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Wednesday, December 18, 2013
The Blackstone Valley’s Neighborhood Newspaper since 1885 www.pawtuckettimes.com Newsstand: 50 Cents
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FOOD
By JOSEPH B. NADEAU
jnadeau@woonsocketcall.com
CUMBERLAND – A Diamond
Hill Road couple just barely escaped
a fast-moving fire in their home
Monday night that sadly claimed the
lives of their two dogs and a cat,
according to firefighters.
David and Marianne Alger had
been asleep in the upper level of their
two-story home just before 11:15
p.m. when they woke to find the
attached downstairs family room on
fire, North Cumberland Fire Chief
Brian Jackvony said Tuesday.
There were two smoke detectors
in the 3397 Diamond Hill Road
home, but the couple did not know
what had awakened them, the chief
added. They encountered the fire
downstairs as the attempted to flee
the upper level and then tried a win-
dow as a possible exit,” Jackvony
said.
“It was frozen shut, so they knew
they had to make it out through the
downstairs,” he said. The couple was
able to get out without injury despite
the growing fire, according to
Jackvony.
BLAZE DESTROYS
CUMBERLAND HOUSE
Times Photo/Ernest A. Brown
The home of David and Marianne Alger of 3397 Diamond Hill Road, Cumberland, was destroyed in a fire late Monday
evening. They escaped unharmed, but their two dogs and a cat perished in the blaze.
By DONNA KENNY KIRWAN
dkirwan@pawtuckettimes.com
PAWTUCKET — The gray,
snowy weather outside City Hall
didn't dampen the mood within,
as six new police recruits were
sworn in as members of the
Pawtucket Police Department on
Tuesday afternoon.
The five men and one woman
had all graduated from the
Municipal Police Academy that
morning, and they received their
badges — pinned by a family
member or loved one — that
afternoon. Fr. Joseph Paquette,
who serves as police chaplain,
delivered an invocation and
benediction, bestowing blessings
and prayers for their safety as
they “serve and protect the won-
derful people of Pawtucket.”
Mayor Donald Grebien and
Attorney General Peter
Kilmartin, a former Pawtucket
Pawtucket police ranks
grow by six newcomers
Spumoni’s Restaurant
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Pawtucket, RI
401-726-4449
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7
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THE TIMES
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VWMM~ã íç QWMMéã
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By RUSS OLIVO
rolivo@woonsocketcall.com
WOONSOCKET – Nearly half the
$25 million statewide affordable
housing bond approved by voters in
2012 has been disbursed, with proj-
ects in Woonsocket, Pawtucket and
Cumberland taking in some of biggest
slices of the pie, officials announced.
Woonsocket-based NeighborWorks
Blackstone River Valley was awarded
nearly $1.2 million to rehab the long-
vacant Mulvey’s Hardware Store, 40
South Main St. The location, next
door to Woonsocket’s Museum of
Pawtucket gets bond money for project
Other Blackstone
Valley cities and
towns receive funds
An artist’s rendering of Mulvey’s makeover in Woonsocket that will include a farm-
ers market. See BOND, Page A2
Times Photo/Ernest A. Brown
Pawtucket's newest police officers, from left, James Leach, Matthew Mello, Ariel
Vega, Zachary Day, Andrew Torres and Patrick Dolan were sworn in by Public
Safety Director Tony Pires in a ceremony in City Council chambers Tuesday.
New officers sworn
in at City Hall fete
See POLICE, page A2
See BLAZE, page A2
Atheists
in the
Rotunda
By JIM BARON
jbaron@pawtuckettimes.com
PROVIDENCE – The
Rhode Island Statehouse
has become a battleground
in the War on Christmas.
Although Gov. Lincoln
Chafee surrendered in the
recent skirmish over what to
call the tree – it is now offi-
cially a Christmas tree, not
a “holiday tree” — there is
now a battle over banners.
The Freedom From
Religion Foundation
(FFRF), a Wisconsin-based
atheist group, has posted a
sign in the Statehouse
Rotunda that says: “At this
season of the winter sol-
stice, let reason prevail.
There are no gods, no dev-
ils, no heaven or hell. There
is only our natural world.
Religion is but myth and
superstition that hardens
hearts and enslaves minds.”
FFRF co-founder Annie
Laurie Gaylor said the sign
is a response to the crèches
and other religious symbols
that ring the Rotunda on the
second
floor of the Statehouse.
“We were asked to do it by
our Rhode Island member-
ship who were concerned
about devotional religion in
the capital not being coun-
tered.
“We don’t think our sign
belongs in a state capital
any more than a manger
Statehouse display
generates another
Yule controversy
See ROTUNDA, page A2
BELLINGHAM – An
unidentified woman was
transported to the University
of Massachusetts Medical
Center in Worcester after a
crash on Williams Way
Tuesday morning, according
to police.
The woman was reported
to have been seriously hurt
after her vehicle overturned
near 34 Williams Way at
about 8:30 a.m., police said.
Rescue personnel had ini-
tially wanted the victim to
be MedFlighted to hospital
but Tuesday’s snowstorms
had ruled out the flight,
according to the fire depart-
ment.
The victim was transport-
ed by Bellingham Rescue to
UMass for treatment, fire
department personnel
reported.
Information on the
woman’s condition was not
available on Tuesday.
scene belongs in a state cap-
ital,” Gaylor acknowledged.
“But if they are going to
allow religion, then we will
be there, too. We don’t think
religion or irreligion
belongs on government
property. Capitals should
stay above the religious
fray.”
Earlier this month, the
group Humanists of Rhode
Island put up a banner in the
Rotunda that says: ‘“Tis the
season to celebrate the birth
of Roger Williams & sepa-
ration of church and state.”
Williams, who founded
Rhode Island in 1636, was
an early advocate for reli-
gious freedom.
The FFRF is the group
that challenged the Place
Jolicoeur war memorial in
Woonsocket last year. The
Humanists of Rhode Island
successfully sought the
removal of a prayer banner
at Cranston West High
School, also in 2012.
“Our group is made up of
people who are personally
free from religion, who tend
to think that religion does
more harm than good,”
Gaylor explained.
“The first question that
has to be asked of religion
is: is it true,” she said. “if
there is no evidence to sup-
port its truth, then it is intel-
lectually dishonest to
believe it. And more people
have been killed in the name
of a deity than for any other
reason. The world is full of
fanatics who think they
know what God wants them
to do.”
Gaylor quoted Thomas
Paine, one of the Founding
Fathers, as saying that any
religion that is united with a
government invariably
engages in persecution. In
Paine’s “The Age of
Reason” he said:
“Persecution is not an origi-
nal feature in any religion;
but it is always the strongly
marked feature of all reli-
gions established by law.
“We see the tradition in
Rhode Island of filling the
Rotunda with devotional
Christian themes to be a
union of church and state,
and we think that is danger-
ous,” she said.
Gaylor admitted that the
message the sign carries is
confrontational.
“The wording of the sign
is plain-spoken and it was
written, basically, to chal-
lenge public forums in capi-
tals that permit manger
scenes,” she said, noting
that in the state of
Washington, it was success-
ful in having crèches
removed from the capital.
Attempts to get comment
from the governor’s office
or the Diocese of
Providence were unsuccess-
ful on Tuesday.
Follow Jim Baron on
Twitter @Jim_Baron
“It was a close call,” he
said.
Once outside, the couple
heard what they later
described as the “sound of a
train coming through,” as
the flames roared through
the building.
Jackvony said the fire
department received a call
from the couple reporting
the fire as well as from
neighbors. The department’s
first unit on the scene found
the attached garage and
family room fully involved
and flames already burning
about a quarter of the main
home nearest the family
room.
The home was located
down a long dirt road from
Diamond Hill Road, and
that made access to the
structure difficult given the
11 degree temperatures upon
firefighters’ arrival and the
resulting icing from the fire-
fighting, according to
Jackvony. The cold only
worsened while the fire-
fighting effort continued
into Tuesday, with a low of
7 degrees being reported, he
noted.
A hydrant was available
on Diamond Hill Road but
the water supply was insuf-
ficient for the fire already
burning in the home, and
Cumberland’s responding
departments called upon the
Woonsocket, North
Attleboro, and Lincoln fire
departments to set up addi-
tional lines to feed the fire-
fighting efforts, according to
Jackvony.
“Once we got the sec-
ondary resources we were
able to get the fire knocked
down,” Jackvony said.
Firefighting units from
Central Falls, Quinnville in
Lincoln, and Wrentham pro-
vided station coverage, he
said. Aside from the loss of
the family’s pets, no one
was injured in the incident,
Jackvony said. The
Providence Canteen truck
did provide the rehabbing
firefighters with warm
drinks to fend off the cold,
he added.
The home was a total
loss, suffering extensive fire
damage with the roof and
main floor of the main
building collapsing into the
basement, Jackvony said.
After an inspection on
Tuesday, the town’s building
official “ordered it demol-
ished as an unsafe struc-
ture,” he said.
The remaining portion of
the home was expected to
be razed today, according to
Jackvony.
The Algers have three
grown children and were
reported to be staying with
family members after the
fire.
The blaze remains under
investigation by state and
local fire marshals due to
the heavy damage to the
structure, but is believed to
have been accidental and
possibly related to a wood
stove in the family room,
Jackvony said.
“The chimney has col-
lapsed, but the information
we received from residents
and neighbors was that the
fire appeared to be centered
in the family room,” he said.
The family was connected
to the main home without
doors so the fire is believed
to have spread rapidly from
that area into the main sec-
tion of the home.
Although losing their
home and most of their
belongings in the fire,
Jackvony said the Algers
were fortunate to have
awakened when they did.
“As tragic as it is, you
need to keep a focus on the
fact they were both able to
escape. It was a very close
call,” he said.
Police captain, attended the
ceremony. The officers were
sworn in by Director of
Administration Tony Pires,
who also serves as the city's
public safety director.
Police Chief Paul King
called the day “a happy
occasion,” not only for the
recruits but for the mayor
and his administration in
their “continued commit-
ment to public safety.” He
added that the extra person-
nel should help significantly
reduce overtime in the
Police Department budget,
which currently has “more
red lines than the American
flag” due to vacancies.
In his opening remarks,
Pires said that the six
recruits were all “outstand-
ing,” and noted that they
had collectively performed
in the top 50 percent of their
class at the Police Academy.
Three were in the top 15
percent of the graduating
class, and five had already
earned bachelor’s degrees,
while one has an associate’s
degree.
Joining the ranks of the
city’s police force was
Patrick M. Dolan, 22, who
graduated second in his
class at the academy. Dolan,
of Worcester, Mass., holds a
bachelor's degree in crimi-
nal justice from Roger
Williams University.
Graduating at number
five in the academy class
was Andrew Torres, of
Dighton, Mass. The 23-
year-old possesses a bache-
lor’s degree in social order
and justice from the
University of Massachusetts
— Amherst.
Also sworn in was
Zachary Day, who was
ranked at number 11 at the
academy. The 24-year-old
from Rehoboth, Mass.,
holds a bachelor's degree in
criminal justice from Curry
College.
Becoming the tenth
woman to join the city's
police department was Ariel
Vega, 21, of Pawtucket.
Vega, who had previously
lived in Central Falls, holds
an associate’s degree from
the Community College of
Rhode Island and is present-
ly pursuing a bachelor’s
degree at Rhode Island
College. She graduated 15th
in her class at the Police
Academy.
Additionally joining the
department was Matthew
Mello, 22, of Bristol. Mello
possesses a bachelor’s
degree in criminal justice
from Roger Williams
University. He was also the
recipient of the Highway
Safety Award from the acad-
emy, where he graduated
22nd in his class.
Rounding out the new
hires was 41-year-old U.S.
Army veteran James Leach,
of Warwick. Leach holds a
bachelor’s degree in crimi-
nal justice from American
Military University and was
the recipient of the
Leadership Award at the
academy, where he ranked
23rd in the class.
Leach retired in January
from 23 years of active duty
as a sergeant major in the
Army’s Military Police
Corps. He served on three
deployments and 10 years
overseas, and has been
awarded the Combat
Infantryman’s Badge, Air
Assault Badge, and numer-
ous other awards and for-
eign decorations.
Pires said that an average
starting salary for a new
officer is around $51,000,
plus another $20,000 in ben-
efits, which brings the total
expenditure to around
$426,000.
This amount, plus their
four months of field train-
ing, is already budgeted for,
he added.
King said the addition of
the six new hires brings the
police force to the optimal
complement of 142, a num-
ber that he hasn’t seen in a
number of years. Three
more recruits are scheduled
to enter the Municipal
Police Academy in January
and graduate in June, filling
additional vacancies that
have occurred or are expect-
ed to occur, he said.
“This will allow us to
have more patrol officers on
the streets,” King said. He
added that with the fiscal
constraints of the past sever-
al years, there were a num-
ber of vacancies in supervi-
sory positions that had to be
left unfilled in order to
maintain patrol levels. The
arrival of the rookie officers
allows for some long-await-
ed upward mobility within
the ranks, he added.
Follow Donna Kirwan on
Twitter@KirwanDonna
Work & Culture, is consid-
ered one of the crucial
“gateways” to the city, fun-
neling traffic into the bur-
geoning Market Square vil-
lage of boutique-style gift
shops and restaurants.
Joseph Garlick, executive
director of NeighborWorks,
said the plans for the build-
ing include redeveloping the
ground floor as function
space for public gatherings
and special events associat-
ed with the Museum of
Work & Culture. Some
exterior space may be con-
figured to accommodate a
farmer’s market and six
affordable rental units will
be located upstairs.
“There will probably be a
lot of stuff happening inside
the building in the next
month or so, but we don’t
expect to really go to town
on it until the weather gets a
little warmer,” said Garlick.
“It will be spring before we
see much going on at
Mulvey’s.”
The bond money repre-
sents only part of the
financing for the project,
which Garlick said repre-
sents an investment closer
to $5 million. The city of
Woonsocket has pledged
$300,000 from the federal
department of Housing and
Urban Development’s
HOME program, which is
targeted for affordable hous-
ing. NeighborWorks, classi-
fied as a Community
Housing Development
Organization, or CHODO,
is the only eligible recipient
in the city, according to
Paulette Miller, the city’s
federal grants coordinator.
Navigant Credit Union is
also financing part of the
project, according to
Garlick.
The bond money will also
allow NeighborWorks to
acquire three foreclosure
tenements in Constitution
Hill, raze one and rehabili-
tate the other two. The
money will also be used by
NeighborWorks to upgrade
44 other units of affordable
housing it already built in
Constitution Hill, one of the
city’s oldest neighborhoods,
according to Garlick.
Twenty-six Projects in 12
communities received bond
money during the initial
round of funding, including:
• Blackstone Valley
Gateway II, $1.6 million.
The project was proposed by
the Pawtucket Citizens
Development Corporation
and calls for 41 scattered
site rental homes, a commer-
cial unit and community
space. Except for six homes
which will be build in
Central Falls, the balance
will be located in Pawtucket.
• Valley Affordable
Housing received $2 million
to support the rehabilitation
of nine existing homes and
build two new ones, yielding
53 affordable rental units in
historic Ashton Village.
• REACH, or Realty
Endeavors for Affordable
Community Housing,
received a combined
$135,500 for two projects in
Central Falls. The City
demolished a foreclosure
property and will transfer it
to REACH for conversion
into an affordable rental
duplex. REACH also intends
to build a three-bedroom
home on a vacant lot on
Mowry Street and sell it a
low-income family.
In all, Building Homes
Rhode Island distributed
$11.5 million of the $25 mil-
lion, 2012 housing bond so
far, according to Nicole
Lagace, a spokeswoman for
Housing WorksRI.
The recipients also
include some smaller proj-
ects in Woonsocket and
Pawtucket. Boston-based
Trinity Woonsocket Limited
Partnership, the owner of the
Glenark Landing, 104
Sayles St., received
$150,000 to underwrite the
development of six afford-
able homes in the mill-to-
apartment conversion and a
neighboring cluster of resi-
dential buildings known as
The Ashley.
Pawtucket Citizens
Development Corporation
received $275,000 to reha-
bilitate a blighted, vacant
building for the purpose of
providing housing for
youths “aging out” of the
foster care system. Eleven
young people will live in
four two-bedroom homes
and one four-bed home,
according to
HousingWorksRI.
BHRI was established by
the state’s Housing
Resources Commission to
distribute housing bonds
which have been approved
by voters. In 2006, voters
approved a $50 million
bond that supported the
development of more than
1,300 units of long-term
affordable housing in 30
communities, according to
Lagace.
The $25 million bond
represents the second
installment of voter-
approved funding for
Building Homes Rhode
Island.
Lagace said recipients of
funding during the first
round of allocations were
made by a BHRI selection
committee that evaluated
applications on the basis of
merit.
The remaining funds will
be allocated by July 2014,
she said.
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FROMPAGE ONE
A2 THE TIMES Wednesday, December 18, 2013
LOTTERY
RI Daily
5-8-4-1
MA Daily
8-5-8-2
Wild Money
3-22-23-26-34
EB 9
Check tomorrow’s
paper for late lotteries.
Bond
Police
Blaze
Rotunda
Woman seriously injured in Bellingham crash
Suspect charged in NS armed robbery
NORTH SMITHFIELD
– AWoonsocket man is fac-
ing armed robbery charges
after he allegedly held up
the CT Gas Station Sunday,
police said.
Robert Attwood, 31, of
72 Cross St., allegedly
entered the store and dis-
played a knife as he
demanded money from a
clerk, police said. Attwood
fled in a motor vehicle and
was arrested by Woonsocket
police early Monday morn-
ing after North Smithfield
authorities broadcast a
description of the vehicle,
according to Detective
Capt. Tim Lafferty.
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FOOD/NATION THE TIMES A3
Wednesday, December 18, 2013
By STEPHANIE WITT SEDGWICK
Special to The Washington Post
Pork and White Bean Stout Stew
8 to 10 servings (12 cups)
Last holiday season, we went a little
overboard in stocking up on winter
brews. When the last guest left, we
had a refrigerator full of dark stouts
and porters. My husband, whose taste
runs to lighter beers, said it was time
to start cooking.
We've now had a year's worth of
chicken cooked in beer, porter-based
sauces and stout stews. Here's one of
our favorites: pork and beans with but-
ternut squash, which turns out to be a
good vegetable pairing for the stout.
The stew looks best when the
squash pieces stay whole, but if they
melt into the mix, don't worry. The
stew will taste just as good.
Ingredients
2 tablespoons olive oil, or more as
needed
3 pounds boneless pork shoulder or
boneless country-style pork chops, cut
into cubes no larger than 1 1/2 inches
1 1/2 cups water, or more as needed
2 cups diced onions
Kosher salt
1 cup stout, such as Samuel Smith's
Imperial Stout
1/4 cup molasses
1/2 teaspoon ground cloves
2 cans (about 30 ounces total) no-
salt-added great Northern beans,
drained and rinsed (may substitute 3
cups home-cooked white beans)
Freshly ground black pepper
1 pound peeled, seeded butternut
squash, cut into 3/4-inch pieces
Steps
Position an oven rack in the bottom
third of the oven; preheat to 325
degrees.
Heat 1 tablespoon of the oil in a
large, nonstick saute pan or skillet over
medium-high heat. Once the oil shim-
mers, add half of the pork, taking care
not to crowd the pan. Cook for 3 to 4
minutes, turning the pieces as needed
until they lose their raw look. Transfer
to a bowl. Repeat with the remaining
cubes, adding oil as needed.
When all of the pork has browned,
increase the heat to high under the
(empty) saute pan or skillet and add
1/2 cup of the water. Use a wooden
spatula or spoon to dislodge any
browned bits, then remove from the
heat.
Meanwhile, heat 1 tablespoon of the
oil in a 5-quart Dutch oven or oven-
proof saucepan over medium-high
heat. Add the onions and a pinch of
salt; reduce the heat to medium. Cook
for 6 to 7 minutes, stirring occasional-
ly, until the onions are soft but not
browned.
Add the stout, the remaining 1 cup
of water, the molasses, cloves and
beans along with the reserved liquid
from the saute pan or skillet. Season
lightly with salt and pepper, stirring to
combine, then add the browned pork.
The liquid should just barely cover
the ingredients; add water as needed.
As soon as the liquid begins to bubble,
cover the pan and transfer it to the
oven. Bake for 1 hour.
Remove from the oven to stir in the
squash, then cover and return to the
oven. Bake for 20 minutes or until the
pork and squash are tender.
Remove the pan from the oven,
uncover it and let the stew rest for 10
minutes. Taste the broth and adjust the
seasoning as needed.
Serve right away, or cool quickly in
a water bath or in a shallow metal pan
or bowl in the refrigerator. Once the
stew has cooled, cover and refrigerate
for up to 3 days or freeze for up to 3
months.
Nutrition Per serving (based on
10): 360 calories, 33 g protein, 29 g
carbohydrates, 11 g fat, 3 g saturat-
ed fat, 80 mg cholesterol, 300 mg
sodium, 7 g dietary fiber, 8 g sugar
SOMETHINGTOSTEWABOUT
A hearty dish made with pork, beans and vegetables.
Holiday gift
ideas for foodies
CLEAN COOKING: Silicone spatulas and brushes from
Trudeau are designed with built-in rests. Small spatula, $8.99,
large spatula $10.99, brush, $10.99. In blue, red, green and
yellow. www.shoptrudeau.com.
A CUT ABOVE: A batch of 30 handcrafted, luxury French
chocolates from Z Chocolat is packaged in a mahogany chest.
$150. Personalized engraved plate is about $20 extra. Other
sizes and types of boxes are available. www.zchocolat.com.
SWEET SOUTHERN: Five-
layer rainbow cake (strawber-
ry, orange, lemon, lime,
grape) with cream cheese
frosting. Nine inches, $55.
Available via phone or e-mail
order at Sugaree's Bakery,
110 W. Bankhead St. New
Albany, Miss. 38652, 866-
SUGAREE,
www.sugarees.com.
