic monopoly” and “luxurious
egoism.” Pope Benedict XVI condemned
“corruption and illegality” in “the conduct
of the economic and political class in rich
countries” while speaking approvingly of
“the redistribution of wealth.”
The difference is that a concern for the
poor and a condemnation of economic injus-
tice are at the very heart of Francis’s mis-
sion. “In this system, which tends to devour
everything which stands in the way of
increased profits,” he writes, “whatever is
fragile, like the environment, is defenseless
before the interests of a deified market,
which become the only rule.” Can you
imagine an American liberal who would
dare say such things?
Conservative American Catholics have
been quick to point out that toward the end
of “The Joy of the Gospel,” Francis strongly
affirms the church’s opposition to abortion.
This is, indeed, one of the ways in which he
is not a conventional liberal. He speaks of
“unborn children” as “the most defenseless
and innocent among us.” He insists that the
church’s position is not “ideological, obscu-
rantist and conservative,” but rather is
“linked to the defense of each and every
other human right.”
Yet almost immediately, he adds that “it
is also true that we have done little to ade-
quately accompany women in very difficult
situations” and quickly moves back to his
broader stand on behalf of “other weak and
defenseless beings who are frequently at the
mercy of economic interests or indiscrimi-
nate exploitation.”
It’s quite true that liberals who love
Francis need to come to terms with aspects
of his thought that may be less congenial to
their assumptions. But the high priority he
has placed on battling economic exploita-
tion, his emphasis on “education, access to
health care, and above all employment,” his
warnings against those who “remain intran-
sigently faithful to a particular Catholic
style from the past” and his unhappiness
with the rise of ultra-orthodoxy — he
upbraids “dour judges bent on rooting out
every threat and deviation” — test conserva-
tives even more.
In light of a recent past in which conser-
vatism was gaining the upper hand in the
U.S. Catholic church, progressives have rea-
son to be elated. Conservative Catholics
know this. That’s why they are torn between
expressing loyalty to a pope who has cap-
tured the popular imagination and fretting
over whether he is transforming the church
with a speed that few thought was possible.
E.J. Dionne is a syndicated columnist.
The heart of the
pope’s mission
The following editorial appeared in
Monday's edition of The Yomiuri
Shimbun:
The use of so-called quasi-legal drugs
must be checked from spreading further
among young people.
Abill to revise the Pharmaceutical
Affairs Law designed to ban the possession,
use and purchase of these hazardous sub-
stances has passed through the House of
Representatives.
The bill provides for imprisonment of up
to three years or a fine of up to 3 million
yen (about $29,000) for violations. It should
be passed into law as soon as possible so its
provisions can be enforced.
Quasi-legal drugs are not subject to laws
and regulations, despite the fact that people
who use them hallucinate or develop other
symptoms similar to those caused by nar-
cotics or stimulant drugs.
The drugs can cause serious health prob-
lems such as disturbed consciousness and
breathing difficulty. There have been a spate
of fatal cases. Last year, 209 people were
taken to the hospital by ambulance in Tokyo
alone after using the drugs, a marked
increase from the 11 such cases in the previ-
ous year.
In some cases, drivers who had used the
drugs struck and killed pedestrians. In one
case, a man who had used them intruded
into the premises of a primary school and
chased students around. The use of the drugs
should be considered a threat to public safe-
ty.
Also worrisome is the fact that the use of
such substances has spread among minors.
According to a survey of about 50,000
middle school students, 120 said they have
taken quasi-legal drugs. Sixty percent of the
users said they also took stimulant drugs.
This shows quasi-legal drugs may be
"gateway drugs."
As others see it: Quasi-legal drugs
Many people don't realize it, but there are
actually two Chinese ambassadors in
Washington: me and the panda cub at the
National Zoo. The cub, which on Sunday
was named Bao Bao, is the first baby panda
blessed by the first ladies of China and the
United States on the 100th day of its birth.
First ladies Peng Liyuan and Michelle
Obama both sent recorded video remarks for
the 100-day celebration party.
Several generations of giant pandas
have been part of the journey of China-
U.S. relations over the past four decades.
During President Richard Nixon's ground-
breaking trip to China in February 1972,
first lady Pat Nixon was seated next to
Chinese Premier Zhou Enlai at the state
banquet. Our premier pointed to a cigarette
pack decorated with pandas on the table in
front of them and asked, "Do you like it?"
Mrs. Nixon, a bit confused, replied: "Well,
I don't smoke." "I mean giant pandas," said
Premier Zhou. Two months after Mrs.
Nixon said "Of course! They are so cute!"
two pandas arrived at Washington's
National Zoo, where they were greeted by
Mrs. Nixon. Since then, pandas have been
sent and loaned to the United States as ges-
ture of good will.
Forty years on, China and the United
States collaborate closely in scientific
research about and conservation of giant pan-
das.
China has more pandas than any other
country, followed by the United States, which
has 15 pandas in zoos in Washington,
Atlanta, San Diego and Memphis. Because
it's very difficult for giant pandas to breed
naturally, Chinese and Americans have been
working hard on breeding through artificial
insemination; thanks to joint efforts, 12
panda cubs besides Bao Bao have been born
in the United States. Bao Bao's brother Tai
Shan is the first panda born in Washington
that survived infancy. When he and Mei Lan
departed for China in February 2010, thou-
sands of people braved heavy snow in
Washington to say goodbye. Tai Shan is in
very good condition at Wolong Panda Base
in Sichuan province, where scientists are try-
ing to determine whether he has fathered a
cub.
Pandas are a daily element in the lives of
many in Washington, where some Metro
farecards display a panda image. But pandas
not only transcend our countries' cultural dif-
ferences, they also merge them. The anima-
tion film "Kung Fu Panda," for example,
combines Hollywood technique and Chinese
element.
Bao Bao, a clear envoy of China-U.S.
friendship, is so popular that more than
123,000 people participated in online voting
to pick her name. Bao Bao was born at a
time when our two countries are determined
to build a new model of win-win coopera-
tion.
In "Kung Fu Panda," the lead character,
Po, is enlightened when his master quotes the
saying "Yesterday is history. Tomorrow is
mystery. But today is a gift, that is why it is
called the present."
If we seize the present, tomorrow will not
be a mystery. We have the power to give
meaning to today's reality, and therein lies the
chance for a better future. Like the panda
hero in the film, we can make ourselves
stronger through cooperation with partners.
Cui Tiankai is China's ambassador to the
United States.
Peace through pandas
Give and take
GUEST COMMENTARY
By Cui Tiankai
E.J. Dionne
hanksgiving is over, the
leftovers are nearly con-
sumed and most everyone
has survived “Black
Friday,” “Small Business
Saturday” and “Cyber
Monday.” It’s the most wonderful
time of the year — the holidays —
or as some like to call it: “The Giving
Season.”
As little kids we are all taught it is
better to give than to receive. Then
we are shuffled off for a visit with
Santa Claus to run down our wish list
of things we want to find wrapped up
in bright paper and bows under the
Christmas tree.
We send out holiday cards, wish
those who celebrate other religions
best wishes and good cheer and
engage in gift exchanges, parties and
family get-togethers.
The message of give-to-get isn’t
lost on any generation. But it seems
that the balance has been tilted
toward the “get” side of things the
last few years.
Case in point: There were numer-
ous coat drives last Friday to coincide
with Black Friday. Dubbed “Buy
Nothing Day,” the idea was that
donated coats and jackets were to be
given away to those who needed
them, but couldn’t afford to purchase
one.
It’s a great idea. Give something
you aren’t using to someone who
could really use it.
One of the coat drives was in front
of the Rhode Island Statehouse.
Students and adult volunteers carted
bags and boxes of gently-used or new
coats to the site in downtown
Providence. Each person who came to
claim a coat was told that it was “one
coat per customer please,” so every-
one who needed one would be able to
find one.
Then things became a little chaotic.
As it turns out, a lesson in giving
back for the students and volunteers
turned into a lesson on greed and
entitlement.
A few of the folks who turned out
to receive a free coat actually tried to
grab more than one. At least one per-
son allegedly thought that taking sev-
eral coats to resell later might be a
lucrative deal.
Some of the people who thought
they were doing a good deed were
surprised by such selfish acts. Most
were disappointed.
However, many children and adults
who needed a winter coat or jacket
did receive one free of charge. The
intent to help one’s fellow man,
woman or child was accomplished,
but the actions of a few people to take
advantage of the situation tainted the
event for those who just wanted to
help.
There are many ways to “give” this
holiday season. Some donate cash,
some donate food or other goods,
some donate their time or services.
A gift is truly a gift if it is given
with no strings or expectations
attached, even if that means the per-
son on the receiving end seems
ungrateful.
However, to all those volunteers at
the Statehouse on Friday and to the
many others who continually offer
assistance: Thank you.
During the holiday season and
throughout the year, we should all
remember that the good feeling that
comes from doing something kind for
another is really the best gift of all.
T
By RUSS OLIVO
rolivo@woonsocketcall.com
BLACKSTONE – After
chipping away at the project
for five years, the
Blackstone Valley Boys &
Girls Club is just days away
from opening its new “ice-
less” skating rink to the
public.
The rink is one of the
only skating facilities of its
kind in the area that
employs a high-tech poly-
mer skating surface instead
of real ice. The companies
that market the grainy,
milky-white surface say the
experience of skating on it
is almost indistinguishable
from real ice, but it’s a lot
cheaper to maintain.
“Think about it,” says
Dan Doyle, longtime chair-
man of the club. “I don’t
have to buy a refrigeration
unit. I don’t have to invest
in a Zamboni.”
The rink is worth about
$250,000, but it cost the
club next to nothing. As
Doyle explains, the rink is
as much a symbol of civic
generosity as it is a place to
skate.
Some of the donations
have come from places
known for their philanthrop-
ic ways, others, not so
much. On Monday, for
example, prison inmates
from Worcester County
House of Corrections in
West Boylston were pound-
ing the last few panels of
synthetic ice into place with
rubber mallets.
LINCOLN – A 47-year-
old local man was charged
with pay evasion for a taxi-
cab fare after allegedly tak-
ing a cab ride from the
Twin River casino and then
jumping out of the vehicle a
short distance away and not
paying the driver, according
to police.
Kirk A. Beane of Great
Road was charged with mis-
demeanor pay evasion and
willful trespassing in con-
nection with the 1:45 a.m.
incident Thanksgiving Day,
according to police.
Twin River security per-
sonnel attempted to have
Beane leave the casino in
the cab after observing him
to be in an intoxicated state
at the West entrance of
Twin River. Beane was
alleged to have agreed to
take the taxi, and one was
called to pick him up,
according to Patrolman
Ryan J. Laboissonniere,
investigating officer.
Beane was also advised
he was no longer welcome
at the Twin River property
and advised not to come
back that night, police said.
After entering and leav-
ing Twin River in a Quality
Cab from Central Falls,
Beane was reported to have
jumped from the vehicle at
the intersection of Route
246 and Twin River Road,
police said.
Twin River surveillance
located the patron in the
area of the valet parking lot,
and Laboissonniere and
Patrolman Richard
Bousquet responded to
location and took him into
custody on the pay evasion
charge, according to police.
He was processed at
police headquarters on the
charges and released to a
friend on a summons to
appear in Third District
Court on Dec. 6, police
said.
In other matters:
• A missing front regis-
tration plate resulted in a
23-year-old Manville
woman’s arrest on an out-
standing warrant for failure
to appear in District Court.
Jordan Rosetta Lee of
Railroad Street, Manville,
was observed driving on
Great Road and Breakneck
Hill Road, and did not stop
for Patrolman Bradley W.
Stewart until after she
began driving north on
Route 146, police said.
A male passenger in the
vehicle, Brian T. Williams,
34, of Railroad Street, was
found to have an active
warrant from Third District
Court, and also a no-contact
order against contact with
Lee, police said. He was
charged with violating a no-
contact order and also
processed on the outstand-
ing warrant, police said.
Lee was issued a sum-
mons over the display of
registration plates and also
cited for operating without
evidence of insurance, and
failure to wear a seat belt in
addition to being processed
on the warrant for a West
Warwick police shoplifting
charge, police said.
She was issued a sum-
mons to appear at the
Rhode Island Traffic
Tribunal on the motor vehi-
cle violations and sent to
the ACI women’s Intake
Center to await a hearing on
the warrant, police said.
Williams was transported to
the ACI Intake Center to
await a hearing on his war-
rant, police said.
• Henry Lincoln Richard
III, 34, of Old River Road,
was charged with a felony
charge of driving a vehicle
without the consent of the
owner Sunday afternoon
after his mother reported
her vehicle stolen earlier in
the day.
Richard was arraigned
before a justice of the peace
on the charge, police said.
• Jason R. Magnan, 30,
of Sherman Farm Road,
was charged with domestic
simple assault and battery
after a disturbance at the
Sherman Farm Road resi-
dence at 7:21 p.m. on
Wednesday, police said.
Funeral Home
Directory
Charles Coelho Funeral Home
151 Cross Street, Central Falls, RI 02863
401-724-9440
Cook-Hathaway Funeral Home
160 Park Street, Attleboro, MA02703
508-222-7700
Foley-Hathaway Funeral Home
126 South Main St., Attleboro, MA02703
508-222-0498
Duffy-Poule Funeral Home
20 Peck Street, Attleboro, MA02703
508-222-0193
Diamond Funeral Home
180 N. Washington Street, North
Attleboro, MA02760 • 508-695-5931
Dyer-Lake Funeral Home
161 Commonwealth Avenue, North Attleboro,
MA02763 • 508-695-0200
Sperry & McHoul Funeral Home
15 Grove Street, N. Attleboro, MA02760
508-695-5651
Darlington Mortuary of
L. Heroux & Sons, Inc.
1042 Newport Avenue, Pawtucket, RI 02861
401-722-4376
Keefe Funeral Home
5 Higginson Avenue, Lincoln, RI 02865
401-725-4253
Lincoln Funeral Home
1501 Lonsdale Ave., Lincoln, RI 02865
401-726-4117
Karol A. Romenski Funeral Home
342 High Street, Central Falls, RI 02863
401-722-7250
R.W. Chatigny Funeral Home
151 Cross Street, Central Falls, RI 02863
401-725-7756
J.J. Duffy Funeral Home
757 Mendon Road, Cumberland, RI 02864
401-334-2300
Perry-McStay Funeral Home
2555 Pawtucket Avenue, E. Providence,
RI 02914 • 401-434-3885
Rebello Funeral Home
901 Broadway, E. Providence, RI 02914
401-434-7744
Raymond Watson Funeral Home
350 Willett Ave., E. Providence, RI 02915
401-433-4400
J.H. Williams Funeral Home
210 Taunton Avenue, E. Providence, RI 02915
401-434-2600
Bellows Funeral Chapel
160 River Road, Lincoln, RI 02865
401-723-9792
Cheetham Funeral Home
1012 Newport Avenue, Pawtucket, RI 02861
401-725-4525
Costigan-O’Neill Funeral Home
220 Cottage Street, Pawtucket, RI 02860
401-723-4035
Lachapelle Funeral Home
643 Main Street, Pawtucket, RI 02860
401-724-2226
Manning-Heffern Funeral Home
68 Broadway, Pawtucket, RI 02860
401-723-1312
Merrick Williams Funeral Home
530 Smithfield Avenue, Pawtucket, RI 02860
401-723-2042
Prata Funeral Home
220 Cottage Street, Pawtucket, RI 02860
401-722-8324
William Tripp Funeral Home
1008 Newport Avenue, Pawtucket, RI 02861
401-722-2140
Russell Boyle Funeral Home
331 Smith Street, Providence, RI 02908
401-272-3100
Mariani & Son Funeral Home
200 Hawkins Street, Providence, RI 02904
401-861-5432
O’Neill Funeral Home
3102 Mendon Road, Cumberland, RI 02864
401-658-1155
Thank You Novenas
For Favors or Prayers Answered
Call 401-365-1438
To place your ad in this publication
(Sample ads.
Many others to
choose from)
PRAYER TO THE
BLESSED VIRGIN
Oh Most Beautiful Flower of Mt.
Carmel, fruitful vine, splendor of
Heaven, Blessed Mother of the Son
of God, Immaculate Virgin, assist
me in this, my necessity. Oh Star of
the Sea, help me and show me here
you are my Mother, Oh Holy Mary,
Mother of God, Queen of Heaven
and Earth, I humbly beseech you
from the bottom of my heart to
secure me in my necessity (make
request). There are none that can
withstand your power. Oh Mary,
conceived without sin, pray for us
who have recourse to thee (3 times).
Holy Mary, I place this prayer in
your hands (3 times). Say this prayer
for three consecutive days and then
you must publish it and it will be
granted to you.
L.L.
$
2
0
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0
0
May the Sacred Heart of
Jesus be adored, glorified,
loved and preserved
throughout the world now
and forever. Sacred Heart of
Jesus, pray for us.
St. Jude, help of the
hopeless pray for us. St. Jude
worker of miracles pray for
us.
Thank You St. Jude.
B.Z.
ST. JUDE’S NOVENA
$
1
5
.
0
0
Thank You Blessed
Virgin Mary for
favor granted.
N.M. & R.B.
$
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THE TIMES
ADVERTISING DEADLINES
FOR
MEMORIAMS
BIRTHDAY REMEMBRANCES
AND HAPPY BIRTHDAYS
Materials Are Needed
3 Business Days Prior To Run Date
Any Questions or For More Information
Please Call:
Christina at
(401) 767-8502
Anniversary Remembrance
Remembered & Missed
Love, Carole
Catherine
Kabbaze
Dec. 3, 1997
Sixteenth
Anniversary
Louis
Kabbaze
Dec. 3, 2008
Fifh
Anniversary
LOCAL
Tuesday, December 3, 2013 THE TIMES A5
New York pair face
credit card fraud
charges after arrest
By JOSEPH B. NADEAU
jnadeau@woonsocketcall.com
LINCOLN – The alleged
use of fraudulent credit
cards at the Target store at
the Lincoln Mall Saturday
evening resulted in the arrest
of two New York men on
felony credit card charges,
according to Police Captain
Philip Gould.
Yvener Jean-Baptiste, 26,
of Brooklyn, and Zacky
Taylor, 24, of Copiague,
N.Y., were charged with
theft (obtaining credit
cards), counterfeiting and
forgery, and a second felony
charge of conspiracy, Gould
said.
The pair is alleged to
have obtained thousands of
dollars in stolen proceeds
through a scheme of using
the fraudulent credit cards to
obtain gift cards, according
to Gould.
Jean-Baptiste and Taylor
were arrested in the parking
lot of Target as they left the
store at about 5:30 p.m.,
Gould said.
“They were found in
possession of illegally
obtained gift cards and cred-
it cards, and the matter is
being investigated further by
our department and other
agencies,” Gould said.
Lincoln Det. Lt. William
Sexton, and Det. Walter
Ptaszek are working the
investigation for the local
department, Gould added.
The ongoing investigation
is looking into how the sus-
pects obtained the credit
cards used in the fraudulent
purchases, according Gould.
With the case surfacing
at the peak of the holiday
buying season, Gould sug-
gested credit card users
should remain vigilant for
any unusual activity on their
cards.
“People should keep a
close eye on their accounts
and monitor their credit card
statements,” he said. “They
may not be paying attention
to some of the smaller
amounts and they should be
sure all the activity taking
place with their accounts is
from purchases they are
making,” Gould said.
Suspects caught
at Lincoln Mall
Lincoln man charged
with jumping cab fare
LINCOLN – The Panera
Bread Restaurant on
George Washington
Highway will be participat-
ing in a fundraiser benefit-
ing the Lincoln Public
Schools today from 11:30
a.m. to 1:30 p.m., accord-
ing to Lincoln High School
Principal Kevin J.
McNamara.
A $10 donation will get
participating patrons a
complete lunch, bakery
item and beverage,
McNamara said.
Proceeds of the
fundraiser will benefit the
Lincoln Public Schools, he
said.
Restaurant fundraiser today
to benefit Lincoln schools
PAWTUCKET — The
Delaney St. Teresa’s
Council #57 of the Knights
of Columbus will be hold-
ing its annual “Keep Christ
in Christmas Breakfast” on
Sunday, Dec. 15 from 8
a.m. to 12 p.m. in the St.
Teresa’s Church hall, 358
Newport Ave., Pawtucket.
Ticket prices are $7 for
adults and $4 for children
ages 3-12.
The menu will include
eggs, homefries, pancakes,
their famous K of C beans,
and assorted pastries. Santa
Claus will also be making a
visit.
As the Delaney Council
#57 has done in the past, all
of the proceeds from the
breakfast will be donated to
The Times’ Merry
Christmas Fund. Since
2007, Council #57 has
donated over $7,800 to the
Merry Christmas Fund,
which helps the Salvation
Army of Pawtucket provide
assistance throughout the
Blackstone Valley.
Pawtucket Knights’ breakfast
to aid Merry Christmas Fund
Pawtucket man arrested after dispute
By DONNA KENNY KIRWAN
dkirwan@pawtuckettimes.com
CENTRAL FALLS — A
Pawtucket man was arrested on
domestic assault charges and resisting
arrest after a patrol officer witnessed
him arguing with his female compan-
ion in the middle of Cross Street near
Broad Street early Sunday morning.
According to Central Falls Police,
Sgt. Joseph Tougas was on patrol at
around 1:42 a.m. when he saw a
vehicle stopped in the middle of
Cross Street and a man and woman
standing outside of the car arguing.
He said he witnessed the man, identi-
fied as Luis F. Zapata, push the
woman twice, and yell at her while a
child inside the car was crying and
yelling for them to “stop.”
Tougas said Zapata, who appeared
to be drunk and extremely agitated,
refused to answer his questions and
tried to strike him twice. After calling
for backup and being placed into cus-
tody, Tougas said that Zapata tried to
kick him in the crotch.
However, police said that the
female victim refused to provide any
information regarding the altercation
and argument or sign any paperwork
regarding the incident.
Based on the officers’ observa-
tions, Zapata, 44, of 139 Mulberry
St., was charged with domestic —
simple assault, domestic — disorder-
ly conduct and resisting arrest, police
said.
THEY NEED YOUR CLOTHES
Submitted photo
Local 670, Council 94 AFSCME recently contributed $100 for the upcoming WAM (Woonsocket Awareness Movement) cloth-
ing drive for homeless. From left, Local 670 members Chris Jarvis, Brian Cote, James Walker, WAM Chairman Dan Darling,
Local 670 president, and Sean Robbin. The clothing drive will be held Saturday, Dec. 14 from 9a.m. to noon at the
Woonsocket Recycle Center on River Street. They are looking for donations of men’s, women’s and children’s winter coats,
hats, gloves, sleeping bags, toothpaste, toothbrushes and winter socks Those with questions may contact James Walker at
401-636-2649.