MADE IN AMERICA: Hand-
washable felt trivets from BNB
Crafts, $18 each. Bamboo
tableware from 180 Degrees,
including dinner plates, $5;
salad plates and bowls, $4;
cups, $3. Dishwasher-safe, in
blue, green, brown, mustard,
orange. MADHouse plastic twig cutlery in gray and teal, four
place settings, $6. All available at American Holiday in
Washington (202) 684-2790.
FOUND RECIPES: If you're still thumbing through cookbooks
on your own shelves to find an eye-catching recipe that uses,
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get one free. www.eatyourbooks.com.
RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — The Richmond Flying
Squirrels are set to announce the name of a beer created
by Richmond-area craft brewery for the minor league
baseball team.
The Double-A affiliate of the San Francisco Giants is
scheduled to announce the name of the new beer at an
event Tuesday afternoon.
The team partnered with Center of the Universe
Brewing Co. in Ashland to create the beer that will be
available at The Diamond and throughout the region.
Fans were asked to help name the amber lager through
an online and text message contest. The finalists for the
name of the beer were: Brush Back, Chin Music,
Hanging Curve, Knee Buckler, and Perfect Game.
Brewery co-founder Chris Ray is a former Major
League Baseball pitcher.
Richmond Flying Squirrels
to get its own beer
MIAMI (AP) — Florida wildlife officials say a man
tried to trade a live alligator for beer at a Miami conven-
ience store.
State Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission
spokesman Jorge Pino says the man received a citation
for illegally capturing and trying to sell the gator.
Pino tells WTVJ-TV that the man trapped the 4-foot-
long gator at a nearby park and brought it to the store
Dec. 10. When he proposed to trade the animal for a 12-
pack of beer, the store clerk called authorities.
Pino says the alligator was "pretty much in good
shape." The animal was released back into the wild.
Man tries to trade gator for brew
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A federal
judge has tossed out a lawsuit filed by
Monster Beverage Corp. that sought to
block the San Francisco city attorney's
investigation into the company's marketing
practices.
U.S. District Judge Virginia Phillips in
Riverside ruled Monday that granting
Monster's request would unfairly hinder a
lawsuit San Francisco City Attorney Dennis
Herrera filed in state court. That suit accus-
es the company of misbranding its highly
caffeinated drinks and marketing them to
children.
Judge dismisses Monster Beverage's lawsuit vs. SF
OPINION
THE TIMES — Wednesday, December 18, 2013
Page A4
PUBLISHER: Mary Lynn Bosiak
Executive Editor: Bianca Pavoncello
Managing Editor: David Pepin
Sports Editor: Eric Benevides
Assistant Editor/News/The Call: Russ Olivo
Assistant Editor/News/The Times: Donna Kenny Kirwan
Controller: Kathleen Needham
Circulation Manager: Jorge Olarte
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It's hard to get excited about a hand-
shake. It is just a courteous gesture, after
all.
But for Cubans, particularly many
Afro-Cubans, such a gesture between their
president and the black president of the
superpower just 90 miles north of them
fuels hopes for bigger changes.
One such change would be the ultimate
lifting of a five-decade long economic
embargo that has disproportionately ratch-
eted up more suffering among black
Cubans, who receive far fewer remittance
dollars than white Cubans and feel more
of the brunt of shortages and hardships, as
well as the increasing economic stratifica-
tion that it abets.
"I knew what happened between Raúl
and Obama because my assistant called
me on the phone and told me," said famed
Afro-Cuban documentarian Gloria
Rolando. "He said, 'Gloria! Gloria! Did
you hear what happened?'
"That was the most important news that
day ... people were calling me all day
about it. We don't always make comments
about news events, but we did about that
one.
"That meeting may be the window for
the start of a new beginning for us."
Yet while Rolando and most Cubans
aren't naïve enough to believe that the
handshake between Raúl Castro and
President Barack Obama at Nelson
Mandela's memorial service last week
means the embargo will be lifted tomor-
row, or that Obama will become the first
serving U.S. president in more than 50
years to visit Cuba, many believe it still
represents a goodwill gesture that is, in
Obama's case, being slowly backed by
small changes.
Since the Obama administration has
been in office, it has eased restrictions on
visas for Cuba as well as people-to-people
travel and cultural tours. The president has
also allowed Cuban-Americans to send
more remittances back to their relatives in
Cuba.
"In the case of our country and the
United States, Raúl has always said that
he would put on the table things to negoti-
ate," said Odalys Lopez, a representative
of the North American Division of the
Cuban Institute for Friendship With the
Peoples, an NGO that, among other
things, facilitates international visits to
Cuba and provides humanitarian aid.
Lopez said that changes that are being
discussed, such as restoring direct postal
service between the two countries, demon-
strate that agreements between the coun-
tries — things that are often symbolized
by a handshake — are ongoing.
"We're in dialogue with the United
States about many things, all the time,"
Lopez said.
That's why Lopez wasn't all that sur-
prised by the handshake between Obama.
Neither was Michael Cobiella, chief of the
publishing house of the Fernando Ortiz
Foundation, which focuses on the study of
Afro-Cubans and other ethnic cultures that
comprise Cuban society.
"I'm a Cuban. I can never be sur-
prised," Cobiella said. "I think that we
have never had anything against the U.S.
people, even in the worse crises.
"There were some bad things said,
some wrong things said, but we have
never had anything against the U.S. peo-
ple."
And when a U.S. president steps up and
shakes the hand of their president during
the funeral of a leader like Mandela,
whom the Cuban people loved, it's a little
tough not to hope.
"The best homage to Mandela was that
handshake," Rolando said. "Nelson
Mandela believed in establishing dialogue
with others ...
"In the history of humankind, there
have been many beginnings to many posi-
tive things. Maybe this is one of those
beginnings."
Tonya Weathersbee is an award-win-
ning columnist based in Jacksonville, Fla.
Obama-Castro handshake
signals hope for Cubans
GUEST COMMENTARY
By Tonya Weathersbee
The bipartisan budget deal was a wel-
come exception to congressional gridlock. It
was not, unfortunately, an indication that
gridlock has been broken in any lasting or
fundamental way.
House Speaker John Boehner publicly
lost his temper with tea party groups because
their political strategy — demonstrated in
the manifest failure of the government shut-
down — neglected to specify a path to victo-
ry. In selling the budget deal to Republican
lawmakers, Boehner and
House Budget Committee
Chairman Paul Ryan pro-
posed such a path: Keep
the public spotlight on
the cascading failures of
the Affordable Care Act
instead of drawing atten-
tion to GOP brinkman-
ship and internal divi-
sions.
This was the appeal —
avoid self-destruction
while your opponent is self-destructing —
that ended up persuading two-thirds of the
Republican Study Committee (the House’s
conservative caucus) and should secure the
requisite number of Senate Republican
votes. It is a perfectly rational political argu-
ment. But it is hardly the prelude to future
legislative ambition.
Put another way: The budget agreement
was passed by the House precisely because it
was small — small in its discretionary
spending increases, in its entitlement adjust-
ments and in controversial ideological con-
tent. It was not a precedent for grand com-
promises on immigration or tax reform. We
are seeing a truce in the budget wars, not the
emergence of a centrist governing coalition.
The budget agreement was also notable
for the role played by President Obama —
which was pretty much none at all. He was
marginal to the deal, which had almost noth-
ing to do with his policy priorities.
Given the inherent powers of the office, a
president is never fully or finally irrelevant.
President George W. Bush, for example, was
at a low ebb of popularity and political influ-
ence when he pursued the troop surge in
Iraq. For a consequential foreign policy deci-
sion, or at a time of national crisis, the chief
executive makes a sudden return to indis-
pensability.
But Obama now risks permanent damage
to his standing as a leader. His main legisla-
tive achievement, the Affordable Care Act, is
broadly tarnished or politically toxic. Polls
indicate growing questions about Obama’s
credibility and competence — mainly
because of the contrast between the way
Obamacare was sold and the way it has been
implemented. (In a recent NBC News/Wall
Street Journal survey, just 37 percent of
Americans gave Obama high marks for
being “honest and straightforward.”) Though
the midterm elections are still a ways off,
control of the Senate could easily switch. A
Republican Senate majority would make
Obama the lamest of ducks.
The relatively minor White House person-
nel adjustments the president has so far
announced convey little sense of urgency.
And his main problem is not personnel-relat-
ed. It is the messy, unfolding reality of
Obamacare. Uptake remains anemic — at
last official count, about 3 million short of
the administration’s 3.3 million year-end
goal. New regulations have caused disrup-
tions in health insurance markets, including
lost and restricted coverage and premium
increases. The president did little to prepare
Americans for these predictable outcomes,
making it difficult for him to credibly argue
that these costs are worth the benefits
(which, for some Americans, they are). And
speaking of costs, Obamacare’s new taxes
begin to bite this coming year.
So, the president (with suspect credibility
and competence) is weakened, while
Republicans in Congress (with doubts about
their compassion and willingness to compro-
mise) are highly unpopular. American poli-
tics seems like a contest of two exhausted
boxers. Both have made serious mistakes.
Both have been unable (so far) to deliver a
decisive blow. Sometimes (as in the budget
deal) they hang on to each other to keep
from falling down.
Over the years, the policy effects of this
political exhaustion have been surprisingly
mixed. On fiscal issues, the legislative
clinches have added up. In recent years, the
two parties have agreed to just more than $2
trillion in reduced spending (over 10 years)
and raised taxes by about $700 billion during
the same period — cutting the 10-year
deficit in half. In the absence of serious enti-
tlement reform, America’s long-term fiscal
prognosis remains disastrous. But the short-
er-term deficit is in significantly better
shape. Yet on domestic policy — including
immigration and issues related to economic
opportunity and mobility — little gets
accomplished. Democrats have few results to
show since the 2010 election. Republicans,
meanwhile, have conducted a debilitating,
internal debate over whether the crafting of
domestic policy is even an appropriate feder-
al role.
America is a nation with serious public
challenges — and a political class exhausted
by minimal exertions.
Read more from Michael Gerson’s
archive, follow him on Twitter or subscribe
to his updates on Facebook .
The exhausted political class
WASHINGTON — A Federal District
Court judge ruled this week that the
National Security Agency's collection and
storage of all Americans' phone records
probably violates the Constitution and is an
"almost Orwellian" system that "surely . . .
infringes on 'that degree of privacy' that the
founders enshrined in the Fourth
Amendment." It's the first successful legal
challenge to NSA surveillance since June,
when Edward Snowden began a cascade of
NSA disclosures. It might just set up the
most important legal debate about surveil-
lance and personal privacy in decades. And
it threatens to undermine one of the major
legal foundations of the NSA's vast surveil-
lance network.
Judge Richard Leon of the District of
Columbia, a George W. Bush appointee,
ordered the government to stop collecting
the phone records of two plaintiffs who
brought suit against the NSA's so-called
metadata program and to destroy the infor-
mation it has on them now. He stayed his
injunction, pending an almost certain
appeal by the Obama administration. But if
the case is eventually heard by an appeals
court -- and there are reasons to think it
will be -- it would be the highest-stakes
and highest-profile battle to date over the
NSA's program, and a proxy argument for
the broader ethical dimensions about mas-
sive government surveillance. Think of it
as the NSA's answer to the Scopes Monkey
Trial -- a public, and undoubtedly passion-
ate debate about whether massive, techno-
logically-enabled surveillance that would
have been impossible a few decades ago is
still compatible with core constitutional
principles of privacy and freedom from
unreasonable searches.
The judge ruled that the government's
collection of phone records relied on an
outdated Supreme Court ruling, from 1979,
that metadata isn't protected by the Fourth
Amendment — an analysis that, on its
own, is likely to ignite considerable debate.
"The ubiquity of phones has dramatically
altered the quantity of information that is
now available and, more importantly, what
that information can tell the Government
about people's lives," Leon wrote. "I cannot
possibly navigate these uncharted Fourth
Amendment waters using as my North Star
a case that predates the rise of cell phones."
But that case, Smith v. Maryland, is part
of the foundation of NSA's global surveil-
lance system, which relies on the collection
of all kinds of metadata -- from phone
records, to email header information, to
Internet addresses. In a more recent ruling
about whether the government needs a war-
rant to install a GPS tracking device on
someone's car, the Supreme Court narrowly
opened the door to a future ruling on
whether metadata should now be protected
under the Constitution, in light of the dra-
matic changes in technology over the past
few decades. Leon's ruling may be the first
step towards bringing that issue before the
nation's highest court, and potentially alter-
ing the way the global surveillance system
is run.
In some respects, momentum has been
building towards this moment. The metada-
ta program was nearly defanged over the
summer, in a rare show of bipartisan sup-
port in the House of Representatives. Since
then, there have been further revelations of
government spying, including on U.S.
allies, and a presidential review panel has
reportedly recommended a sweeping set of
reforms at the NSA, including prohibiting
the agency from storing Americans' phone
records.
Lawmakers are expected to take up leg-
islation limiting the NSA's powers next
year, and the Senate Intelligence
Committee has launched an investigation
into intelligence collection programs.
Since June, the Obama administration
has mounted a public relations offensive in
support of the NSA program and has told
lawmakers that it is legal and necessary to
protect Americans from terrorist attacks —
an argument that Judge Leon found unper-
suasive. But officials have rarely had to
publicly argue the legality and constitution-
ality of the program in court.
In finding that the metadata program
probably violates the Fourth Amendment,
Leon ruled on broad grounds, leaving the
D.C. Court of Appeals a number of poten-
tial options. They could dismiss the case --
ruling, as previous courts have, that the
plaintiffs lack standing to bring the suit
because they can't prove that they were
individually subjected to secret surveil-
lance.
But that was before Snowden's leak,
which provided documented evidence that
the government was collecting phone
records.
It's unclear how Leon's ruling would
affect other challenges pending in at least
three other federal courts. But news of his
decision seemed to renew the hopes of oth-
ers who've brought challenges to the meta-
data program and have tried, unsuccessful-
ly, to fight other aspects of NSA surveil-
lance over the years.
Harris is author of "The Watchers: The
Rise of America's Surveillance State."
Court case could kneecap the NSA
GUEST COMMENTARY
By Shane Harris
Michael Gerson
By RUSS OLIVO
rolivo@woonsocketcall.com
NORTH SMITHFIELD –
Alert to bad guys: K9 cop
Joery is on patrol, and when
he takes a bite out of crime,
he really does use his teeth.
And judging by the brisk
wag of his tail and what
appeared distinctly like the
wrinkle of a smile along his
canine jawline, the four-
year-old Belgian Malinois
seems to enjoy his work.
In a demonstration of his
talents behind the police sta-
tion Tuesday, the powerful,
ruddy-brown four-legger got
sicced on Officer Greg
Landry, clad in a puffy, mat-
ted suit for protection. On
command from his handler,
Officer Jay Rainville, Joery
bolted toward Landry with
frighteningly single-minded
determination and latched
his jaws onto Landry’s wrist
with a lock that would make
the manufacturers of Vice-
Grips proud.
Joery was so adamant
about hanging on that
Landry and Rainville were
able to lift the 60-pound ani-
mal two feet off the ground,
shake him a little bit while
he dangled in the air, all
with his jaws locked on
Landry’s wrist. He just
wouldn’t let go, at least not
until he was told to.
“He’s got a pretty mean
bite and he hits you pretty
hard,” said Landry, who was
either shaken or invigorated
by the violent animal
encounter. It was hard to
tell.
Joery (pronounced “YU-
ree) was born in Holland
and looks similar to a
German Shepherd, except
he’s a little more sleek and
the coloration of his fur is
akin to that of a fisher cat,
with a little black around the
snout. Joery was initially
trained as a bomb sniffer for
war zones before he was
donated to the local police
force by the Rhode Island
State Police nearly a year
ago.
Yesterday’s demonstra-
tion marks his official
induction into the ranks of
the North Smithfield police
after he and Rainville, the
handler, simultaneously
completed a rigorous seven-
week training program in
which they were paired
liked podded peas, which is
kind of the whole idea.
The training strengthened
the bond between handler
and dog – a prerequisite for
the successful deployment
of dogs in police work – and
turned Joery into a more
well-rounded K9, according
to Rainville. Should the
need ever arise, he can still
sniff out explosives, but he’s
just as good at tracking
down errant human beings,
whether they’re missing
senior citizens, lost children
or criminals in flight.
And as yesterday’s ani-
mal show-and-tell so graphi-
cally demonstrated, he’s
good at tackling criminal
suspects on command.
“You can see how the
aggression is up when you
put him in situations when
he needs to bite,” said
Rainville.
Man and school-finished
beast have been on patrol
together since Nov. 9, back-
ing up each other during the
dark, dangerous hours of the
third shift.
One chore Joery will not
be called upon to do is use
his nasal talents to ferret out
drugs hidden in cars, homes
or other hiding places.
Rainville said bomb-sniffers
like Joery can also find
firearms, ammunition, and
related weaponry, but they
generally cannot be cross-
trained to locate narcotics.
During the demonstra-
tion, Rainville held Joery on
a leash while Landry stood
about 25 yards away, gear-
ing up for the inevitable.
Rainville pretended that
Landry was an uncoopera-
tive criminal and repeatedly
ordered him to show his
hands or he would unleash
the dog and he would be bit-
ten.
Landry refused, and
Rainville let go of the leash,
freeing Joery like a bolt
from an arrow. The dog was
just as disciplined and
responsive when, finally,
Rainville ordered him to
stop biting Landry.
Joery dutifully sidled up
to his handler and rested
belly-down on the cold
pavement, looking up at his
handler with doleful eyes as
if waiting for the next com-
mand.
“I’ve gotten to bond with
him,” says Rainville.
Funeral Home
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Thank You Novenas
For Favors or Prayers Answered
Call 401-365-1438
To place your ad in this publication
(Sample ads.
Many others to
choose from)
PRAYER TO THE
BLESSED VIRGIN
Oh Most Beautiful Flower of Mt.
Carmel, fruitful vine, splendor of
Heaven, Blessed Mother of the Son
of God, Immaculate Virgin, assist
me in this, my necessity. Oh Star of
the Sea, help me and show me here
you are my Mother, Oh Holy Mary,
Mother of God, Queen of Heaven
and Earth, I humbly beseech you
from the bottom of my heart to
secure me in my necessity (make
request). There are none that can
withstand your power. Oh Mary,
conceived without sin, pray for us
who have recourse to thee (3 times).
Holy Mary, I place this prayer in
your hands (3 times). Say this prayer
for three consecutive days and then
you must publish it and it will be
granted to you.
L.L.
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May the Sacred Heart of
Jesus be adored, glorified,
loved and preserved
throughout the world now
and forever. Sacred Heart of
Jesus, pray for us.
St. Jude, help of the
hopeless pray for us. St. Jude
worker of miracles pray for
us.
Thank You St. Jude.
B.Z.
ST. JUDE’S NOVENA
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Thank You Blessed
Virgin Mary for
favor granted.
N.M. & R.B.
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OBITUARIES/LOCAL
Wednesday, December 18, 2013 THE TIMES A5
Lillian M. Skavron
PAWTUCKET — Lillian
M. (Stafford) Skavron, 85,
passed away Saturday,
December 14, 2013. She was
the wife of George J.
Skavron Sr. for 62 years.
A lifelong resident of
Pawtucket,
she was a
daughter of
the late Lester
and Marie
(Spano)
Stafford. Lil
loved and
owned thor-
oughbred race horses. She
also loved dogs, baking, trav-
eling and had a passion for
cooking.
Besides her husband, she
leaves two sons, Henry
Emond and his wife, Debra
of Tacoma, Wash., and
George J. Skavron Jr. and his
wife, Debbie of Baton
Rouge, La.; two daughters,
Deborah S. Skavron of
Cumberland and Melissa
Mendelsohn and her hus-
band, Dr. Steven Mendelsohn
of Asheville, N.C.; a daugh-
ter-in-law, Debra L. Skavron
of Pawtucket, wife of Lil's
late son, Robert J. Skavron
who passed in 2012; a broth-
er, Lester Stafford of Cocoa
Beach, Fla.; seven grandchil-
dren and four great-grand-
children. She was the sister
of the late Josephine Elderkin
and Andrew Spano.
Her funeral will be held
Thursday at 11 a.m. from
WILLIAM W. TRIPP
Funeral Home, 1008
Newport Ave., Pawtucket,
followed by a Mass of
Christian Burial at moon in
St. Teresa Church, 358
Newport Ave. Interment will
follow at Seekonk Cemetery.
VISITATION will be
Wednesday 4 to 7 p.m. In
lieu of flowers, memorial
gifts to the Animal Rescue
League, 34 Elbow St.,
Providence, RI 02903 would
be appreciated.
TRIPPFUNERAL-
HOME.com
Frank R. Chabot
PAWTUCKET — Frank
R. Chabot, 92, passed away
Monday, December 16, 2013.
He was the son of the late
Frank X. and Claudia M.
(Gaucher) Chabot.
Frank resided in
Pawtucket
most of his
life until
moving to
Cumberland
in 1999. He
was a World
War II U.S.
Army veter-
an. Frank was employed by
the Ward Baking Company
for thirty years until retiring
in 1978.
He leaves a niece, Karen
A. Hocking and her husband,
Robert of Warwick and
grandnieces, grandnephews,
great-grandnieces and great-
grandnephews. He was the
brother of the late Thelma C.
Cloutier and Doris R.
DeBlois, and the uncle of the
late Marcia L. Wild. Services
will be held Thursday at 10
a.m. at WILLIAM W. TRIPP
Funeral Home, 1008
Newport Ave., Pawtucket.
Interment with Military
Honors will follow at Notre
Dame Cemetery. Visitation is
respectfully omitted.
TRIPPFUNERALHOME.com
James W. Donahue
James W. Donahue, 83, of
Pawtucket, passed away
Saturday, December 14,
2013. He was the husband
of Louise (Marquis)
Donahue. They were happily
married for 62 years. Born
in Pawtucket, he was the son
of the late John and Florence
(Tomlinson) Donahue.
Besides his wife he is sur-
vived by five children,
Michael Donahue and his
wife Marilyn, Cathleen
Donahue-Parrott and her hus-
band William, Patricia
Houlker and her husband
John, and Timothy and James
Donahue; ten grandchildren,
and six great grandchildren.