Skaters to take to synthetic surface in Blackstone
PRESENTS YOUR COMMUNITY CALENDAR
Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday
Send your community events to notices@pawtuckettimes.com
1 2 3 4 6 5 7
Woonsocket
•The third annual “Night of
Sonnet and Song – On a
Graceful Journey” at St. Ann Arts
& Cultural Center, 84
Cumberland St. Doors open at
5:30pm. This inspirational World
AIDS Day event will include food,
music, penny social, poetry
readings, door prizes, and
resource information. This event
is free event open to the public;
donations are appreciated. 401-
235-6092 or
lcohen@famresri.org for addition-
al information.
•Milk Fund benefit event at The
Gym LLC, 2168 Diamond Hill
Road, 8 a.m. Run/walk to the
Bocce Club and enjoy a free
breakfast and walk/run back .
$10 donation goes to the Milk
Fund. First 75 participants
receive T-shirts. Vendors from 9
a.m. to noon.
•Blackstone Valley Polar
Express, tours at 1 and 4 p.m.
leavign from One Depot Square.
Tickets online at www.black-
stonevalleypolarexpress.com or
call 401-724-2200.
Woonsocket
• “Buenas Noches for the Milk
Fund” at The Burrito Company,
104 Cass Ave., cocktails 6 p.m,.
dinner, 6:30. Hosted by WNRI’s
Roger Bouchard. $20 includes
dinner, entertainment and Mexican
themed raffle baskets. Tickets
available at The Burrito Company,
786 Diamond Hill Road.
Woonsocket
• Cash Mob, gathering at 6 p.m.
at Walnut Hill Plaza Parking Lot,
1500 Diamond Hill Road. Two
local business will be announced
at 6:15. Each member agrees to
spend $20 at each location.
Sponsored by The Blackstone
Valley Independent Business
Alliance and the Northern RI
Chamber of Commerce.
Pawtucket
• The Leon Mathieu Senior
Center and Shri Studio have
partnered to offer a “Yoga for
Seniors” on Tuesday mornings
from 9:30am-10:30am at Shri
Studio, 21 Broad Street. The fee
for Leon Mathieu Senior Center
members is $5 per person per
month. 728-7582.
Cumberland
• Teen Anime Club at the
Cumberland Public Library,
every Tuesday from 6:30 to
7:30 p.m. for teens 13+. Watch
anime and have a snack, draw,
play games and meet special
gifts.
Woonsocket
•Harris Public Library hosts
Creative Writing Group
Wednesdays, 7:30 p.m.
Central Falls
• Forand Manor holds Bingo
every Monday and Wednesday,
starting at 5:15 p.m.
Burrillville
•Jesse M. Smith Library in
Harrisville Wreath Making
Workshop. Join URI Master
Gardener, Lee Menard, and
make a beautiful holiday wreath
out of natural materials.
Registration is required and can
be done by phone (710-7800) or
in person.
Blackstone
•Calling all area musicians to
join the newly formed BMR
Alumni and Friends Band. Meet
at 6:30 at BMR auditorium on
Dec. 4, 11 and 18. Call 508-
883-1291 for more information.
Glocester
• Candleligth shopping in
Chepachet, presented by the
Glocester Heritage Society, 6 to
9 p.m. Local shops will be dec-
orated for the season and the
streets will be lighted with our
new antique street lights.The
sounds of holiday music and
carolers will add to the old fash-
ioned ambiance that folks have
enjoyed for many years.
www.candlelightshopping.com.
Woonsocket
• Italian Buffet Dinner to benefit
the Milkd Fund at the Italian
Workingman’s Club, 947
Diamond Hill Road, 5:30 to
7:30 p.m. $10 adults, $6 ages
3-12.
• Written Word Writing Group
Thursdays, 7:15 p.m. at Harris
Public Library. An outlet for adult
writers of all leanings: poetry,
journaling, prose, short story,
sermon, comedy, script writing,
puppets. No critiquing. All are
welcome and there is no
charge.
Burrillville
• The RI Stage Ensemble pres-
ents “Miracle on 34th Street” at
7:30 p.m. Ticket are $15 on the
website, ristage.org, and at the
door. Discounts available for sen-
iors, students and vets.
• Christmas bazaar at Pine
Grove Health Center, 999 South
Main St., Pascoag, Dec. 6 and
7, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Crafts,
penny social, baked goods, jew-
lery, children’s room, raffles and
more. Dynamites, chips, and
drinks available.
Woonsocket
•Blackstone Valley Polar
Express, tours at 4 and 7 p.m.
leaving from One Depot Square.
Tickets online at www.black-
stonevalleypolarexpress.com or
call 401-724-2200.
•Cercle Laurier will host and all-
you-can-eat beer and dynamite
Milk Fund benefit event from 6 to
9 p.m., featuring a DJ and raf-
fles. All proceeds raised will be
donated to The Milk Fund.
Woonsocket
•Woonsocket Historical Society
annual Christmas Open House, 1
to 4 p.m. Public invited. 42 South
Main St., garden level.
•Annual Boudoir Bingo to benefit
the Milk Fund, Athena’s, 640
Winter St. Doors open at 7 p.m.
$10 per person for 10 games,
50/50 raffle and raffle gift basket.
Register by calling 762-6110 ext.
12.
Lincoln
•Davies High School 2nd annual
Holiday Bazaar, 9am-3pm, 50
Jenckes Hill Road.
•The Cumberland-Lincoln
Community Chorus will perform a
Holiday Concert, 7 p.m. at the
Blackstone Valley Historical
Society, 1873 Louisquisset Pike.
$10. www.bvhsri.org
Pawtucket
•The Times Jingle Mingle, 7 to
11 p.m. at Lefoyer Club, 151
Fountain St. Benefit for the
Pawtucket Times Merry
Christmas Fund supporting the
Salvation Army. Buffet with music.
767-8525 for reservations.
DECEMBER
8 9 10 11 13 12 14
Woonsocket
•Club Par-X Breakfast to benefit
the Milk Fund, 36 Stanley Ave.,
8 a.m. to noon. $8 adults, $5
ages 3-12. Penny social, raffles
and prizes. Tickets at the door or
by calling chairperson Susan
Tessier-MacKenzie, 487-4136.
Cumberland
• The Lusitania Boys U15
Soccer Team hosts its first holi-
day fair at Club Lusitania, 10
Chase St., from 10 a.m. to 3
p.m. A donation of a non-perish-
able food item would be appreci-
ated. More than 45 local crafters
and vendors.
• 2nd annual Irish Dance
Spectacular featuring dancers
from Tir Na Nog Irish Dance at
Blackstone River Theatre, 2-5
p.m. $12 advance, $15 at the
door. www.riverfolk.org.
Pawtucket
•The Ladies Auxiliary to the
Major Walter Gatchell VFW Post
#306 hold their annual
Christmas Bingo, 171 Fountatin
St. Doors open at 11 a.m., bingo
starts at 1.
Cumberland
•The Cumberland Library hosts
“As Seen on Pinterest: Holiday Gif
Tags and More,” 6:30 p.m. Make
unique gift tags and more to add to
your holiday presents. Space is
limited, register online or by calling
(401) 333-2552 ext. 2.
•AARP Cumberland Chapter
4646 Christmas Party, St.
Joseph’s Hall, 1303 Mendon
Road. Business meeting begins at
11 a.m., followed by a luncheon
from Davenport’s Restaurant.
Central Falls
•Forand Manor holds Bingo every
Monday and Wednesday, starting
at 5:15 p.m.
Bellingham
• Reading with Indy, 6:30 to 7:30
p.m. at the Bellingham Public
Library. Indy, a certified reading
therapy dog will be at the library on
Mondays. Children sign up for 15
minutes to read to Indy. All ages
welcome. Please register only one
time per month in order to give
other children opportunities to
read.
Pawtucket
•Pawtucket Veterans Council of
RI, in conjuntion with Korean
War Veterans Chapter 1, will
hold a Christmas dinner party at
7 p.m. at Hose Company #6,
636 Central Ave. For information
or to RSVP call Jim Hollis at
333-2928 or Jim Robbins at
837-2450. RSVP by Dec. 2.
Woonsocket
• Christmas at the Pillsbury
House to benefit the Milk Fund,
341 Prospect St., 7 to 9 p.m.
Hors d’oeuvres and refresh-
ments. Tours of the house by
owner Roger Bouchard. Piano
music. $35 per person. Limited
number of tickets available.
Cumberland
• Teen Candy Sushi Class at the
Cumberland Public Library, 5:30
p.m. Space is limited. Register
online, at the library or by calling
(401) 333-2552 ext. 2. Ages
11-18 welcome.
Woonsocket
•Main Street Holiday Stroll, 4:30
to 7:30 p.m. Family friendly enter-
tainment, including carolers,
horse and buggy rides, arts and
crafts, fireworks and Santa’s
arrival. www.rihs.org.
•Harris Public Library hosts
Creative Writing Group
Wednesdays, 7:30 p.m..
Northbridge
• The Blackstone Valley Coin and
Collectables Club hosts a coin
show at Brian’s Restaurant in
Whitinsville from 3 to 8 p.m. All are
welcome.
Burrillville
• The Commissioners of the
Burrillville Housing Authority will
meet in regular session at the
Burrillville Housing Authority com-
munity room, Ashton Court,
Harrisville, at 6:30 p.m.
Blackstone
•Calling all area musicians to join
the newly formed BMR Alumni
and Friends Band. Meet at 6:30
at BMR auditorium on Dec. 4, 11
and 18. Call 508-883-1291 for
more information.
Woonsocket
• Dinner and Christmas with
Kitty Litter at the Stadium
Theatre, 6:30 p.m. An evening
of holiday cheer and drag come-
dy with the self-proclaimed first
lady of Providence Ms. Kitty
Litter. www.stadiumtheatre.com.
• Written Word Writing Group
Thursdays, 7:15 p.m. at Harris
Public Library. An outlet for adult
writers of all leanings: poetry,
journaling, prose, short story,
sermon, comedy, script writing,
puppets. No critiquing. All are
welcome and there is no
charge.
Millville
• Blackstone Valley Community
Concert Band holiday concert at
7 p.m., at St. John’s Episcopal
Church, 49 Central St. A free-
will offering will be taken.
Lincoln
• Scholastic Book and Vendor
Fair, Dec. 12-14 at the Family
Literacy Center, 12 Parkway,
Manville. Holiday gifts to pur-
chase and a visit from Santa.
www.flcri.org.
Burrillville
• Pascoag Council, 383,
Knights of Columbus Friday
Night Bingo at the Columbus
Club, 98 Roosevelt Ave. Games
begin at 6:20 p.m.; doors open
at 4:30 p.m.
• The RI Stage Ensemble pres-
ents “Miracle on 34th Street” at
7:30 p.m. Ticket are $15 on the
website, ristage.org, and at the
door.
Woonsocket
•”A Christmas Carol” presented
by Encore Repertory Company
at The Stadium Theatre, 7:30
p.m. www.stadiumtheatre.com.
•Blackstone Valley Polar
Express, tours at 4 and 7 p.m.
leaving from One Depot Square.
Tickets online at www.black-
stonevalleypolarexpress.com or
call 401-724-2200.
Lincoln
• Scholastic Book and Vendor
Fair, Dec. 12-14 at the Family
Literacy Center, 12 Parkway,
Manville. Holiday gifts to pur-
chase and a visit from Santa.
www.flcri.org.
Millville
•Third annual Magic of
Christmas Celebration at St.
Augustine Parish, 17 Lincoln St.
Christmas craft fair from 10 a.m.
to 2 p.m. Crafters, vendors, raf-
fles and food. North Pole
Carnival on Dec. 15 from 11:30
a.m. to 2 p.m. Games, relays,
Santa visit, lunch and more.
Pawtucket
•Park Place Congregational
Church, UCC, 71 Park Place,
hosts a Holiday Harmonies
Cabaret. Doors open at 6:30
p.m., dinner at 6:30, show at
7:15. Donations: $18 adults,
$5 children 5-12, free under
5. Reservations at 726-2800
by Dec. 11 at 3 p.m.
Burrillville
•”Santa at Stillwater” event at
Stillwater Mill Center.
Snowman building contest
from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.,
Santa arrives at 1. Burrillville
Animal Shelter will be collect-
ing donations of pet products
under the Pavilion.
15 16 17 18 20 19 21
Millville
•Third annual Magic of
Christmas Celebration at St.
Augustine Parish, 17 Lincoln St.
North Pole Carnival from 11:30
a.m. to 2 p.m. Games, relays,
Santa visit, lunch and more.
•Community lessons and carols
at St. John Episcopal Church, 49
Central St. Free-will offering for
local food bank. All are welcome.
Bellingham
•The First Baptist Church of
Bellingham will hold its Live
Nativity from 4 to 8 p.m.
Snow date Dec. 22. Animalas,
refreshments, crafts for kids.
Free event. All are welcome.
East Providence
•St. Margaret Parish choirs per-
form a Christmas concert at 4
p.m., 1098 Pawtucket Ave.,
Rumford. Free, open to public.
Pawtucket
•Delaney St. Teresa’s Council
57 annual Keep Christ in
Christmas breakfast, 8 a.m. to
noon, St. Teresa’s church hall.
$7 adults, $4 children.
East Providence
•Historical Society Holiday Turkey
Dinner and free public concert, 6
p.m. at Newman Church Hall,
Rumford. Must make reservations
in advance to attend dinner. 438-
1750.
Woonsocket
• Dinner and Messages of Hope
and Love with spiritual medium
Roland Comtois at the Stadium
Theatre, 6:30 p.m. www.stadi-
umtheatre.com.
Central Falls
•Forand Manor holds Bingo every
Monday and Wednesday, starting
at 5:15 p.m.
Bellingham
• Reading with Indy, 6:30 to 7:30
p.m. at the Bellingham Public
Library. Indy, a certified reading
therapy dog will be at the library on
Mondays. Please register only one
time per month.
Pawtucket
• The Leon Mathieu Senior
Center and Shri Studio have
partnered to offer a “Yoga for
Seniors” on Tuesday mornings
from 9:30am-10:30am at Shri
Studio, 21 Broad Street. The fee
for Leon Mathieu Senior Center
members is $5 per person per
month. 728-7582.
Central Falls
• Forand Manor holds Bingo
every Monday and Wednesday,
starting at 5:15 p.m.
Woonsocket
•Harris Public Library hosts
Creative Writing Group
Wednesdays, 7:30 p.m.
Blackstone
•Calling all area musicians to
join the newly formed BMR
Alumni and Friends Band. Meet
at 6:30 at BMR auditorium on
Dec. 4, 11 and 18. Call 508-
883-1291 for more information.
Woonsocket
• Tony Cerbo is Home for
Christmas at the Stadium
Theatre. Music in the style of
Michael Buble and Harry
Connick Jr. Show includes din-
ner served in the lobby.
www.stadiumtheatre.com.
• Written Word Writing Group
Thursdays, 7:15 p.m. at Harris
Public Library. An outlet for adult
writers of all leanings: poetry,
journaling, prose, short story,
sermon, comedy, script writing,
puppets. No critiquing. All are
welcome and there is no
charge.
Burrillville
• Pascoag Council, 383,
Knights of Columbus Friday
Night Bingo at the Columbus
Club, 98 Roosevelt Ave. Games
begin at 6:20 p.m.; doors open
at 4:30 p.m.
Woonsocket
•Blackstone Valley Polar
Express, tours at 4 and 7 p.m.
leaving from One Depot Square.
Tickets online at www.black-
stonevalleypolarexpress.com or
call 401-724-2200.
•Ocean State Holiday Pops con-
cert at the Stadium Theatre, 8
p.m. This 60 piece orchestra will
fill you with the spirit of Christmas
as they play all of your favorite
merry holiday favorites. www.sta-
diumtheatre.com.
Woonsocket
•Blackstone Valley Polar
Express, tours at 1, 4 and 7 p.m.
leaving from One Depot Square.
Tickets online at www.black-
stonevalleypolarexpress.com or
call 401-724-2200.
•Holiday Extravaganza Concert
at Chan’s, 8 p.m., Chan’s
Restaurant, 267 Main St.
www.chanseggrollsandjazz.com
•9th annual Cookie Walk at St.
Michael Ukrainian Orthodox
Church hal, 74 Harris Ave., 9
a.m. to noon. Homemade cook-
ies $8 a pound. Pre-orders of 5
pounds or more, call 765-1410.
Wrentham
•Cumberland Lincoln
Community Chorus Holiday
Concert, 3 p.m., Trinity
Episcopal Church, 47 East St.
www.clccmusic.org. Free-will
offerings appreciated.
Bellilngham
•The First Baptist Church of
Bellingham will hold its annual
Christmas Contata entitled,
“Three Trees” at 7 p.m. Free
event and all are welcome.
22 23 24 25 27 26 28
Cumberland
• Widow support group meets
every Sunday — the first two
Sundays of the month are at the
Community Chapel on Diamond
Hill Rd. The second two are at
Emerald Bay Manor, Diamond
Hill Road. All meetings 2 p.m.
Call 401-333-5815.all. $7
adults, $4 children.
Woonsocket
•Blackstone Valley Polar
Express, tours at 1 and 4 p.m.
leaving from One Depot Square.
Tickets online at www.black-
stonevalleypolarexpress.com or
call 401-724-2200.
North Smithfield
•Slatersville Village Green
Christmas Eve Luminaria. The his-
toric village green and walkways of
Slatersville will be lit by canlelight,
leading to the entrance of
Slatersville Congregational
Church.
www.slatersvillechurch.org.
Central Falls
•Forand Manor holds Bingo every
Monday and Wednesday, starting
at 5:15 p.m.
Bellingham
• Reading with Indy, 6:30 to 7:30
p.m. at the Bellingham Public
Library. Indy, a certified reading
therapy dog will be at the library on
Mondays. Please register only one
time per month.
Glocester
• Harmony Library offers a chil-
dren’s Sewing Wrokshop at 3 and
5 p.m. in the community room for
children in grades 2 and up. $10
material fee. Registration is
required. Call 949-2850 or visit
www.harmonylibrary.org.
Bristol
•Sparkle! An Outdoor Family
Event, Blithewold Mansion,
Gardens & Arboretum, 101 Ferry
Road. Come stroll through
Blithewold's illuminated gardens
and greenhouse, breathing in that
crisp Christmas air or joining our
carolers as they spread holiday
cheer. Enjoy music, cocoa, and
roasted marshmallows around a
roaring bonfire in Blithewold's
Enclosed Garden. Carolers will
be singing around the bonfire
from 6:30 - 7 pm. Hot Cocoa is
free; s'mores kits will be available
for $1.
.
Bristol
•Sparkle! An Outdoor Family
Event, Blithewold Mansion,
Gardens & Arboretum, 101 Ferry
Road. Come stroll through
Blithewold's illuminated gardens
and greenhouse, breathing in that
crisp Christmas air or joining our
carolers as they spread holiday
cheer. Enjoy music, cocoa, and
roasted marshmallows around a
roaring bonfire in Blithewold's
Enclosed Garden. Carolers will
be singing around the bonfire
from 6:30 - 7 pm. Hot Cocoa is
free; s'mores kits will be available
for $1.
Burrillville
• Pascoag Council, 383,
Knights of Columbus Friday
Night Bingo at the Columbus
Club, 98 Roosevelt Ave. Games
begin at 6:20 p.m.; doors open
at 4:30 p.m.
Bristol
•Christmas at Blithewold, 101
Ferry Road. Christmas at
Blithewold has a new theme
every year. The Mansion is open
for touring Tuesday through
Sunday 11a.m. - 5 p.m. Buy
your admission tickets online or
at the door. Our wonderful volun-
teers work hard to incorporate
the annual theme into their deco-
rations and design of their
rooms; almost every room at
Blithewold is decorated for
Christmas. Our Christmas
includes a 18 ft Christmas tree,
music performances, teas, sing-
a-longs with Santa and more.
ALLIANCE
BLACKSTONE VALLEY FEDERAL CREDIT UNION
594 Central Avenue, Pawtucket, RI • 401-722-8236 • www.ABVFCU.com
Mon. 9-5pm, Tues. & Wed. 9-4:30pm, Thur. & Fri. 9-6pm, Sat. 9-12pm
Christmas
Day
Christmas
Eve
IMPORTANT IMPORTANT IMPORTANT
IMPORTANT IMPORTANT IMPORTANT
TIE BREAKER
TOTAL COMBINED OFFENSIVE YARDAGE
of BOTH TEAMS
CLEVELAND at NEW ENGLAND Total Yards
Name Phone
Address
101 HIGGINSON AVE., LINCOLN, RI - 401-764-0664
www.snakehilltrading.com • CLOSED ON MONDAYS
Snake Hill Trading Post
ANY ONE
ITEM 20% OFF
(With Tis Coupon • Excluding Sale Items) • Expires Dec. 31, 2013
RI’s LARGEST
BOOTSELECTION
Western & Motorcycle
Clothing & Accessories
For Men, Women & Children
Branch
Village
Pool & Spa
Needs
www.bvpoolspa.com
643 Great Road,
No. Smithfield, RI
401-597-0093
Hours: Fri 9-6pm; Sat & Sun 9-3pm
8 Models to choose
from starting at $2,999
All your spa chemical
needs in stock!
NEAL‛S HARMONY CAFE
3 Main Street, Manville, RI • 762-9350
Watch The Games All Weekend &
Monday Nights on Large Hi Def TVs
December 7 .... Screwy Louie & Bam Bam
December 14 ........................... Liz Boudrea
December 21 .................... Blue Cherry Pie
December 28 .............. Northeast Groove
DECEMBER EVENTS
Live Music
Saturdays
200 Main Street, Blackstone, MA
(508) 928-2164 • OPEN 7 DAYS
Mon. - Sat. 11am-1am • Sun. Noon-1am • Kitchen Open till 10p
www.FirehouseTavernMa.com
FIREHOUSE TAVERN
& SMOKEHOUSE
AUTHENTIC
WOOD SMOKED RIBS, PORK & BRISKET
MONDAY NIGHT FOOTBALL!
ALL YOU CAN EAT DYNAMITES $3.99
SUNDAY SPECIAL
ALL YOU CAN EAT SMOKED PORK LASAGNA $8.95
Brakes • Tire • Exhaust • State Inspection • All Major and Minor Repairs
840 CUMBERLAND HILL ROAD, WOONSOCKET, R.I.
GO PATS!
DON’T FORGET TO HAVE YOUR CAR WINTERIZED
INC.
24 Hour
Road Service & Towing
1442 Newport Avenue • Pawtucket, RI 02861 • 725-1933
Hours: Monday - Friday 8:00am - 5:00pm • RI Lic. #65
“Your Local Body Shop”
Drive Safely from
COLLISION
REPAIR
~All phases~
From minor scratches and
dents to major repairs. We
accept claims by all insurance
companies, RI and MA.
Pub & Restaurant
3 Farm St., Blackstone • 508-883-7700
176 Columbus Ave., Pawtucket • 401-475-1040
Home To Family, Friends and Great Food
NFL GAME DAY SPECIALS!
Available Any Game - Any Day!
Appetizer Specials .........................$4.99
Wings ..............................................45¢
House Draft Special 16 oz ............$1.99
INDIANAPOLIS CINCINNATI
BUFFALO TAMPA BAY
KANSAS CITY WASHINGTON
MINNESOTA BALTIMORE
MIAMI PITTSBURGH
DETROIT PHILADELPHIA
TENNESSEE DENVER
RULES
1. Indicate your choice of the winning team by placing a check mark
in the box preceding the name of your pick.
2. In the tie breaker box below place a number representing the
combined total offensive yardage of the two teams featured in the
Tie Breaker Game. In the event of a tie, the entry that most closely
matches, without exceeding, the actual combined total yardage of the
teams will be declared the winner. If a continued tie results, a winner
will be determined by random drawing. Fill in your name, address and
phone number in the space provided. Decision of the judges is final.
3. Submit the entire page as your entry, enter as often as you wish, no
photocopied forms will be accepted. Game is for amusement purposes
only and no purchase is required to win. Free entry forms may be
obtained at the front desk of The Call, 75 Main Street, Woonsocket,
RI 02895 or The Times, 23 Exchange Street, Pawtucket, RI 02860.
Entries may be mailed to The Times or The Call, c/o Pigskin Picks.
4. While entries may be mailed if you choose, they must be received
no later than 5pm on Friday preceding the game selected. Entries
received after 5pm will not be included in that weeks contest
regardless of when the entry was postmarked.
5. Employees and Independent Carriers of The Call or The Times and
their immediate family members are not eligible to win.
CALL/TIMES STAFF PICKS
DIANE DENISE JAYSON NICK GUEST
A CHANCE TO WIN EACH WEEK
$
100.00 CASH
FROM THE
(Contest through December 24, 2013)
THIS WEEK’S GUEST PICKS by
&
Jorge at Te Roast House
INDY
BUF
KC
BALT
NE
CAR
NYJ
DET
PITT
DEN
SD
SEA
ARIZ
GB
7-5
94-68
CINC
BUF
KC
BALT
NE
CAR
NYJ
DET
PITT
DEN
NYG
SEA
ARIZ
ATL
8-4
94-68
CINC
BUF
KC
BALT
NE
NO
OAK
PHIL
PITT
DEN
NYG
SEA
STL
ATL
7-5
95-67
CINC
BUF
KC
BALT
NE
NO
OAK
DET
MIA
DEN
SD
SEA
ARIZ
GB
8-4
93-69
INDY
BUF
WASH
MINN
NE
NO
NYJ
PHIL
PITT
DEN
SD
SEA
ARIZ
GB
6-6
90-72

L
A
S
T
W
EEK’S W
IN
N
E
R

Rocky Keenan
of Seekonk
1 Wrong
K & R Auto Salvage, Inc.
JUNK CARS WANTED!!
Wholesale for
Used Auto Parts
Parts for All Makes and
Models Foreign & Domestic!
90-Day Standard Warranty
Extended Available
950 Smithfeld Road, North Providence, RI 02904
(401) 353-9200 or 1-800-638-8089
Open Monday - Friday 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Lic. #241
View our inventory at www.kandrparts.com
The recent fire
hasn’t hindered
us! We are open
for business!!!
NORTH SMITHFIELD
AUTOMOTIVE CENTER
106 GREENVILLE RD. N. SMITHFIELD, RI • 769-2525
MONDAY-FRIDAY 8:00-5:00 • SATURDAY 8:00-1:00
CALL 769-2525
VISIT US ON THE WEB:
www.northsmithfieldautomotivecenter.com
82 SCHOOL STREET, FORESTDALE • 356-1966
JOIN US AT LINDY’S TAVERN
HOURS: Mon. thru Sat. 11am-1am - Sun. Noon-1am
Kitchen Open till 10pm Every Fri. and Sat.
TUESDAY DINNER SPECIALS $10.99
MONDAY NIGHT FOOTBALL!!!
$.35 WINGS!
NY GIANTS SAN DIEGO
THRIFTY LIQUORS
97 Main Street, Blackstone, MA • 508-883-3122
All Beer and Coolers + Dep. - No Sales Tax In Mass • ATM - Mastercard - Visa
BACARDI RUM 1.75LT ......................................... $22.99
FETZER 1.5LT .............................................................. $9.99
YELLOW TAIL 1.5LT ................................................. $9.99
BEARFOOT WINES 1.5LT ................................. $11.99
ABSOLUT VODKA 1.75LT ................................... $27.99
BAILEYS 1.75LT ........................................ $13.99 After MIR
DEWERS 1.75LT ....................................................... $34.99
CANADIAN CLUB 1.75LT .................................... $17.99
SALE ENDS 12/19/2013
OPEN DAILY 9:00 A.M. TO 11:00 P.M.
SUNDAY 12 NOON TO 8:00 P.M.
GET YOUR AD IN NEXT WEEK’S
FOR JUST
$
65
00
per week
In Print Every Week
Online Every Day
CALL TODAY!
401-767-8505
GET YOUR AD IN NEXT WEEK’S
FOR JUST
$
65
00
per week
In Print Every Week
Online Every Day
CALL TODAY!
401-767-8505
Last Week Last Week Last Week Last Week Last Week
Season Season Season Season Season
(all guests)
CLEVELAND NEW ENGLAND SEATTLE SAN FRANCISCO
CAROLINA NEW ORLEANS ST LOUIS ARIZONA
OAKLAND NY JETS ATLANTA GREEN BAY
When people
start reading the
Yellow Pages
every morning
We’ll start placing
“BIG ADS”
in them!
401-722-4000
401-727-9262
For display advertising please call
Some of our favorite photos include our loving pets!
Te Call is publishing
every Monday beginning on April 1st, 2013.
Give your furry friend a day in the spotlight! We
encourage our readers to grab your camera and
capture your furry friends in pictures. All photo
entries are FREE of charge. It’s our pleasure to
feature your furry friends weekly.
Please be sure to submit the highest quality photos possible.
PDF copies of your pet appearing in our newspaper
can also be purchased for $6.00
PETS
Your Name:
Address:
Phone#:
Email:
Pet’s Name:
Age:
Mail to:
C/O Pet Page
23 Exchange Street
Pawtucket, RI 02860
or email
editor@pawtuckettimes.com
TUE   WED   THU FRI SAT
42-47
30-35
44-48
27-34
52-56
35-39
46-50
38-43
40-45
30-34
AM Clouds
Sunny
AM Shwrs Rain
M. Sunny
Five Day Forecast data supplied by Storm Team 10
WEATHER/REGION A8 THE TIMES
Tuesday, December 3, 2013
Today’s Forecast
Narragansett Buzzards Merrimack to Chatham to
Bay Bay Chatham Watch Hill
Weather ..............Morning Clouds, Developing Sun........
Wind (knots) NW 6-12 N 6-12 N 10-14 N-NE 10-13
Seas (feet) 2 1-2 3-5 2
Visibility (miles) 5 5 5 5
Mark Searles’s Southern New England Area Forecast
An ocean storm will intensify as it passes east of Cape Cod this afternoon...thick
clouds this morning will give way to increasing sunshine through the afternoon.
The clear sky will last through much of Wednesday before a warm front brings the
clouds back and the chance of a few rain showers overnight. Thursday will be the
warmest of the week with highs climbing into the 50s. Steadier rain returns Friday
with cooler air building in for the weekend.
R.I. weighs prescription drug registry to curb abuse
DAVID KLEPPER
Associated Press
PROVIDENCE —
Rhode Island is weighing
whether to create a pre-
scription drug registry so
doctors and pharmacists
can identify patients who
are struggling with sub-
stance abuse.
The proposed online reg-
istry would track prescrip-
tions for controlled sub-
stances so health profes-
sionals could see how often
a patient has received them.
New York began a similar
prescription monitoring
program earlier this year.
More than 180 Rhode
Islanders died from unin-
tentional drug overdoses
last year — more than four
times the number of homi-
cide victims in the state.
That number includes peo-
ple who died after using
prescribed and illicit drugs.
Health officials say many
people struggling with pre-
scription drug addiction
often switch between illegal
drugs like heroin and legal
ones like oxycodone.
A state task force
reviewing the idea met for
the first time Monday at the
Statehouse. The commis-
sion includes lawmakers,
state health officials, physi-
cians and a community
mental health expert and is
led by state Rep. William
O’Brien, D-North
Providence.
O’Brien said he began
looking at the idea after
talking to a constituent
whose daughter is addicted
to oxycodone.
“She’s getting it from
clinics, hospitals, emer-
gency rooms, doctors,”
O’Brien said. “She comes
up with more and more cre-
ative ways to get this drug.
It’s torture for her family.”
There are significant
challenges to creating a
registry, however. Some
members of the task force
said a registry must respect
patient privacy and
expressed concerns that it
would only address a small
part of the problem of drug
abuse.
Michael Fine, the state’s
director of health and a
member of the commission,
said the state must do more
to address drug addiction in
all forms. He said state data
shows that addicts will
move from using a legal,
prescribed substance to
street drugs based on fac-
tors including ease of
access and cost.
“You want to look at the
total number of overdose
deaths,” Fine said. “If you
squeeze the balloon in one
place, it just goes some-
where else.”
The task force is expect-
ed to report its findings
back to the General
Assembly in the spring.
Tracking controlled
substances the goal
of new proposal
Number of homeless Mass. families placed in motels surges
GREENFIELD, Mass.
(AP) — The number of
homeless Massachusetts
families being placed by the
state in motels and hotels
has surged to an all-time
high, driven in part by cuts
in state and federal housing
subsidies.
The state Executive
Office of Housing and
Economic Development
reports that nearly 2,100
families per night on aver-
age were temporarily
housed in hotel rooms in
October, a practice that
costs the state tens of mil-
lions of dollars annually.
The demand is so great
that some homeless families
from the Boston area are
being placed in western
Massachusetts.
The surge has followed
cuts in state and federal
housing subsidies, soaring
rents in the Boston area, and
still-high rates of unemploy-
ment and underemployment
among the poor, Aaron
Gornstein, state undersecre-
tary for housing, told The
Boston Globe .
“The state as a whole has
recovered from the Great
Recession faster than most
other states, but in many
ways we're still struggling,”
Gornstein said. “Federal
budget cuts have made the
situation worse.”
Motels cost $82 per
night. State spending on
motels has exploded to more
than $46 million from about
$1 million in 2008, accord-
ing to state records.
The average motel stay is
about seven months,
although some families live
in motels for a year waiting
for affordable housing,
according to state housing
officials.
Jim Greene, director of
the Emergency Shelter
Commission of Boston, said
Massachusetts needs more
long-term rental assistance
programs that target families
who are homeless or at risk
of homelessness. Short-term
solutions, like hotels, don’t
work, he said.
Gretchen Vazquez and
her two children were
moved to a Greenfield hotel
when the state subsidy for
her Boston apartment ran
out.
The hotel is cramped, far
from her church, and her
older daughter missed about
two weeks of school.
“I’m stuck,” Vazquez
said. “I don’t know what's
going to happen next.”
Man seeks new trial in UMass murder
DENISE LAVOIE
AP Legal Affairs Writer
BOSTON — Bryan Johnston and David
Sullivan were close friends in high school
and kept in touch after heading off to differ-
ent colleges. But years later, Johnston
walked into Sullivan’s off-campus apartment
at UMass-Amherst and shot him six times
with an assault rifle.
During Johnston's trial, he didn’t deny
killing his old friend but claimed he was
insane at the time and was not criminally
responsible for his actions. Prosecutors said
Johnston, who had been using steroids for
months and had been drinking beer the night
of the 2004 killing, shot Sullivan because he
was angry he had been ignoring him. The
two were good friends while attending
Wahconah Regional High School in Dalton.
Johnston, who attended Westfield State
College, was found guilty of murder.
But now he is asking the state’s highest
court to overturn his conviction and grant
him a new trial, arguing, among other things,
that the judge’s instructions may have fright-
ened jurors into rejecting his insanity
defense. The Supreme Judicial Court is
scheduled to hear Johnston’s appeal Friday.
Johnston’s appellate lawyer, David
Nathanson, argues that errors by the judge
and his trial lawyer “unfairly cut away” at
Johnston’s legitimate insanity defense.
Nathanson said that the instructions given
to jurors could have led them to believe that
Johnston would be released from a psychi-
atric facility after only a short period of time
if they found him not guilty by reason of
insanity. He will ask the court to consider
changing the standard jury instruction in
such cases so it is made clear that defendants
found not guilty by reason of insanity can be
committed for the rest of their lives.
Nathanson said Johnston's trial attorney
asked the judge to instruct jurors that
Johnston could be held for life in a locked
facility if he was found not guilty by reason
of insanity.
The judge declined and instead gave a
standard instruction, which described how
Johnston would be evaluated for 40 days,
prosecutors would have 60 days to petition
for his commitment and then he would be
evaluated every year.
Appeal based on instructions
to jury on insanity defense
Suspect denies
killing mother
SOUTH KINGSTOWN
(AP) — A man accused of
killing and dismembering his
mother in Narragansett has
pleaded not guilty.
WPRI-TV reports that
Robert Taylor pleaded not
guilty Monday in
Washington County Superior
Court to charges of murder,
mutilation of a corpse, larce-
ny and vandalism.
The 46-year-old Taylor is
accused of killing his mother,
Alison Taylor, in May, then
cutting up her body and dis-
posing of her remains in a
trash bin. He has been held
since the killing, and was
indicted last month by a
grand jury.
By HOWARD ULMAN
AP Sports Writer
FOXBORO — It takes the New England
Patriots a while to get their offense going.
Then the second half starts and Tom Brady's
attack is very tough to stop.
The Patriots (9-3) have outscored their last
two opponents 61-21 after intermission despite
trailing by double digits at halftime. In both
games, they scored on each of their first five
possessions of the second half. The final scores
were identical: 34-31 over the Denver
Broncos, one of the NFL's best teams, and the
Houston Texans, right now the worst.
"As the game went on, we were able to see
how Houston was going to match up to our dif-
ferent personnel groups," New England coach
Bill Belichick said Monday. "Let's say, defen-
sively, when you're facing a team that uses a lot
of personnel groups, it's hard to have a lot of
things ready for a lot of different groups."
The Texans (2-10) hadn't seen many two-
back alignments in watching video of Patriots
games. So they might not have prepared for
seldom-used James Develin, who powered his
way to a 1-yard touchdown on the first series
of the second half as offensive coordinator
Josh McDaniels used a fullback more often
Sunday.
"Josh did a good job of mixing the groups,"
Belichick said. "It's just hard (for a defense) to
have a game plan where you have eight or nine
different calls against seven, eight groups. You
just run out of time to practice it and time to
work on it."
The Patriots trailed 17-7, the fourth time in
their past five games they were behind at half-
time. But seven minutes into the third quarter
they led 21-17.
"Coach will come in at halftime and say
'OK, these are the things we're going to have to
do well to move the ball,'" Brady said. "We
SPORTS
Blackstone Valley
THE TIMES, Tuesday, December 3, 2013 — B1
College football
MOVINGINTHE RIGHT DIRECTION
URI athletic director hopes to have new
head coach in place by middle of the month
Blackstone Valley Sports file photo
Now that the head coaching position for the football program has
officially been posted, University of Rhode Island Athletic Director
Thorr Bjorn, pictured, can begin interviewing potential candidates.
The vacancy was created when Joe Trainer was dismissed last
month with one year remaining on his contract.
By BRENDAN McGAIR
bmcgair@pawtuckettimes.com
WARWICK — If everything shakes
out according to Thorr Bjorn’s plan, the
University of Rhode Island will have a
new football head coach in place by the
middle of the month.
Speaking about the ongoing search
to find Joe Trainer’s successor at a col-
lege basketball luncheon held at the
Radisson Hotel, Bjorn stated that the
official job posting in accordance with
state requirements took place Monday.
The Rams' athletic director noted that
such a step must take place before inter-
viewing prospective candidates.
“We haven’t formally interviewed
anybody at this point, but we’ve certain-
ly been proactive with the folks we’ve
talked to just to gauge a sense of inter-
est,” Bjorn stated. “We’re moving for-
ward quickly. We can’t set a deadline,
but if we can have someone named by
mid-December, I think I’ll feel pretty
good about it.
“We want to find the right person
rather than rushing to just fill the spot,”
he continued. “I’ve just been thrilled
with the level of interest from a number
of really successful coaches.”
The quest of seeking out what will be
the 20th football coach in Rhody histo-
ry is being conduced without aid from a
search firm. Bjorn said that a small, on-
campus committee is in place, yet it has
not yet officially met. All the homework
that has been done up until this point is
the result of Bjorn putting out feelers, a
step that he says was done during the
search process that led to the eventual
hiring of Dan Hurley as the URI men’s
basketball head coach.
In conversing with outsiders, Bjorn
came away impressed with the “can-
do” perception surrounding his grid
program, one that posted a 12-44 record
in Trainer’s five seasons at the helm.
“What I’ve been trying to do inter-
nally is look at some of the challenges
we bring to the table from an adminis-
trative support standpoint and an
administrative non-coaching side of the
house. What are some of the things we
need to do differently? What can we do
across the board to put ourselves in a
position to be competitive?” Bjorn said.
“People think we can be successful
here, but when you’re not successful,
it’s not just a coach’s problem. It’s a
program issue.”
All of Trainer’s assistant coaches
remain at Rhode Island in compliance
with their contract obligations, which
are set to expire at the end of the month.
See URI, page B3
High school football
NFL
Looking for a
little payback
Northmen hope to turn the
tables on Scarlet Knights
tonight in Division IV semis
By JON BAKER
jbaker@pawtuckettimes.com
NORTH SMITHFIELD — Way back on Sept. 28, North
Smithfield High traveled to Exeter/West Greenwich's home grid-
iron and exhibited perhaps its sloppiest game of the season, but
still sustained “only” a 17-14 loss.
The two will meet yet again in a R.I. Division IVTournament
semifinal in West Greenwich at 6 p.m., Tuesday, and – to prepare
his troops mentally – Pennington is utilizing not just what hap-
pened in that contest but also one that occurred three years ago
this same weekend.
“We're trying to concentrate on doing the little things well,”
Pennington explained. “I've been thinking back to when we lost
to them down there in double overtime. At one point, with about
four or five minutes left (in regulation), we were ahead, 30-22.
“I've been reminding the kids of that, the fact (the Scarlet
Knights) had been to a couple of championship games, and that
their guys knew they had the pedigree, the confidence in each
other, to come back and win it,” he added. “They drove the ball
down the field and scored, but they still had to get the two-point
conversion to tie.
“They did with ease, then eventually won it in double OT.
They were able to get those points because of confidence, and we
(defensively) looked like deer in the headlights. I've been telling
the kids this week that we can't be overwhelmed in that moment.
Once they scored the touchdown, we were thinking about that
mistake, not (stopping) the conversion; I've been saying, 'It's all
about the next play, now what happened previously.'”
At a practice session Sunday afternoon, Pennington admitted
he walked his defensive players down to the goal line and set a
See NORTHMEN, page B3
See PATRIOTS, page B3
ERNEST A. BROWN / Blackstone Valley Sports photo
North Smithfield junior Devon Deragon (22) gets upended by Exeter/West Greenwich senior Ryan Ricard (53) as teammate
Ian Geyer (4) closes in during the second quarter of the Sept. 28 Division IV regular-season contest the two teams staged.
The Scarlet Knights prevailed that day, 17-14. North Smithfield and EWG will once again meet on the gridiron Tuesday night,
this time with a spot in the Division IV Super Bowl on the line.
File photo
Bill Belichick, left, watched Tom Brady (12) and the rest of New England’s offense kick it into
high gear during the second half of Sunday’s come-from-behind 34-31 victory over the
Houston Texans. Second-half surges have become the norm for the Patriots lately. Against
the Denver Broncos the previous week, New England came back from a 24-0 halftime deficit
to win in overtime by an identical 34-31 score.
Another week, another
second-half surge for Pats
Slow starts remain a major source of concern
REGIONAL
SCOREBOARD
SPORTS
B2 THE TIMES Tuesday, December 3, 2013
UPPERDECKPLANSTRYOUTSFOR9 & UNDERBASEBALLPROGRAM
LINCOLNLITTLELEAGUEPLANSANNUALMEETINGONDEC. 12
LINCOLN — Lincoln Little League will hold its annual meeting on Thursday, Dec. 12 at 7 p.m. at the
Lincoln Town Hall on 100 Old River Road. A review of the league financial statements will be dis-
cussed. Also, BCI checks will be performed for all prospective 2014 managers and coaches in the
baseball and softball divisions.
For more information, contact Jackie Fernandes at fernandesjackie@yahoo.com or 401-230-3249.
DARLINGTONBRAVESPLAN“HOLIDAYHAPPENINGSFUNDRAISER”
FORFLORIDATRIPONWEEKENDOFDEC. 6 &7 ATBRAVESHALL
PAWTUCKET — The Darlington Braves football and cheerleading teams, which is looking to raise
funds for their 15U cheerleading team’s trip to Florida for the National AYC Cheer Competition, will con-
duct a “Holiday Happenings Fundraiser” on the weekend of Dec. 6 and 7 at the Braves Hall on 92 East
Ave. in Pawtucket.
The Braves will also be sending two football players that made the Blackstone Valley AYF’s Eighth-
Grade All-Star Team to Florida.
On Friday, Dec. 6, the Braves will hold a pasta dinner from 6-9 p.m. Tickets are $5 per person, while
children under the age of 2 are free. On Saturday, Dec. 7, the Braves will conduct a pancake breakfast
with Santa Claus from 9-11 a.m., and tickets for the breakfast are $3 per person. Also taking place on
Saturday is a children’s craft corner from 9 a.m.-4 p.m., and an indoor yard sale from 9 a.m.-4 p.m..
Tables for the yard sale are still available at $10 each.
A“Holiday Mega Raffle” will also take place during the weekend, beginning on Friday evening and
continuing through Saturday.
For more information email Bravesprez@aol.com or call (401) 369-1673.
TRIPLECROWNUMPIRESSEEKSNEWMEMBERSFOR2014 SEASON
WOONSOCKET — Triple Crown Umpires is looking for umpires for the 2014 season. Those interest-
ed must have two years experience working the bases or behind the plate at the Little League, or Big
Diamond level.