He was the brother of the late
Mary Jenkins.
Relatives and friends are
invited to a Mass of Christian
Burial on Friday, December
20 at 10 a.m. in Saint Leo the
Great Church of Blessed
Pope John Paul II Parish, 697
Central Avenue, Pawtucket.
Burial will follow in Saint
Stephen’s Cemetery,
Attleboro. In lieu of flowers,
donations may be made to
Home and Hospice Care of
RI, 1085 North Main Street,
Providence, RI 02904.
www.rifuneral.com
Everett A. LaRocque
PAWTUCKET — Everett
A. LaRocque, 92, passed
away unexpectedly on
Sunday, December 15, 2013.
He was the beloved husband
of the late Margaret (Daley)
LaRocque.
Born in Attleboro, he was
a son of the late Eli and Eva
(Courtois) LaRocque.
Everett was a United
States Navy veteran of World
War II and worked as a mas-
ter printer at various compa-
nies throughout Rhode Island
for many years until his
retirement. He was a long-
time communicant of St.
Edward Church, Pawtucket,
where he was a member of
the parish choir. Everett also
belonged to the LeFoyer
Club, Pawtucket and sang
with Les Gais Chanteurs. He
was an avid gardener and
enjoyed spending time out-
doors.
Everett leaves four chil-
dren, Stephen A. LaRocque
of Bethesda, Md., Gregory
M. LaRocque of Seekonk,
Ann E. LaRocque of
Woodstock, Vt, and David V.
LaRocque of Wakefield, R.I.;
six grandchildren and four
great-grandchildren. He was
the brother of the late Roland
LaRocque of Seattle, Wash.
His funeral and burial will
be private. For online condo-
lences visit: TRIPPFUNER-
ALHOME.com
By JIM BARON
jbaron@pawtuckettimes.com
PROVIDENCE – While it may be
odious and obnoxious to post a sexual-
ly explicit photo or video of someone
on the Internet without his or her
knowledge or permission – what is
often called revenge porn – it is not
illegal in Rhode Island.
Not yet, anyway.
Attorney Peter Kilmartin wants to
outlaw it and is proposing legislation
to do so.
Actually, he has tried to do it
before, in each of the last three legisla-
tive sessions. On those occasions,
however, it was part of comprehensive
Internet security and privacy legisla-
tion and described as “unauthorized
dissemination of indecent material”
and it seemingly flew under the radar
of lawmakers and the media, and was
not passed.
As a stand-alone bill with the label
“revenge porn,” Kilmartin hopes the
measure will turn more heads and get
attention from legislators this year, his
spokeswoman, Amy Kempe, said
Tuesday.
There have been complaints in
Rhode Island about the phenomenon in
recent years, Kempe said, but when
local police departments called the
attorney general’s office asking what to
do about it, they were told there was
no law against it, and the perpetrators
could not be charged with a crime.
Revenge porn is uploaded by former
lovers or hackers for the purpose of
humiliation, according to the attorney
general’s office.
The images or videos are often
accompanied by personal information,
including the pictured individual’s full
name and links to social media pro-
files.
“We have all been taught that once
an image is posted on the Internet,
there is a good chance it will be in
cyberspace forever,” Kilmartin said in
a written statement. “But the latest
phenomenon of individuals posting
intimate photos and videos on ‘revenge
porn’ sites with the mission to embar-
rass exes takes the exploitation and
degradation of people, especially
women, to a new level of depravity.
These private images go viral to the
world leaving the victim no recourse to
have the images removed. This legisla-
tion will give law enforcement and
prosecutors the tools they need to hold
these vengeful individuals accountable
for this horrendous action.”
Rep. Donald Lally of South
Kingstown and Sen. Erin Lynch of
Warwick will be the sponsors of the
revenge porn bill in their respective
chambers.
The legislation would prohibit a
person from electronically disseminat-
ing visual images of another engaged
in sexually explicit conduct or the inti-
mate parts of another, without that per-
son’s consent and where the person
had a reasonable expectation of priva-
cy. Constitutionally protected activity
would be exempt from the law.
Those in violation would be guilty
of a felony with a maximum penalty of
three years in prison or a fine of not
more than $3,000 or both.
“Individuals posting explicit photos
with the intent of embarrassing a for-
mer romantic partner must be pun-
ished, and this new law would give
law enforcement and prosecutors the
tools necessary to take decisive
action.”
Lally said in a press release. “ Once
such a law is on the books, it will
hopefully make those seeking revenge
think twice before invading someone’s
privacy in such a degrading manner.”
“Posting explicit photos of a former
partner without their consent is
extremely hurtful and embarrassing,”
Lynch added. “Penalties need to be
strong to ensure that people think
twice before attempting to degrade an
individual in this way.”
Follow Jim Baron on Twitter
@Jim_Baron
Kilmartin declares war on ‘revenge porn’
Measure would put
stop to online attempts
to embarass exes
Lincoln police press vehicle charges against driver
Cranston police
to probe excess
of parking tickets
LINCOLN – Police
charged a Providence man
with motor vehicle viola-
tions after stopping him for
speeding on Breakneck Hill
Road on Tuesday.
Patrolman Alvaro E.
Herrera observed the dark
blue Nissan Altima driven
by Derick E. Lemon of
Mawney Street,
Providence, traveling at 46
mph on Breakneck Hill
Road at 3:52 a.m. before it
turned onto Great Road
where he pulled the vehicle
over.
The registration plate
on the vehicle came back
to a 2002 Jeep, and Lemon
was also found to be driv-
ing without insurance,
Lemon said.
Herrera determined the
operator be driving without
a valid license and issued
Lemon a District Court
summons for driving with-
out a license. He was also
referred to the Rhode
Island Traffic Tribunal for
violations of operation of a
unregistered motor vehicle,
operating without evidence
of insurance and speeding,
police said.
NS police welcoming new K9 officer on patrol
Times Photo/Ernest A. Brown
North Smithfield Police Lt. Greg Landry, acting as a police
suspect, center, is attacked by Joery, a 4-year-old Belgian
Malinois K9 that was just added to the police force. Officer
Jay Rainville, right, is the dog’s handler. The department was
holding a demonstration on Tuesday.
Warren bill to ban
credit checks on
applicants for jobs
BOSTON (AP) — U.S.
Sen. Elizabeth Warren said
Tuesday she will introduce a
bill that would ban what she
calls the widespread use of
personal credit history by
employers screening job
applicants.
The Massachusetts
Democrat said the practice of
seeking credit reports from
prospective employees
unfairly targets women,
minorities, seniors, students
and others with fewer finan-
cial resources to recover
from a personal setback like
an illness, divorce or death in
the family.
"For millions of working
families a hard personal blow
translates into a hard finan-
cial blow that will show up
for years in a low credit
score," Warren told reporters.
CRANSTON (AP) —
Cranston police are investi-
gating two city councilors'
allegations that their wards
were blanketed with tickets
in retaliation for their votes
against a proposed police
contract.
The Providence Journal
reports Councilmen Paul
Archetto and Steven Stycos
made the allegations at
Monday's council meeting.
They say police issued more
than 60 tickets in each of
their wards after the vote —
most for illegal parking —
after issuing only nine in the
rest of the city in the same
period.
The council's Finance
Committee voted 4-3 against
the contract Nov. 14.
Mayor Allan Fung said
Tuesday he contacted police
once he learned of the allega-
tions and they began investi-
gating.
He said he doesn't con-
done intimidating behavior
by city employees.
PRESENTS YOUR COMMUNITY CALENDAR
Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday
Send your community events to notices@pawtuckettimes.com
15 16 17 18 20 19 21
Millville
•Third annual Magic of Christmas
Celebration at St. Augustine
Parish, 17 Lincoln St. North Pole
Carnival from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Games, relays, Santa visit, lunch
and more.
•Community lessons and carols at
St. John Episcopal Church, 49
Central St. Free-will offering for
local food bank. All are welcome.
East Providence
•St. Margaret Parish choirs per-
form a Christmas concert at 4
p.m., 1098 Pawtucket Ave.,
Rumford. Free, open to public.
Pawtucket
•Delaney St. Teresa’s Council
57 annual Keep Christ in
Christmas breakfast, 8 a.m. to
noon, St. Teresa’s church hall.
$7 adults, $4 children.
•The German-American Cultural
Society of Rhode Island presents
a Christmas concert with
Schubert-Lorelei Sangerchor and
La Chorale French Chorus of
Providence at 3 p.m., 78 Carter
Ave. Concert $10. Dinner $15,
served at 5:30 p.m.
East Providence
•Historical Society Holiday Turkey
Dinner and free public concert, 6
p.m. at Newman Church Hall,
Rumford. Must make reservations
in advance to attend dinner. 438-
1750.
Woonsocket
• Dinner and Messages of Hope
and Love with spiritual medium
Roland Comtois at the Stadium
Theatre, 6:30 p.m. www.stadi-
umtheatre.com.
• The Knights of Columbus
General Moylan Assembly busi-
ness meeting, 7 p.m. at All Saints
Parish Hall, 323 Rathbun St.
Central Falls
•Forand Manor holds Bingo
every Monday and Wednesday,
starting at 5:15 p.m.
Bellingham
• Reading with Indy, 6:30 to 7:30
p.m. at the Bellingham Public
Library. Indy, a certified reading
therapy dog will be at the library
on Mondays. Please register only
one time per month.
Pawtucket
• The Leon Mathieu Senior
Center and Shri Studio have
partnered to offer a “Yoga for
Seniors” on Tuesday mornings
from 9:30am-10:30am at Shri
Studio, 21 Broad Street. The fee
for Leon Mathieu Senior Center
members is $5 per person per
month. 728-7582.
Central Falls
• Forand Manor holds Bingo
every Monday and Wednesday,
starting at 5:15 p.m.
Woonsocket
•Harris Public Library hosts
Creative Writing Group
Wednesdays, 7:30 p.m.
•Boy Scout Troop 2
Woonsocket Holiday Show, 6:30
to 8 p.m., Our Lady Queen of
Martyrs Church, Park Square.
Please bring a dessert or bever-
age to share before the show.
Woonsocket
• Tony Cerbo is Home for
Christmas at the Stadium
Theatre. Music in the style of
Michael Buble and Harry
Connick Jr. Show includes din-
ner served in the lobby.
www.stadiumtheatre.com.
• Written Word Writing Group
Thursdays, 7:15 p.m. at Harris
Public Library. An outlet for adult
writers of all leanings: poetry,
journaling, prose, short story,
sermon, comedy, script writing,
puppets. No critiquing. All are
welcome and there is no
charge.
Burrillville
• Pascoag Council, 383,
Knights of Columbus Friday
Night Bingo at the Columbus
Club, 98 Roosevelt Ave. Games
begin at 6:20 p.m.; doors open
at 4:30 p.m.
Pawtucket
• The Leon Mathieu Senior
Center’s annual holiday
party,12:30 p.m. Senior Center
member must sign up at th sec-
ond floor office and the cost is
$2. Deadline is Dec. 13.
Woonsocket
•Blackstone Valley Polar
Express, tours at 4 and 7 p.m.
leaving from One Depot Square.
Tickets online at www.black-
stonevalleypolarexpress.com or
call 401-724-2200.
•Ocean State Holiday Pops con-
cert at the Stadium Theatre, 8
p.m. This 60 piece orchestra will
fill you with the spirit of Christmas
as they play all of your favorite
merry holiday favorites. www.sta-
diumtheatre.com.
Woonsocket
•Blackstone Valley Polar
Express, tours at 1, 4 and 7 p.m.
leaving from One Depot Square.
Tickets online at www.black-
stonevalleypolarexpress.com or
call 401-724-2200.
•Holiday Extravaganza Concert
at Chan’s, 8 p.m., Chan’s
Restaurant, 267 Main St.
www.chanseggrollsandjazz.com
•9th annual Cookie Walk at St.
Michael Ukrainian Orthodox
Church hal, 74 Harris Ave., 9
a.m. to noon. Homemade cook-
ies $8.50 a pound. Pre-orders
of 5 pounds or more, call 765-
1410.
Wrentham
•Cumberland Lincoln
Community Chorus Holiday
Concert, 3 p.m., Trinity
Episcopal Church, 47 East St.
www.clccmusic.org. Free-will
offerings appreciated.
Bellilngham
•The First Baptist Church of
Bellingham will hold its annual
Christmas Contata entitled,
“Three Trees” at 7 p.m. Free
event and all are welcome.
22 23 24 25 27 26 28
Cumberland
• Widow support group meets
every Sunday — the first two
Sundays of the month are at the
Community Chapel on Diamond
Hill Rd. The second two are at
Emerald Bay Manor, Diamond
Hill Road. All meetings 2 p.m.
Call 401-333-5815.all. $7
adults, $4 children.
Woonsocket
•Blackstone Valley Polar
Express, tours at 1 and 4 p.m.
leaving from One Depot Square.
Tickets online at www.black-
stonevalleypolarexpress.com or
call 401-724-2200.
North Smithfield
•Slatersville Village Green
Christmas Eve Luminaria. The his-
toric village green and walkways of
Slatersville will be lit by canlelight,
leading to the entrance of
Slatersville Congregational
Church.
www.slatersvillechurch.org.
Woonsocket
•The monthly business meeting of
the Knights of Columbus
Woonsocket Council will be held
at 7 p.m. in the All Saints Church
Hall, Rathbun St.
Central Falls
•Forand Manor holds Bingo every
Monday and Wednesday, starting
at 5:15 p.m.
Glocester
• Harmony Library offers a chil-
dren’s Sewing Workshop at 3 and
5 p.m. in the community room for
children in grades 2 and up. $10
material fee. Registration is
required. Call 949-2850 or visit
www.harmonylibrary.org.
Bristol
•Sparkle! An Outdoor Family
Event, Blithewold Mansion,
Gardens & Arboretum, 101 Ferry
Road. Come stroll through
Blithewold's illuminated gardens
and greenhouse, breathing in that
crisp Christmas air or joining our
carolers as they spread holiday
cheer. Enjoy music, cocoa, and
roasted marshmallows around a
roaring bonfire in Blithewold's
Enclosed Garden. Carolers will
be singing around the bonfire
from 6:30 - 7 pm. Hot Cocoa is
free; s'mores kits will be available
for $1.
.
Woonsocket
•Christmas Concert of Sacred
Music performed by the Schola
Sanctae Caeciliae under the
direction of Henri St. Louis at
5:30 pm, followed by a
Traditional Latin High Mass at
6:00pm, at Precious Blood
Church, 94 Carrington Ave. A
freewill donation will be taken
up; for more info, call 401-766-
0626.
Bristol
•Sparkle! An Outdoor Family
Event, Blithewold Mansion,
Gardens & Arboretum, 101 Ferry
Road. Come stroll through
Blithewold's illuminated gardens
and greenhouse, breathing in that
crisp Christmas air or joining our
carolers as they spread holiday
cheer. Enjoy music, cocoa, and
roasted marshmallows around a
roaring bonfire in Blithewold's
Enclosed Garden. Carolers will
be singing around the bonfire
from 6:30 - 7 pm. Hot Cocoa is
free; s'mores kits will be available
for $1.
Burrillville
• Pascoag Council, 383,
Knights of Columbus Friday
Night Bingo at the Columbus
Club, 98 Roosevelt Ave. Games
begin at 6:20 p.m.; doors open
at 4:30 p.m.
Bristol
•Christmas at Blithewold, 101
Ferry Road. Christmas at
Blithewold has a new theme
every year. The Mansion is open
for touring Tuesday through
Sunday 11a.m. - 5 p.m. Buy
your admission tickets online or
at the door. Our wonderful volun-
teers work hard to incorporate
the annual theme into their deco-
rations and design of their
rooms; almost every room at
Blithewold is decorated for
Christmas. Our Christmas
includes a 18 ft Christmas tree,
music performances, teas, sing-
a-longs with Santa and more.
Christmas
Day
Christmas
Eve
JANUARY
29 30 31 1 3 2 4
Cumberland
• Widow support group meets
every Sunday — the first two
Sundays of the month are at the
Community Chapel on Diamond
Hill Rd. The second two are at
Emerald Bay Manor, Diamond
Hill Road. All meetings 2 p.m.
Call 401-333-5815.all. $7
adults, $4 children.
Central Falls
•Forand Manor holds Bingo
every Monday and Wednesday,
starting at 5:15 p.m.
Bellingham
• Reading with Indy, 6:30 to 7:30
p.m. at the Bellingham Public
Library. Indy, a certified reading
therapy dog will be at the library
on Mondays. Please register only
one time per month.
Lincoln
• The Lincoln Public Library is
offering a Safe Sitter Program
from 9:15am to 4:15pm. This
one-day program is designed for
11-14-year-olds. Training will
include babysitting as a busi-
ness, childcare, behavior man-
agement skills, and infant & child
CPR. Students should bring a
lunch, drink, and snack.
Preregistration is required. Class
size is limited to sixteen (16) stu-
dents. $45 fee is cash-only and
is expected at time of registration
at the Reference desk. (401)
333-2422 x17. www.lincolnli-
brary.com/Events.
Pawtucket
• The Leon Mathieu Senior
Center and Shri Studio have
partnered to offer a “Yoga for
Seniors” on Tuesday mornings
from 9:30am-10:30am at Shri
Studio, 21 Broad Street. The fee
for Leon Mathieu Senior Center
members is $5 per person per
month. 728-7582.
Woonsocket
• Written Word Writing Group
Thursdays, 7:15 p.m. at Harris
Public Library. An outlet for adult
writers of all leanings: poetry,
journaling, prose, short story,
sermon, comedy, script writing,
puppets. No critiquing. All are
welcome and there is no
charge.
Burrillville
• Pascoag Council, 383,
Knights of Columbus Friday
Night Bingo at the Columbus
Club, 98 Roosevelt Ave. Games
begin at 6:20 p.m.; doors open
at 4:30 p.m.
Woonsocket
•The Stadium Theatre
Performing Arts Centre hosts a
free "Three Stooges festival" fea-
turing Larry, Moe and Curly at
their comical best in classic
episodes from the 1930s and
1940s, at 7 p.m. No tickets
required.
Woonsocket
•The Stadium Theatre
Performing Arts Centre hosts a
free "Three Stooges festival"
featuring Larry, Moe and Curly
at their comical best in classic
episodes from the 1930s and
1940s, at 7 p.m. No tickets
required.
Happy
New Year
5 6 7 8 10 9 11
Cumberland
• Widow support group meets
every Sunday — the first two
Sundays of the month are at the
Community Chapel on Diamond
Hill Rd. The second two are at
Emerald Bay Manor, Diamond
Hill Road. All meetings 2 p.m.
Call 401-333-5815.all. $7
adults, $4 children.
Central Falls
•Forand Manor holds Bingo
every Monday and Wednesday,
starting at 5:15 p.m.
Bellingham
• Reading with Indy, 6:30 to 7:30
p.m. at the Bellingham Public
Library. Indy, a certified reading
therapy dog will be at the library
on Mondays. Please register only
one time per month.
Pawtucket
• The Leon Mathieu Senior
Center and Shri Studio have
partnered to offer a “Yoga for
Seniors” on Tuesday mornings
from 9:30am-10:30am at Shri
Studio, 21 Broad Street. The fee
for Leon Mathieu Senior Center
members is $5 per person per
month. 728-7582.
Central Falls
• Forand Manor holds Bingo
every Monday and Wednesday,
starting at 5:15 p.m.
Woonsocket
•Harris Public Library hosts
Creative Writing Group
Wednesdays, 7:30 p.m.
Woonsocket
• Written Word Writing Group
Thursdays, 7:15 p.m. at Harris
Public Library. An outlet for adult
writers of all leanings: poetry,
journaling, prose, short story,
sermon, comedy, script writing,
puppets. No critiquing. All are
welcome and there is no
charge.
Burrillville
• Pascoag Council, 383,
Knights of Columbus Friday
Night Bingo at the Columbus
Club, 98 Roosevelt Ave. Games
begin at 6:20 p.m.; doors open
at 4:30 p.m.
Smithfield
• Winter Big Day 2014, 8 a.m.
to 5 p.m., hosted by the
Audubon Society of Rhode
Island, 401-949-5454. Set
out with Audubon to cover
many of the state's winter hot
spots during this daylong van
trip in search of our feathered
winter residents. Dress warmly
and pack a lunch and optics.
Departs from Audubon Society
of Rhode Island Powder Mill
Ledges Wildlife Refuge, 12
Sanderson Rd. Ages: 16 and
up. Program fee: $55
www.asri.org
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07 NISSAN MURANO AWD
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08 TOYOTA TACOMA
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08 DODGE RAM
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Loaded, Low Miles Stk#S2639
06 BMW X5 AWD
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V6, Auto, Leather, Roof & More
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08 LEXUS RX350 RWD
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V6, Auto, Leather, Navigation
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08 INFINITI EX35
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AWD, PS, PL, Leather,
Must See! Stk#S2643
10 CADILLAC CTS
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Loaded, Gray
Stk#S2676
11 NISSAN SENTRA
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4 Cyl, Auto, Loaded
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05 ACURA TL
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Low Miles Stk#S2401
12 SUBARU LEGACY
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08 VOLVO S80 AWD
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11 VW GOLF
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4 Cyl, Auto, Loaded
Stk#S2592
12 NISSAN VERSA
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Silver, Auto, PS, PW
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08 AUDI A4 AWD
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4 Cyl, Auto, Loaded, Like New
Stk#S2626
11 BUICK REGAL CXL
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Silver, Leather, PW, PL
Stk#S2702
13 HYUNDAI ACCENT LT
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Blue
Stk#S2650
07 ACURA TL
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Beige, Loaded
Stk#S2715
06 VW BEETLE GTS
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Red, Auto
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06 DODGE CHARGER R/T
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Orange
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07 PONTIAC G6
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09 HONDA ACCORD LX
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09 MERCEDES C300
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11 HONDA CIVIC EX
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07 BMW 750LI
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09 NISSAN MAXIMA CVT
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13 NISSAN ALTIMA S
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11 NISSAN SENTRA
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11 FORD TAURUS SEL
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11 MAZDA 3
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11 CHEVY IMPALA LT
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12 FIAT 500
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06 TOYOTA 4 RUNNER
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12 FORD FUSION SEL
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06 INFINITI M35X
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07 CHEVY SILVERADO
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Ext Cab 4x4, V8, Auto, All
Power, Low Miles, Stk#S2570
4
AVAIL
07 CHEVY SILVERADO XC
$16,888 OR $68 WK
4WD, Silver, All Power
Stk#S2731
10 HYUNDAI VERACRUZ
$16,988 OR $68 WK
V6, Auto, Loaded, Low Miles,
Like New Stk#2497
12 CHEVY EQUINOX
$16,988 OR $68 WK
Silver, AWD, Auto
Stk#2654
3
AVAIL
3
AVAIL
3
AVAIL
7
PASS.
7
PASS.
6
AVAIL
3
AVAIL
6
AVAIL
4
AVAIL
6
AVAIL
5
AVAIL
5
AVAIL
6
AVAIL
4
AVAIL
3
AVAIL
WED THU FRI SAT SUN
30-34
20-25
40-44
22-27
44-47
31-35
47-50
35-39
49-52
38-41
Breezy Breezy Partly Cloudy Partly Sunny
Showers
Five Day Forecast data supplied by Storm Team 10.
LOCAL A8 THE TIMES
Wednesday, December 18, 2013
Today’s Forecast
Narragansett Buzzards Merrimack to Chatham to
Bay Bay Chatham Watch Hill
Weather ........... Sun and Clouds...........
Wind (knots) NW 15-25 NW 15-25 NW 15-30 NW 15-25
Seas (feet) 2-3 2-4 4-8 4-8
Visibility (miles) 5 5 5 5
Gary Ley’s Southern New England Area Forecast
Low pressure that brought the light snow yesterday is now far out to sea. A warming
trend is about to set in driving temperatures well above average into the weekend.
By later Sunday the next cold front will be approaching and may produce some rain
showers. Watch out for the melting snow freezing and producing black ice for the
next couple of nights.
LIT UP WITH CHRISTMAS SPIRIT
Submitted photos
Amy Zolt, above. a former Pawtucket School Committee mem-
ber and Potter Street resident, invited neighbors, family and
friends to decorate and witness the lighting of a tree in front of
her house on Saturday night in memory of the children who
tragically died last year in the Sandy Hook Elementary School
shooting in Newtown, Conn. Students from the JMW High
School for the Visual and Performing Arts also sang Christmas
carols and attendees enjoyed hot chocolate donated by
Dunkin' Donuts. At left, Kaitlyn Paradiso, a senior at JMWHigh
School, singing “Do you Hear What I Hear?”
pawtuckettimes.com
SPORTS
Blackstone Valley
THE TIMES, Wednesday, December 18, 2013 — B1
BOSTON (AP) — Zdeno Chara scored two
power-play goals and Jarome Iginla had a pair of
assists against his former team to help the Boston
Bruins defeated the Calgary Flames 2-0 on Tuesday
night.
David Krejci also had two assists and Tuukka
Rask made 21 saves for the Bruins in their third
straight shutout of the Flames in Boston. Rask picked
up his third shutout of the season and extended
Calgary's scoreless streak in Boston to 189 minutes,
36 seconds.
Reto Berra kept Calgary close, stopping 29 shots
as the Bruins controlled play most of the game.
Boston outshot the Flames 31-21 one week after
rallying for a 2-1 win in Iginla's return to Calgary,
where he played 16 seasons and spent nine as the
team's captain.
Iginla didn't get a point in his first game as a visitor
against the Flames, but was a big part of the Boston
power play Tuesday.
Krejci and Iginla set up Chara's slap shot from the
point that beat Berra and put the Bruins ahead 7:38
into the second period. Lance Bouma was serving a
double-minor for high-sticking, then was called for
another high stick in the third shortly before Boston
made it 2-0 on another goal by Chara.
Krejci started the play again with a pass to Iginla,
whose shot from the left circle wound up between
Chara's skates for an easy poke into the net with 16:41
left.
Iginla was traded to Pittsburgh last March, then
signed with Boston as a free agent in the offseason.
Notes: Boston forward Craig Cunningham made
his NHLdebut. ... Bruins forward Shawn Thornton,
who is appealing a 15-game suspension for punching
and injuring Pittsburgh's Brooks Orpik, did not play. ...
The Flames have not scored in Boston since Oct. 19,
2006, when Alex Tanguay scored with 9:36 left in the
third period.
ERNEST A. BROWN / Blackstone Valley Sports photos
ERNEST A. BROWN / Blackstone Valley Sports photo
Left, PC point guard Bryce Cotton (left), who scored 21 points,
nails a long three-pointer over the reach of Yale defender Nick
Victor during the first half of the Friars’ victory on Tuesday night.
Right, PC’s Tyler Harris (right) gets ready to bury a jumper over
Yale’s Justin Sears (left) and Victor for two of his 19 points.
NHL
Close call: PC nips Yale
Cotton, Harris help Friars hold off Bulldogs, 76-74
PC’s Carson Desrosiers (33) sails to the hoop for a layup past the reach of Yale’s Brandon
Sherrod during the opening half of Tuesday night’s game at the Dunkin’ Donuts Center.
The Friars improved to 9-2 by holding on for a 76-74 victory. See FRIARS, page B3
MLB
File photo
Boston Bruins captain Zdeno Chara netted a pair of
power-play goals to help his team cop a 2-0 victory
over the Calgary Flames on Tuesday night.
By The Associated Press
he New York Yankees were hit with
a $28 million luxury tax bill, push-
ing their total past the $250 million
mark since the penalty began in
2003.
According to Major League Baseball calcula-
tions sent to teams Tuesday, the Los Angeles
Dodgers were the only other team that exceeded
the tax threshold this year and must pay $11.4
million. Boston finished just under for the sec-
ond straight year, coming in $225,666 shy of the
$178 million mark.
Figures include average annual values of con-
tracts for players on 40-man rosters, earned
bonuses and escalators, adjustments for cash in
trades and $10.8 million per team in benefits.
Because the Yankees have been over the tax
threshold at least four consecutive times, they
pay at a 50 percent rate on the overage, and their
$28,113,945 bill was second only to their $34.1
million payment following the 2005 season. The
Yankees are responsible for $252.7 million of
the $285.1 million in tax paid by all clubs over
the past 11 years.
Yankees owner Hal Steinbrenner said he
hopes to get under the threshold next year, when
it rises to $189 million. That would reset the
team's tax rate to 17.5 percent for 2015 and get
the Yankees some revenue-sharing refunds.
But following agreements Tuesday on a $2
million, one-year deal with second baseman
Brian Roberts and a $7 million, two-year con-
tract with left-hander Matt Thornton, the
Yankees are at $177.7 million for 15 players
next year, when benefits are likely to total
between $11 million and $12 million. Their only
hope to get below the threshold appears to be if
an arbitrator upholds most of Alex Rodriguez's
211-game suspension, relieving the team of a
large percentage of the third baseman's $25 mil-
lion salary.
Tax money is used to fund player benefits
and MLB's Industry Growth Fund.
The Yankees finished with the highest regular
payroll for the 15th consecutive year, winding up
at a record $237,018,889. The Dodgers, in their
first full season under new ownership, were just
$146,647 behind after nearly doubling spending
from $129.1 million.
Regular payrolls include salaries, earned
bonuses and pro-rated shares of signing bonuses.
Los Angeles had a higher payroll for the tax:
$243 million to New York's $234 million. But
because the Dodgers didn't exceed the threshold
in 2012, they pay at a 17.5 percent rate and owe
$11,415,959. They would pay at a 30 percent
rate if they exceed the threshold next year.
Checks to the commissioner's office are due
by Jan. 21.
Houston, which lost more than 100 games for
the third straight season, had a payroll less than
one-eighth that of the Yankees and Dodgers. The
Astros' finished at $29.3 million, the lowest total
in the major leagues since the 2008 Florida
Marlins and just $1.3 million more than
Rodriguez made with the Yankees.
After trading many of their stars following an
unsuccessful first season in their new downtown
ballpark, the Marlins lowered their payroll to
$42.3 million from $89.9 million in 2012. Minne-
sota dropped from $101 million to $76 million.
Toronto boosted spending from $92 million
to nearly $126 million.
The average salary increased 7.1 percent, to
$3,326,645 from $3,105,093, according to MLB's
calculations, the steepest rise since 2006.
Red Sox fall below luxury tax threshold for second straight year
Yankees sign Roberts, Thornton, absorb $28Mbill
T
Chara, Iginla
help B’s put
out Flames
College basketball
Rask turns away 21
shots in 2-0 triumph
By BRENDAN McGAIR
bmcgair@pawtuckettimes.com
PROVIDENCE — You know that the Providence
Friars are involved in a tight, white-knuckle affair when
Ed Cooley emphatically removes his sport jacket and
flings it in the general direction of the bench.
When it was all over and PC had secured a hard-
fought 76-74 win over upset-minded Yale on Tuesday
night before 3,281 patrons, Cooley immediately honed
in on his team’s porous defense, one that came oh-so-
close to allowing the Bulldogs to waltz out of the
Dunkin’ Donuts Center with an eyebrow-raising victory.
The Bulldogs ended up shooting 68.2 percent in the
second half and 53.6 percent for the game. It’s not a fig-
ure that will show up on the stat sheet, but given
Cooley’s frostiness regarding the Friars and the lack of
defense it displayed, it’s likely he knew that Yale ended
up hitting 23 of its final 30 shots, a stretch that dates
back to the final five minutes of the first half.
“We didn’t have it defensively,” sighed Cooley.
“Normally I like our defensive effort, but we’ve got to
get better. Our interior defense and our ball screens, we
just weren’t very good.”
Given the limited numbers Cooley is working with
at the moment, the head coach understands that things
need to be done in order to mask the flaws of the Friars
who are available. PC ended up winning the rebounding
battle by a 29-27 count after allowing Yale to own the
glass in the first half (the Bulldogs enjoyed a 20-11
advantage).
“Our big picture – we can’t guard like that if we’re
going to win in the Big East,” Cooley boldly stated. “If
you play like that in this league, you’re going to get
embarrassed.”
While the defensive situation clearly bothered
Cooley, he can take comfort in knowing that his short-
handed unit received contributions from the usual sus-
pects. As usual, Bryce Cotton led the Friars in points (21
on 8-fo-14 shooting) and assists (eight). Save for the
two late-game turnovers that allowed Yale to stay right
by PC’s side, Cotton played 39 flawless minutes.
REGIONAL SCOREBOARD
SPORTS
B2 THE TIMES Wednesday, December 18, 2013
TRIPLECROWNUMPIRESSEEKSNEWMEMBERSFOR2014 SEASON
CUMBERLANDRECOFFERSYOUTHTRACKPROGRAM
WOONSOCKET — Triple Crown Umpires is looking for umpires for the 2014 season. Those interest-
ed must have two years experience working the bases or behind the plate at the Little League, or Big
Diamond level.
For more information, contact Tommy Brien at (401) 765-3419.
CUMBERLAND — The Recreation Department is offering a youth track program for youngsters ages
3-10 on Saturdays from 5:45-6:45 p.m. in the Cumberland High School’s Wellness Center beginning
Saturday, Dec. 14.
The cost is $10, and registration can be completed by calling the department at 401-334-9996.
UPPERDECKPLANSTRYOUTSFOR9 & UNDERBASEBALLPROGRAM
CUMBERLAND — Upper Deck Baseball Academy is holding tryouts for its 9-and-under baseball
team, the Rhode Island Red Sox, and players ages 8 and 9 are welcome to try out.
Call the Deck for more information at 334-1539.
TODAY
BOYS
Basketball
Shea at Cranston West, Woonsocket at Ponaganset, 7 p.m.
Hockey
Mount St. Charles at Malden Catholic, 6 p.m.
Wrestling
Lincoln, West Warwick at Moses Brown, 4:30 p.m.; Cumberland at Middletown, (at
Gaudet MS); La Salle at Woonsocket, 7 p.m.; Barrington at Tolman, 7:30 p.m.
GIRLS
Basketball
Cumberland at Lincoln, Tolman at North Providence, Cranston East at Burrillville,
Seekonk at Mount St. Charles, St. Raphael at Taunton, 7 p.m.
CO-ED
Swimming
Lincoln at Mount St. Charles, 3:30 p.m.; Prout at Cumberland, 4 p.m.
THURSDAY
BOYS
Basketball
Woonsocket at South Kingstown, 7 p.m.
Wrestling
Hope at Tolman, 6 p.m.; Johnston at Cumberland, Toll Gate at Burrillville, 7 p.m.
GIRLS
Basketball
Bishop Keough at Shea, 6 p.m.; Juanita Sanchez at Central Falls, 7 p.m.
Indoor Track
Tolman, Shea, Cranston West vs. Cumberland; Central Falls vs. Narragansett;
Woonsocket, Toll Gate vs. South Kingstown, (at Providence Career & Technical
Academy field house), 5:30 p.m.
FRIDAY
BOYS
Basketball
Central Falls at Cumberland, Davies at Burrillville, Cranston West at St. Raphael, Shea
at Exeter/West Greenwich, North Smithfield at Mount St. Charles, Lincoln at North
Providence, Tolman at West Warwick, 7 p.m.
Hockey
St. Raphael/PCD/Wheeler Co-op vs. Johnston/North Providence Co-op, (at
Smithfield Rink), 7 p.m.; La Salle at Burrillville, 7:30 p.m.; Lincoln vs. Mount Hope, (at
Lynch Arena), 8 p.m.; Mount St. Charles at Smithfield, 8:30 p.m.
GIRLS
Basketball
Tolman at Pilgrim, 6 p.m.; St. Raphael at Warwick Vets, Portsmouth at Woonsocket,
Lincoln at East Providence, 7 p.m.
Hockey
Narragansett/North Kingstown/South Kingstown Co-op vs. Lincoln/Cumberland Co-
op, (at Adelard Arena), 7:30 p.m.; Burrillville/Ponaganset Co-op at Mount St. Charles,
9 p.m.
SATURDAY
BOYS
Hockey
Scituate/Tolman Co-op vs. Narragansett, (at Benny Mageria Rink, West Warwick), 6
p.m.; Coventry at Burrillville, 7 p.m.; North Kingstown vs. Cumberland, (at Adelard
Arena), 7:30 p.m.; St. Raphael/PCD/Wheeler Co-op vs. Rogers/Tiverton/ Rocky
Hill Co-op, (at St. George’s), 7:30 p.m.; Woonsocket at West Warwick/EWG Co-op,
7:30 p.m.; Lincoln vs. North Smithfield, (at Levy Rink), 8:30 p.m.; Cranston Co-op at
Mount St. Charles, 9 p.m.
GIRLS
Hockey
Narragansett/North Kingstown/South Kingstown Co-op at Burrillville/Ponaganset
Co-op, 3 p.m.; Mount St. Charles vs. Bay View, (at Levy Rink), 4:30 p.m.; Cranston
Co-op vs. Smithfield/North Smithfield/Coventry Co-op, (at Smithfield Rink), 7 p.m.;
Lincoln/Cumberland Co-op vs. Barrington/ Mount Hope/Portsmouth Co-op, (at
Lynch Arena), 7:30 p.m.
CO-ED
Indoor Track
R.I. Track Coaches Association Invitational Meet, (at Providence Career & Technical
Academy field house), noon.
BOYS& GIRLSCLUBOF PAWTUCKET’SPANTHERBASKETBALL LEAGUE
R.I. HIGHSCHOOL SPORTSSCHEDULE
CUMBERLAND’SLUSITANASPORTSFCPLANS
OPENTRYOUTS FORU-12 GIRLS’ SOCCERTEAM
CUMBERLAND — Cumberland’s Premier Soccer Club, Lusitana Sports FC, is holding open tryouts
for it's U-12 girls team. The team is looking to add 6-8 skilled field players: forwards, midfielders,
defenders, and an experienced goalie.
The team secured second place this past MAPLE season with a record of 6-1-1. The upcoming
season will be a transition from the small sided 8v8 format to the true 11v11 play, thus the need for
additional skilled field players. All players -- in-state/out of state, premier club and competitive town
team players -- are welcome to tryout. Open tryouts will be done during normal training sessions (no
mass tryout session), as this will allow the coaching staff to truly evaluate the player, while allowing
the player to become comfortable with the team. The coaching staff is looking forward to this open try-
out period and are excited to be adding talented players to this Premier level squad.
To schedule a personal tryout, contact Head Coach Jason Boissel at jbmccasey@verizon.net.
8-10 In-House Division
Regular Season Standings
As of Monday, December 16
TEAM W L T Pct. GB
Ayoub Engineering 5 0 0 1.000 ---
Manhattan Housing 5 0 0 1.000 ---
Candeias Auto 3 2 0 .600 2
Pawtucket Credit Union 2 3 0 .400 3
Wiley Center 2 3 0 .400 3
Excellent Coffee 1 4 0 .200 4
NEPTCO, Inc. 1 4 0 .200 4
London Health 1 4 0 .200 4
RECENT RESULTS
Candeias Auto 22, PCU 21
Leading scorers: CA (Owen Gropper 11 pts.), PCU (Wilson 11 pts.)
Wiley Center 14, London Health 8, 2OT.
Leading scorers: WC (Mo Holtzman 6 pts.), LH (Tommy 4 pts.)
Manhattan Housing 20, Neptco 14
Leading scorers: MH (Tyrone 9 pts.), N (3 players with 4 pts. each)
Ayoub 18, Excellent Coffee 16
Leading scorers: A (Lonnie and Ilyan with 6 pts. each), EC (Marlen 6 pts.)
UPCOMING SCHEDULE
Friday, Dec. 20, 5:30 p.m., Manhattan Housing vs. Ayoub Engineering
Friday, Dec. 20, 6:30 p.m., Neptco vs. Excellent Coffee
Friday, Dec. 20, 7:30 p.m., Wiley Center vs. Candeias Auto
Saturday, Dec. 21, 11 a.m., PCU vs. London Health
11-12 In-House Division
Regular Season Standings
As of Monday, December 16
TEAM W L T Pct. GB
ClassSick Custom 4 0 0 1.000 —
Beretta Realty 2 2 0 .500 2
Holloway Cleaning 2 2 0 .500 2
Butler Messier 2 2 0 .500 2
Chatteron Insurance 2 2 0 .500 2
McBurney Electric 0 4 0 .000 4
UPCOMING SCHEDULE
Saturday, Dec. 21, noon, Butler & Messier vs. Holloway Cleaning
Saturday, Dec. 21, 1 p.m., McBurney Electric vs. Beretta Realty
Saturday, Dec. 21, 2 p.m., Chatterton Insurance vs. ClassSick Custom
MAKEUPGAMESCHEDULE
Saturday, Jan. 4, noon, Holloway Cleaning vs. Beretta Realty
Saturday, Jan. 4, 1 p.m., Butler & Messier vs. Chatterton Insurance
Saturday, Jan. 4, 2 p.m., McBurney Electric vs. ClassSick Custom
NEWYORK(AP) — Atackle-machine linebacker, a tackle-
busting running back and one of the most disruptive defensive tack-
les in the country made return appearances on The Associated Press
All-America team.
Alabama linebacker C.J. Mosley, Arizona running back
Ka'Deem Carey and Arizona State defensive tackle Will Sutton
were selected to the first team for the second straight season.
The All-America teams were released Tuesday and selected by a
panel of APcollege football poll voters.
Heisman Trophy winner Jameis Winston from Florida State
added All-American to his resume after a spectacular redshirt fresh-
man season. Heisman finalists Andre Williams from Boston College
and Northern Illinois' Jordan Lynch also made the first team.
Williams joins Carey in the backfield and Lynch, the dual-threat
quarterback, was chosen as an all-purpose player.
Carey, a junior, is second in the nation in rushing after leading
last year, but said he thinks he's a better player now.
"I worked hard to improve my speed and strength in the offsea-
son while keeping my speed," Carey said. "I put on 10 pounds of
weight and I think that's helped my durability. I also wanted to be a
better blocker away from the ball. Blocking for our quarterback and
our receivers is key to our system and it's important that I do my
part even when I'm not carrying the ball."
Carey and Williams are set to compete on the same field this
bowl season when Arizona and Boston College meet in the
Advocare V100 Bowl in Shreveport, La., on Dec. 31. It will mark
the first time since the 1977 Rose Bowl that two players selected
first-team APAll-America at running back then faced off in a bowl.
That game featured Michigan's Rob Lytle and Southern California's
Ricky Bell.
Mosley, a senior, was the leading tackler for a defense that
ranked fifth in the country in yards allowed per game. Sutton, a sen-
ior, was named Pac-12 defensive player of the year for the season
straight season.
Winston, a landslide Heisman winner last week, is joined on the
first team by three Florida State teammates — center Bryan Stork,
kicker Roberto Aguayo and cornerback Lamarcus Joyner — to give
the top-ranked Seminoles more than any other school.
Florida State defensive tackle Timmy Jernigan made the second
team, along with offensive tackle Cameron Erving. The Seminoles
had six players on the three teams, the most of any school.
No. 2 Auburn, which plays Florida State on Jan. 6 in the BCS
championship game in Pasadena, Calif., placed Heisman finalists
Tre' Mason on the second team at running back and offensive line-
man Reese Dismukes and Gregory Robinson on the third team.
Texas A&M Heisman finalist Johnny Manziel, last year's
Heisman winner and All-American quarterback, made the second
team. Alabama's AJ McCarron, another Heisman finalist, is the
third-team quarterback for the second consecutive season.
The first-team receivers are Oregon State's Brandin Cooks, who
leads the nation in yards receiving (139.2 per game), and Texas
A&M's Mike Evans, who is averaging 20.3 yards a catch.
Texas Tech's Jace Amaro is the first-team tight end. The senior
leads all tight ends in catches (98) and yards (1,240).
Joining Stork on the offensive line are Texas A&M tackle Jake
Matthews and Alabama tackle Cyrus Kouandjio, as well as Baylor
guard Cyril Richardson and Stanford guard David Yankey.