For more information, contact Tommy Brien at (401) 765-3419.
CUMBERLAND — Upper Deck Baseball Academy will be holding tryouts for its 9 & ender baseball
team, the Rhode Island Red Sox Eight and Nine year old boys welcome.
Call the Deck for more information at 334-1539.
TUESDAY
BOYS
Football
Division IV semifinals: North Smithfield at Exeter/West Greenwich, 6 p.m.
FRIDAY
BOYS
Hockey
Lincoln vs. St. Raphael/PCD/Wheeler co-op (at Thayer Arena), 6 p.m.; Woonsocket
vs. Scituate/Tolman co-op (at Smithfield), 7 p.m.; Johnston/North Providence co-op
vs. Cumberland (at Adelard), 7:30 p.m.; North Smithfield at Toll Gate (at Thayer Arena),
Bishop Hendricken at Mount St. Charles, 9 p.m.
GIRLS
Hockey
Mount St. Charles vs. La Salle (at Levy Arena), 6 p.m.; Toll Gate/Pilgrim/Warwick Vets
co-op vs. Lincoln/Cumberland co-op (at Levy Arena), 7:30 p.m.
SATURDAY
BOYS
Hockey
Narragansett vs. Scituate/Tolman co-op (at West Warwick), 6 p.m.; Lincoln vs. John-
ston/North Providence co-op (at Smithfield), 7:30 p.m.; Mount St. Charles vs. La Salle
(at Thayer), 8 p.m.; Barrington at Burrillville, 8:30 p.m.
GIRLS
Hockey
Lincoln/Cumberland co-op vs. Burrillville/Ponaganset co-op (at Levy Arena), 12:30
p.m.; Bay View at Mount St. Charles, 7:30 p.m.
SUNDAY
BOYS
Football
Division II Super Bowl: Cumberland vs. West Warwick (at Cranston Stadium), 3 p.m.
Saturday’s Race
PAWTUCKET — Providence Jingle Bell Run, 10
a.m., Slater Memorial Park, 451 Newport Ave.
(Benefits Arthritis Foundation). For more information,
visit www.arthritis.org/Jingle-Bell-Run.
Sunday’s Race
PROVIDENCE — Downtown Jingle 5K & Elves 1K,
11 a.m., R.I. Convention Center, 1 Sabin St. (Holiday
Season 5K and Youth 1K. Costumes welcome.
Youth 1K starts at 10:30 a.m.) Contact: Organizer. 1-
401-952-6333.
Sunday, December 15
NEWPORT — 30th Annual Christmas 10k Run & 5k
Walk, 10 a.m., Rogers High School, 15 Wickham
Road (Free t-shirt to preregistered before Dec 12.
Awards. Showers available.) Contact: Melanie Cahill
(Women and Infants The Program in Womens ). 1-
401-741-9708.
Sunday, December 22
PORTSMOUTH — Fourth annual Beat Santa 5k, 10
a.m., Common Fence Point Community Center,
929 Anthony Rd. (a festive fun run where runners
must beat Santa to receive a present) Contact: John
Santillo (RIRR). 1-401-714-4581.
Thursday, December 26
WEST GREENWICH — Nooseneck 18K, 1 p.m.,
Tavern on the Hill, 809 Noose-neck Hill Rd.
(Participate in our famous re-gift raffle.) Contact:
Michael Tammaro (Narragansett Running
Association). 1-401-874-2079.
AREAROADRACESCHEDULE
LEBANON, N.H. (AP) — Latest skiing conditions, as supplied by SnoCountry
Mountain Reports. Conditions are subject to change due to weather, skier/rider
traffic and other factors. Be aware of changing conditions. For more information
go to www.snocountry.com
Monday, Dec. 2
NEWENGLAND
Rhode Island
Yawgoo Valley — Mon Reopen 12/6 packed powder 10-20 base 2 of 12 trails 1
mile 6 acres, 2 of 4 lifts, Mon-Wed: 12p-8p; Thu-Fri: 10a-9p Sat: 8:30a-9p; Sun:
8:30a-5p;
Massachusetts
Blandford — Plan to Open 12/26
Bousquet — Plan to Open 12/7
Bradford — Plan to Open 12/12
Catamount — Plan to Open 12/7
Jiminy Peak — Reopen 12/6 machine groomed Fri: 9a-10p; Sat: 8:30a-10p Sun:
8:30a-4p; Open Fri-Sun;
Nashoba Valley — Reopen 12/7 sm Sat/Sun: 8:30a-10p Open Sat/Sun;
Otis Ridge — Plan to Open 12/14
Ski Butternut — Plan to Open 12/6 Mon-Fri: 9a-4p Sat/Sun: 8:15a-4p;
Ski Ward — Mon 8:43 am MG machine groomed 6-20 base 3 of 9 trails, 34%
open 2 of 4 lifts, sm Mon-Fri: 11a-9p; Sat: 9a-9p; Sun: 9a-5p; Dec 02-06: 4p-
9p;
Wachusett — Mon 3:47 pm MG machine groomed 6-30 base 9 of 23 trails, 40%
open 61 acres, 5 of 8 lifts, Mon-Fri: 9a-10p; Sat/Sun: 8a-10p;
New Hampshire
Attitash — Plan to Open 12/7 Mon-Fri: 9a-4p Sat/Sun: 8:30a-4p;
Black Mountain — Plan to Open 12/13 1 new
Bretton Woods — Mon 1:13 pm packed powder machine groomed 10-20 base
18 of 62 trails 30% open, 6 miles, 111 acres, 3 of 10 lifts, Mon-Fri: 9a-4p
Sat/Sun: 8a-4p;
Cannon Mountain — Mon 6:40 am MG machine groomed 10-20 base 7 of 73
trails 10% open, 26 acres, 3 of 10 lifts, sm Mon-Fri: 9a-4p; Sat/Sun: 8:30a-4p;
Cranmore — Mon Reopen 12/7 loose granular machine groomed 10-20 base 17
of 57 trails 30% open, 58 acres, 4 of 7 lifts, sm Fri: 9a-4p; Sat/Sun: 9a-4p; Open
Fri-Sun;
Crotched Mountain — Reopen 12/7 Mon-Fri: 9a-9p Sat/Sun: 9a-9p;
Dartmouth Skiway — Plan to Open 12/14
Granite Gorge — Plan to Open 12/14
Gunstock — Plan to Open 12/6
King Pine — Plan to Open 12/13
Loon Mountain — Mon 2:28 pm packed powder machine groomed 6-12 base 20
of 61 trails 33% open, 9 miles, 133 acres, 3 of 12 lifts, Mon-Fri: 9a-4p Sat/Sun:
8a-4p;
NEWENGLANDSKI REPORT
R.I. HIGHSCHOOL SPORTSSCHEDULE
PAWTUCKET&PROVIDENCEFIGURESKATINGCLUBCURRENTLY
ACCEPTINGREGISTRATIONSFORBASICSKILLSPROGRAM
PAWTUCKET — The Pawtucket & Providence Figure Skating Club is accepting registrations for its
Basic Skills Skating Program. Lessons are appropriate for either hockey or figure skating and are avail-
able for skaters ages three through adult.
Classes start on Saturday, Dec. 7, and are held at Lynch Arena in Pawtucket.
Classes for beginning skaters will be held from 12:10-1:00 p.m. Lessons for skaters with more expe-
rience will take place from 11:10 a.m.-12 noon. Participants must have their own skates.
Registration can be done either by coming to the open registration at Lynch Arena on Saturday, Nov.
23, from 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Skaters can also mail in their completed forms and payment. Skaters can save
$10 by using a coupon, available on our website, and registering by Nov. 23.
For program information, fees, and schedule, go to ppfsc.org and click on "Basic Skills", email ppf-
scbasicskills@earthlink.net, or call (508) 212-2611.
On The Banner
On The Banner
PHOTO FEATURED IN PIC OF THE DAY LAST WEEK
October 4, 2013 - Shea senior winger Helder Andrade (7),
left, battles Central junior striker Esril Giron during 1st half
action at City Stadium in Providence Friday.
Ernest A. Brown photo/RIMG.
Cumberland High School Athletic
HOF welcomes eight new members
Submitted photo
The Cumberland High School Athletic Hall of Fame opened its doors to eight new members during a ceremony that was
held last Friday at Wright’s Farm. Those HOFs who were present include, front row, left to right, Christine Boutiette, Dan
McKee and Kim Mooney. Back row, left to right, Charley Bourgery, Tim Carey, Todd Carey and Dave Wright.
Men’s college basketball
Big win means Top 25 ranking for ‘Nova
By JIM O'CONNELL
AP Basketball Writer
Breaking down this week's
Associated Press college basketball poll:
JUMPINGIN: Villanova's wins over
Kansas and Iowa on the way to the Battle
4 Atlantis championship were a boost to
the Wildcats, moving from unranked to
No. 14 in the AP poll.
That's an impressive jump into the
poll, but it's far from the best.
In November 1989, Kansas went
from unranked to No. 4 after beating No.
2 LSU, No. 1 UNLV and No. 25 St.
John's in the NIT Season Tip-Off, which
was known then as the Preseason NIT.
The second-best improvement was by
Connecticut in November 2010 when the
Huskies went from unranked to No. 7
after beating No. 2 Michigan State and
No. 8 Kentucky on the way to winning
the Maui Invitational.
NEWCOMERS: Villanova wasn't
the only newcomer to this week's poll.
San Diego State used its wins over
Creighton and Marquette en route to the
championship run of the Wooden Legacy
to arrive at No. 24. The Aztecs were
ranked in 12 of the first 13 weeks last
season.
It's been a longer time for Dayton,
appearing at No. 25 following its third-
place finish at the Maui Invitational. The
Flyers beat then-No. 11 Gonzaga in the
opening round, lost to then-No. 18
Baylor in the semifinals when a last-sec-
ond shot didn't fall and beat California
for third place. The Flyers' last appear-
ance in the Top 25 was the first two
weeks of 2009-10.
Villanova and San Diego State are the
only teams this season with two wins
over ranked teams.
SO LONG: Three teams dropped out
of the poll this week, with North
Carolina's fall from No. 16 the biggest
exit.
The Tar Heels were 12th in the pre-
season poll and the first poll of the regu-
lar season. Their home loss to Belmont
dropped them to No. 24. North Carolina
turned that drop around the next week
when the upset of then-No. 3 Louisville
moved it to No. 16.
That wasn't enough of a cushion to
keep the Tar Heels from falling out after
the 63-59 loss to UAB on Sunday.
The others to fall from the ranks of the
ranked this week were Big East mem-
bers who both lost two games. Creighton
fell from 20th after losses to San Diego
State and George Washington in the
Wooden Legacy. Marquette dropped
from No. 25 after losing at Arizona State
and to San Diego State in the Wooden
Legacy.
LEAGUE LOOK: There were no
changes at the top of the conference race
in the Top 25 with the Big Ten still hav-
ing five teams, followed by the Big 12
with four.
The Pac-12 and American Athletic
Conference both stayed with three
ranked teams. The Atlantic Coast
Conference dropped to two teams with
the loss of North Carolina and it is tied
with the Southeastern Conference and
the Atlantic 10, which added Dayton to
Massachusetts this week.
The Big East had both its teams from
last week — Creighton and Marquette
— fall out but Villanova moved in to
keep it in the standings tied with the
Missouri Valley (Wichita State),
Mountain West (San Diego State) and
West Coast (Gonzaga) conferences.
SPORTS
THE TIMES B3 Tuesday, December 3, 2013
If your child’s name appears in the Pic of the Day you are welcome to receive
FREE photo reproductions of the Pic of the Day. Call Diane Ames at 401-767-
8505 to request your Pic of the Day photo set and you will receive one 8”x10”
and two 5”x7” photos as a free gift from Navigant Credit Union. Please give us
the date that your Pic of the Day ran in the paper.
Additional photos can be ordered at a cost of
$8.00 each for one 8”x10” or two 5”x7”
11”x17” Posters can also be ordered at a cost of $10.00
Please leave your order quantities and contact information when you call. You will be called when your
order will be ready for pick up. We accept cash, check and all major credit cards.
Free Pic of the Day
Photo Give-A-Way
Trainer himself has been back on campus to
conduct exit interviews with players.
“Joe and I have talked numerous times
over the last two weeks. He wants nothing
more than the program to be successful, so
he’s been giving me some good insight as far
as some things we need to work on from my
end,” Bjorn said. “You want to be open to that
type of information.”
Asked if those dealings with his ex-foot-
ball coach have provided a sense of what the
next step will entail for the 45-year-old
Trainer, Bjorn responded, “He hasn’t said
anything. I think obviously he wants to stay
in coaching and I think he’s a good coach.
He’s just looking forward to the next fit that
makes sense for him and his family.”
In terms of the Rhody players, Bjorn has
already gathered them for two team meetings
since Trainer’s firing.
“They have an understanding of the time-
line; right now, they know their focus needs
to be on academics and training,” said the
athletic director. “Everyone starts from
scratch when a new coaching staff comes in,
so the players need to realize that when they
come in, you want to be thought of at a cer-
tain level. You want your name to be on the
‘A’ list, not on the ‘B’ list. That’s based on
taking care of business in all the important
areas. ”
The Rams finished the 2013 season on
Saturday, Nov. 16 with official word coming
two days later that Trainer had been relieved
of his duties with one year remaining on his
contract. To that end, Bjorn stated that the
decision to cut ties was not an impulse one.
“You do think about things over the last
few weeks. You always hear these clichés
from ADs that ‘It’s an ongoing evaluation’
and ‘We’re going to evaluate at the end of the
year.’ You’re really doing your evaluation all
year long,” Bjorn expressed. “It wasn’t like it
was a rash decision. It was something that Joe
and I talked about (the day before Trainer and
URI officially parted ways) and talked a little
bit more the following day. It just felt like it
was the right time.”
Follow Brendan McGair on Twitter
@BWMcGair03
scene to demonstrate his message. He informed them they were
leading, 21-20, late in the fourth, then stated, “OK, what are you
going to do? They need the extra point, so are you just going to
let them have it? Or are you going to rise to the occasion and try
your best to block it?
“What we did three years ago was give them the two-point
conversion, and it was a run. They ran it right down our throats.
They scored and went on to win. I also said the game could've
been over if we just stopped it.”
As for the most recent defeat, Pennington has harped on that
as well.
“We were down early, 14-0, and it's because we weren't tak-
ing care of the ball,” he noted of his squad, which finished with
three fumbles (none lost), an interception and eight penalties for
a minus 60 yards. NS eventually came back to tie it at 14-14, but
Avenger senior Ian Geyer knocked home a 20-yard field goal
with 9:21 left to seal it.
“We started to slow; we allowed them to score two quick
touchdowns, and you can't do that against a good, solid, well-
coached team,” he added. “Jim (Alves, EWG's chief) does a nice
job with those guys. The problem was we let them jump out on
top. We need to start playing from the first down of the game. If
we do that (this time), we'll be in the ballgame.
“We had to push to try to get back into it, and that's tough,
especially against such a good defense. When you keep trying to
get something going, you expend a lot of energy, and I think we
just ran out of gas in the fourth quarter.”
He recalled one snap in the second quarter that still bothers
him.
“We had one mistake where (senior signal caller) Mike
(Cicerone) called a play in the huddle on first down, and – with
the guys up at the line – he wanted to change the play,”
Pennington said. “He was looking at a receiver, but the snap went
past him. Next thing we knew, it was second and, like, 26. That's
a 'Bad News Bears' kind of play.
“There's no way we can do that and expect to win the game;
the teams who are tight, they're the ones who will do that, and we
were tight,” he continued. “Still, I did like the fact that our kids
fought right to the end. They didn't quit, especially in that first
half. Their defense is really strong, but they didn't get down.”
***
During that loss, senior running back Dwight Anderson
amassed 103 yards and a touchdown (with a two-point conver-
sion) on 26 carries – the Scarlet Knights posted 270 ground yards
on 46. Meanwhile, senior quarterback Jake Hornoff completed
just three of eight tosses for 35 yards, though chipped in 63 more
on 10 keepers.
For the Northmen, junior Nick Cicerone (who's doubtful for
this playoff tilt with a dislocated elbow) scored on a six-yard
option jaunt with 5:09 left before halftime. Matt Lachance then
hauled in senior Dylan Nardowy's 65-yard halfback option bomb
down the right sideline with 2:32 left in the third, and the latter's
PAT boot tied it.
“The thing that worries me is the fact they're disciplined in
what they do,” Pennington offered. “It's no secret, and they're not
fancy; they don't try to trick you. The backs run hard and they've
got a big offensive line which tries to push you around.
“The way to combat that is to play disciplined, hard-nosed
football, be willing to be just as tough as they are,” he added.
“You don't stop (the ground attack) by side-stepping a ball carri-
er, but by playing tough and physical. Their QB can run the ball,
and (senior running back Dustin VanLuven works off the wing.
“I mean, they were 6-1 in league, and that's not by happen-
stance.”
The good news: The third-seeded Northmen (6-4 overall, 5-2
league) closed the season just one game behind No. 2-ranked
EWG (7-3, 6-1); in addition, they have momentum on their side,
claiming two straight in easy fashion.
After crushing Central Falls, 61-8, they traveled to fourth-
seeded Scituate on Thanksgiving morning and bused home with
a 53-20 blowout.
“I think we gained even more confidence after that win,” he
said of the holiday verdict. “The collective attitude is good, and I
think our guys are excited, ready to go at it. Since that (semifinal
loss three seasons ago), we've been to the playoffs every year.
And, since I've been the head coach in our series, the team play-
ing at home has won, so we have beaten them.
“It also means that every kid I've got has played in at least one
post-season game, but we haven't won any of the three. I want to
see that change this year. We keep knocking on the door, so even-
tually, it's going to open.
“What I want most for our players to understand is not let the
moment overwhelm you but to embrace it,” he continued. “I
know it's more intense, but you can't let it affect the way you've
played all season. I think it's getting through to them, I really do.
(Senior receiver/defensive end) Peter Keenan is a captain, a
three-year starter and a heckuva good football player. He's going
to have to keep everybody focused, as are the other veterans.
“We're going to have to play the caliber of football we're capa-
ble of; I've told them that if they – once the game is over – can
say to themselves themselves, 'I gave it everything I had. I left it
all out there,' then they can walk off the field with their heads
held high. If we give it 120 percent, I'll put our guys up against
every team in our division.
“I mean that.”
started with a great drive there at the start of the
third quarter, then scored again, then scored
again and scored again. It was really a great
way for us to play offense."
The Patriots didn't play that way in the first
seven games when they scored just 54 points
after halftime.
But in the last five, they have 133 points
after intermission, including three in overtime.
They've scored on 23 of their 36 possessions
(64 percent) with 16 touchdowns and seven
field goals.
The post-halftime percentage is even better
in the past three games, when the Patriots have
scored on 14 of 20 possessions (70 percent)
with nine touchdowns and five field goals.
Brady has completed 73 percent of his passes
for an average of 233 yards.
"You give up a touchdown drive and then
you go over there and you come right back out
on a three-and-out or turnover or something
like that and you don't get everything fixed,"
Belichick said of opposing defenses.
"Sometimes those plays reappear in the next
drive and hurt you again."
Now, if only the Patriots could improve in
the first half.
Four games have been decided by a touch-
down or field goal in the final 5 seconds. They
split two that were won on overtime field goals
and won two by scoring with 5 seconds left.
And the winning margin in nine of the Patriots'
12 games was seven points or less. They won
six of them.
"When it does come down to those types of
games, we feel comfortable," running back
Shane Vereen said.
"It's something that we've done so many
times."
On Sunday, the Patriots snapped a three-
game road losing streak.
"Every team has talent so it's tough to win on
the road, especially when you get behind 17-7,"
Brady said. "You pump a lot of life in to them
there. It ended up being a dogfight for us, but
we found a way to pull it out."
They did it without Stevan Ridley, their lead-
ing rusher, who was inactive after losing fum-
bles in the previous three games.
"There's no sending a message. You sit down
and talk to somebody man to man and talk
about the situation," Belichick said. "This isn't
cryptic. We're just trying to win a football
game."
Texans defensive end Antonio Smith won-
dered how the Patriots excelled against a
defense that had some new wrinkles for the
game.
It was "miraculous" how they changed their
offense to key on the defense, Smith said.
"Either teams are spying on us or scouting us."
Belichick said he was aware of Smith's
remarks, but "I don't have any comment on
them. I think that's a league matter."
NFL
Patriots not worried about
Smith’s cries about spying
Continued from page B1
Local sports? Call us at 767-8545
Continued from page B1
URI continues coaching search for next head coach
College football
High school football
Northmen ready for Round 2 with Scarlet Knights
Continued from page B1
WES PENNINGTON
... Northmen one win away from Super Bowl
SCOREBOARD
NBA
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Boston 27 18 7 2 38 75 55
Detroit 28 14 7 7 35 78 73
Tampa Bay 26 16 9 1 33 76 66
Montreal 27 15 9 3 33 73 57
Toronto 27 14 10 3 31 75 73
Ottawa 27 10 13 4 24 78 90
Florida 27 7 15 5 19 59 91
Buffalo 28 6 20 2 14 48 85
Metropolitan Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 28 18 9 1 37 86 64
Washington 27 14 11 2 30 82 78
N.Y. Rangers 27 14 13 0 28 60 66
New Jersey 27 11 11 5 27 59 64
Philadelphia 26 12 12 2 26 57 63
Carolina 27 10 12 5 25 57 78
Columbus 27 10 14 3 23 67 80
N.Y. Islanders 27 8 15 4 20 72 93
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Chicago 28 20 4 4 44102 76
St. Louis 25 18 4 3 39 89 57
Colorado 25 19 6 0 38 76 52
Minnesota 28 15 8 5 35 68 67
Nashville 27 13 11 3 29 62 75
Dallas 25 12 9 4 28 70 73
Winnipeg 28 12 12 4 28 73 80
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
San Jose 26 18 3 5 41 92 60
Anaheim 29 18 7 4 40 91 77
Los Angeles 27 16 7 4 36 70 58
Phoenix 26 15 7 4 34 85 84
Vancouver 29 14 10 5 33 77 77
Calgary 26 9 13 4 22 70 93
Edmonton 28 9 17 2 20 73 95
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
— — —
Sunday's Games
Edmonton 3, Dallas 2, SO
Vancouver 3, Carolina 2
Detroit 4, Ottawa 2
Monday's Games
Winnipeg at N.Y. Rangers, (n)
New Jersey at Montreal, (n)
Philadelphia at Minnesota, (n)
St. Louis at Los Angeles, (n)
Tuesday's Games
San Jose at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Pittsburgh at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m.
Carolina at Washington, 7 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Ottawa at Florida, 7:30 p.m.
Dallas at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Vancouver at Nashville, 8 p.m.
Phoenix at Edmonton, 9:30 p.m.
Los Angeles at Anaheim, 10 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Montreal at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at Detroit, 8 p.m.
Phoenix at Calgary, 10 p.m.
NHL Goalie Leaders
By The Associated Press
Through games of Sunday, December 1, 2013
Name Team GPI MINS GA AVG
Ben Scrivens Los Angeles 14 710 18 1.52
Josh Harding Minnesota 21 1181 30 1.52
Cory Schneider New Jersey 12 732 21 1.72
Tuukka Rask Boston 22 1329 42 1.90
Carey Price Montreal 21 1263 42 2.00
Marek Mazanec Nashville 11 631 21 2.00
Marc-Andre Fleury Pittsburgh 23 1338 46 2.06
Ben Bishop Tampa Bay 20 1156 40 2.08
Steve Mason Philadelphia 19 1120 39 2.09
Jaroslav Halak St Louis 20 1132 40 2.12
Semyon Varlamov Colorado 19 1101 39 2.13
Jonas Gustavsson Detroit 9 529 19 2.16
Kari Lehtonen Dallas 19 1129 41 2.18
Martin Brodeur New Jersey 15 902 33 2.20
Antti Niemi San Jose 23 1382 51 2.21
Pekka Rinne Nashville 9 493 19 2.31
Brian Elliott St Louis 8 389 15 2.31
Jonathan Quick Los Angeles 16 945 37 2.35
Corey Crawford Chicago 24 1374 54 2.36
Roberto Luongo Vancouver 24 1393 56 2.41
SPORTS
B4 THE TIMES Tuesday, December 3, 2013
SPORTS ON THE AIR
TODAY
NBABASKETBALL
7:30 p.m. — Milwaukee at Boston, CSN, WBZ-FM (98.5).
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7:15 p.m. — Indiana at Syracuse, ESPN.
7:15 p.m. — Illinois at Georgia Tech, ESPN2.
9:15 p.m. — Michigan at Duke, ESPN.
9:15 p.m. — Notre Dame at Iowa, ESPN2.
NHLHOCKEY
8 p.m. — Dallas at Chicago, NBC Sports.
SOCCER
2:40 p.m. — Premier League, West Ham at Crystal Palace, NBC
Sports.
NFL
By The Associated Press
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
New England 9 3 0.750 322 261
Miami 6 6 0.500 252 248
N.Y. Jets 5 7 0.417 189 310
Buffalo 4 8 0.333 267 307
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Indianapolis 8 4 0.667 285 274
Tennessee 5 7 0.417 264 267
Jacksonville 3 9 0.250174 352
Houston 2 10 0.167 230 323
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Cincinnati 8 4 0.667 292 216
Baltimore 6 6 0.500 249 235
Pittsburgh 5 7 0.417 263 278
Cleveland 4 8 0.333 231 297
West
W L T Pct PF PA
Denver 10 2 0.833 464 317
Kansas City 9 3 0.750 298 214
San Diego 5 7 0.417 279 277
Oakland 4 8 0.333 237 300
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
Dallas 7 5 0.583329303
Philadelphia 7 5 0.583300281
N.Y. Giants 5 7 0.417237297
Washington 3 9 0.250269362
South
W L T Pct PF PA
New Orleans 9 2 0.818 305 196
Carolina 9 3 0.750 285 157
Tampa Bay 3 9 0.250 217 285
Atlanta 3 9 0.250 261 340
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Detroit 7 5 0.583 326 287
Chicago 6 6 0.500 323 332
Green Bay 5 6 1.458 294 305
Minnesota 3 8 1.292 289 366
West
W L T Pct PF PA
Seattle 10 1 0.909 306 179
San Francisco 8 4 0.667 297 197
Arizona 7 5 0.583 275 247
St. Louis 5 7 0.417 279 278
— — —
Thursday’s Games
Detroit 40, Green Bay 10
Dallas 31, Oakland 24
Baltimore 22, Pittsburgh 20
Sunday's Games
Minnesota 23, Chicago 20, OT
New England 34, Houston 31
Indianapolis 22, Tennessee 14
Jacksonville 32, Cleveland 28
Carolina 27, Tampa Bay 6
Philadelphia 24, Arizona 21
Miami 23, N.Y. Jets 3
San Francisco 23, St. Louis 13
Atlanta 34, Buffalo 31, OT
Cincinnati 17, San Diego 10
Denver 35, Kansas City 28
N.Y. Giants 24, Washington 17
Monday's Game
New Orleans at Seattle, 8:40 p.m.
Thursday, Dec. 5
Houston at Jacksonville, 8:25 p.m.
Sunday, Dec. 8
Atlanta at Green Bay, 1 p.m.
Minnesota at Baltimore, 1 p.m.
Kansas City at Washington, 1 p.m.
Buffalo at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m.
Miami at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m.
Detroit at Philadelphia, 1 p.m.
Indianapolis at Cincinnati, 1 p.m.
Cleveland at New England, 1 p.m.
Oakland at N.Y. Jets, 1 p.m.
Tennessee at Denver, 4:05 p.m.
Seattle at San Francisco, 4:25 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at San Diego, 4:25 p.m.
St. Louis at Arizona, 4:25 p.m.
Carolina at New Orleans, 8:30 p.m.
Monday, Dec. 9
Dallas at Chicago, 8:40 p.m.
NFL Calendar
By The Associated Press
Dec. 29 — Regular season ends
Jan. 4-5 — Wild-card playoffs
Jan. 11-12 — Division-round playoffs
Jan. 19 — Conference championships
Feb. 1 — NFL Honors awards show at New
York
Feb. 2 — Super Bowl at East Rutherford,
N.J.
NHL
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OL SL PtsGF GA
Manchester23 15 4 1 3 3472 56
Providence 21 11 7 1 2 25 74 71
St. John's 23 11 9 1 2 2566 67
Worcester 17 8 8 1 0 1738 49
Portland 18 7 8 1 2 1746 53
East Division
GP W L OL SL PtsGF GA
Binghamton21 14 6 0 1 2978 59
WB/Scranton2113 5 1 2 2970 53
Syracuse 20 11 7 1 1 2456 53
Norfolk 22 10 8 0 4 24 57 56
Hershey 19 7 7 2 3 19 57 59
Northeast Division
GP W L OL SL PtsGF GA
Springfield 19 14 3 1 1 3058 41
Albany 21 12 7 1 1 2663 57
Adirondack 20 9 9 0 2 2048 54
Hartford 21 9 10 0 2 2055 69
Bridgeport 20 6 10 1 3 1655 73
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Midwest Division
GP W L OL SL PtsGF GA
Grand Rapids2115 4 1 1 32 81 51
Milwaukee 20 10 5 4 1 25 51 55
Rockford 24 12 11 1 0 2569 84
Chicago 21 10 9 0 2 22 57 56
Iowa 18 7 11 0 0 1440 49
North Division
GP W L OL SL PtsGF GA
Toronto 20 12 7 1 0 2559 53
Hamilton 22 10 9 0 3 2359 63
Rochester 21 9 8 2 2 2264 71
Lake Erie 20 10 9 0 1 2156 62
Utica 19 6 11 1 1 1443 59
West Division
GP W L OL SL PtsGF GA
Abbotsford 25 17 6 1 1 3683 70
Texas 23 11 8 2 2 2678 68
San Antonio21 10 10 0 1 21 57 58
Oklahoma City229 10 0 3 2156 64
Charlotte 21 7 13 0 1 1554 67
NOTE: Two points are awarded for a win, one
point for an overtime or shootout loss.
— — —
Sunday's Games
Milwaukee 2, Charlotte 1
Bridgeport 3, Manchester 2
Providence 3, Hershey 2, SO
Monday's Games
No games scheduled
Tuesday's Games
Texas at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Bridgeport at Adirondack, 7 p.m.
Springfield at Albany, 7 p.m.
Utica at Rochester, 7:05 p.m.
Iowa at San Antonio, 8 p.m.
AHL
By The Associated Press
Dec. 2-5 — Major League Baseball Players
Association executive board meeting, La Jolla,
Calif.
Dec. 9-12 — Winter meetings, Lake Buena Vista,
Fla.
Dec. 9 — Hall of Fame expansion era committee
(1973 and later) vote announced, Lake Buena
Vista, Fla.
2014
Jan. 8 — Hall of Fame voting announced.
Jan. 14 — Salary arbitration filing.
Jan. 15-16 — Owners' meetings, Paradise Valley,
Ariz.
Jan. 17 — Salary arbitration figures exchanged.
Feb. 1-21 — Salary arbitration hearings, St.
Petersburg, Fla.
Feb. 13 — Voluntary reporting date for pitchers,
catchers and injured players.
Feb. 18 — Voluntary reporting date for other play-
ers.
Feb. 25 — Mandatory reporting date.
March 12 — Last day to place a player on uncon-
ditional release waivers and pay 30 days termina-
tion pay instead of 45 days.
March 22-23 — Los Angeles Dodgers vs.
Arizona, Sydney.
March 26 — Last day to request unconditional
release waivers on a player without having to pay
his full 2014 salary.
March 30 — Opening day for other teams. Active
rosters reduced to 25 players.
June 5 — Amateur draft.
July 15 — All-Star game, Minneapolis.
July 18 — Deadline for amateur draft picks to
sign.
July 27 — Hall of Fame inductions, Cooperstown,
N.Y.
July 31 — Last day to trade a player without secur-
ing waivers.
BASEBALL CALENDAR
By The Associated Press
Dec. 3
1943 — Notre Dame quarterback Angelo Bertelli wins the Heisman Trophy.
1946 — Army halfback Glenn Davis is named the Heisman Trophy winner.
1950 — Tom Fears of the Los Angeles Rams has 18 receptions against Green Bay.
1950 — Cloyce Box of the Detroit Lions has 302 yards receiving and scores four touchdowns against
the Baltimore Colts.
1956 — Wilt Chamberlain scores 52 points in his collegiate debut with Kansas.
1957 — Texas A&M halfback John David Crow is named the Heisman Trophy winner.
1972 — Bobby Howfield of the New York Jets kicks six field goals against New Orleans.
1973 — Dick Anderson of the Miami Dolphins intercepts four passes, returning two for touchdowns,
against Pittsburgh.
1979 — Southern California halfback Charles White is named the Heisman Trophy winner.
1982 — Tommy Hearns wins the WBC welterweight title with a 15-round decision over Wilfred
Benitez in New Orleans.
2000 — The 200-yard rushing games by Mike Anderson, Corey Dillon, Warrick Dunn and Curtis
Martin mark the first time in NFL history that four runners have 200 yards on the same day. It's never
happened three times in a single day. Anderson rushes for an NFL rookie record 251 yards and four
touchdowns in Denver's 38-23 victory over New Orleans.
2004 — Bode Miller wins his fourth race of the season in the downhill at Beaver Creek, Colo., and
Daron Rahlves is second to give the United States its first 1-2 finish on the World Cup circuit. The
last time U.S. men went 1-2 in any elite international race was 1984, when Phil Mahre won the
Olympic slalom in Sarajevo and twin brother Steve took the silver medal.
THIS DATE IN SPORTS
Monday's Sports Transactions
By The Associated Press
BASEBALL
American League
DETROIT TIGERS — Agreed to terms with
INF/OF Don Kelly on a one-year contract.
KANSAS CITY ROYALS — Declined to offer a
2014 contract to INF Chris Getz.
NEW YORK YANKEES — Traded C Chris Stewart
to Pittsburgh for a player to be named. Agreed to
terms with INF Brendan Ryan on a two-year con-
tract. Declined to offer 2014 contracts to INFs
David Adams and Jayson Nix and RHP Matt
Daley.
National League
ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS — Named Mike
Harkey pitching coach and Mel Stottlemyre Jr.
bullpen coach.
LOS ANGELES DODGERS — Agreed to terms
with OF Mike Baxter, C Drew Butera and LHP
Scott Elbert on one-year contracts.
PITTSBURGH PIRATES — Designated C Michael
McKenry for assignment.
American Association
WINNIPEG GOLDEYES — Signed C Matthew
Albaugh and RHP David Hatt.
Frontier League
GATEWAY GRIZZLIES — Signed C Garrett Vail.
RIVER CITY RASCALS — Signed RHP Corey
MacDonald.
FOOTBALL
NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS — Released OT
Patrick Ford from the practice squad. Re-signed
OL R.J. Dill to the practice squad.
Canadian Football League
EDMONTON ESKIMOS — Signed SB Adarius
Bowman to a two-year contract extension.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
DALLAS STARS — Placed D Aaron Rome on
injured reserve, retroactive to Nov. 24. Recalled
F Travis Morin from Texas (AHL).
DETROIT RED WINGS — Reassigned D
Richard Nedomlel from Grand Rapids (AHL) to
Toledo (ECHL).
OTTAWA SENATORS — Reassigned D Mark
Borowiecki and F Derek Grant to Binghamton
(AHL). Recalled F Mike Hoffman from
Binghamton.
PHOENIX COYOTES — Assigned D Rostislav
Klesla to Portland (AHL).
COLLEGE
BIG TEN CONFERENCE — Fined Nebraska
$10,000 for a violation of the conference's
sportsmanship policy by football coach Bo
Pelini during Friday's game.
COLGATE — Announced the retirement of foot-
ball coach Dick Biddle.
FLORIDA — Announced CB Loucheiz Purifoy
will enter the NFL draft.
MISSOURI-KANSAS CITY — Named Carla
Wilson athletic director.
SOUTHERN CAL — Announced the resignation
of interim football coach Ed Orgeron. Named
Steve Sarkisian football coach.
WAKE FOREST — Announced the resignation
of football coach Jim Grobe.
TRANSACTIONS
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
NFL
FAVORITE OPEN TODAY O/U UNDERDOG
Thursday
Houston 3 2½ (43) at Jacksonville
Sunday
Kansas City 3 3 (46) at Washington
at Baltimore 7 7 (43) Minnesota
at New England OFF OFF (OFF) Cleveland
at N.Y. Jets 3 3 (40½) Oakland
at Cincinnati 5½ 5 (44) Indianapolis
at New Orleans OFF OFF (OFF) Carolina
at Philadelphia 2½ 2½ (54½) Detroit
at Pittsburgh 3½ 3 (41½) Miami
at Tampa Bay 2½ 2½ (42½) Buffalo
at Denver 12½ 12½ (50) Tennessee
at Arizona 7 6½ (41½) St. Louis
at San Diego 3 3 (46) N.Y. Giants
at San Francisco OFF OFF (OFF) Seattle
at Green Bay OFF OFF (OFF) Atlanta
Monday
at Chicago OFF OFF (OFF) Dallas
Off Key
Cleveland QB questionable
New Orleans played Monday night
Seattle played Monday night
Green Bay QB questionable
Chicago QB questionable
College Football
FAVORITE OPEN TODAY UNDERDOG
Thursday’s Game
Louisville 7 3½ at Cincinnati
Friday
Conference Championships
Mid-American
At Detroit
N. Illinois 3 3 Bowling Green
Saturday
Memphis Pk 1 at UConn
at Rutgers 7 7 South Florida
at Baylor 14 13½ Texas
at South Alabama Pk 2 La.-Lafayette
at SMU OFF OFF UCF
at Oklahoma St. 10½ 10½ Oklahoma
Off Key
SMU QB questionable
Conference Championships
Conference USA
Marshall 4½ 4½ at Rice
Southeastern
At Atlanta
Auburn 3 1½ Missouri
Atlantic Coast
At Charlotte, N.C.
Florida St. 30 29 Duke
Pacific-12
at Arizona St. 3 3 Stanford
Big Ten
At Indianapolis
Ohio St. 6½ 5½ Michigan St.
Mountain West
at Fresno St. 3½ 3 Utah St.
GLANTZ-CULVER LINE
MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Toronto 6 10 .375 —
Boston 7 12 .368 ½
Philadelphia 6 12 .333 1
Brooklyn 5 12 .294 1½
New York 3 13 .188 3
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 14 3 .824 —
Atlanta 9 9 .500 5½
Washington 8 9 .471 6
Charlotte 8 10 .444 6½
Orlando 6 10 .375 7½
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Indiana 16 1 .941 —
Chicago 7 8 .467 8
Detroit 7 10 .412 9
Cleveland 5 12 .294 11
Milwaukee 3 13 .188 12½
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 14 3 .824 —
Houston 13 5 .722 1½
Dallas 10 8 .556 4½
Memphis 8 8 .500 5½
New Orleans 8 8 .500 5½
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Portland 14 3 .824 —
Oklahoma City 12 3 .800 1
Denver 10 6 .625 3½
Minnesota 9 10 .474 6
Utah 3 15 .167 11½
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 12 6 .667 —
Golden State 10 8 .556 2
Phoenix 9 8 .529 2½
L.A. Lakers 9 9 .500 3
Sacramento 4 11 .267 6½
— — —
Sunday's Games
Denver 112, Toronto 98
Indiana 105, L.A. Clippers 100
Detroit 115, Philadelphia 100
Golden State 115, Sacramento 113
Miami 99, Charlotte 98
Oklahoma City 113, Minnesota 103
New Orleans 103, New York 99
Portland 114, L.A. Lakers 108
Monday's Games
Orlando at Washington, (n)
New Orleans at Chicago, (n)
Atlanta at San Antonio, (n)
Houston at Utah, (n)
Indiana at Portland, 10 p.m.
Tuesday's Games
Orlando at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Denver at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m.
Milwaukee at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Detroit at Miami, 7:30 p.m.
Phoenix at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Charlotte at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Sacramento, 10 p.m.
Toronto at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Denver at Cleveland, 7 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Phoenix at Houston, 8 p.m.
Detroit at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.
Dallas at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Indiana at Utah, 9 p.m.
San Antonio vs. Minnesota at Mexico City, Mexico,
9:30 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Portland, 10 p.m.
NBA Leaders
THROUGH DEC. 1
Scoring
G FG FT PTS AVG
Durant, OKC15 126 146 424 28.3
Anthony, NYK16 150 103 421 26.3
James, MIA 17 158 104 445 26.2
George, IND17 143 77 405 23.8
Love, MIN 19 147 116 450 23.7
Harden, HOU14 98 106 330 23.6
Martin, MIN 18 132 108 417 23.2
Aldrdge, POR17 157 67 381 22.4
Curry, GOL 15 122 39 334 22.3
Ellis, DAL 18 141 96 395 21.9
Cousins, SAC15 127 72 326 21.7
DeRozan, TOR16 123 76 345 21.6
Afflalo, ORL 16 116 71 342 21.4
Turner, PHL 18 147 78 384 21.3
Thmpsn, GOL18 138 44 382 21.2
Griffin, LAC 18 153 73 382 21.2
Irving, CLE 17 130 66 351 20.6
Lawson, DEN16 109 90 330 20.6
Nowitzki, DAL18 131 83 371 20.6
Lillard, POR 17 109 78 344 20.2
Rebounds
G OFF DEF TOT AVG
Love, MIN 19 73 186 259 13.6
Jordan, LAC18 80 151 231 12.8
Howard, HOU18 57 167 224 12.4
Drmmond, DET17 78 129 207 12.2
Vucevic, ORL16 49 128 177 11.1
Griffin, LAC 18 41 158 199 11.1
Ibaka, OKC 15 44 109 153 10.2
Davis, NOR 16 60 103 163 10.2
Hawes, PHL 16 30 132 162 10.1
Cousins, SAC15 35 116 151 10.1
Assists
G AST AVG
Paul, LAC 17 205 12.1
Wall, WAS 17 153 9.0
Curry, GOL 15 130 8.7
Rubio, MIN 19 162 8.5
Jennings, DET 15 126 8.4
Lawson, DEN 16 131 8.2
Teague, ATL 18 146 8.1
Holiday, NOR 16 124 7.8
Blake, LAL 18 138 7.7
Dragic, PHX 14 101 7.2
This Week’s Schedule
By The Associated Press
Thursday’s Game
Louisville at Cincinnati, 7:30 p.m.
Friday’s Game
MIDWEST
Mid-American championship, Bowling Green
vs. Northern Illinois, at Detroit, 8 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
EAST
Memphis at UConn, 1 p.m.
South Florida at Rutgers, 7:30 p.m.
SOUTH
Conference USA championship, Marshall vs.
Rice at TBD, Noon
Southern U. at Jackson St., 2 p.m.
SEC championship, Missouri vs. Auburn, at
Atlanta, 4 p.m.
Louisiana-Lafayette at South Alabama, 8 p.m.
ACC championship, Duke vs. Florida St.,
Charlotte, N.C., 8 p.m.
MIDWEST
Big Ten championship, Ohio St. vs. Michigan
St. at Indianapolis, 8 p.m.
SOUTHWEST
Oklahoma at Oklahoma St., Noon
UCF at SMU, Noon
SWAC championship, Jackson St. vs. South-
ern U., at Houston, 2 p.m.
Texas at Baylor, 3:30 p.m.
FAR WEST
Pac-12 championship, Stanford at Arizona
St., 8 p.m.
Mountain West championship, Utah St. vs.
Fresno St. at TBA, 10 p.m.
FCS PLAYOFFS
Second Round
Fordham at Towson, 1 p.m.
Coastal Carolina at Montana, 2 p.m.
New Hampshire at Maine, 2 p.m.
Tennessee State at Eastern Illinois, 2 p.m.
Furman at North Dakota State, 3:30 p.m.
South Dakota State at Eastern Washington, 4
p.m.
Jacksonville State at McNeese State, 7 p.m.
Sam Houston State at Southeastern Louisia-
na, 8 p.m.
The AP Top-25
The top 25 teams in The Associated Press'
college basketball poll, with first-place votes
in parentheses, records through Dec. 1, total
points based on 25 points for a first-place
vote through one point for a 25th-place vote
and last week's ranking:
Record Pts Prv
1. Michigan St. (63) 7-0 1,623 1
2. Arizona (2) 7-0 1,547 4
3. Kentucky 7-1 1,473 3
4. Syracuse 7-0 1,375 8
5. Ohio St. 6-0 1,340 7
6. Kansas 6-1 1,240 2
7. Louisville 6-1 1,139 9
8. Wisconsin 8-0 1,094 10
9. Oklahoma St . 7-1 1,070 5
10. Duke 6-2 1,021 6
11. Wichita St. 8-0 911 12
12. UConn 7-0 836 13
13. Oregon 7-0 801 14
14. Villanova 7-0 785 —
15. Florida 6-1 758 15
16. Memphis `5-1 748 21
17. Iowa St. 5-0 623 17
18. UCLA 7-0 548 19
19. Gonzaga 7-1 380 11
20. Baylor 7-1 377 18
21. UMass 6-0 274 24
22. Michigan 5-2 223 22
23. Iowa 7-1 171 23
24. San Diego St. 5-1 150 —
25. Dayton 6-1 90 —
Others receiving votes: Indiana 74, Virginia
73, New Mexico 71, North Carolina 62,
Florida St. 40, Boise St. 36, Pittsburgh 36,
VCU 30, Charlotte 20, Colorado 17,
Creighton 17, Missouri 16, Harvard 10,
Illinois 10, Cincinnati 8, Mississippi 3,
George Washington 2, Saint Mary's (Cal) 2,
Xavier 1.