Richardson and Yankey were second-team All-Americans last sea-
son.
Mosley and Sutton are on the first-team defense with Pittsburgh
defensive tackle Aaron Donald, who won the Nagurski and
Bednarik awards as the nation's best defensive player and the
Outland and Lombardi as the country's best lineman.
Missouri's Michael Sam, the Southeastern Conference defensive
player of the year, and Jackson Jeffcoat, the Big 12 defensive player
of the year, are the defensive ends. UCLA's Anthony Barr and Ohio
State's Ryan Shazier round out the linebackers.
Michigan State's Darqueze Dennard, one of the leaders of the
nation's top-ranked defense, is the other cornerback with Joyner.
The safeties are Mississippi's Cody Prewitt and Washington State's
Deone Bucannon.
Tom Hornsey of Memphis made the first team as the punter.
College football
Mosley, Sutton, Carey repeat as All-American picks
Boys’ indoor track
On The Banner
On The Banner
PHOTO FEATURED IN PIC OF THE DAY LAST WEEK
November 8, 2013 - Cumberland quarterback Tyler Calabro
(13) gains yardage after breaking the grips of West Warwick
defenders Keevaun Hazard-Page (4) and Oscar Trochez (61) for
the quarterback keep during 2nd quarter action at Tucker Field
Friday night. Ernest A. Brown photo/RIMG.
Lions, Clippers, Mounties
stay unbeaten in division
Staff reports
PROVIDENCE — Lincoln, Cumberland, and Mount St. Charles
continued their rule of the Northern Division on Monday night at the
Providence Career &Technical Academy field house by sweeping
their respective meets and remaining unbeaten on the young season.
The Lions and Clippers improved to 5-0 and Mount boosted its
record to 4-0. The three neighboring foes don’t face each other until
their tri-meet finales on Monday, Jan. 20.
The Lions grabbed three victories, defeating Tolman (96-3), Shea
(64-36), and Juanita Sanchez (82-18), while the Clippers claimed
their tri-meet with relative ease, downing St. Raphael (90-19) and
Woonsocket (87-22).
Six different athletes won events for the Lions -- Thomas Morin
(3,000, 10:23), Giovanni Gray (shot put, 38-9.5), Stefan Balestra
(weight throw, 57-11), Nick Ryan (1,500, 5:28.9), James Heineman
(1,000, 3:13) and Reily Walker (55-meter hurdles, 9.97). Balestra
(shot, 36-5.25) and Gray (55-5.5) were also among the many Lions
who placed second in their events.
The Raiders, who also managed to defeat Tolman, 70-28, and
raise their record to 3-2, received individual victories from Mustafa
Fahnbulleh in the 55-meter dash (6.82), Fabio Gomes in the 300
(:39.42), and Reuben Gomes in the 600 (1:36.6).
Shea also won the 4x400 relay in 4:05.9 behind the team of
Solomon Agyemang, Charis Mitchell, Fabio Gomes, and Reuben
Gomes, as well as the 4x200 relay in 1:38.7 behind the squad of
Kenneth Teye, Jaures Tetchi, Fabio Gomes, and Fahnbulleh.
Tolman, which also defeated Juanita Sanchez by a 49-45 score,
received a first place from Jonathan Villada in the 1,000 (3:16.6).
The Clippers copped all but four of the 13 events on the docket
en route to their fabulous night and received multiple victories from
Zen-ming Feng (55 dash, 7.1, and 300, 42.53).
Kyle Courtney also won the 600 (1:35.1) and helped the 4x400
team of Kody Sankey, Alex Southiere, and Tanner Maurice notch
another victory (3:53.4), and Jason Lambrou added a first place in
the long jump (20-7.5) and a second in the high jump (5-2).
Also winning events were William Mardo (1,000, 2:56.9), Sean
Laverty (1,500, 4:20.1), James Haupt (3,000, 9:43.8), and Dan
Salazar (55 hurdles, 9.48).
The Novans, who also picked up a 59-44 win over the Saints to
even their record at 2-2, were led by Connor Fugere’s victory in the
shot put, an event he won by more the five feet with a 50-8.5 toss,
and Austin Taft’s first place in the weight throw (46-11.25).
Taking first place for the Saints were John Michalczyk in the
high jump (5-6) and the 4x200 relay team of Alfred Dorbor, Kelton
Dos Santos, Alvin Johnson, and Helpisis Genao (1:47.9).
The Mounties, meanwhile, won 11 events and receive superb
meets from three of their seniors as they cruised past Ponaganset
(89-6) and Central Falls (76-27). Elijah Tousignant took multiple
first places in the 1,000 (2:58.3) and 1,500 (5:27.3), as did Chris
Miele in the 55 hurdles (8.63) and shot put (41-5.5) and Anthony
Pasquarelli in the 55 dash (7.21) and high jump (6 feet).
Mount’s other first places came from Ryan Diogo (300, 41.19),
Max Schlott (600, 1:34.9), Ben Weiss (long jump, 17-6.75), Luke
Demers (3,000, 9;56.8), and the 4x400 relay team of Jake Leahey,
Andrew Van Winter, Weiss, and Miele (3:54.8).
Central Falls, which also blasted Ponaganset, 68-9, was led by
Alexis Dominguez, who took first in the weight throw (36-1.5) and
finished second in the shot put (32-2.5). Erik Mateo also placed sec-
ond in the high jump (5-0) and 300 (41.64).
“Offensively we’ve been
good in practice,” noted Cooley.
Tyler Harris finished with 19
points while LaDontae Henton
added 13 points and six
rebounds. Coming out of a
timeout with PC holding a 73-
72 lead with 49.1 seconds
remaining, Henton caught the
ball and immediately turned to
the hoop for what proved to be
an important basket.
Now down three with 17.6
seconds left, Yale was looking
to get shooter Greg Kelley in
position for a game-tying 3-
pointer, but the ball ended up in
the hands of Javier Duren. A
junior, Duren lost control as he
started to go into a spin move.
Kadeem Batts (10 points) came
up with the loose ball and
would go on to hit a free throw
that made it a two-possession
game with 5.6 seconds remain-
ing.
Yale was led by sophomore
forward Justin Sears, who col-
lected a game-high 31 points
on 13-of-16 shooting. Kelley
was the only other Bulldog to
notch double figures, his 11
points coming on three 3-point-
ers.
Taking the court for their
first competitive game in nearly
two weeks, the Friars lit up the
Bulldogs to the tune of six 3-
pointers (in seven tries) in the
opening eight minutes. The bar-
rage from distance featured
three triples from Harris and
two from Cotton as PC shred-
ded Yale’s man defense on its
way to vaulting out to a 22-10
advantage.
Junking the man in favor of
a 2-3 zone, the Bulldogs contin-
ued to get burned by the Friars,
this time the scoring punch
coming from down low. Anifty
floater in the lane by Cotton
made it 30-17 with five minutes
left, but that’s when Yale took
over.
With Sears terrorizing the
Friars in the post, the Bulldogs
ripped off 14 straight points to
pull within one at 35-34. Batts
momentarily stopped the bleed-
ing with a three in the corner,
but Yale scored the half’s final
four points to make it a 35-all
affair at recess. All told, the visi-
tors strung together an 18-3
surge.
“I just thought we calmed
down a little bit and started to
believe in ourselves,” said Yale
head coach James Jones. “We
missed a lot of easy shots earli-
er in the game, but I thought
our guys played with more con-
fidence as the half went on.”
That confidence Jones
touched upon extended deep
into the second half. Yale hit
five of its first seven shots to
grab a 44-41 lead. PC battled
back to take the lead and actual-
ly extended it a little bit after
Cotton kissed a shot high off
the glass and made the free
throw to make it 57-51 with
9:55 remaining.
The Bulldogs refused to
pack it as they continued to stay
close. Helped by two miscues
by Cotton – one coming when
he stepped on the baseline
inside the final minute – Yale
pieced together a 7-2 run to
make it a one-point game
before PC made a few plays in
the end.
Afterwards, all Cooley could
do was count his lucky stars.
“Hopefully we can watch
some film and learn from what
we did today. It’s one of those
games where you have to turn
the page and get better from,”
said Cooley. “We did win the
basketball game. I’ve never
coached a bad win, but we exe-
cuted just enough.”
***
On the status of suspended
freshmen Rodney Bullock and
Brandon Austin, Cooley said
that nothing has changed. Both
continue to practice with the
team as they await word regard-
ing their status.
“At the end of the day,
we’ve got to follow a process.
Hopefully a resolution will be
coming soon,” said Cooley.
“I’m more concerned about the
guys who are playing and at the
same time as we go through
this process with our players, it
will be what it is. Until then,
there’s not really a lot to talk
about.”
***
The lift that seldom-used
Brice Kofane provided in the
second half should be pointed
out. Kofane, who has scored
three points in three games this
season, entered with PC up 50-
48. He exited at 6:55 after con-
tributing a slam dunk, two free
throws and two rebounds. More
importantly, the Friars were
ahead by a 61-55 count.
“He was a good energy
guy,” noted Cooley.
Follow Brendan McGair on
Twitter @BWMcGair03
SPORTS
THE TIMES B3 Wednesday, December 18, 2013
DAVIE, Fla. (AP) — Among all of the Miami Dolphins, idle
tackle Jonathan Martin knows the team's new celebrity safety the
best, because they played together in college.
So when Michael Thomas made a game-winning interception in
his NFLdebut and found himself mobbed by teammates who didn't
even know his name, Martin was quick to send a congratulatory
text message, coast to coast and Stanford alum to Stanford alum.
"That means a lot," Thomas said Tuesday. "Jonathan was one of
my best friends at Stanford. I looked up to Jon."
Thomas said Martin's still rooting for Miami, despite his allega-
tions of daily harassment by teammates that prompted him to leave
the team in October. The bullying scandal threatened to sabotage the
season, but instead the Dolphins (8-6) have gone 5-2 since Martin
went home to California, and they'll clinch a wild-card playoff berth
if they win their final two games.
Low on star power, the Dolphins are winning thanks to a broad
cross-section of contributors, none more improbable than Thomas.
"Michael Thomas, the new superstar," coach Joe Philbin said
Tuesday.
Undrafted out of college, Thomas joined the Dolphins last week
when they signed him off the San Francisco 49ers' practice squad,
where he had spent the past two seasons. Once in town, he worked
with Miami's scout squad but didn't practice with the defense, and
was expected to play only on special teams Sunday against the New
England Patriots.
But when cornerbacks Brent Grimes and Nolan Carroll left the
game with injuries, nickel back Jimmy Wilson switched to corner,
and Thomas found himself in the game at safety with four minutes
left. He had to borrow gloves from receiver Mike Wallace.
"You try to give to the needy," Wallace said with a laugh.
In the final minute, with Miami leading 24-20, Tom Brady tried
to pull off the Patriots' fourth consecutive comeback victory, and a
completion gave them a first down at the Dolphins' 19 with 27 sec-
onds to go.
Miami defensive coordinator Kevin Coyle consulted frantically
with assistant coach Blue Adams, who had tutored Thomas, to find
out what coverages the newcomer would be comfortable with.
"Blue is behind me in the press box and I kept asking him, 'Does
he know this? What things can we do?'" Coyle said with a laugh. "I
started calling out things that I was thinking about, and Blue had a
lot of confidence that Michael knew everything. He said, 'Oh, he
can do that.' I'm like, 'Blue, he has only been here two days.' But he
goes, 'No, no, we've been over all of that. We got it. We got it. He's
smart.'"
The Dolphins twice called timeout during the final series of
downs to make sure Thomas and the rest of the patchwork second-
ary understood the call.
Brady threw for the end zone on first down, but Thomas leaped
and swatted the ball out of Danny Amendola's grasp. After two
more incompletions, Brady threw Thomas' way again on fourth
down, and he jumped again to intercept a pass intended for Austin
Collie.
Thomas fell to his back, still clutching the ball as he looked to
the sky. Soon he was in tears.
"I thought about all the hardships I had been through to try to get
to this one moment," he said. "Later, when I talked to my mom, it
was really emotional. She had prayed for me all the time and told
me, 'Keep the faith. Keep working. You'll get your shot. When you
get it, take advantage.' For it to actually happen was great. The
whole family was crying."
Grimes and Carroll returned to practice Tuesday, so Thomas
might be relegated to special teams Sunday at Buffalo. Even so, the
Dolphins newcomer is hoping he has finally found a home in the
NFL.
"I moved into an apartment Monday to celebrate our victory," he
said with a grin. "So I'm here for at least another week."
NFL
Dolphins safety becomes ‘new superstar’ after win over Pats
Continued from page B1
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ENGLEWOOD, Colo. (AP) — The Pro
Football Hall of Fame will get the right cleat that
Matt Prater wore when he kicked the longest field
goal in history.
Just not for a while.
"Yeah, they asked for the cleats. I said I'd give
them to them after the season," Prater told The
Associated Press.
If the Denver Broncos (11-3) and their strong-
legged kicker can help it, that package won't be
arriving in Canton, Ohio, until after the Super
Bowl in February.
Jason Aikens, collections curator for the Hall of
Fame, said it's not unusual for kickers who set
records to wait until after the season to give up
their cleats because there's a lot involved in break-
ing in a new kicking shoe and kickers aren't fond
of changing shoes during a hot streak or following
a record-breaking kick.
"I use the same ones for the whole season,"
Prater said. "I have some I practice with and some
I wear in games."
Prater kicked a 64-yard field goal on the last
play of the first half against Tennessee in 14-
degree weather on Dec. 8 in Denver, sparking the
Broncos' 51-28 comeback win over the Titans.
Hall of Fame will get Prater’s cleats
ERNEST A. BROWN / Blackstone Valley Sports photo
PC’s LaDontae Henton (left) nearly loses the ball as Yale defender Javier Duren (20) tries to swat
it away during the first half of the Friars’ victory on Tuesday night.
Friars hold on to defeat Bulldogs
SCOREBOARD
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Boston 34 23 9 2 48 94 70
Tampa Bay 34 20 11 3 43 93 82
Montreal 35 20 12 3 43 88 75
Detroit 36 15 12 9 39 91 99
Toronto 36 17 16 3 37 99105
Ottawa 35 14 15 6 34 99 113
Florida 35 13 17 5 31 81 110
Buffalo 34 8 23 3 19 59 98
Metropolitan Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 35 24 10 1 49108 75
Washington 33 18 12 3 39105 97
Carolina 34 14 13 7 35 79 94
N.Y. Rangers 34 16 17 1 33 76 91
Philadelphia 33 14 15 4 32 76 91
New Jersey 34 13 15 6 32 78 85
Columbus 34 14 16 4 32 87 95
N.Y. Islanders 35 9 19 7 25 85 121
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Chicago 36 24 7 5 53135101
St. Louis 32 22 6 4 48 112 76
Colorado 32 22 9 1 45 94 75
Minnesota 35 19 11 5 43 81 81
Dallas 32 15 12 5 35 92 99
Nashville 33 16 14 3 35 77 92
Winnipeg 36 15 16 5 35 95106
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Anaheim 36 24 7 5 53 116 91
Los Angeles 34 22 8 4 48 94 68
San Jose 33 20 7 6 46108 82
Vancouver 35 20 10 5 45 98 83
Phoenix 32 18 9 5 41104100
Calgary 34 13 16 5 31 86108
Edmonton 35 11 21 3 25 93120
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
— — —
Monday's Games
Pittsburgh 3, Toronto 1
Winnipeg 3, Columbus 2
Ottawa 3, St. Louis 2, OT
Colorado 6, Dallas 2
Tuesday's Games
Tampa Bay 3, N.Y. Islanders 2, SO
Boston 2, Calgary 0
Buffalo 4, Winnipeg 2
Florida 3, Toronto 1
Anaheim 5, Detroit 2
Phoenix at Montreal, (n)
Washington at Philadelphia, (n)
San Jose at St. Louis, (n)
Chicago at Nashville, (n)
Vancouver at Minnesota, (n)
Colorado at Dallas, (n)
Edmonton at Los Angeles, (n)
Wednesday's Games
Ottawa at New Jersey, 7:30 p.m.
Pittsburgh at N.Y. Rangers, 8 p.m.
Thursday's Games
Boston at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
Phoenix at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Columbus at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Minnesota at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
Florida at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m.
Calgary at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Nashville at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
Montreal at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Vancouver at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Edmonton at Colorado, 9:30 p.m.
San Jose at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.
SPORTS
B4 THE TIMES Wednesday, December 18, 2013
SPORTS ON THE AIR
TODAY
NBABASKETBALL
7 p.m. — Indiana at Miami, ESPN.
7:30 p.m. — Detroit at Boston, CSNNE, WEEI (850 AM).
9:30 p.m. — Chicago at Houston, ESPN.
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m. — Texas at North Carolina, ESPN2.
8 p.m. — USF at St. John's, FS1.
9 p.m. — Stanford vs. UConn, at Hartford, Conn., ESPN2.
9:30 p.m. — Northwestern St. at Baylor, FSN.
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m. — Mississippi at Baylor, FSN.
NHLHOCKEY
8 p.m. — Pittsburgh at N.Y. Rangers, NBC Sports.
INTERNATIONALSOCCER
2:30 p.m. — FIFAClub World Cup, semifinal, Raja Casablanca
vs. Atletico Mineiro of Brazil, at Marrakech, Morocco, FS1.
NFL
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
New England 10 4 0 .714 369 311
Miami 8 6 0 .571 310 296
N.Y. Jets 6 8 0 .429 246 367
Buffalo 5 9 0 .357 300 354
South
W L T Pct PF PA
y-Indianapolis 9 5 0 .643 338 319
Tennessee 5 9 0 .357 326 355
Jacksonville 4 10 0 .286 221 399
Houston 2 12 0 .143 253 375
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Cincinnati 9 5 0 .643 354 274
Baltimore 8 6 0 .571 296 277
Pittsburgh 6 8 0 .429 321 332
Cleveland 4 10 0 .286 288 362
West
W L T Pct PF PA
x-Denver 11 3 0 .786 535 372
x-Kansas City 11 3 0 .786 399 255
San Diego 7 7 0 .500 343 311
Oakland 4 10 0 .286 295 393
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
Philadelphia 8 6 0 .571 364 349
Dallas 7 7 0 .500 393 385
N.Y. Giants 5 9 0 .357 251 357
Washington 3 11 0 .214 305 434
South
W L T Pct PF PA
New Orleans 10 4 0 .714 359 270
Carolina 10 4 0 .714 328 208
Tampa Bay 4 10 0 .286 258 324
Atlanta 4 10 0 .286 309 388
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Chicago 8 6 0 .571 406 391
Green Bay 7 6 1 .536 353 362
Detroit 7 7 0 .500 362 339
Minnesota 4 9 1 .321 363 425
West
W L T Pct PF PA
x-Seattle 12 2 0 .857 380 205
San Francisco10 4 0 .714 349 228
Arizona 9 5 0 .643 342 291
St. Louis 6 8 0 .429 316 324
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division
— — —
Thursday, Dec. 12
San Diego 27, Denver 20
Sunday’s Games
Minnesota 48, Philadelphia 30
Atlanta 27, Washington 26
San Francisco 33, Tampa Bay 14
Seattle 23, N.Y. Giants 0
Chicago 38, Cleveland 31
Indianapolis 25, Houston 3
Buffalo 27, Jacksonville 20
Miami 24, New England 20
Kansas City 56, Oakland 31
Carolina 30, N.Y. Jets 20
Arizona 37, Tennessee 34, OT
St. Louis 27, New Orleans 16
Green Bay 37, Dallas 36
Pittsburgh 30, Cincinnati 20
Monday's Game
Baltimore 18, Detroit 16
Sunday, Dec. 22
Tampa Bay at St. Louis, 1 p.m.
Indianapolis at Kansas City, 1 p.m.
Denver at Houston, 1 p.m.
Miami at Buffalo, 1 p.m.
New Orleans at Carolina, 1 p.m.
Dallas at Washington, 1 p.m.
Cleveland at N.Y. Jets, 1 p.m.
Minnesota at Cincinnati, 1 p.m.
Tennessee at Jacksonville, 1 p.m.
Arizona at Seattle, 4:05 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Detroit, 4:05 p.m.
Oakland at San Diego, 4:25 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Green Bay, 4:25 p.m.
New England at Baltimore, 4:25 p.m.
Chicago at Philadelphia, 8:30 p.m.
Monday, Dec. 23
Atlanta at San Francisco, 8:40 p.m.
NFL Calendar
By The Associated Press
Dec. 29 — Regular season ends
Jan. 4-5 — Wild-card playoffs
Jan. 11-12 — Division-round playoffs
Jan. 19 — Conference championships
Feb. 1 — NFL Honors awards show at New
York
Feb. 2 — Super Bowl at East Rutherford, N.J.
NHL
NBA
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
Manchester 29 19 5 1 4 43 90 73
St. John's 29 15 11 1 2 33 87 76
Providence 27 14 9 1 3 32 95 89
Portland 24 10 9 1 4 25 67 75
Worcester 22 10 10 1 1 22 53 64
East Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
WB/Scranton 26 16 7 1 2 35 81 64
Binghamton 26 14 9 0 3 31 91 82
Norfolk 27 13 9 1 4 31 73 73
Syracuse 25 12 10 1 2 27 64 70
Hershey 24 10 9 2 3 25 77 77
Northeast Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
Springfield 25 18 4 1 2 39 81 60
Albany 26 17 7 1 1 36 86 66
Adirondack 25 12 11 0 2 26 60 63
Bridgeport 27 10 13 1 3 24 69 91
Hartford 26 9 14 0 3 21 63 87
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Midwest Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
Grand Rapids 26 19 5 1 1 40100 59
Rockford 29 15 12 2 0 32 86 100
Milwaukee 24 12 7 4 1 29 62 66
Chicago 26 12 12 0 2 26 72 73
Iowa 24 10 13 1 0 21 57 68
North Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
Toronto 24 14 9 1 0 29 68 60
Rochester 27 12 11 2 2 28 81 87
Lake Erie 26 12 11 0 3 27 72 82
Hamilton 27 12 12 0 3 27 69 77
Utica 25 8 15 1 1 18 56 78
West Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
Abbotsford 29 20 7 1 1 42100 80
Texas 28 16 8 2 2 36 96 78
Okla. City 29 10 14 0 5 25 78 94
San Antonio 28 11 15 0 2 24 74 85
Charlotte 26 11 14 0 1 23 69 80
NOTE: Two points are awarded for a win, one for an
overtime or a shootout loss.
— — —
Monday's Games
No games scheduled
Tuesday's Games
No games scheduled
Wednesday's Games
Hamilton at Chicago, 12 p.m.
Syracuse at Hershey, 7 p.m.
Abbotsford at Utica, 7 p.m.
Toronto at Rochester, 7:05 p.m.
Grand Rapids at Iowa, 8:05 p.m.
San Antonio at Texas, 8:30 p.m.
Thursday's Game
Norfolk at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
AHL
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
TRANSACTIONS
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
NFL
FAVORITE OPEN TODAY O/U UNDERDOG
Sunday’s Games
Miami 2½ 2½ (43) at Buffalo
at Carolina 3 3 (46½) New Orleans
Dallas 2½ 3 (53½) at Washington
at St. Louis 5½ 5½ (42½) Tampa Bay
at Philadelphia 4 3 (56) Chicago
at N.Y. Jets 1 2½ (40½) Cleveland
at Kansas City 6½ 6½ (44) Indianapolis
at Cincinnati 7 7 (48½) Minnesota
Denver 9½ 10½ (52) at Houston
Tennessee 5½ 5½ (44) at Jacksonville
at Seattle 9½ 10½ (44) Arizona
at Detroit 9½ 9 (48½) N.Y. Giants
at San Diego 7½ 10 (50½) Oakland
at Green Bay OFF OFF (OFF) Pittsburgh
at Baltimore 2 2½ (45) New England
Monday’s Game
at San Francisco 10½ 12 (45) Atlanta
Off Key — Green Bay QB is questionable.
College Football
FAVORITE OPEN TODAY O/U UNDERDOG
Saturday’s Games
New Mexico Bowl
At Albuquerque, N.M.
Washington St. 4½ 4½ (65) Colorado St.
Las Vegas Bowl
Southern Cal 4½ 6 (62½) Fresno St.
Famous Idaho Potato Bowl
At Boise, Idaho
San Diego St. +1½ Pk (53) Buffalo
New Orleans Bowl
at Tulane Pk 1 (49½) La.-Lafayette
Monday’s Game
Beef 'O' Brady's Bowl
At St. Petersburg, Fla.
East Carolina 12½ 13½ (62½) Ohio
GLANTZ-CULVER LINE
Quarterbacks
Att Com Yds TD Int
Manning, DEN 580 393 4811 47 10
P. Rivers, SND 482 337 4048 28 9
Rthlisbrger, PIT 525 340 3915 25 11
A. Smith, KAN 480 292 3160 23 6
Brady, NWE 578 352 4049 23 10
Dalton, CIN 512 315 3649 27 16
Tannehill, MIA 521 325 3627 23 14
Luck, IND 496 291 3299 21 9
Campbell, CLE 236 139 1597 10 5
Fitzptrick, TEN 300 185 2107 13 10
— — —
Rushers
Att Yds Avg LG TD
Charles, KAN 246 1181 4.80 46 11
Mathews, SND 2361012 4.29 51 5
Moreno, DEN 224 939 4.19 25t 10
Johnson, TEN 230 860 3.74 30t 5
Be. Tate, HOU 181 771 4.26 60 4
Spiller, BUF 162 745 4.60 77 2
Jackson, BUF 174 725 4.17 59 7
Jns-Drew, JAX 208 719 3.46 48 5
Ivory, NYJ 157 705 4.49 69 3
Jennings, OAK 149 679 4.56 80t 6
— — —
Receivers
No Yds Avg LG TD
Johnson, HOU 991295 13.1 62t 5
Ant. Brown, PIT 951307 13.8 56 8
Edelman, NWE 89 914 10.3 44 6
A.. Green, CIN 871268 14.6 82t 8
Ke. Wright, TEN 851007 11.8 45 2
Thomas, DEN 781194 15.3 78t 11
Cameron, CLE 75 848 11.3 53 7
Gordon, CLE 741467 19.8 95t 9
Decker, DEN 731130 15.5 61 8
Welker, DEN 73 778 10.7 33 10
— — —
Punt Returners
No Yds Avg LG TD
Doss, BAL 23 359 15.6 82t 1
Ant. Brown, PIT 27 347 12.9 67t 1
McCluster, KAN 54 631 11.7 89t 2
Benjamin, CLE 22 257 11.7 79t 1
Edelman, NWE 32 356 11.1 43 0
Holliday, DEN 26 250 9.6 81t 1
Br. Tate, CIN 29 274 9.4 43 0
Thigpen, MIA 28 237 8.5 34 0
K. Martin, HOU 34 275 8.1 87t 1
Reynaud, TEN 18 135 7.5 35 0
— — —
Kickoff Returners
No Yds Avg LG TD
Q. Demps, KAN 28 846 30.2 95t 1
Jac. Jones, BAL 23 662 28.8 77t 1
Holliday, DEN 24 676 28.2 105t 1
Todman, JAX 24 662 27.6 59 0
Br. Tate, CIN 31 832 26.8 71 0
K. Martin, HOU 33 864 26.2 50 0
D. Reed, IND 24 590 24.6 39 0
Cribbs, NYJ 20 490 24.5 42 0
Ta. Jones, OAK 24 572 23.8 41 0
F. Jones, PIT 19 447 23.5 42 0
— — —
Scoring Touchdowns
TDRush Rec Ret Pts
J. Charles, KAN 18 11 7 0 108
Moreno, DEN 12 10 2 0 72
D. Thomas, DEN 11 0 11 0 66
J. Thomas, DEN 11 0 11 0 66
Welker, DEN 10 0 10 0 60
Ant. Brown, PIT 9 0 8 1 54
Cotchery, PIT 9 0 9 0 54
Gordon, CLE 9 0 9 0 54
C. Johnson, TEN 9 5 4 0 54
M. Jones, CIN 9 0 9 0 54
— — —
Kicking
PAT FG LG Pts
Gostkowski, NWE 37-37 32-35 54 133
J. Tucker, BAL 25-25 35-37 61 130
M. Prater, DEN 67-67 20-21 64 127
Novak, SND 37-37 28-31 50 121
Vinatieri, IND 29-29 29-33 52 116
Suisham, PIT 32-32 27-29 48 113
Folk, NYJ 22-22 30-31 54 112
Succop, KAN 48-48 21-25 51 111
D. Carpenter, BUF 29-29 27-30 55 110
Sturgis, MIA 32-32 26-34 54 110
NFC INDIVIDUAL LEADERS
NFL TEAMSTATISTICS
AFC INDIVIDUAL LEADERS
Quarterbacks
Att Com Yds TD Int
Foles, PHL 266 165 2398 23 2
McCown, CHI 220 147 1809 13 1
Rodgers, GBY 251 168 2218 15 4
Wilson, SEA 357 231 3077 24 8
Brees, NOR 575 392 4500 34 10
Romo, DAL 508 325 3602 29 9
Bradford, STL 262 159 1687 14 4
Cutler, CHI 296 189 2173 16 10
Newton, CAR 424 264 3049 21 11
M. Ryan, ATL 563 374 3887 22 14
— — —
Rushers
Att Yds Avg LG TD
McCoy, PHL 2691343 4.99 57t 7
Peterson, MIN 2681221 4.56 78t 10
Forte, CHI 2581200 4.65 55 7
Morris, WAS 2361125 4.77 45t 6
Lynch, SEA 2601089 4.19 43 11
Lacy, GBY 2481028 4.15 60 8
Gore, SNF 2421017 4.20 51 8
Murray, DAL 178 977 5.49 41 8
R. Bush, DET 197 940 4.77 39 4
Stacy, STL 202 854 4.23 40t 6
— — —
Receivers
No Yds Avg LG TD
Garcon, WAS 961146 11.9 53t 4
Marshall, CHI 901185 13.2 44 10
Johnson, DET 811449 17.9 87 12
D. Bryant, DAL 811061 13.1 79 11
Jeffery, CHI 801265 15.8 80t 7
Graham, NOR 761071 14.1 56t 14
Jackson, PHL 751275 17.0 61t 9
Cruz, NYG 73 998 13.7 70t 4
Douglas, ATL 73 963 13.2 80t 2
Fitzgerald, ARI 73 823 11.3 75t 10
— — —
Punt Returners
No Yds Avg LG TD
Hyde, GBY 21 280 13.3 93t 1
Sherels, MIN 18 236 13.1 86t 1
Ginn Jr., CAR 21 263 12.5 41 0
G. Tate, SEA 46 540 11.7 71 0
Page, TAM 23 251 10.9 52 0
L. James, SNF 18 186 10.3 40 0
T. Austin, STL 33 280 8.5 98t 1
R. Randle, NYG 26 214 8.2 32 0
Sproles, NOR 24 164 6.8 28 0
Spurlock, DET 22 145 6.6 57 0
— — —
Kickoff Returners
No Yds Avg LG TD
Patterson, MIN 361199 33.3 109t 2
Dw. Harris, DAL 26 792 30.5 90 0
Hester, CHI 411172 28.6 80 0
Page, TAM 19 479 25.2 44 0
J. Rodgers, ATL 23 525 22.8 34 0
Ginn Jr., CAR 23 523 22.7 38 0
Arenas, ARI 18 400 22.2 46 0
T. Austin, STL 18 398 22.1 32 0
Paul, WAS 20 411 20.6 39 0
— — —
Scoring Touchdowns
TDRush Rec Ret Pts
Graham, NOR 14 0 14 0 84
M. Lynch, SEA 13 11 2 0 78
Ve. Davis, SNF 12 0 12 0 72
Johnson, DET 12 0 12 0 72
De. Bryant, DAL 11 0 11 0 66
Peterson, MIN 11 10 1 0 66
B. Marshall, CHI 10 0 10 0 64
Fitzgerald, ARI 10 0 10 0 60
Forte, CHI 9 7 2 0 56
D. Jackson, PHL 9 0 9 0 54
— — —
Kicking
PAT FG LG Pts
Hauschka, SEA 40-40 30-31 53 130
Crosby, GBY 35-35 30-34 57 125
P. Dawson, SNF 38-38 27-30 55 119
Walsh, MIN 39-40 26-30 54 117
Gould, CHI 41-42 25-28 58 116
D. Bailey, DAL 43-43 24-26 53 115
Feely, ARI 35-35 25-29 52 110
Hartley, NOR 41-41 22-30 55 107
Gano, CAR 37-37 23-26 55 106
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 12 14 .462 —
Toronto 9 13 .409 1
Brooklyn 9 15 .375 2
New York 7 17 .292 4
Philadelphia 7 19 .269 5
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 18 6 .750 —
Atlanta 13 12 .520 5½
Charlotte 11 14 .440 7½
Washington 10 13 .435 7½
Orlando 8 17 .320 10½
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Indiana 20 4 .833 —
Detroit 12 14 .462 9
Chicago 9 14 .391 10½
Cleveland 9 15 .375 11
Milwaukee 5 19 .208 15
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 19 5 .792 —
Houston 16 9 .640 3½
Dallas 14 10 .583 5
New Orleans 11 11 .500 7
Memphis 10 13 .435 8½
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Portland 22 4 .846 —
Oklahoma City 19 4 .826 1½
Denver 14 9 .609 6½
Minnesota 12 13 .480 9½
Utah 6 21 .222 16½
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 17 9 .654 —
Phoenix 14 9 .609 1½
Golden State 13 12 .520 3½
L.A. Lakers 11 13 .458 5
Sacramento 7 16 .304 8½
Monday's Games
Detroit 101, Indiana 96
Brooklyn 130, Philadelphia 94
Boston 101, Minnesota 97
Miami 117, Utah 94
Atlanta 114, L.A. Lakers 100
Washington 102, New York 101
Orlando 83, Chicago 82
L.A. Clippers 115, San Antonio 92
Tuesday's Games
Portland 119, Cleveland 116
Charlotte 95, Sacramento 87
L.A. Lakers at Memphis, (n)
Oklahoma City at Denver, (n)
New Orleans at Golden State, (n)
Wednesday's Games
Utah at Orlando, 7 p.m.
Indiana at Miami, 7 p.m.
Charlotte at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Detroit at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Sacramento at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Washington at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m.
Portland at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
New York at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.
Memphis at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
San Antonio at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Chicago at Houston, 9:30 p.m.
New Orleans at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.
Thursday's Games
Chicago at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
San Antonio at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
NBA Calendar
By The Associated Press
Jan. 6 — 10-day contracts can be signed.
Jan. 10 — Contracts guaranteed for rest of sea-
son.
Feb. 14-16 — All-Star weekend, New Orleans.
Feb. 20 — Trade deadline, 3 p.m. EST.
April 16 — Last day of regular season.
April 19 — Playoffs begin.
May 20 — Draft lottery.
June 5 — NBA Finals begin.
June 16 — Draft early entry withdrawal deadline.
Bowl Glance
Saturday, Dec. 21
New Mexico Bowl
At Albuquerque
Washington State (6-6) vs. Colorado State (7-6), 2 p.m. (ESPN)
Las Vegas Bowl
Fresno State (11-1) vs. Southern Cal (9-4), 3:30 p.m. (ABC)
Famous Idaho Potato Bowl
At Boise, Idaho
Buffalo (8-4) vs. San Diego State (7-5), 5:30 p.m. (ESPN)
New Orleans Bowl
Tulane (7-5) vs. Louisiana-Lafayette (8-4), 9 p.m. (ESPN)
— — —
Monday, Dec. 23
Beef 'O' Brady's Bowl
At St. Petersburg, Fla.
Ohio (7-5) vs. East Carolina (9-3), 2 p.m. (ESPN)
Tuesday, Dec. 24
Hawaii Bowl
At Honolulu
Oregon State (6-6) vs. Boise State (8-4), 8 p.m. (ESPN)
— — —
Thursday, Dec. 26
Little Caesars Pizza Bowl
At Detroit
Bowling Green (10-3) vs. Pittsburgh (6-6), 6 p.m. (ESPN)
Poinsettia Bowl
At San Diego
Northern Illinois (12-1) vs. Utah State (8-5), 9:30 p.m. (ESPN)
— — —
Friday, Dec. 27
Military Bowl
At Annapolis, Md.
Marshall (9-4) vs. Maryland (7-5), 2:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Texas Bowl
At Houston
Minnesota (8-4) vs. Syracuse (6-6), 6 p.m. (ESPN)
Fight Hunger Bowl
At San Francisco
BYU (8-4) vs. Washington (8-4), 9:30 p.m. (ESPN)
— — —
Saturday, Dec. 28
Pinstripe Bowl
At New York
Notre Dame (8-4) vs. Rutgers (6-6), Noon (ESPN)
Belk Bowl
At Charlotte, N.C.
Cincinnati (9-3) vs. North Carolina (6-6), 3:20 p.m. (ESPN)
Russell Athletic Bowl
At Orlando, Fla.
Miami (9-3) vs. Louisville (11-1), 6:45 p.m. (ESPN)
Buffalo Wild Wings Bowl
At Tempe, Ariz.
Kansas State (7-5) vs. Michigan (7-5), 10:15 p.m. (ESPN)
— — —
Monday, Dec. 30
Armed Forces Bowl
At Fort Worth, Texas
Middle Tennessee (8-4) vs. Navy (7-4), 11:45 a.m. (ESPN)
Music City Bowl
At Nashville, Tenn.
Mississippi (7-5) vs. Georgia Tech (7-5), 3:15 p.m. (ESPN)
Alamo Bowl
At San Antonio
Oregon (10-2) vs. Texas (8-4), 6:45 p.m. (ESPN)
Holiday Bowl
At San Diego
Arizona State (10-3) vs. Texas Tech (7-5), 10:15 p.m. (ESPN)
— — —
Tuesday, Dec. 31
AdvoCare V100 Bowl
At Shreveport, La.
Arizona (7-5) vs. Boston College (7-5), 12:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Sun Bowl
At El Paso, Texas
Virginia Tech (8-4) vs. UCLA (9-3), 2 p.m. (CBS)
Liberty Bowl
At Memphis, Tenn.
Rice (9-3) vs. Mississippi State (6-6), 4 p.m. (ESPN)
Chick-fil-A Bowl
At Atlanta
Texas A&M (8-4) vs. Duke (10-3), 8 p.m. (ESPN)
— — —
Wednesday, Jan. 1
Heart of Dallas Bowl
At Dallas
UNLV (7-5) vs. North Texas (8-4), Noon (ESPNU)
Gator Bowl
At Jacksonville, Fla.
Nebraska (8-4) vs. Georgia (8-4), Noon (ESPN2)
Capital One Bowl
At Orlando, Fla.
Wisconsin (9-3) vs. South Carolina (10-2), 1 p.m. (ABC)
Outback Bowl
At Tampa, Fla.
Iowa (8-4) vs. LSU (9-3), 1 p.m. (ESPN)
Rose Bowl
At Pasadena, Calif.
Stanford (11-2) vs. Michigan State (12-1), 5 p.m. (ESPN)
Fiesta Bowl
At Glendale, Ariz.
Baylor (11-1) vs. UCF (11-1), 8:30 p.m. (ESPN)
— — —
Thursday, Jan. 2
Sugar Bowl
At New Orleans
Alabama (11-1) vs. Oklahoma (10-2), 8:30 p.m. (ESPN)
— — —
Friday, Jan. 3
Orange Bowl
At Miami
Ohio State (12-1) vs. Clemson (10-2), 8 p.m. (ESPN)
Cotton Bowl
At Arlington, Texas
Missouri (11-2) vs. Oklahoma State (10-2), 7:30 p.m. (FOX)
— — —
Saturday, Jan. 4
BBVA Compass Bowl
At Birmingham, Ala.
Vanderbilt (8-4) vs. Houston (8-4), 1 p.m. (ESPN)
— — —
Sunday, Jan. 5
GoDaddy.com Bowl
At Mobile, Ala.
Arkansas State (7-5) vs. Ball State (10-2), 9 p.m. (ESPN)
— — —
Monday, Jan. 6
BCS National Championship
At Pasadena, Calif.
Florida State (13-0) vs. Auburn (12-1), 8:30 p.m. (ESPN)
— — —
Saturday, Jan. 18
East-West Shrine Classic
At St. Petersburg, Fla.
East vs. West, 4 p.m. (NFLN)
Tuesday's Sports Transactions
By The Associated Press
BASEBALL
American League
CLEVELAND INDIANS — Agreed to terms with RHP
John Axford on a one-year contract, pending a phys-
ical and RHP Shaun Marcum on a minor league con-
tract.
HOUSTON ASTROS — Agreed to terms with RHP
Matt Albers on a one-year contract.
TORONTO BLUE JAYS — Agreed to terms with INF
Steve Tolleson on a minor league contract.
National League
LOS ANGELES DODGERS — Agreed to terms with
INF Josh Bell and RHP Sam Demel on minor league
contracts.
American Association
GARY SOUTHSHORE RAILCATS — Traded RHP
Tim Verthein to Florence (Frontier) for 1B Jeremy
Hamilton.
WINNIPEG GOLDEYES — Signed LHP Brendan
Lafferty.
Can-Am League
NEW JERSEY JACKALS — Released OF Willie
Cabrera.
Frontier League
ROCKFORD AVIATORS — Signed INF Brian
Bistagne, OF Michael Hur and INF Elvin Rodriguez to
contract extensions.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
NEW YORK KNICKS — Recalled G Chris Smith from
Erie (NBADL).
FOOTBALL
National Football League
CHICAGO BEARS — Waived S Sean Cattouse.
CINCINNATI BENGALS — Placed P Kevin Huber on
injured reserve. Signed P Shawn Powell.
DALLAS COWBOYS — Placed LB Justin Durant on
injured reserve. Released RB George Winn from the
practice squad. Re-signed LB Orie Lemon from the
practice squad.
DENVER BRONCOS — Agreed to terms with DE
Jeremy Mincey.
INDIANAPOLIS COLTS — Placed LB Pat Angerer on
injured reserve. Agreed to terms with RB Shaun
Draughn. Signed G Zach Allen to the practice squad.
JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS — Placed WR Cecil
Shorts and G Will Rackley on injured reserve. Signed
C Patrick Lewis from Cleveland's practice squad.
Signed G Drew Nowak from the practice squad.
Signed DE D'Aundre Reed to the practice squad.
MIAMI DOLPHINS — Released S D.J. Campbell
Claimed DB Jalil Brown off waivers from Indianapolis.
MINNESOTA VIKINGS — Released RB Joe Banyard.
PITTSBURGH STEELERS — Placed LB LaMarr
Woodley on injured reserve. Signed LB Jamaal
Westerman.
TENNESSEE TITANS — Released QB John Skelton.
Signed QB Tyler Wilson.
Canadian Football League
EDMONTON ESKIMOS — Signed CB Joe Burnett
and RB Hugh Charles to contract extensions through
2015.
WINNIPEG BLUE BOMBERS — Named Marcel
Bellefeuille offensive coordinator.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
BUFFALO SABRES — Assigned F Luke Adam and D
Mark Pysyk and Brayden McNabb to Rochester
(AHL). Recalled F Kevin Porter and D Chad
Ruhwedel from Rochester.
COLUMBUS BLUE JACKETS — Recalled F Jack
Skille from Springfield (AHL). Sent G Jeremy Smith to
Springfield.
DALLAS STARS — Placed F Vernon Fiddler on
injured reserve, retroactive to Dec. 7. Recalled D
Cameron Gaunce from Texas (AHL).
NASHVILLE PREDATORS — Recalled G Magnus
Hellberg from Milwaukee (AHL).
WASHINGTON CAPITALS — Recalled C Casey
Wellman from Hershey (AHL).
American Hockey League
AHL — Suspended Bridgeport D Mike Cornell two
games for receiving a match penalty for an illegal
check to the head of an opponent in a Dec. 15 game
at Manchester.