USA Today Top 25 Poll
The top 25 teams in the USA Today men's
college basketball poll, with first-place votes
in parentheses, records through Dec. 1,
points based on 25 points for a first-place
vote through one point for a 25th-place vote
and previous ranking:
Record Pts Pvs
1. Michigan State (31) 7-0 799 1
2. Arizona (1) 7-0 758 3
3. Ohio State 6-0 695 6
4. Kentucky 7-1 683 4
5. Syracuse 7-0 682 7
6. Louisville 6-1 607 9
7. Kansas 6-1 597 2
8. Duke 6-2 547 5
9. Wisconsin 8-0 517 11
10. Wichita State 8-0 484 12
11. Oklahoma State 7-1 476 8
12. Florida 6-1 426 13
13. Oregon 7-0 417 15
14. UConn 7-0 410 14
15. Memphis 5-1 311 19
15. Gonzaga 7-1 311 10
17. UCLA 7-0 261 21
18. Iowa State 5-0 245 22
19. Villanova 7-0 201 —
20. Baylor 7-1 195 17
21. Michigan 5-2 156 20
22. UMass 6-0 122 —
23. Indiana 6-1 76 25
24. Iowa 7-1 63 23
25. North Carolina 4-2 62 16
Others receiving votes: Virginia 42, New
Mexico 36, San Diego State 35, VCU 35,
Pittsburgh 33, Dayton 26, Boise State 21,
Creighton 17, Saint Mary's 13, Florida State
10, Missouri 10, Colorado 8, Charlotte 6,
Marquette 4, Notre Dame 2, George
Washington 1.
WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
The Women's Top Twenty Five
By The Associated Press
The top 25 teams in The Associated Press'
women's college basketball poll, with first-place
votes in parentheses, records through Dec. 1,
total points based on 25 points for a first-place
vote through one point for a 25th-place vote and
last week's ranking:
Record Pts Prv
1. UConn (36) 9-0 900 1
2. Duke 8-0 864 2
3. Tennessee 7-0 807 3
4. Notre Dame 6-0 769 5
5. Kentucky 8-0 752 7
6. Stanford 7-1 737 6
7. Louisville 7-1 675 4
8. Maryland 7-1 650 8
9. Baylor 6-0 642 9
10. Penn St. 5-1 528 13
11. Colorado 6-0 480 14
12. South Carolina 7-0 442 17
13. LSU 6-1 441 15
14. Oklahoma St. 7-0 370 19
15. Nebraska 6-1 330 10
16. Purdue 5-1 293 16
17. Oklahoma 4-2 290 18
18. North Carolina 6-2 283 11
19. Georgia 8-0 280 22
20. Iowa St. 6-0 249 23
21. California 5-2 216 20
22. Syracuse 8-0 132 —
23. Texas A&M 4-2 131 12
24. Gonzaga 4-1 125 24
25. Iowa 8-1 93 —
Others receiving votes: Michigan St. 88, Florida
St. 33, Arizona St. 31, Texas 19, Arkansas 10,
Marquette 9, West Virginia 8, Georgia Tech 6,
UTEP 6, Northwestern 5, Middle Tennessee 2,
San Diego 2, BYU 1, Bowling Green 1.
MEN’S COLLEGE HOCKEY
NCAA Division I Ice Hockey Poll
MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — The top 20 teams in the
NCAA Division I men's ice hockey poll, compiled
by U.S. College Hockey Online, with first-place
votes in parentheses, records through Dec. 1 and
previous ranking:
Record Pts Pvs
1. Minnesota (41) 11-2-1 988 1
2. St. Cloud State (8)9-1-2 940 2
3. Michigan 9-2-1 883 3
4. Providence 11-2-2 843 4
5. Quinnipiac 13-2-2 817 5
6. Ferris State (1) 11-2-2 754 6
7. UMass-Lowell 10-4-0 683 8
8. Yale 6-2-2 628 9
9. Boston College 8-4-2 583 7
10. Clarkson 10-3-1 552 10
11. Union 8-3-2 430 15
12. Miami 8-6-2 421 13
13. Notre Dame 9-6-1 404 11
14. Lake Superior 9-4-1 353 16
15. Cornell 7-4-1 251 14
16. Nebraska-Omaha8-6-0 228 17
17. Wisconsin 4-5-1 179 12
18. New Hampshire9-7-1 134 20
19. Northeastern 9-5-1 131 —
20. Minnesota-Duluth6-5-1 122 18
Others receiving votes: Rensselaer 102, Ohio
State 29, Boston University 13, Denver 13,
Vermont 7, St. Lawrence 5, Maine 3, North
Dakota 2, Air Force 1, Minnesota State 1.
MLB
Teams face midnight
deadline to offer deals
NEWYORK (AP) — As the big-money free agents negoti-
ated, dozens of players with lower profiles waited to find out
whether they would be dumped on the market by their clubs
Monday night.
Teams had until midnight to offer 2014 contracts to
unsigned players on their 40-man rosters. Once a player
receives a contract offer, his team no longer can release him
before the start of the season without giving him termination
pay. That means a club would be responsible for about one-
sixth of the salary, which could be a large amount if the player
is eligible for arbitration.
Clubs often use the so-called tender deadline as leverage to
force agreements with players they won't go to arbitration with.
In the first announcement of the day, Kansas City declined
to offer a contract to infielder Chris Getz, who made $1.05 mil-
lion this year while hitting .220.
Detroit struck a one-year deal with infielder Don Kelly. In
agreements announced Friday, the Los Angeles Dodgers
reached deals with outfielder Mike Baxter and catcher Drew
Butera ($700,000 each) and left-hander Scott Elbert
($575,000).
With an excess of catching after reaching an agreement to
sign Brian McCann, the New York Yankees traded Chris
Stewart to Pittsburgh for a player to be named. The Yankees
also finalized a $5 million, two-year contract with Brendan
Ryan, who became their starter in September when Derek Jeter
went back on the disabled list.
Among players already on the free-agent market, left-hander
Scott Kazmir was closing in on a $22 million, two-year con-
tract with the Oakland Athletics.
The new contract is pending a physical, a person said,
speaking of anonymity because the team hadn't finalized the
deal.
Catcher Dioner Navarro agreed to an $8 million, two-year
contract with Toronto, a person familiar with those negotiations
said, also speaking on condition of anonymity because the
agreement had not been announced.
Navarro will get $3 million next year and $5 million in
2016.
BOXING
Fight Schedule
(Televised fights in parentheses)
Tuesday’s Fights
At Osaka, Japan, Daiki Kameda vs. Liborio Solis, 12, for Kameda's IBF super flyweight and
WBA World super flyweight titles; Tomoki Kameda vs. Immanuel Naidjala, 12, for Kameda's
WBO bantamweight title; Katsunari Takayama vs. Vergilio Silvano, 12, for Takayama's IBF
minimumweight title.
At Bethlehem, Pa., Roy Jones Jr. vs. Bobby Gunn, 12, cruiserweights.
DEAR ABBY:
I am a 38-year-old woman
who has been dating a 41-year-
old man for seven months.
He’s wonderful and treats me
magnificently. We have simi-
lar values and interests and
are very much in love. Sadly,
although I have always wanted
children, he does not.
At my age, I have dated
enough men to know that I
have found someone special. I
realize my choice is either to
stay in a relationship with a
fabulous partner, knowing we
won’t have children, or end it,
hoping I’ll find someone just
as wonderful who wants kids.
Your advice in making the
hardest decision of my life
would be greatly appreciated.
— MATERNAL
IN NEW YORK
DEAR MATERNAL: I’ll
try. Many women in their late
30s find that conceiving a
child is complicated, and it
can also take longer than they
thought. It has taken you 38
years to find this exceptional
man, and it could take quite a
bit of time to find another
one who is so compatible.
Look at it this way: If you
married “Mr. Wonderful” and
learned afterward that he
couldn’t father a child, would
you leave him? Insist on
adopting? Or would you count
the many blessings you do
have with him and stay?
Many women are happily
childless. However, if you’re
not one of them, you should
take your chances and move
on — remembering that there
are no guarantees.
DEAR ABBY:
I work on a busy street in
San Francisco where smokers
walk around puffing all day
while ignoring those around
them. Don’t you think they
should be considerate enough
to smoke at designated areas
only and not while walking
with their secondhand smoke
billowing around other pedes-
trians?
I have seen pregnant
women and children inundat-
ed by the smoke as these
puffers stroll by with no
regard. We nonsmokers would
appreciate their courtesy for
others because we don’t want
to inhale what they’re smok-
ing. Can you comment?
— HATES THAT HABIT
DEAR HATES THAT
HABIT: I hate it, too, but
unless there is an ordinance in
your city that prohibits smok-
ing on certain sidewalks, I
think it’s unrealistic to expect
smokers who inhale not to
exhale.
DEAR READERS:
Years ago, a young mother
in Arlington, Va., wrote my
mother about a book she had
received that promised to help
parents prepare their children
for school by expanding their
vocabulary. The “secret”?
Reading to them while they
are small.
Children learn words by
hearing them spoken in con-
text — the more they hear, the
more they absorb. Like every-
thing else, reading is some-
thing people will do more of if
they enjoy it. When a parent
reads to a child, the child
associates reading with pleas-
ure.
“The Read-Aloud
Handbook” by Jim Trelease
became a huge best-seller
when it was published.
Penguin Books called it one
of the 75 most important
books it has published in its
history. The book is now in its
seventh — and LAST — edi-
tion and has been completely
revised and updated. If you’re
a parent who wants your child
to succeed, a grandparent, or
someone contemplating
becoming a parent in the
future, pick up a copy.
The first half is filled with
the latest research on the
importance of literacy for chil-
dren’s success; the rest lists
book titles and ages of the
youngsters for which they’re
intended. To learn more about
the author, visit www.trelease-
on-reading.com. To order the
book, go to
www.penguin.com.
— Love, ABBY
Dear Abby is written by
Abigail Van Buren, also known
as Jeanne Phillips, and was
founded by her mother, Pauline
Phillips. Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box
69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.
Abby shares more than 100
of her favorite recipes in two
booklets: “Abby’s Favorite
Recipes” and “More Favorite
Recipes by Dear Abby.” Send
your name and mailing
address, plus check or money
order for $14 (U.S. funds) to:
Dear Abby, Cookbooklet Set,
P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris,
IL 61054-0447. (Shipping and
handling are included in the
price.)
TUESDAY EVENING DECEMBER 3, 2013
6 PM 6:30 7 PM 7:30 8 PM 8:30 9 PM 9:30 10 PM 10:30 11 PM 11:30
^ WGBH 2 2 2 2
PBS NewsHour (N) Å Greater Bos-
ton Å
Favorites Charlie Rose (N) Å
2 2 2
$ WBZ 4 4 4
WBZ News
(N) Å
CBS Evening
News/Pelley
Wheel of For-
tune (N)
Jeopardy!
(N) Å
NCIS “The Namesake” A petty
officer is shot.
NCIS: Los Angeles A crime is
linked to a cartel kingpin.
(:01) Person of Interest “Rel-
evance” Å
WBZ News
(N) Å
Late Show W/
Letterman
4 4
% WCVB 5 5 5
NewsCenter 5
at Six (N)
ABC World
News
Inside Edition
(N) Å
Chronicle Å Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.
Å
(:01) The Gold-
bergs (N)
(:31) Trophy
Wife (N)
What Would You Do? (Season
Premiere) (N) Å
NewsCenter 5
Late (N)
(:35) Jimmy
Kimmel Live
6 6 5 5
& WLNE 6
ABC6 News at 6
(N) Å
ABC World
News
omg! Insider
(N) Å
Inside Edition
(N) Å
Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.
Å
(:01) The Gold-
bergs (N)
(:31) Trophy
Wife (N)
What Would You Do? (Season
Premiere) (N) Å
ABC6 News at
Eleven (N)
(:35) Jimmy
Kimmel Live
6 6
_ WHDH 7 7 7
7 News at 6PM
(N)
NBC Nightly
News (N)
Access Hol-
lywood (N)
Extra (N) Å The Biggest Loser A contestant
goes home for the week.
The Voice “Live Eliminations”
The artists face elimination.
(:01) Chicago Fire Boden tries to
save the firehouse. (N)
7 News at
11PM (N)
Tonight Show
w/Jay Leno
7 7
* WJAR 10 10 10
NBC 10 News at
6pm (N)
NBC Nightly
News (N)
NBC 10 News at
7pm (N)
Extra (N) Å The Biggest Loser A contestant
goes home for the week.
The Voice “Live Eliminations”
The artists face elimination.
(:01) Chicago Fire Boden tries to
save the firehouse. (N)
NBC 10 News at
11pm (N)
Tonight Show
w/Jay Leno
10 10 10 10
, WPRI 12
12 News at 6 CBS Evening
News/Pelley
Wheel of For-
tune (N)
Jeopardy!
(N) Å
NCIS “The Namesake” A petty
officer is shot.
NCIS: Los Angeles A crime is
linked to a cartel kingpin.
(:01) Person of Interest “Rel-
evance” Å
News at 11 Late Show W/
Letterman
12 12 12 12
9 WFXT 6 13 13
Fox 25 News at
6 (N) Å
Fox 25 News at
6:30 (N)
TMZ (N) Å Dish Nation
(N) Å
Dads (N) Å
(DVS)
Brooklyn Nine-
Nine (N)
New Girl “All
In”
The Mindy
Project (N)
Fox 25 News at 10 (N) Å Fox 25 News at
11 (N)
TMZ Å
8
< WLWC 9
Modern Fam-
ily Å
Modern Family
“Fears”
The Big Bang
Theory Å
The Big Bang
Theory Å
The Originals Klaus opens up to
Marcel. (N) Å
Supernatural “Holy Terror” A
massive angel slaughter. (N)
Two and a Half
Men
Two and a Half
Men
The Office
“Spooked”
The Office
“Murder”
28 28 9 9
D WSBE 8 15 9 9
World News
America
Nightly Busi-
ness Report
Last of the Summer Wine (7:50) As Time Goes By: You Must Remember
This Å
(:19) Waiting for God No enter-
tainment fund. Å
Miranda Å BBC World
News Å
(Off Air)
36 36 8 8 18
F WSBK 8 14 14
Two and a Half
Men
Two and a Half
Men
The Big Bang
Theory Å
The Big Bang
Theory Å
Bones Brennan wakes up blood-
ied and beaten. Å
Bones A bone-smuggling ring is
uncovered. Å
WBZ News
(N) Å
Friends Rela-
tionship rules.
Seinfeld Å The Office
“Spooked”
3 3
L WGBX 21 21 16 16
Greater Bos-
ton Å
Nightly Busi-
ness Report
A Christmas Celtic Sojourn
Live Å
Father Brown Father Brown
searches for a girl. Å
Return to Downton Abbey A look back at “Down-
ton Abbey.” (N) Å
Return to Downton Abbey A look back at “Down-
ton Abbey.” Å
44
X WLVI 9 12 12
The Middle Å The Middle Å Modern Fam-
ily Å
Modern Family
“Fears”
The Originals Klaus opens up to
Marcel. (N) Å
Supernatural “Holy Terror” A
massive angel slaughter. (N)
7 News at 10PM on CW56 (N) ÅThe Arsenio Hall Show Å
26 12
∞ WNAC 11
Entertainment
Tonight (N)
Access Hol-
lywood (N)
TMZ (N) Å Dish Nation
(N) Å
Dads (N) Å
(DVS)
Brooklyn Nine-
Nine (N)
New Girl “All
In”
The Mindy
Project (N)
Eyewitness
News at 10
(:45) Sports
Wrap
Seinfeld Å Family Guy Å
64 64 11 11
¥ WBPX 20 15 15
Criminal Minds Following a con
artist’s mental decline.
Criminal Minds A serial killer
targets random victims. Å
Criminal Minds A suspect
abducts nannies and children.
Criminal Minds A series of
deaths in Manhattan.
Criminal Minds The Replicator
targets a team member.
Flashpoint “Broken Peace” In
pursuit of James Mitchell.
15
µ WPXQ 7
Criminal Minds Following a con
artist’s mental decline.
Criminal Minds A serial killer
targets random victims. Å
Criminal Minds A suspect
abducts nannies and children.
Criminal Minds A series of
deaths in Manhattan.
Criminal Minds The Replicator
targets a team member.
Flashpoint “Broken Peace” In
pursuit of James Mitchell.
15 15
CABLE 6 PM 6:30 7 PM 7:30 8 PM 8:30 9 PM 9:30 10 PM 10:30 11 PM 11:30 CABLE
A&E 37 64 37 37
Storage Wars
Å
Storage Wars
Å
Storage Wars
Å
Storage Wars
Å
Storage Wars
Å
Storage Wars
Å
Storage Wars
Texas (N)
Storage Wars
Texas (N)
Shipping Wars
Å
Shipping Wars
(N)
(:01) Shipping
Wars Å
(:31) Shipping
Wars Å
265 118 181 181 181
A-P 42 56 63 63
Finding Bigfoot: Further Evi-
dence Å
River Monsters: Unhooked “Cold
Blooded Horror” Å
Frozen Planet “Winter” Winter
brings a test of survival.
Frozen Planet “Spring” Polar
spring triggers huge changes.
Frozen Planet The filming of
“Frozen Planet.” Å
Frozen Planet “Winter” Winter
brings a test of survival.
282 184 130 130 130
AMC 25 71 59 59
(5:30) } ### Twister (1996) Helen Hunt, Bill Paxton. Storm
chasers race to test a new tornado-monitoring device. Å
} ### Men in Black (1997, Action) Tommy Lee Jones, Will
Smith. Secret agents monitor extraterrestrial activity on Earth.
(:01) } ### Bad Boys (1995) Martin Lawrence. Two Miami
cops attempt to recover stolen police evidence. Å
254 130 231 231 231
BET 79 67
106 & Park: BET’s Top 10 Live
(N) Å
Soul Train Awards 2013 Celebrating the best in R&B Soul Music. Å Husbands- Ho. Husbands- Ho. Husbands- Ho. The Game Å The Game Å
329 124 270 270 270
BRAV 70 63 57 57
Shahs of Sunset GG and her
family go on a rafting trip.
The Real Housewives of Beverly
Hills “Star of the Family”
The Real Housewives of Atlanta The Real Housewives of Atlanta Shahs of Sunset MJ and Vida
work on their relationship. (N)
Watch What
Happens: Live
Shahs of
Sunset
273 129 185 185 185
CNBC 48 44 46 46
Mad Money (N) The Kudlow Report (N) American Greed Jeanetta offers
help to homeowners.
The Car Chas-
ers
The Car Chas-
ers
The Car Chas-
ers (N)
The Car Chas-
ers (N)
Mad Money
355 208 102 102 102
CNN 49 41 42 42
(5:00) The Situ-
ation Room
(:28) Crossfire
(N)
Erin Burnett OutFront (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Å Piers Morgan Live (N) AC 360 Later (N) Erin Burnett OutFront
202 200 100 100 100
COM 58 67 61 61
(5:56) South
Park Å
(:27) Tosh.0 Å The Colbert
Report Å
Daily Show/Jon
Stewart
(7:59) Key &
Peele Å
Tosh.0 Å Tosh.0 Å Tosh.0 Å Tosh.0 (N) Å Sneak Peek
(N) Å
Daily Show/Jon
Stewart
(:31) The Col-
bert Report
249 107 190 190 190
CSNE 55 36 52 52
SportsNet Cen-
tral (N)
UNO’s Sports
Tonight Live
Celtics Pre-
game Live
NBA Basketball Milwaukee Bucks at Boston Celtics. From TD Garden in Boston. (N
Subject to Blackout)
Celtics Post-
game Live
SportsNet Cen-
tral (N)
UNO’s Sports
Tonight Live
3 and Out
77 77 77
DISC 24 59 39 39
Moonshiners Mark and Jeff clear
the still site. Å
Moonshiners Mark and Jeff set
up the remote site. Å
Moonshiners: Outlaw Cuts
(N) Å
Moonshiners “Hush Money”
Wayne perfects his recipe. (N)
(:01) Porter Ridge The rival
gangs compete. (N) Å
(:01) Moonshiners Wayne per-
fects his recipe. Å
278 182 120 120 120
DISN 34 53 24 24
Good Luck
Charlie Å
Jessie Å A.N.T. Farm Å Dog With a
Blog
} Beethoven’s Christmas Adventure (2011,
Comedy) Kyle Massey. ‘PG’ Å
(:45) Phineas
and Ferb
Jessie Å Dog With a
Blog Å
A.N.T. Farm Å Shake It Up! Å
290 172 250 250 250
E! 63 72 34 34
(5:30) Keeping Up With the
Kardashians
E! News (N) Giuliana & Bill Giuliana con-
fronts her many fears.
Tia & Tamera Tamera convinces
Tia to take a DNA test.
Total Divas WWE; struggles;
relationships changes.
Chelsea Lately
(N)
E! News
236 114 196 196 196
ESPN 30 34 49 49
SportsCenter (N) Å (:15) College Basketball Indiana at Syracuse. (N) (:15) College Basketball Michigan at Duke. (N) (:15) SportsCenter (N) Å
206 140 70 70 70
ESPN2 29 35 50 50
Around the
Horn (N)
Pardon the
Interruption (N)
(:15) College Basketball Illinois at Georgia Tech. (N) (:15) College Basketball Notre Dame at Iowa. (N) (:15) Olbermann (N) Å
209 144 74 74 74
ESPNC 132 309 258 258
(5:00) College Basketball From
March 8, 1987. Å
(:15) Global Supercard Wres-
tling Å
(:15) Global Supercard Wres-
tling
(:15) Global Supercard Wres-
tling
(:15) Global Supercard Wres-
tling
(:15) Boxing From April 20,
1991.
208 143 71 71 71
EWTN 22 96 56 56
Faith and
Culture
Rookies in
Rome Å
Daily Mass The Franciscan Mis-
sionaries. Å
Mother Angelica Live Classics
(N) Å
EWTN Reli-
gious
Rosary Threshold of Hope Å Pope Benedict Women of
Grace
422 261 285 285 285
FAM 38 50 26 26
} ### The Santa Clause (1994, Comedy) Tim Allen, Judge
Reinhold. An adman takes over for fallen Santa.