HARTFORD WOLF PACK — Reassigned F Josh
Nicholls to Greenville (ECHL). Signed F Akim Aliu to a
professional tryout agreement.
MILWAUKEE ADMIRALS — Recalled F Josh Shalla
from Cincinnati (ECHL).
SPRINGFIELD FALCONS — Reassigned D Ilari
Melart to Ugra (KHL). Signed LW Jean-Francois
Jacques to a standard contract. Recalled D Thomas
Larkin from Evansville (ECHL).
ECHL
ECHL — Fined Reading F Dustin Gazley an undis-
closed amount.
FLORIDA EVERBLADES — Announced F Carl
Nielsen was reassigned to the team by Syracuse
(AHL).
GWINNETT GLADIATORS — Signed G Paul
Karpowich. Acquired G Brad Phillips from Stockton
for future considerations.
READING ROYALS — Announced G Brandon
Anderson was recalled by Hershey (AHL). Signed G
Josh Watson. Placed D Ryan Kavanagh on team sus-
pension.
SOCCER
Major League Soccer
PORTLAND TIMBERS — Acquired a 2014 fourth-
round SuperDraft pick from Houston for the rights to
D David Horst.
SAN JOSE EARTHQUAKES — Traded D Justin
Morrow to Toronto FC for allocation money.
SEATTLE SOUNDERS FC — Traded F Eddie
Johnson to D.C. United for allocation money.
COLLEGE
BENTLEY — Named Rick Edelmann men's and
women's tennis coach.
FAIRLEIGH DICKINSON — Announced the resigna-
tion of women's soccer coach Rick Stainton to take
the same position at Seton Hall.
HAMPTON — Named Connell Maynor football
coach.
MIAMI (OHIO) — Named George Barnett offensive
co-coordinator and offensive line coach, Eric Koehler
offensive co-coordinator and quarterbacks coach
and Pat Welsh tight ends coach.
OREGON — Suspended CB Troy Hill indefinitely
from the football team following his arrest.
AFC OFFENSE
Yards Rush Pass
Denver 453.4 116.8 336.6
San Diego 396.0 116.5 279.5
New England 390.7 118.3 272.4
Cincinnati 362.4 111.6 250.7
Houston 359.1 113.6 245.5
Cleveland 346.2 84.9 261.3
Oakland 344.3 134.1 210.2
Kansas City 341.2 125.6 215.6
Pittsburgh 340.4 79.4 260.9
Tennessee 338.1 111.5 226.6
Indianapolis 337.3 109.1 228.1
Buffalo 330.5 138.2 192.3
Miami 329.1 95.3 233.9
Baltimore 309.9 82.9 227.0
N.Y. Jets 306.7 128.3 178.4
Jacksonville 290.1 82.5 207.6
— — —
AFC DEFENSE
Yards Rush Pass
Houston 304.2 120.9 183.3
Cincinnati 318.4 98.7 219.6
Cleveland 328.9 103.8 225.1
Baltimore 334.0 102.4 231.6
Pittsburgh 338.0 115.6 222.4
N.Y. Jets 341.4 86.1 255.4
Tennessee 345.0 119.1 225.9
Buffalo 346.4 127.3 219.1
Miami 356.1 117.2 238.9
Oakland 358.4 103.9 254.4
Indianapolis 362.6 128.9 233.6
Kansas City 365.2 114.4 250.8
Denver 371.5 105.4 266.1
New England 372.7 132.5 240.2
San Diego 376.2 108.8 267.4
Jacksonville 381.8 131.9 249.9
NFC OFFENSE
Yards Rush Pass
Philadelphia 414.0 152.9 261.1
Detroit 405.3 112.9 292.4
Green Bay 397.2 130.4 266.9
New Orleans 397.0 89.2 307.8
Chicago 393.4 117.6 275.8
Washington 383.4 140.9 242.4
Seattle 354.5 141.0 213.5
Minnesota 353.9 128.0 225.9
Atlanta 341.5 79.3 262.2
Arizona 339.5 94.1 245.4
Dallas 338.2 96.6 241.6
Carolina 326.0 129.4 196.6
St. Louis 317.3 115.0 202.3
San Francisco 316.1 137.1 179.1
N.Y. Giants 311.6 83.5 228.1
Tampa Bay 283.7 105.6 178.1
— — —
NFC DEFENSE
Yards Rush Pass
Seattle 279.5 105.3 174.2
Carolina 296.3 84.9 211.4
San Francisco 299.1 99.4 199.7
New Orleans 312.8 116.4 196.4
Arizona 322.3 83.2 239.1
N.Y. Giants 336.4 107.4 229.0
Tampa Bay 344.5 109.6 234.9
Detroit 351.6 98.6 252.9
Washington 362.7 110.9 251.9
St. Louis 362.9 105.4 257.5
Green Bay 376.3 123.4 252.9
Chicago 380.4 152.4 228.0
Atlanta 386.3 131.4 254.9
Philadelphia 402.4 110.8 291.6
Minnesota 406.5 115.9 290.6
Dallas 427.3 129.9 297.4
Local sports? Call 767-8545
2013 Final Baseball Payrolls
NEW YORK (AP) — The final 2013 payrolls for the
30 major league teams, according to information
received by clubs from the commissioner's office.
Figures are for 40-man rosters and include salaries
and pro-rated shares of signing bonuses, earned
incentive bonuses, non-cash compensation, buy-
outs of unexercised options and cash transactions.
In some cases, parts of salaries that are deferred
are discounted to reflect present-day values.
N.Y. Yankees $237,018,889
L.A. Dodgers 236,872,242
Boston 176,481,441
Philadelphia 166,159,063
Detroit 154,728,724
L.A. Angels 143,670,107
San Francisco 141,312,169
Texas 137,185,918
Toronto 125,879,791
Washington 120,935,536
St. Louis 119,642,308
Chicago White Sox 116,740,909
Cincinnati 116,137,930
Baltimore 103,299,013
Chicago Cubs 100,859,265
Atlanta 95,340,877
N.Y. Mets 95,128,685
Milwaukee 92,698,695
Seattle 91,102,412
Arizona 90,204,915
Cleveland 88,964,754
Kansas City 86,614,795
Colorado 78,836,045
Minnesota 76,132,483
Pittsburgh 74,608,266
San Diego 74,201,807
Oakland 71,075,550
Tampa Bay 64,610,387
Miami 42,301,773
Houston 29,270,160
Total 3,348,014,908
Baseball Calendar
By The Associated Press
Jan. 8 — Hall of Fame voting announced.
Jan. 14 — Salary arbitration filing.
Jan. 15-16 — Owners' meetings, Paradise Valley,
Ariz.
Jan. 17 — Salary arbitration figures exchanged.
Feb. 1-21 — Salary arbitration hearings, St.
Petersburg, Fla.
Feb. 13 — Voluntary reporting date for pitchers,
catchers and injured players.
Feb. 18 — Voluntary reporting date for other play-
ers.
Feb. 25 — Mandatory reporting date.
March 12 — Last day to place a player on uncon-
ditional release waivers and pay 30 days termina-
tion pay instead of 45 days.
March 22-23 — Los Angeles Dodgers vs. Arizo-
na, Sydney.
March 26 — Last day to request unconditional
release waivers on a player without having to pay
his full 2014 salary.
March 30 — Opening day for other teams. Active
rosters reduced to 25 players.
June 5 — Amateur draft.
July 15 — All-Star game, Minneapolis.
July 18 — Deadline for amateur draft picks to sign.
July 27 — Hall of Fame inductions, Cooperstown,
N.Y.
DEAR ABBY:
A couple of years ago, my
husband informed me that he
likes to dress in women’s cloth-
ing. Since then he has read
books, is seeing a counselor,
and the reality is, he is trans-
gender. He now wears his hair
long and has long fingernails.
I have tried to be under-
standing and have gone places
with him when he is dressed as
a woman. He has met other
transgender people who have
either made the full transition
or are content without it. I
allow my husband time with
these new friends without me.
I did feel weird that he was
clothes shopping and going to
movies with his new friends.
I have reconciled with these
activities and I’m OK with
them so far. But I have told
him that if he decides to
change his gender to female, I
will not be able to be married
to him. He’s on hormones at
the moment and has told me
he plans to start testosterone
blockers.
I love him, Abby, but NOT
the woman side of him. Am I
unreasonable to put a bound-
ary on my marriage? He thinks
if he slowly eases me into the
idea that it will be OK. He says
I am his “world” and I should
love him no matter what gen-
der he is. Am I being selfish?
— SOMEWHERE
IN THE NORTHWEST
DEAR SOMEWHERE:
You appear to be a loving and
accepting wife. You may be
your husband’s world, but his
world is changing — and along
with it, so is yours. It is not
selfish to take care of yourself.
You did not enter your mar-
riage to be partnered with
another woman, and you
should not be made to feel
guilty remaining with one if it’s
not what you want. Some
spouses stay together; others
just can’t.
If you haven’t heard of the
Straight Spouse Network, it is
a confidential support network
of current or former heterosex-
ual spouses or partners of gay,
lesbian, bisexual or transgen-
der mates. It was founded in
1991, and its mission is to help
straight spouses or partners
cope with coming-out issues,
and help mixed-orientation
couples and their children
build bridges of understanding.
To learn more about it and
find a support group near you,
visit www.straightspouse.org.
DEAR ABBY:
I have always had an
extremely close relationship
with my little sister. Last year,
I graduated from high school
and left for university. It was
hard for both of us. My college
is an hour away from where
my family lives, so even though
I live on campus, I try to come
home whenever I can to visit
on weekends.
Lately it seems like my little
sister has emotionally dis-
tanced herself from me. She
doesn’t confide in me any-
more, shows little interest in
my life, and it has gotten to the
point where she barely
acknowledges me in public. I
have tried talking to her about
it and telling her how much it
hurts me, but she tells me I’m
overreacting and to stop being
stupid.
My mom says she does this
with everyone and that this is
typical for a 14-year-old teenag-
er, but it breaks my heart to be
so excluded from her life. Is
this just a phase I have to learn
to deal with and accept? What
should I do?
— SAD BIG SISTER
IN SWITZERLAND
DEAR BIG SISTER: Your
sister is growing up, and part
of that process means becom-
ing an individual. Right now
she is trying to figure out who
she is, apart from the family
she loves — including you. I’m
sure she isn’t intentionally try-
ing to hurt your feelings.
Because you were so close, she
may have felt abandoned when
you left for college. Your moth-
er is right about this. Let your
sister evolve. She’ll be back.
Accept it for now.
Dear Abby is written by
Abigail Van Buren, also known
as Jeanne Phillips, and was
founded by her mother, Pauline
Phillips. Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box
69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.
Good advice for everyone —
teens to seniors — is in “The
Anger in All of Us and How to
Deal With It.” To order, send
your name and mailing
address, plus check or money
order for $7 (U.S. funds) to:
Dear Abby, Anger Booklet,
P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris,
IL 61054-0447. (Shipping and
handling are included in the
price.)
WEDNESDAY EVENING DECEMBER 18, 2013
6 PM 6:30 7 PM 7:30 8 PM 8:30 9 PM 9:30 10 PM 10:30 11 PM 11:30
^ WGBH 2 2 2 2
PBS NewsHour (N) Å Greater Bos-
ton Å
Rick Steves’
Europe Å
Nature Wolves and buffalo in
Canada. Å (DVS)
NOVA “Extreme Ice” Cameras
record melting glaciers.
Extreme by Design Students
build projects for the poor. (N)
Charlie Rose (N) Å
2 2 2
$ WBZ 4 4 4
WBZ News
(N) Å
CBS Evening
News/Pelley
Wheel of For-
tune (N)
Jeopardy!
(N) Å
A Home for the Holidays With
Celine Dion (N) Å
Criminal Minds A suspect tar-
gets people in Detroit.
CSI: Crime Scene Investigation
“Double Fault”
WBZ News
(N) Å
Late Show W/
Letterman
4 4
% WCVB 5 5 5
NewsCenter 5
at Six (N)
ABC World
News
Inside Edition
(N) Å
Chronicle Å The Middle Å The Goldbergs
Å
Modern Fam-
ily Å
(:31) Barbara Walters Presents the 10 Most Fas-
cinating People of 2013 (N) Å
NewsCenter 5
Late (N)
(:35) Jimmy
Kimmel Live
6 6 5 5
& WLNE 6
ABC6 News at 6
(N) Å
ABC World
News
omg! Insider
(N) Å
Inside Edition
(N) Å
The Middle Å The Goldbergs
Å
Modern Fam-
ily Å
(:31) Barbara Walters Presents the 10 Most Fas-
cinating People of 2013 (N) Å
ABC6 News at
Eleven (N)
(:35) Jimmy
Kimmel Live
6 6
_ WHDH 7 7 7
7 News at 6PM
(N)
NBC Nightly
News (N)
Access Hol-
lywood (N)
Extra (N) Å The Sing-Off “Movie Night” The groups perform songs from mov-
ies. (N) Å
Michael Bublé’s 3rd Annual
Christmas Special (N) Å
7 News at
11PM (N)
Tonight Show
w/Jay Leno
7 7
* WJAR 10 10 10
NBC 10 News at
6pm (N)
NBC Nightly
News (N)
NBC 10 News at
7pm (N)
Extra (N) Å The Sing-Off “Movie Night” The groups perform songs from mov-
ies. (N) Å
Michael Bublé’s 3rd Annual
Christmas Special (N) Å
NBC 10 News at
11pm (N)
Tonight Show
w/Jay Leno
10 10 10 10
, WPRI 12
12 News at 6 CBS Evening
News/Pelley
Wheel of For-
tune (N)
Jeopardy!
(N) Å
A Home for the Holidays With
Celine Dion (N) Å
Criminal Minds A suspect tar-
gets people in Detroit.
CSI: Crime Scene Investigation
“Double Fault”
News at 11 Late Show W/
Letterman
12 12 12 12
9 WFXT 6 13 13
Fox 25 News at
6 (N) Å
Fox 25 News at
6:30 (N)
TMZ (N) Å Dish Nation
(N) Å
The X Factor “Performance Show” The remaining acts perform.
(N) Å
Fox 25 News at 10 (N) Å Fox 25 News at
11 (N)
TMZ Å
8
< WLWC 9
Modern Fam-
ily Å
Modern Fam-
ily Å
The Big Bang
Theory Å
The Big Bang
Theory Å
The iHeartradio Jingle Ball 2013 Performers include Miley Cyrus.
(N) Å
Two and a Half
Men
Two and a Half
Men
The Office Å The Office Å
28 28 9 9
D WSBE 8 15 9 9
World News
America
Nightly Busi-
ness Report
America’s Test
Kitchen
Are You Being
Served?
Favorites BBC World
News Å
(Off Air)
36 36 8 8 18
F WSBK 8 14 14
Two and a Half
Men
Two and a Half
Men
The Big Bang
Theory Å
The Big Bang
Theory Å
Law & Order: Criminal Intent
“Shandeh” Å
Law & Order: Criminal Intent
Self-help guru implicated.
WBZ News
(N) Å
Friends Å Seinfeld “The
Trip” Å
The Office Å
3 3
L WGBX 21 21 16 16
Greater Bos-
ton Å
Nightly Busi-
ness Report
Antiques Road-
show
America’s Test
Kitchen
The Casebook of Sherlock
Holmes Å
Doc Martin “The Departed” Å Doc Martin: Revealed Cast and crew of “Doc
Martin.” Å
PBS NewsHour
(N)
44
X WLVI 9 12 12
The Middle
“The Telling”
The Middle Å Modern Fam-
ily Å
Modern Fam-
ily Å
The iHeartradio Jingle Ball 2013 Performers include Miley Cyrus.
(N) Å
7 News at 10PM on CW56 (N) ÅThe Arsenio Hall Show Å
26 12
∞ WNAC 11
Entertainment
Tonight (N)
Access Hol-
lywood (N)
TMZ (N) Å Dish Nation
(N) Å
The X Factor “Performance Show” The remaining acts perform.
(N) Å
Eyewitness
News at 10
(:45) Sports
Wrap
Seinfeld “The
Opera” Å
Family Guy Å
64 64 11 11
¥ WBPX 20 15 15
Law & Order: Criminal Intent
Nightclub owner. Å
Law & Order: Criminal Intent A
loan shark kidnaps a family.
WWE Main Event (N) Å } ## Walking Tall (2004, Action) The Rock, Johnny Knoxville. A
sheriff and a deputy try to rid their town of thugs.
} ## Walking Tall (2004) The
Rock, Johnny Knoxville.
15
µ WPXQ 7
Law & Order: Criminal Intent
Nightclub owner. Å
Law & Order: Criminal Intent A
loan shark kidnaps a family.
WWE Main Event (N) Å } ## Walking Tall (2004, Action) The Rock, Johnny Knoxville. A
sheriff and a deputy try to rid their town of thugs.
} ## Walking Tall (2004) The
Rock, Johnny Knoxville.
15 15
CABLE 6 PM 6:30 7 PM 7:30 8 PM 8:30 9 PM 9:30 10 PM 10:30 11 PM 11:30 CABLE
A&E 37 64 37 37
The First 48 A 69-year-old Navy
veteran is murdered.
Duck Dynasty The entire family
vacations in Hawaii. Å
Duck Dynasty
Å
Duck Dynasty
Å
Duck Dynasty The Robertsons
rehearse the Nativity.
Duck Dynasty
“Going Si-ral”
Duck Dynasty
Å
(:01) Rodeo Girls “Backstabbing
& Barn Fights” Å
265 118 181 181 181
A-P 42 56 63 63
Monsters Inside Me “It Came
From a Tick ...” Å
Monsters Inside Me “There’s a
Worm in My Eye” Å
Monsters Inside Me “A Deadly
Swim” (N) Å
Monsters Inside Me “My Christ-
mas From Hell” (N)
Monsters Inside Me “I Almost
Killed My Baby” (N)
Monsters Inside Me “My Christ-
mas From Hell” Å
282 184 130 130 130
AMC 25 71 59 59
(5:30) } ## Miss Congeniality (2000) Sandra Bullock. A clumsy
FBI agent goes under cover at a beauty pageant.
} ### Home Alone (1990, Comedy) Macaulay Culkin, Joe Pesci, Daniel Stern. A
left-behind boy battles two burglars in the house.
} ### Home Alone (1990, Comedy) Macaulay
Culkin, Joe Pesci, Daniel Stern.
254 130 231 231 231
BET 79 67
106 & Park: BET’s Top 10 Live “Wild Out Wednes-
day” (N) Å
Husbands- Ho. Husbands- Ho. Husbands- Ho. Scandal Cyrus tries to take down
Sally. Å
Scandal Cyrus realizes he may
have gone too far. Å
The Game Å The Game “In
Treatment”
329 124 270 270 270
BRAV 70 63 57 57
Shahs of Sunset Asa tries to help
GG cope.
The Real Housewives of Atlanta
“Savann-No”
Kathy Griffin: Record Breaker
The comic performs. (N)
Top Chef Actor Anthony Mackie
joins the judges.
Top Chef Questlove judges poul-
try drumsticks. (N) Å
Watch What
Happens: Live
Top Chef Å
273 129 185 185 185
CNBC 48 44 46 46
Mad Money (N) The Kudlow Report (N) Mob Money: Murders and
Acquisitions
American Greed An esteemed
doctor turns to crime.
American Greed A famous art
dealer cons high society.
Mad Money
355 208 102 102 102
CNN 49 41 42 42
(5:00) The Situ-
ation Room
(:28) Crossfire
(N)
Erin Burnett OutFront Jake Tap-
per anchors. (N)
Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Å Piers Morgan Live (N) AC 360 Later (N) The 11th hour
(N)
ICYMI
202 200 100 100 100
COM 58 67 61 61
(5:58) South
Park Å
(:29) Tosh.0
Rey Dogg.
The Colbert
Report Å
Daily Show/Jon
Stewart
Key & Peele Å South Park Å South Park “Imaginationland: The Trilogy” The
boys cross into a new dimension. Å
Key & Peele
(N) Å
Daily Show/Jon
Stewart
(:31) The Col-
bert Report
249 107 190 190 190
CSNE 55 36 52 52
SportsNet Cen-
tral (N)
UNO’s Sports
Tonight Live
Celtics Pre-
game Live
NBA Basketball Detroit Pistons at Boston Celtics. From TD Garden in Boston. (N
Subject to Blackout)
Celtics Post-
game Live
SportsNet Cen-
tral (N)
UNO’s Sports
Tonight Live
SportsNet Cen-
tral (N)
77 77 77
DISC 24 59 39 39
Amish Mafia Alan goes to court
to learn his fate. Å
Amish Mafia Gang gives their
reaction to the show. Å
Amish Mafia: The Devil’s Cut “A
Very Amish Christmas” (N)
Porter Ridge: Hilljack’d “Christ-
mas Special” (N)
Moonshiners: Outlaw Cuts
“Christmas Special” (N)
Porter Ridge: Hilljack’d “Christ-
mas Special” Å
278 182 120 120 120
DISN 34 53 24 24
Good Luck
Charlie Å
Jessie Å Good Luck
Charlie Å
Jessie Å Good Luck
Charlie Å
} Good Luck Charlie, It’s Christmas! (2011,
Comedy) Bridgit Mendler. ‘NR’ Å
Good Luck
Charlie Å
Austin & Ally ÅGravity Falls Å Jessie Å
290 172 250 250 250
E! 63 72 34 34
(5:30) Keeping Up With the
Kardashians
E! News (N) Nene Leakes A reigning queen of
reality television.
E!ES Anchorman 2: The Legend
Continues (N)
The Soup (N) The Soup Chelsea Lately
(N)
E! News
236 114 196 196 196
ESPN 30 34 49 49
SportsCenter (N) Å NBA Basketball Indiana Pacers at Miami Heat. From the AmericanAirlines Arena in
Miami. (N)
NBA Basketball Chicago Bulls at Houston Rockets. From the Toyota Center in Hous-
ton. (N)
206 140 70 70 70
ESPN2 29 35 50 50
Around the
Horn (N)
Pardon the
Interruption (N)
College Basketball Texas at North Carolina. (N) College Basketball Stanford at Connecticut. (N) SportsCenter (N) Å
209 144 74 74 74
ESPNC 132 309 258 258
(5:00) NBA From Feb. 1, 2013.