} ### Scrooged (1988, Comedy) Bill Murray, Karen Allen, John
Forsythe. TV-network bigshot meets Christmas ghosts.
} ### National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation (1989, Com-
edy) Chevy Chase, Beverly D’Angelo, Randy Quaid.
311 180 199 199 199
FOOD 28 62 53 53
Cutthroat Kitchen Making nachos
without utensils.
Chopped Ladies from school
cafeterias compete.
Chopped The chefs prepare holi-
day-themed dishes.
Chopped Gingerbread oysters;
big birds.
Chopped Celebrities compete
for charity.
Chopped A sweet bread in the
first round.
231 110 164 164 164
FX 53 30 30 30
Two and a Half
Men
Two and a Half
Men
} ## Real Steel (2011, Action) Hugh Jackman, Evangeline Lilly, Dakota Goyo. A boxing promoter
and his son build a robot fighter.
Sons of Anarchy “You Are My Sunshine” Jax’s
world is turned upside down. (N)
Sons of Anar-
chy
248 137 53 53 53
HGTV 44 61 32 32
House Hunters Renovation A
house with creative space.
Hunters Int’l House Hunt-
ers Å
Income Property Å Income Property (N) Å House Hunters
(N) Å
Hunters Int’l House Hunters Renovation A
house with a small kitchen.
229 112 165 165 165
HIST 41 69 58 58
How the Earth Was Made
“Yosemite” Å
Pawn Stars
“Pawnocchio”
Pawn Stars Å Pawn Stars
“Zzzzzz”
Pawn Stars Å Pawn Stars “Jet
Setters”
Pawn Stars
“Just Shoe It”
A Very Shelby
Christmas (N)
(:31) Pawn
Stars Å
(:02) The Real Story of Christ-
mas Å
269 120 128 128 128
LIFE 40 28 36 36
} # An Accidental Christmas (2007, Drama) Cynthia Gibb. Two
children scheme to reunite their estranged parents. Å
} Christmas Angel (2009) K.C. Clyde, Bruce Davison. A woman
assists a man who helps others during the holidays. Å
} ### A Christmas Wedding (2006) Sarah Paulson. A stranded
woman must get home in time for her wedding.
252 108 140 140 140
MTV 60 76 28 28
Generation Cryo Numerous half-
siblings.
Generation Cryo A request to
contact the donor.
Girl Code Girl Code Awkward. Awkward. Snooki &
JWOWW (N)
Awkward. “Old
Jenna”
(:01) Girl Code (:31) Awkward.
331 160 210 210 210
NESN 56 37 51 51
Red Sox Report
(N)
Red Sox Report Charlie Moore
Outdoors
Charlie Moore
Outdoors
Behind the
B (N)
Bobby Orr and the Big, Bad
Bruins
Behind the B Sports Today
LIVE (N)
Sports Today Sports Today Sports Today
623 434 76 76 76
NICK 35 52 25 25
SpongeBob
SquarePants
SpongeBob
SquarePants
The Thunder-
mans Å
The Haunted
Hathaways
Full House Å Full House Å Full House Å Full House Å Full House Å Full House Å Friends Å (:36) Friends Å
299 170 252 252 252
SYFY 69 73 62 62
Naked Vegas Naked Vegas Red must blend
models in with a room.
Naked Vegas “Painting Playmate
Claire Sinclair”
Naked Vegas “Cosplay and
Steampunk”
Naked Vegas (Season Finale) (N) Naked Vegas “Devil Pirates and
Aliens”
244 122 180 180 180
SPIKE 26 74 55 55
Bar Rescue A cockroach infesta-
tion plagues a bar.
Bar Rescue Splitting one bar
into two.
Criss Angel BeLIEve Criss
attempts to revive the dead.
Criss Angel BeLIEve “Double
Straight Jacket”
Criss Angel BeLIEve “Elephant
Herd Vanish” (N)
Criss Angel BeLIEve Criss
attempts to revive the dead.
262 168 54 54 54
TLC 39 55 38 38
Toddlers & Tiaras Brenna
expects royal treatment. Å
Bakery Boss Bakery business is
suffering for Violet. Å
Little People, Big World “A
Bride and a Bulldozer” Å
Little People, Big World “All
Tangled Up” (N) Å
The Little
Couple
The Little
Couple
Little People, Big World “All
Tangled Up” Å
280 183 139 139 139
TNT 27 32 33 33
Bones Booth’s mother returns.
Å
Bones A journalist killed by a
mutated virus. Å
Bones “Pilot” Skeletal remains
found in a lake. Å
Boston’s Finest Tim Stanton
leads an investigation. (N)
(:01) Marshal Law: Texas “Ter-
ror in the Burbs” (N)
(:01) Boston’s Finest “No More
Bullets” Å
245 138 51 51 51
TOON 36 51 60 60
Total Drama:
All Stars
Total Drama:
All Stars
Total Drama:
All Stars (N)
World of Gum-
ball
Uncle Grandpa
(N)
Steven Uni-
verse
Regular Show
“Guy’s Night”
Adventure Time The Cleveland
Show
American Dad
“Con Heir”
Family Guy Å Family Guy Å
296 176 257 257 257
TVL 43 48 64 64
The Andy
Griffith Show
The Andy
Griffith Show
The Andy
Griffith Show
The Andy
Griffith Show
The Andy
Griffith Show
The Andy
Griffith Show
Everybody-Ray-
mond
Everybody-Ray-
mond
Everybody-Ray-
mond
Everybody-Ray-
mond
Hot in Cleve-
land Å
The King of
Queens Å
301 106 244 244 244
USA 52 31 35 35
Law & Order: Special Victims
Unit “Shaken” Å
Law & Order: Special Victims
Unit “Escape” Å
Modern Fam-
ily Å
Modern Fam-
ily Å
Modern Fam-
ily Å
Modern Fam-
ily Å
Modern Fam-
ily Å
Modern Fam-
ily Å
Modern Fam-
ily Å
Modern Fam-
ily Å
242 105 50 50 50
WTBS 45 33 31 31
Seinfeld “The
Fire” Å
Seinfeld “The
Pilot” Å
Seinfeld “The
Pilot” Å
Family Guy Å The Big Bang
Theory
The Big Bang
Theory
The Big Bang
Theory
The Big Bang
Theory
The Big Bang
Theory
Trust Me, I’m a
Game Show
Conan (N) Å
247 139 52 52 52
PREMIUM 6 PM 6:30 7 PM 7:30 8 PM 8:30 9 PM 9:30 10 PM 10:30 11 PM 11:30 PREMIUM
ENC 292 630 326 326
(5:55) } ## The Rookie (1990) Clint Eastwood. A young detec-
tive teams up with a two-fisted veteran cop. ‘R’ Å
} ## Total Recall (2012, Science Fiction) Colin Farrell. A factory
worker begins to think he’s really a spy. ‘PG-13’ Å
} ## Firestarter (1984, Horror) David Keith. Quasifederal agents
hunt a flame-causing little girl and her father. ‘R’ Å
526 340 350 350 350
HBO 200 400 301 301
Mike Tyson:
Undisputed
(:45) } ## Meet the Fockers (2004, Comedy) Robert De Niro,
Ben Stiller. Future in-laws clash in Florida. ‘PG-13’ Å
(:45) } ## Beautiful Creatures (2013, Fantasy) Alden Ehrenreich, Alice Englert.
Star-crossed teens uncover dark secrets in their town. ‘PG-13’ Å
Treme The city celebrates the
election. Å
501 300 400 400 400
MAX 220 450 341 341
(4:15) } ###
Life of Pi ‘PG’
} ## Rambo: First Blood Part II (1985, Action)
Sylvester Stallone. ‘R’ Å
(:15) } # Snake Eyes (1998, Suspense) Nicolas Cage, John
Heard. U.S. official is killed at an Atlantic City fight. ‘R’ Å
} ## Parental Guidance (2012) Billy Crystal. A man uses old-
school methods to take care of his grandkids. ‘PG’ Å
512 310 420 420 420
SHOW 240 500 361 361
} I Don’t
Know How
(:25) } ### The Woman in Black (2012, Hor-
ror) Daniel Radcliffe. ‘PG-13’ Å
Masters of Sex “Fallout” A for-
mer participant is pregnant.
Homeland “Good Night” Brody
embarks on a mission.
Masters of Sex “Fallout” A for-
mer participant is pregnant.
Homeland “Good Night” Brody
embarks on a mission.
537 318 365 365 365
STARZ 280 600 321 321
(5:00) } ### Miracle (2004, Drama) Kurt
Russell, Patricia Clarkson. ‘PG’ Å
(:20) } ## Hotel Transylvania (2012, Comedy)
Voices of Adam Sandler. ‘PG’ Å
} ## Ladder 49 (2004, Drama) Joaquin Phoenix. A firefighter
awaits rescue from a burning building. ‘PG-13’ Å
} ## Harold & Kumar Go to
White Castle (2004) ‘R’ Å
520 350 340 340 340
TMC 260 550 381 381
(4:45) } Pros
& Ex-Cons ‘R’
(:20) } # Brake (2012) Stephen Dorff. A federal
agent is taken captive by terrorists. ‘R’
} ### Red Riding: 1974 (2009) Andrew Garfield. A rookie
crime reporter tries to solve a series of child abductions. ‘NR’
} ### Red Riding: 1980 (2009, Crime Drama)
Warren Clarke, James Fox. ‘NR’ Å
(:40) } Red
Riding: 1983 ‘NR’
544 327 385 385 385
A B C D DISH DTV P-VF BrVF BuVF
A - Cox B - Uxbridge, Millville Comcast
C - Blackstone, Franklin Comcast D - Bellingham Comcast
DEAR ABBY
Jeanne Phillips
Woman saddened by partner
who doesn’t want kids
Horoscope
Sudoku solution
By HOLIDAY MATHIS
ARIES (March 21-April 19).
You have mixed feelings about
ceremonies. Sometimes you feel
they are boring, stiff and con-
trived. Then again, that is pre-
cisely what makes them so
memorable. So plan a bit of cer-
emony into your next big gather-
ing.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20).
You think you know right from
wrong, but when you get into
some of the gray areas today,
you’ll discover that it’s not as
clear as you thought. Your inten-
tions are pure, but is that
enough?
GEMINI (May 21-June 21).
In the morning, you’re all pleas-
antries and loving words, but
there may be something a bit
heavier to impart in the evening.
Think about what you want to
say first. Practice it on paper if
you have to, but don’t let it go
unsaid!
CANCER (June 22-July 22).
Don’t let the afternoon lull hurt
your overall productivity. A
brisk walk is the best thing to
clear the fog in your head. And
if you go for longer than 20 min-
utes, you may even experience a
spiritual high.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). You
will be asked to do a job you are
not yet qualified to do. This is a
sign that you should consider
getting new training. Investigate
the need. How likely are you to
get more requests like this one?
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22).
Most people will do something
about the suffering of others
when they know it exists. But
most people won’t seek that
kind of knowledge. You have a
sixth sense about where the
problems are and how you can
help.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23).
You’ll feel better when things
look better. The disorder in your
living environment is largely the
mess of other people. Even
though your mess is small in
comparison, clean it up, and the
others will follow suit.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
21). Through the ages, average
people have experienced works
of sheer brilliance and laughed.
But that doesn’t mean that
every misunderstood work is
brilliant. Interpret today’s pres-
entation with caution.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-
Dec. 21). Knowing is not
enough. The person who knows
the path but doesn’t walk it is
no better off than the person
who doesn’t know the path.
Walk the path.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19). You don’t want to be the
kind of person who avoids con-
frontation, so you actively seek
it. For some interactions, elec-
tronic correspondence can seem
cowardly. Important news is
best delivered in person.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18). Our memories may change
and fail, but for the most part,
it’s easier to recall what really
happened than it is to recall a
story about what happened.
Because of this, someone who
lied will be caught.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20).
Lead with your integrity, and
you’ll receive hints as to the
character of others. Pretty pack-
ages are not always filled with
goodness. Being tasteful is not
the same thing as being right or
intelligent.
AMUSEMENTS Tuesday, December 3, 2013
THE TIMES B5
Mother Goose & Grimm
For Better or Worse
Rose Is Rose
Funky Winkerbean
Cryptoquote Su Do Ku
Baby Blues
Marvin
Get Fuzzy
Crankshaft
Garfield
Gasoline Alley
Zits
B.C.
Blondie
(Answers tomorrow)
SALAD HEDGE EXCEED SAFETY
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: His hope of winning the sprint was about to
be — DASHED
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
RUCRY
NAPST
TEEQUA
ROPRAL
©2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.
J
u
m
b
le
p
u
z
z
le
m
a
g
a
z
in
e
s
a
v
a
ila
b
le
a
t
p
e
n
n
y
d
e
llp
u
z
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le
s
.
c
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s
THE Ans:
Tips and computer program at www.sudoku.com.
For solutions, check “JRC Publications” on the
solutions page of www.sudoku.com.
By Johnny Hart
By Jerry Scott & Jim Borgman
By Lynn Johnston By Tom Batiuk
By Dean Young & Denis Lebrun By Jim Davis
By Mike Peters By Jim Scancarelli
By Rick Kirkman & Jerry Scott
By Pat Brady By Tom Armstrong
By Tom Batiuk
By Darby Conley
© Puzzles by Pappocom
Lio
By Mark Tatulli
Retail
By Norm Feuti
Pearls Before Swine
By Stephan Pastis
COMICS
B6 THE TIMES Tuesday, December 3, 2013
Tuesday, December 3, 2013 THE TIMES B7
Business Hours:
Monday-Friday 9:00am-5:00pm
Website:
www.pawtuckettimes.com
24 Hour Classifieds Online
Just click “Place A Classified Ad”
And send us your ad
It’s simple and user friendly
401-365-1438
100 Legals 100 Legals
100 Legals 100 Legals
MUST BE RECEIVED
3 BUSINESS DAYS
PRIOR TO
PUBLICATION
For further information
Call 722-4000 Monday
thru Friday;
8:30 a.m. To 4:30 p.m.
100 Legals
( )
or Emailed to:
classified@pawtuckettimes.com
Complete instructions
should include:
Publication dates,
Billing information and
the Name and Phone
number of individual to
contact if necessary.
LEGAL NOTICES
continued next column
100 Legals
LEGAL NOTICE
INFORMATION
Legal Notices may be
mailed to:
The Times,
P.O. Box 307,
Pawtucket, RI 02860
Faxed to:
(401) 727-9250
continued next column
100 Legals
FIND A HOME. Sell a
home. Find a tenant. Call
the classified team at The
Times to place your ad-
vertisement. Call 401-
722-4000
330 Brokers - Agents
Real Estate-Sale
WOONSOCKET 3BR
1st floor, Bernon St. Ren-
ovated all. 6 parking
spaces. Private storage,
coin-op. $800 First, Last.
508-962-1045
UPDATED 2 bed + office,
2
nd
,Bellingham /Woonsock-
et border, quite area,
$950+ utilities, no pets or
smoking. 401-484-2177
PAWTUCKET 2
nd
, 3 rooms,
1 bed, appliances, utilities,
parking included, no pets
$175wk. 401-723-2625
NEW TODAY
N. SMITHFIELD 2 bed,
appliances, quiet, w/heat
& hot water. parking
$975. 401-369-0215
Cumberland. 3
rd,
1 bed,
newly remodeled, off str
parking, no pets, Section
8 ok. 401-714-8478
304 Apartments
Unfurnished
Readers of The Times are
advised The Times does
not knowingly accept ad-
vertisements that are in
violation of the Federal
Fair Housing Law and the
Rhode Island Fair Hous-
ing Practices Act. The
Federal Fair Housing Law
and Rhode Island Fair
Housing Practices Act are
designed to prevent dis-
crimination in the pur-
chase and rental of hous-
ing. Refusal to rent,
lease, or sell property to
anyone due to age, race,
color, religion, sex, sexu-
al orientation, marital sta-
tus, disability, familial
status, or country of an-
cestral origin is in viola-
tion of the Fair Housing
Law. If you have a com-
plaint, contact the Rhode
Island Commission for
Human Rights. They will
help any person that has
been discriminated
against in the rental of
housing, the sale of
housing, home financing
or public accommoda-
tions. Call the Rhode Is-
land Commission for Hu-
man Rights, 401-222-
2661.
300 Rental Agencies
Real Estate-Rent
LOOKING FOR SOME-
THING HARD TO FIND?
Be sure to look in the
classified pages of The
TImes every day. Surely
you'll find interesting
things that you may want
or need. The Times is the
perfect marketplace you
can enjoy in the comfort
of your own home. There
is something for every-
one in The Times classi-
fieds!
45 bundles Roofing shin-
gles $4.00 per bundle, re-
tail price $32 per bundle,
mixed colors 767-2248
273 Miscellaneous
Merchandise
Merchandise
DRIVER/Warehouse work-
er wanted for part time,
must be dependable,
some heavy lifting re-
quired, no special license
needed. Apply El Gee
Products, 86 Pine grove
Ave. Bellingham, MA
204 General Help
Wanted
The Times does not know-
ingly accept advertise-
ments in the Employment
classifications that are
not bonafide job offers.
Classification 200 is pro-
vided for Employment In-
formation, Services and
Referrals. This newspa-
per does not knowingly
accept Employment ads
that indicate a preference
bases on age from em-
ployees covered be Age
Discrimination In Em-
ployment Act. Nor do we
in any way condone em-
ployment based solely
upon discrimination prac-
tices.
200 Employment
Services
Employment
ATTENTION
TO ADVERTISE YOUR
BUSINESS IN THIS
SECTION
CALL THE TIMES
CLASSIFIED DEPT
401-722-4000
159 General
Services
Business Services
BOAT trailer for an 18 ft.
boat with electric winch,
always stored inside
$495.00. 401-767-2248
130 Campers -
RV's - Trailers
1998 FORD Ranger PLU,
5 speed, 6 cyl., runs
great, new sticker till
2015, $2,495. 401-447-
4451 or 401-769-0095
126 Trucks
VOLKS WAGON JETTA GT
1998, 5 speed, 32 MPG,
inspected. $995. Call
401-767-7025
SELL YOUR CAR, VAN OR
TRUCK THE EASY WAY.
Call the classified team at
The Times today. Tell
more than 40,000 adult
readers in the are about
your vehicle. It's easy to
do, just dial 401-722-
4000. or visit us at www.-
pawtuckettimes.com
NISSAN MAXIMA 2000
143,000 miles, needs
work, $1,500 or best of-
fer. Call 401-568-8850
HONDA ACCORD
2004 LX, Clear title, 70k
mi, Automatic, exterior
color Gold. $2750. Call
(828) 919-9835.
FULLY LOADED MINI-VAN
Leather interior, DVD play-
er, remote starter, heated
seats. $6500. Jeff - 508-
360-1519. Must see!
2011 NISSAN Versa Manu-
al 5 speed, 47,000 miles,
very good condition.
$7,000. 401-714-5120
2011 Hyundai Accent. Ex-
cellent condition. 5
speed. $6500. Call 727-
8922
123 Autos For Sale
2005 Nissan Sentra SE.
4dr., loaded, auto, 4cyl
(32MPG) Inspected, nice,
must see, runs new. First
$2350. 401-241-0413
2001 Nissan Altima GXE
Ltd. 4dr., loaded, auto,
4cyl, roof, wheels, mint.
Low miles. Must see.
$2,000. 401-241-0259
2001 Kia Sportage. 4 cylin-
der, 4 wheel drive, 5
speed, 148k miles,
$1600. Call 769-2350
2000 VOLVO V70XC, 177k,
good running, well main-
tained, dependable, safe.
$2,000 best. 401-450-
6422
2000 Chrysler Seabring
JXI Limited Conv. Load-
ed, new inspection, low
miles, 1 owner, must see.
$2,050. 401-585-2421
1997 SUBURU Legacy All
wheel drive wagon, 5
speed, inspected
$1,700/best offer 401-
787-4764
1997 Chevy Blazer. 4dr.,
4WD, tow package, load-
ed. $1500. 401-339-8312
1996 NISSAN Altima, 4
door, 4 cyl. Auto, runs
great. $1,795.00. 401-
769-0095 or 401-447-
4451
1989 TOYOTA COROLLA
$500, 114,000 m, call Joe
726-1237
1985 MERCEDES 380SL, 2
tops, silver/gray,
garaged, all records, ex-
cellent $10k best, 401-
821-1066
1979 CHEVY Corvette
Stingray, in good condi-
tion, runs excellent
$6,000 or best. Call 401-
426-7461
1973 CADILLAC always
garaged, 8 yrs. not used,
75k miles, $3,590. 401-
767-2248
02 MAZDA MPV Minivan,
leather seats, DVD,
14,000 miles $3,200. Call
401-487-2584
01 Honda Accord LX. 4dr.,
loaded, auto, burgundy,
wheels, alarm, low miles,
must see & drive, first
$2500. 401-301-0056
123 Autos For Sale
Vehicles
READ THE TIMES EVERY
DAY...to find out what's
happening in your neigh-
borhood. You'll find
school news, employ-
ment news, health news,
sports, who's getting
married, who's getting
promoted, who's running
for office and much
more. If it's important to
you, it'll probably be in
The Times. To get The
Times delivered to your
home every day, call 401-
722-4000.
DID YOU KNOW that the
Classified Section is filled
with lots of interesting in-
formation? You can find
a house, an apartment, a
cat, a job and lots more!!
The Times Classifieds are
loaded with "local" infor-
mation and merchandise
that you will find useful.
Be in the know....read the
classified section every
day.
111 Special Notices
CREDIT
FOR ERRORS
Each advertiser is asked
to check his/her adver-
tisement on the first
day of publication and
to report any error to
the Times classified
department (722-
4000) as soon as pos-
sible for correction.
No adjustment will be
given for typographical
errors, which do not
change the meaning or
lessen the value of the
advertisement.
Credit will be allowed
only to that portion of
the advertisement
where the error oc-
curred.
107 Personals
Annoucements
Whatever You Wish To Sell!
Your Classified Ad will appear in The Call,
The Times & ‘Burbs, plus Online 24/7!
WE CAN HELP! CALL TODAY!
All new/first time advertisers will receive
25% OFF their first ad!
401- 365- 1438
H
O
M
E
S
C
A
R
S
T
R
U
C
K
S
P
E
T
S
ANTIQUES
TELEVISIONS
T
O
Y
S
o
r
B
IC
Y
C
L
E
S
W
O
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S
T
O
V
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S
MORTGAGEE'S SALE
24 Illinois Street
Central Falls, Rhode Island
Will be sold at public auction on December 11,
2013 at 11:00 a.m., local time on the premises
by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
mortgage made and executed by Peter J. Ayotte,
dated March 1, 2006 and recorded in Book 653
at Page 90 and assigned in Book 653 at Page
111 of the Records of Land Evidence in the City
of Central Falls, State of Rhode Island, the condi-
tions of said mortgage having been broken.
The above premises will be sold subject to any
and all valid superior or prior liens or encum-
brances on the premises.
TERMS: Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000) down
payment in cash, certified check or bank check at
time of sale; other terms will be announced at
the time of sale.
By order of the holder of the mortgage which
gives notice of its intention to bid at sale or any
adjournment thereof.
ROBERTS, CARROLL, FELDSTEIN & PEIRCE
INCORPORATED
Edward G. Avila, Esquire
Attorneys for the holder of the mortgage
Ten Weybosset Street
Providence, Rhode Island 02903
NOTICE OF MORTGAGEE'S SALE
419 West Avenue
Pawtucket, Rhode Island
The premises described in the mortgage will be
sold, subject to all encumbrances, prior liens
and such matters which may constitute valid
liens or encumbrances after sale, at public auc-
tion on December 17, 2013 at 11:00 a.m., on the
premises by virtue of the power of sale in said
mortgage made by Antonio P. Andrade, dated
November 15, 2006, and recorded in the Paw-
tucket, RI Land Evidence Records in Book 2765
at Page 302, the conditions of said mortgage
having been broken. $5,000.00 in cash, certified
or bank check required to bid. Other terms to be
announced at the sale.
SHECHTMAN HALPERIN SAVAGE, LLP
1080 Main Street
Pawtucket, Rhode Island
Attorney for the present
Holder of the Mortgage
MORTGAGEE'S SALE
80 Fisher Road, Unit 79, Building 25,
Land Phase III, Ski Valley Condominiums
Cumberland, RI
The premises described in the mortgage will be
sold subject to all encumbrances and prior liens
on November 19, 2013 at 10:00 a.m. on the
premises, by virtue of the power of sale con-
tained in a mortgage by Francis J. Votta dated
March 26, 2010 and recorded in the Cumberland
Land Evidence Records in Book 1492, Page 150,
the conditions of said mortgage having been
broken.
$5,000.00 in cash, certified or bank check is re-
quired to bid. Other terms will be announced at
the sale.
Sale scheduled for November 19, 2013 at 10:00
a.m. has been continued to December 19, 2013
at 10:00 a.m.
HARMON LAW OFFICES, P.C.
Attorney for the Holder of the Mortgage
150 California Street
Newton, MA 02458
(617) 558-0500
201307-0453 - GRY
MORTGAGEE'S SALE
26 Littlefield Street Pawtucket, RI
The premises described in the mortgage will be
sold subject to all encumbrances and prior liens
on December 17, 2013 at 12:00 p.m. on the
premises, by virtue of the power of sale con-
tained in a mortgage by Edward Langford dated
April 8, 2005 and recorded in the Pawtucket
Land Evidence Records in Book 2341, Page 112,
the conditions of said mortgage having been
broken.
$5,000.00 in cash, certified or bank check is re-
quired to bid. Other terms will be announced at
the sale.
HARMON LAW OFFICES, P.C.
Attorney for the Holder of the Mortgage
150 California Street
Newton, MA 02458
(617) 558-0500
201202-0429 - PRP
MORTGAGEE'S SALE
103 Martin Street
Pawtucket, RI 02860
The premises described in the mortgage will be
sold on December 11, 2013 at 10:00 A.M. local
time, on the premises, by virtue of the power of
sale in said mortgage made by PETER G. HEN-
DERSON, dated June 30, 2005, and recorded in
the Pawtucket land evidence records, in Book
2415 at Page 157 the conditions of said mort-
gage having been broken. This sale is subject to
all prior liens and encumbrances and any mat-
ters which may constitute valid liens or encum-
brances after said sale.
Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in cash, certi-
fied check or bank check required to bid. Other
terms and conditions will be announced at the
sale.
McCORRY and GANNON
ATTORNEYS FOR MORTGAGEE
727 Central Avenue
Pawtucket, RI 02861
(401) 724-1400
CONDOMINIUM LIEN FORECLOSURE SALE
6 Nate Whipple Highway, Unit 108
Cumberland, RI
Will be sold at Public Auction on December 12,
2013, at 1:00 P.M., on the premises, by power
of sale granted to the Victorian Court Condo-
minium Association by R.I.G.L. § 34-36.1-3.16
and pursuant to R.I.G.L. § 34-36.1-3.21, the
obligation of the Unit Owner, Maria L. Desnoy-
ers, to pay condominium assessments having
been defaulted. That certain condominium Unit
in the Victorian Court Condominium described in
the deed into owner for Unit 108, recorded in the
Cumberland Land Evidence Records, in Book
1340 at Page 333, containing the recording data
for the Declaration which is incorporated herein.
The Unit will be sold subject to matters which
may constitute valid liens or encumbrances after
sale. Terms and conditions of sale to be an-
nounced at sale. Cash, certified or bank check
for $5,000 required to bid.
RAYMOND HARRISON
Attorney for Victorian Court Condo. Assoc.
33 College Hill Road, Suite 5B
Warwick, RI 02886
(401) 821-8200
MORTGAGEE'S SALE
29 Washington Street
Pawtucket, Rhode Island
Will be sold at public auction on December 11,
2013 at 10:00 a.m. local time on the premises by
virtue of the power of sale contained in a mort-
gage made and executed by Consuelo L. Rojas
and Victor E. Rojas dated June 8, 2005 and
recorded in Book 2394 at Page 20 as assigned in
Book 2394 at Page 31, of the Records of Land
Evidence in the City of Pawtucket, State of
Rhode Island, the conditions of said mortgage
having been broken.
The above premises will be sold subject to any
and all valid superior or prior liens or encum-
brances on the premises.
TERMS: Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000) down
payment in cash, certified check or bank check at
time of sale; other terms will be announced at
the time of sale.
By order of the holder of the mortgage which
gives notice of its intention to bid at sale or any
adjournment thereof.
ROBERTS, CARROLL, FELDSTEIN & PEIRCE
INCORPORATED
Edward G. Avila, Esquire
Attorneys for the holder of the mortgage
Ten Weybosset Street
Providence, Rhode Island 02903
MORTGAGEE'S SALE
51 Ballston Avenue Pawtucket, RI
The premises described in the mortgage will be
sold subject to all encumbrances and prior liens
on November 25, 2013 at 11:00 a.m. on the
premises, by virtue of the power of sale con-
tained in a mortgage by George Dube and Connie
Goodman-Dube dated July 6, 2005 and recorded
in the Pawtucket Land Evidence Records in Book
2419, Page 145, the conditions of said mortgage
having been broken.
$5,000.00 in cash, certified or bank check is re-
quired to bid. Other terms will be announced at
the sale.
HARMON LAW OFFICES, P.C.
Attorney for the Holder of the Mortgage
150 California Street
Newton, MA 02458
(617) 558-0500
201304-0987 - PRP
By order of the holder of the mortgage, the sale
originally scheduled for November 25, 2013 at
11:00 a.m. has been postponed to December 26,
2013 at 11:00 a.m. on the premises.
HARMON LAW OFFICES, P.C.
Attorney for the Holder of the Mortgage
150 California Street
Newton, MA 02458
(617) 558-0500
STATE OF RHODE ISLAND
Probate Court of the
CITY OF PAWTUCKET
NOTICE
OF MATTERS PENDING AND FOR HEARING
IN SAID COURT
CITY OF PAWTUCKET
The Court will be in session at 2:00PM
on the dates specified in notices below
for hearing on said matters:
KELLEY, JEANETTE, estate.
Sale of real estate located in Pawtucket at 68
Rosemont Avenue designated at Lot 749 on As-
sessor's plat 18: for hearing December 4, 2013.
THURBER JR., ALVIN, estate.
Sale of real estate located in Central Falls at 64-
66 Cross St. designated as Lot 60 on Assessor's
Plat 1 and 71 Cross St. designated as Lot 30 on
Assessor's Plat 1: for hearing December 4, 2013.
EVANS, KENNETH A., estate.
Derek K. Evans of Dallas, TX has qualified as Ex-
ecutor and has appointed Harry J. Hoopis, Esq.
of 33 College Hill Road Building 5B, Warwick as
his agent in Rhode Island: creditors must file
their claims in the office of the probate clerk
within the time required by law beginning
November 19, 2013.
KIMMETT, DOROTHY J., estate.
Janet Champa of Leominster, MA and Laura
Martin of Pawtucket have qualified as Co-Ex-
ecutrices and Janet Champa has appointed Mar-
garet-Mary Hovarth Esq. of 75 Park Place, Paw-
tucket as her Agent in Rhode Island: creditors
must file their claims in the office of the probate
clerk within the time required by law beginning
November 19, 2013.
LEVASSEUR, GAIL ANN, estate.
Daniel P. Levasseur Jr. of Pawtucket has quali-
fied as Administrator: creditors must file their
claims in the office of the probate clerk within
the time required by law beginning November
19, 2013.
LOPES, ANNA, estate.
R.J. Connelly III, Esq. of Pawtucket has qualified
as Administrator CTA: creditors must file their
claims in the office of the probate clerk within
the time required by law beginning November
19, 2013.
MCCAUGHEY, KATHERINE E., estate.
Denise Dehertogh of Cumberland has qualified
as Executrix: creditors must file their claims in
the office of the probate clerk within the time re-
quired by law beginning November 19, 2013.
SKAVRON, ROBERT J., estate.
Debra Skavron of Pawtucket has qualified as
Administratrix: creditors must file their claims in
the office of the probate clerk within the time re-
quired by law beginning November 19, 2013.
TOOLE, HELEN G., estate.
Reverend Lawrence E. Toole of Cumberland has
qualified as Executor: creditors must file their
claims in the office of the probate clerk within
the time required by law beginning November
19, 2013.
Richard J. Goldstein,
City Clerk
STATE OF RHODE ISLAND
PROVIDENCE, SC
SUPERIOR COURT
IN RE: TAX ASSESSOR'S
PARCEL 002, BLOCK 08, MAP 401
NEWPORT AVENUE AND NEW ROAD
EAST PROVIDENCE, RHODE ISLAND
("Subject Parcel")
M. P. No. 13-5665
NEXT-OF-KIN NOTICE
As a result of recent archaeological work done
at the Subject Parcel, formerly the East Provi-
dence Cemetery, various and certain human re-
mains were found which are described as fol-
lows:
1. Possible additional remains of the following
persons who were re-interred to the Springvale
Cemetery in the 1960's:
Sarah Sutton
Albert Greene
Laura Norton
Mary McCallum
George H. Bowen
Walter McLane
Frederick Henry Bowen
(Mary)/Martha Eveleth
Lucy Mandell
James Smith
Alfred Millay
Maria Norton
Henry Foye
Serena Foye
Ruth Bork (Burke)
Sarah (Palriquin) Langill
Freddie McLane
Nelson Wayte
Mary E. Hankins
2. Possible remains of the following persons (P)
believed to be relatives of persons who were re-
interred (R) to the Springvale Cemetery in the
1960's:
Henrietta Berry (P)
Unknown Person (P)
Jacob Berry (R)
Mary Jane Berry (R)
Hugh McCallum (P)
Infant McCallum (P)
Infant McCallum (P)
Infant McCallum (P)
Mary McCallum (R)
Albert Bishop (P)
Maude Bishop (P)
Jane Bishop (R)
Unknown Person (P)
Unknown Person (P)
Lora (Laura) Arnold (R)
Stephen Arnold (R)
Unknown Person (P)
Albert Norton (R)
Grace E. Bowen (P)
Infant Bowen (P)
Mary Louisa (James) Bowen (P)
Frederick Henry Bowen (R)
George H. Bowen (R)
3. Possible remains of the following persons (P)
believed to be relatives of unknown persons re-
interred (R) to the Springvale Cemetery in the
1960's:
Isabella Burke (P)
Unknown Person (R)
Mittie Burke (P)
Unknown Person (R)
4. Possible remains of the following person:
James Loren Anthony
The owner of the Subject Parcel has filed a peti-
tion with the Providence Superior Court request-
ing court approval of the re-interment of the re-
mains described above, and a hearing on that
petition is scheduled for December 10, 2013 at
9:30 a.m. at the Providence Superior Court, 250
Benefit Street, Courtroom #17, Providence,
Rhode Island. Anyone wishing to be heard with
respect to the re-interment plan is encouraged to
appear at the hearing.
Robert D. Wieck, Esq.
Wieck DeLuca & Gemma Incorporated
56 Pine Street, Suite 700
Providence, Rhode Island 02903
Tel. (401) 454-8700
Tuesday, December 3, 2013 B8 THE TIMES
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STATE OF RHODE ISLAND
Probate Court of the
CITY OF PAWTUCKET
NOTICE
OF MATTERS PENDING AND FOR HEARING
IN SAID COURT
CITY OF PAWTUCKET
The Court will be in session at 2:00PM
on the dates specified in notices below
for hearing on said matters:
AGOSTINI, DOMINIC J., estate.
Probate of Will: for hearing December 11, 2013.
BOUCHER, RAYMOND E., estate.
Petition to reopen Probate of Will: for hearing
December 11, 2013.
CALABRO, FRANK C., estate.
Probate of Will: for hearing December 11, 2013.
KELLY, EARL F., estate.
Probate of Will: for hearing December 11, 2013.
MORISSETTE, HEATHER L., ward.
First Account of Guardian: for hearing December
11, 2013.
ROSBOROUGH, PATRICIA, ward.
Appointment of Guardian: for hearing December
11, 2013.
TEIXEIRA, JOAN TERESA (alias Joan T. Teix-
eira), estate.
First and Final Account of Administratrix: for
hearing December 11, 2013.
JOHNSTON, THOMAS A., estate.
Robert Johnston and Thomas M. Johnston both
of Rico, CO have qualified as Co-Executors and
both have appointed Bernard P. Healy, Esq. of
750 East Avenue, Pawtucket as their Agent in
Rhode Island: creditors must file their claims in
the office of the probate clerk within the time re-
quired by law beginning November 26, 2013.
PENDLEBURY, JOHN H., estate.
Richard E. Fuller of Lincoln has qualified as Ex-
ecutor: creditors must file their claims in the of-
fice of the probate clerk within the time required
by law beginning November 26, 2013.
PENDLETON, WINIFRED, estate.
R.J. Connelly III, Esq. of Pawtucket has qualified
as Administrator: creditors must file their claims
in the office of the probate clerk within the time
required by law beginning November 26, 2013.
Richard J. Goldstein,
City Clerk
CONDOMINIUM LIEN FORECLOSURE SALE
1309 Pound Hill Road, Unit 1309
North Smithfield, RI
Will be sold at Public Auction on December 12,
2013, at 2:00 P.M., on the premises, by power of
sale granted to the Slater Homes Condominium
Association by R.I.G.L. § 34-36.1-3.16 and pur-
suant to R.I.G.L. § 34-36.1-3.21, the obligation
of the Unit Owner, Mortgage Electronic Registra-
tion Systems, Inc., to pay condominium assess-
ments having been defaulted. That certain con-
dominium Unit in the Slater Homes Condomini-
um described in the deed into owner for Unit
1309, recorded in the North Smithfield Land Evi-
dence Records, in Book 517 at Page 31, contain-
ing the recording data for the Declaration which
is incorporated herein. The Unit will be sold
subject to matters which may constitute valid
liens or encumbrances after sale. Terms and
conditions of sale to be announced at sale.
Cash, certified or bank check for $5,000 required
to bid.
RAYMOND HARRISON
Attorney for Slater Homes Condo. Assoc.
33 College Hill Road, Suite 5B
Warwick, RI 02886
(401) 821-8200
100 Legals 100 Legals
NATION
Fast-food strikes aimed at 100 cities
CANDICE CHOI
and SAM HANANEL
Associated Press
NEWYORK — Fast-food
workers in about 100 cities will
walk off the job on Thursday,
organizers say, which would
mark the largest effort yet in a
push for higher pay.
The actions are intended to
build on a campaign that began
about a year ago to call attention
to the difficulties of living on the
federal minimum wage of $7.25
an hour, or about $15,000 a year
for a full-time employee.
The protests are part of a
movement by labor unions,
Democrats and other worker
advocacy groups to raise pay in
low-wage sectors. Last month,
President Barack Obama said he
would back a Senate measure to
raise the federal minimum wage
to $10.10 an hour.
Protesters are calling for $15
an hour, although many see the
figure as a rallying point rather
than a near-term possibility.
It’s not clear how large the
turnout will be at any given loca-
tion, or whether the walkouts will
be enough to disrupt operations.
Similar actions this summer had
varying results, with some restau-
rants unable to serve customers
and others seemingly unaffected.
The National Restaurant
Association, an industry lobbying
group, called the demonstrations
a “campaign engineered by
national labor groups,” and said
the vast majority of participants
were union protesters rather than
workers.
The group added that past
demonstrations “have fallen well
short of their purported num-
bers.”
Kendall Fells, a New York
City-based organizer for Fast
Food Forward, said demonstra-
tions are planned for 100 cities,
in addition to the 100 cities
where workers will strike. He
said plans started coming togeth-
er shortly after the one-day
actions in about 60 cities this
summer.
“They understand they’re not
going to win from a one-day
strike,” Fells said of workers.
Still, organizers face an uphill
battle in reshaping an industry
that competes aggressively on
low prices, a practice that has
intensified as companies includ-
ing McDonald’s Corp., Burger
King Worldwide Inc. and Yum
Brands Inc., which owns KFC,
Pizza Hut and Taco Bell, face
growing competition and slow
growth in the weak economy.
Fast-food workers are also
seen as difficult to unionize,
given the industry’s high turnover
rates.
But the Service Employees
International Union, which repre-
sents more than 2 million work-
ers in health care, janitorial and
other industries, has been provid-
ing organizational and financial
support to the push for higher pay
over the past year.
Berlin Rosen, a political con-
sulting and public relations firm
based in New York City, has also
been coordinating communica-
tions efforts and helping organiz-
ers connect with media outlets.
In the meantime, U.S. Senate
Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-
Nev., has promised a vote on the
wage hike by the end of the year.
But the measure is not expected
to gain traction in the House,
where Republican leaders oppose
it.
Supporters of wage hikes have
been successful at the state and
local level. Last month, voters in
New Jersey approved a hike in
the minimum to $8.25 an hour,
up from $7.25 an hour.
California, New York,
Connecticut and Rhode Island
also raised their minimum wages
this year.
Campaign to raise
minimum wage gets
more aggressive
Stocks tumble on disappointing Thanksgiving sales
NEWYORK (AP) — The final month of
a stellar year for stocks began with a thud.
All three major indexes closed lower
Monday, the first day of trading in
December. Investors sold shares on signs
that American shoppers — that seemingly
inexhaustible fuel of global economic
growth — may hold tight to their cash this
holiday season.
Shoppers turned out in record numbers
over the four-day Thanksgiving weekend,
but plunked down less cash than they did
last year. It was the first decline in
Thanksgiving weekend spending since a
retail trade group began tracking it in 2006.
Investors reacted by selling all types of
retailer stocks, from department stores to
specialty chains. J.C. Penney, Macy’s and
Target fell about 2 percent each. Urban
Outfitters dropped nearly 4 percent.
“This holiday season is not going to be a
gangbuster,” said Lindsey Piegza, chief
economist of Sterne Agee. “Retailers are
bracing for declining activity from now to
the beginning of the year.”
One big exception to the retailer doldrums
was Ebay, which rose 1.6 percent thanks to
signs of strong sales from its online auctions.
The Dow Jones industrial average has
surged 22 percent this year and, if history
holds, will add to that gain this month. The
Dow has risen in December in three out of
every four years going back to 1950, accord-
ing to the Stock Trader's Almanac. The aver-
age gain: 1.7 percent.
On Monday, the Dow fell 77.64 points, or
0.5 percent, to 16,008.77. The Standard &
Poor's 500 index dropped 4.91 points, or 0.3
percent, to 1,800.90. The Nasdaq composite
fell 14.63 points, or 0.4 percent, to 4,045.26.
The government reported that developers
boosted construction spending in October at
the fastest pace in more than four years. A
separate survey showed that manufacturing
activity rose at its fastest pace in 2 ½ years.
Joseph S. Tanious, global market strate-
gist at JPMorgan, said he was encouraged by
the reports, and saw little reason to sell. But
he said many people have made so much
money in the market already that they want
to play it safe and lock in gains.
“Investors are looking for reasons to sell,”
Tanious said. “But I think the markets will
move higher between here and the year-
end.”
Stocks have soared as the economy main-
tains a slow but steady recovery and compa-
nies continue to increase earnings. Demand
for stocks also has been bolstered by Federal
Reserve purchases of $85 billion of bonds
each month. The goal is to hold down inter-
est rates, make bonds less attractive than
stocks, and stimulate the economy.
Same-sex marriage officially arrives for Hawaiians
HONOLULU (AP) — Hawaii
issued 40 licenses for same-sex
marriages Monday as gay mar-
riages began in the state with six
couples at a Waikiki resort
exchanging vows side-by-side in
front of a few hundred guests.
The state began accepting
applications for licenses on its
website at midnight. Almost all
of the licenses were for couples
on Oahu, said state Department
of Health spokeswoman Janice
Okubo. One license was for a
couple on Maui.
Saralyn Morales was among
the six couples who tied the knot
at the Waikiki resort shortly after
the new law took effect.
“It’s about making that com-
mitment to the person that I want
to spend the rest of my life
with,” she said shortly after cut-
ting a small wedding cake with
her spouse, Isajah Morales.
Okubo said the Health
Department already has certified
one same-sex marriage and was
verifying documents for two
dozen more. The state has up to
two days to issue a marriage cer-
tificate once a marriage is per-
formed if a couple obtains their
license online.
Hawaii helped start the
national gay marriage discussion
more than two decades ago when
a same-sex couple was denied a
marriage license, leading to a
court fight that eventually
prompted Congress to pass the
Defense of Marriage Act in
1996. Part of that law, which
stipulated that marriage was
between a man and woman, was
struck down earlier this year by
the U.S. Supreme Court.
Tourism is the lifeblood of
Hawaii, and officials believe the
islands will benefit from the new
law.
An estimate from a
University of Hawaii researcher
says the state will get a $217
million tourism boost over the
next three years as a result of
gay marriage.
The new law allows couples
to register for a license and be
married the same day, a process
that appeals to tourists. Couples
can sign up for a license online
then be verified by any license
agent throughout the state.
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