(N)
Who’s Number 1? Å Who’s Number 1? Å Who’s Number 1? Å Who’s Number 1? Å Who’s Number 1? Å
208 143 71 71 71
EWTN 22 96 56 56
News Colleen
C. Campbell
Ascent of the
Mount Å
Daily Mass The Franciscan Mis-
sionaries. Å
EWTN Live “Fr. Robert Bar-
ron” (N)
News Colleen
C. Campbell
Catholicism: The New Evangelization Advent Reflec-
tions
Women of
Grace
422 261 285 285 285
FAM 38 50 26 26
(5:00) } ### The Polar
Express (2004) Michael Jeter
Winnie the
Pooh
Mickey’s Xmas
Carol
} #### Mary Poppins (1964, Musical) Julie Andrews, Dick Van Dyke, Glynis Johns. Live action/
animated. London children meet a nanny and a chimney sweep.
The 700 Club Å
311 180 199 199 199
FOOD 28 62 53 53
Diners, Drive-
Ins and Dives
Diners, Drive-
Ins and Dives
Restaurant: Impossible “Rising
Sun Bistro”
Restaurant: Impossible “Holiday:
Impossible 2”
Restaurant Stakeout Division
Street Grill owner seeks help.
Restaurant: Impossible “Goom-
bazz Gone Wild” (N)
Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives
“BBQ Legends” (N)
231 110 164 164 164
FX 53 30 30 30
(5:00) } ## Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen (2009, Sci-
ence Fiction) Shia LaBeouf, Megan Fox, Josh Duhamel.
} ## Real Steel (2011, Action) Hugh Jackman, Evangeline Lilly, Dakota Goyo. A boxing promoter
and his son build a robot fighter.
} ## Real Steel (2011) Hugh
Jackman, Evangeline Lilly.
248 137 53 53 53
HGTV 44 61 32 32
Buying and Selling “Dan &
Voula” Å
Buying and Selling A couple
wants to sell their house.
Property Brothers Marla and
Adam look to move out.
Buying and Selling (N) Å House Hunters:
Where?
Hunters Int’l Property Brothers Å
229 112 165 165 165
HIST 41 69 58 58
American Pickers The guys try
to find an odor in the van.
American Pickers Rick Nielsen’s
warehouse. Å
American Pickers Bonnie and
Clyde’s motorbike. Å
American Pickers (N) Å Bible Secrets Revealed “Myste-
rious Prophecies” (N)
(:02) Bible Secrets Revealed
“The Forbidden Scriptures”
269 120 128 128 128
LIFE 40 28 36 36
} A Very Merry Daughter of the Bride (2008) Joanna Garcia. A
wedding planner disapproves of her mother’s romance. Å
} Christmas on the Bayou (2013) Hilarie Burton, Tyler Hilton. A
man tries to rekindle a romance with an executive. Å
} Love at the Christmas Table (2012) Danica McKellar. A man
realizes that his best friend is the woman that he loves.
252 108 140 140 140
MTV 60 76 28 28
Snooki &
JWOWW
Snooki &
JWOWW
Awkward. Jenna wants to get
Val’s job back.
Awkward. Jenna ponders who
she wants to be.
Girl Code Girl Code Girl Code (N) Ke$ha: My
Crazy
(:02) Big Tips Texas “Friendter-
vention; Cow Girl Up” (N)
331 160 210 210 210
NESN 56 37 51 51
Red Sox Now
(N)
Red Sox Now English Premier League Soccer Tottenham Hotspur FC vs Liver-
pool FC. From White Hart Lane in London, England.
Liverpool Connected (N) Sports Today
LIVE (N)
Sports Today Sports Today Sports Today
623 434 76 76 76
NICK 35 52 25 25
SpongeBob
SquarePants
SpongeBob
SquarePants
Sam & Cat Å The Haunted
Hathaways
Full House Å Full House Å Full House Å Full House Å Full House Å Full House
“Shape Up”
Friends Å (:36) Friends Å
299 170 252 252 252
SYFY 69 73 62 62
Haunted Highway The team
explores Bray road. Å
Haunted Highway “Lake Murray
Beast; The Donner Party”
Haunted Highway “Shades of
Death; Bridge of Doom”
Haunted Highway “Black Angel;
Arizona Domes” Å
Killer Contact “The Mayan
Empire” (N)
Killer Contact “The Butcher of
Iquique” (N)
244 122 180 180 180
SPIKE 26 74 55 55
(3:30) } The
Longest Yard
Cops “Coast to
Coast”
Cops “Coast to
Coast”
Cops Broward
County, Fla.
Cops Å Cops “Evading
Arrests”
Cops “Fight
Night” Å
Cops Å Cops “Caught in
a Lie”
Cops “Street
Arrests No. 2”
Cops Å Cops A cyclist
tries to flee.
262 168 54 54 54
TLC 39 55 38 38
Toddlers & Tiaras “Southern
Celebrity Glitzmas” Å
Bakery Boss Buddy visits
Friendly Bake Shop. Å
Bakery Boss Bakery business is
suffering for Violet. Å
Bakery Boss Kristi’s cupcake
shop in Texas. Å
Bakery Boss The loss of a father;
business slowed. Å
Bakery Boss Kristi’s cupcake
shop in Texas. Å
280 183 139 139 139
TNT 27 32 33 33
(5:00) } ### The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers (2002, Fantasy) Elijah Wood, Ian McKellen,
Liv Tyler. Members of a fellowship battle evil Sauron and his pawns. Å
Mob City “Oxpecker; Stay Down” (Season Finale) Bugsy Siegel’s
trial approaches. (N) Å
(:04) Mob City Bugsy Siegel’s
trial approaches. Å
245 138 51 51 51
TOON 36 51 60 60
(5:00) } ### Stuart Little
(1999, Comedy) Geena Davis.
Johnny Test Å Teen Titans Go! World of Gum-
ball
Total Drama:
All Stars
Dr. Seuss’
Grinch
Smurfs: Christ-
mas
The Cleveland
Show
American
Dad Å
Family Guy Å Family Guy Å
296 176 257 257 257
TVL 43 48 64 64
The Andy
Griffith Show
The Andy
Griffith Show
The Andy
Griffith Show
The Andy
Griffith Show
The Andy
Griffith Show
The Andy
Griffith Show
Everybody-Ray-
mond
Everybody-Ray-
mond
Kirstie “Little
Bummer Boy”
The Exes (N) Å Kirstie “Little
Bummer Boy”
The Exes Å
301 106 244 244 244
USA 52 31 35 35
Law & Order: Special Victims
Unit “Venom” Å
Law & Order: Special Victims
Unit “Fat” Å
Law & Order: Special Victims
Unit “Criminal Hatred”
Law & Order: Special Victims
Unit “Monster’s Legacy”
Law & Order: Special Victims
Unit “Secrets Exhumed”
Modern Fam-
ily Å
Modern Fam-
ily Å
242 105 50 50 50
WTBS 45 33 31 31
Seinfeld “The
Pool Guy”
Seinfeld “The
Sponge”
Seinfeld “The
Gum” Å
Family Guy Brian and Stewie go
to the North Pole. Å
Family Guy Å The Big Bang
Theory
The Big Bang
Theory
The Big Bang
Theory
The Big Bang
Theory
Conan (N) Å
247 139 52 52 52
PREMIUM 6 PM 6:30 7 PM 7:30 8 PM 8:30 9 PM 9:30 10 PM 10:30 11 PM 11:30 PREMIUM
ENC 292 630 326 326
(5:50) } ## The Notebook (2004, Romance) Ryan Gosling. A
man tells a story to a woman about two lovers. ‘PG-13’ Å
} # Deuce Bigalow: European Gigolo (2005,
Comedy) Rob Schneider. ‘R’ Å
} ### Starship Troopers (1997) Casper Van Dien. Young
troops battle a vicious army of gigantic insects. ‘R’ Å
(:45) } Frozen
(2010) ‘R’
526 340 350 350 350
HBO 200 400 301 301
} ## Won’t Back Down (2012) Maggie Gyllenhaal. Two women
try to make a difference at a local school. ‘PG’ Å
} ## Jack the Giant Slayer (2013) Nicholas Hoult. A young
farmhand must defend his land from fearsome giants. Å
Treme “Dippermouth Blues”
Batiste gets a movie job.
24/7 Red Wings/Maple Leafs:
Road to the NHL
501 300 400 400 400
MAX 220 450 341 341
(4:35) } ##
French Kiss
} ### Shaun of the Dead (2004, Comedy)
Simon Pegg, Kate Ashfield. ‘R’ Å
(:15) } ### Go (1999, Comedy-Drama) Desmond Askew. A
checkout girl faces danger from an irate drug dealer. ‘R’ Å
} ### Chronicle (2012, Science Fiction) Dane
DeHaan, Alex Russell. ‘PG-13’ Å
(:25) Zane’s the
Jump Off
512 310 420 420 420
SHOW 240 500 361 361
(5:35) } ## 54 (1998, Drama)
Ryan Phillippe. ‘R’ Å
(:15) } # Java Heat (2013, Action) Kellan Lutz, Mickey Rourke,
Ario Bayu. An American looks for a terrorist in Indonesia. ‘R’
Inside the NFL (N) Å Homeland “The Star” Å Inside the NFL Å
537 318 365 365 365
STARZ 280 600 321 321
(5:55) } ## Cellular (2004, Suspense) Kim
Basinger, Chris Evans. ‘PG-13’ Å
} ### Frankenweenie (2012, Comedy) Voices
of Catherine O’Hara. ‘PG’ Å
} ## Guess Who (2005, Comedy) Bernie Mac. A black man
meets his daughter’s white boyfriend. ‘PG-13’ Å
(10:50) } ### Identity
(2003) John Cusack. ‘R’ Å
520 350 340 340 340
TMC 260 550 381 381
(:15) } ### JCVD (2008) Jean-Claude Van Damme. Actor Jean-
Claude Van Damme goes home to find tranquility. ‘R’
} ### The Wild and Wonderful Whites of
West Virginia (2009, Documentary) ‘NR’ Å
} ### White Lightnin’ (2009, Drama) Edward
Hogg, Carrie Fisher, Muse Watson. ‘NR’
(:05) } Jack the Reaper (2012,
Horror) Tony Todd. ‘R’ Å
544 327 385 385 385
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DEAR ABBY
Jeanne Phillips
Husband on gender journey
wants his wife to go along
Horoscope
Sudoku solution
By HOLIDAY MATHIS
ARIES (March 21-April 19).
While waiting for sea monkeys
to grow or for a parent to
assemble a complicated toy, a
child learns patience. If young
children can learn not to expect
immediate results, so can that
childish person in your life.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20). Of course people should
take care of themselves. But
you’re willing to go the extra
mile to take care of others —
and not just when they are sick
or weary, but any old time at
all. It’s part of how you show
your love.
GEMINI (May 21-June 21).
You’ll get plenty accomplished
because you thrive in the very
atmosphere others fear. You’re
fine with being alone, and
you’re not afraid of silence,
either. In fact, you prefer it.
CANCER (June 22-July 22).
When you look for opportuni-
ties, you’re not seeking a free
handout or benefit. Instead,
you’re looking for a chance to
match your skills with another
person’s needs.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22).
You’ll be dealing with people of
all ages. It can be difficult to
keep everyone’s developmental
stage in mind, but try to
remember not to treat older
people like children or children
like older people.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22).
While a relationship is obvious-
ly uneven, the fact remains that
you’re there for a reason.
Keeping score won’t change
that and will only make you feel
worse about the arrangement.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23).
Avoid the passive-aggressive
choice to remain silent as a
means of making someone pay
attention to you. It will be far
more effective to say what you
need to say and get feelings out
in the open.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
21). Sometimes taking your
grievances directly to the
source is not the best idea. Give
it some time. You’ll feel differ-
ently tomorrow, and Friday will
change your stance yet again.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-
Dec. 21). Your creativity is
flowing even stronger than
usual. Consider using it to sur-
prise the one you love. You’ll
thrill to the happy, excited
response your efforts earn.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19). Friends who don’t take an
interest when you speak of your
hopes and dreams aren’t really
friends at all. Rather, they are
people who conveniently fit
into your current lifestyle.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18). Go off script. If you make
a scripted inquiry, you’ll get an
insincere response. Say what
you really want to express, and
ask what you really want to
know.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20). There’s no need to test a
person’s loyalty; just assume
they are loyal and be loyal in
return. Know that everyone is
trying to do what’s best. Stay
focused on the things that will
improve your corner of the
scene.
AMUSEMENTS Wednesday, December 18, 2013
THE TIMES B5
Mother Goose & Grimm
For Better or Worse
Rose Is Rose
Funky Winkerbean
Cryptoquote Su Do Ku
Baby Blues
Marvin
Get Fuzzy
Crankshaft
Garfield
Gasoline Alley
Zits
B.C.
Blondie
(Answers tomorrow)
PUNCH DINKY PONCHO BEAVER
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: The arm wrestler was about to win because
he had the — UPPER HAND
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
NOLPY
LOMYD
LIPRAL
SUMSIE
©2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.
J
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m
b
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p
u
z
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m
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v
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p
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Print your
answer here:
Tips and computer program at www.sudoku.com.
For solutions, check “JRC Publications” on the
solutions page of www.sudoku.com.
By Johnny Hart
By Jerry Scott & Jim Borgman
By Lynn Johnston By Tom Batiuk
By Dean Young & Denis Lebrun By Jim Davis
By Mike Peters By Jim Scancarelli
By Rick Kirkman & Jerry Scott
By Pat Brady By Tom Armstrong
By Tom Batiuk
By Darby Conley
© Puzzles by Pappocom
Lio
By Mark Tatulli
Retail
By Norm Feuti
Pearls Before Swine
By Stephan Pastis
COMICS
B6 THE TIMES Wednesday, December 18, 2013
Wednesday, December 18, 2013 THE TIMES B7
Business Hours:
Monday-Friday 9:00am-5:00pm
Website:
www.pawtuckettimes.com
24 Hour Classifieds Online
Just click “Place A Classified Ad”
And send us your ad
It’s simple and user friendly
401-365-1438
100 Legals 100 Legals
MORTGAGEE'S SALE
16 Allendale Avenue,
North Providence, RI 02911
The premises described in the mortgage will be
sold subject to all encumbrances and prior liens
on January 2, 2014 at 2:00PM on the premises,
by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
mortgage from Dino J. Guilmette dated Septem-
ber 1, 2006 and recorded in Book 2314 at Page
332 in the Records of Land Evidence in the Town
of North Providence, RI, the conditions of said
mortgage having been broken.
The property will be sold subject to the redemp-
tion rights in favor of the Internal Revenue Ser-
vice by virtue of Notice of Federal Tax Liens
recorded in Book 2795, Page 287, in Book 2723,
Page 223, in Book 2717, Page 52, in Book 2705,
Page 281 and in Book 2799, Page 142 in the
records of Land Evidence in the Town of North
Providence, RI.
$5,000.00 in cash, certified or bank check is re-
quired to bid. Other terms will be announced at
the sale.
By order of the Mortgagee which gives notice of
its intention to bid at such sale or any postpone-
ment or adjournment thereof.
KORDE & ASSOCIATES, P.C.
Attorneys for the Holder of the Mortgage
321 Billerica Road
Suite 210
Chelmsford, MA 01824-4100
(978) 256-1500
(12/11/2013, 12/18/2013, 12/25/2013)
13-012706
LEGAL NOTICE
INFORMATION
Legal Notices may be
mailed to:
The Times,
P.O. Box 307,
Pawtucket, RI 02860
Faxed to:
(401) 727-9250
or Emailed to:
classified@pawtuckettimes.com
Complete instructions
should include:
Publication dates,
Billing information and
the Name and Phone
number of individual to
contact if necessary.
LEGAL NOTICES
MUST BE RECEIVED
3 BUSINESS DAYS
PRIOR TO
PUBLICATION
For further information
Call 722-4000 Monday
thru Friday;
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100 Legals
FIND A HOME. Sell a
home. Find a tenant. Call
the classified team at The
Times to place your ad-
vertisement. Call 401-
722-4000
330 Brokers - Agents
Real Estate-Sale
1, 2 & 3 BED All new, ready
to move in Woonsocket.
401-447-4451 or 769-0095
305 Apartments
Furnished
WOONSOCKET 80 Spring
St. 2 bed, North End, 1
st
floor, hardwoods, wash-
er/dryer, $195 wk. 401-
309-1257
WOONSOCKET $650mo.,
25 Canal St. 2
nd
floor,
hook ups, basement
storage, newly renovat-
ed 401-568-2116 or 401-
524-2302
Pawtucket. 2
nd
, 1 bed, hot
water/heat, appliances in-
cluded. Recently remod-
eled. No pets. Section 8
ok. 401-714-8478
NORTH End, 2 bed, 2
nd
,no
utilities, off st. parking,
private entrance no smok-
ing $600mo. 766-7392
304 Apartments
Unfurnished
Cumberland. 3
Rd,
1 & 2
bed, newly remodeled, off
str parking, no pets, Sec-
tion 8 ok. 401-714-8478
304 Apartments
Unfurnished
Readers of The Times are
advised The Times does
not knowingly accept ad-
vertisements that are in
violation of the Federal
Fair Housing Law and the
Rhode Island Fair Hous-
ing Practices Act. The
Federal Fair Housing Law
and Rhode Island Fair
Housing Practices Act are
designed to prevent dis-
crimination in the pur-
chase and rental of hous-
ing. Refusal to rent,
lease, or sell property to
anyone due to age, race,
color, religion, sex, sexu-
al orientation, marital sta-
tus, disability, familial
status, or country of an-
cestral origin is in viola-
tion of the Fair Housing
Law. If you have a com-
plaint, contact the Rhode
Island Commission for
Human Rights. They will
help any person that has
been discriminated
against in the rental of
housing, the sale of
housing, home financing
or public accommoda-
tions. Call the Rhode Is-
land Commission for Hu-
man Rights, 401-222-
2661.
300 Rental Agencies
Real Estate-Rent
LOOKING FOR SOME-
THING HARD TO FIND?
Be sure to look in the
classified pages of The
TImes every day. Surely
you'll find interesting
things that you may want
or need. The Times is the
perfect marketplace you
can enjoy in the comfort
of your own home. There
is something for every-
one in The Times classi-
fieds!
273 Miscellaneous
Merchandise
DINING Room set, cherry
wood, 7 piece with pads
$400.00. Small kitchen
appliances. 401-333-2444
265 Furniture -
Household
Merchandise
PRESSMAN
Pressmen wanted - full
and part time opportuni-
ties in the following
categories: Engraving,
Foil Stamping, Emboss-
ing, Letterpress and Off-
set. Experienced press-
men need only apply.
Send resume to:
toddm@artcraft.com
MEAT CUTTER
MANAGER NEEDED
Meat Cutter Manager
needed at the Internation-
al Meat Market. Must be
experienced in Kobe
Japenesse Cut Style.
Please Fax resume to
401-728-3812.
AUTOMOTIVE garage help
wanted, full or part time,
must have valid drivers li-
cense. Apply to 20 Cape
Rd., Mendon, Mass
204 General Help
Wanted
The Times does not know-
ingly accept advertise-
ments in the Employment
classifications that are
not bonafide job offers.
Classification 200 is pro-
vided for Employment In-
formation, Services and
Referrals. This newspa-
per does not knowingly
accept Employment ads
that indicate a preference
bases on age from em-
ployees covered be Age
Discrimination In Em-
ployment Act. Nor do we
in any way condone em-
ployment based solely
upon discrimination prac-
tices.
200 Employment
Services
Employment
ATTENTION
TO ADVERTISE YOUR
BUSINESS IN THIS
SECTION
CALL THE TIMES
CLASSIFIED DEPT
401-722-4000
159 General
Services
Business Services
BOAT trailer for an 18 ft.
boat with electric winch,
always stored inside
$495.00. 401-767-2248
130 Campers -
RV's - Trailers
1998 FORD Ranger PLU,
5 speed, 6 cyl., runs
great, new sticker till
2015, $2,495. 401-447-
4451 or 401-769-0095
126 Trucks
SELL YOUR CAR, VAN OR
TRUCK THE EASY WAY.
Call the classified team at
The Times today. Tell
more than 40,000 adult
readers in the are about
your vehicle. It's easy to
do, just dial 401-722-
4000. or visit us at www.-
pawtuckettimes.com
HONDA ACCORD
2004 LX, Clear title, 70k
mi, Automatic, exterior
color Gold. $2750. Call
(828) 919-9835.
2011 Hyundai Accent. Ex-
cellent condition. 5
speed. $6500. Call 727-
8922
2001 Nissan Altima GXE
Ltd. 4dr., loaded, auto,
4cyl, roof, wheels, mint.
Low miles. Must see.
$2,000. 401-241-0259
2001 Kia Sportage. 4 cylin-
der, 4 wheel drive, 5
speed, 148k miles,
$1600. Call 769-2350
2000 VOLVO V70XC, 177k,
good running, well main-
tained, dependable, safe.
$2,000 best. 401-450-
6422
1997 SUBURU Legacy All
wheel drive wagon, 5
speed, inspected
$1,700/best offer 401-
787-4764
1997 Chevy Blazer. 4dr.,
4WD, tow package, load-
ed. $1500. 401-339-8312
1996 NISSAN Altima, 4
door, 4 cyl. Auto, runs
great. $1,795.00. 401-
769-0095 or 401-447-
4451
1991 JAGUAR XJS sport
coupe, V12, gold with
saddle interior, auto, only
87k original miles, needs
V-gasket. $4,500. 769-0516
123 Autos For Sale
1994 FORD Crown Victo-
ria. Runs excellent, very
well maintained, receipts.
$950. 401-465-1500
1989 TOYOTA COROLLA
$500, 114,000 m, call Joe
726-1237
1979 CHEVY Corvette
Stingray, in good condi-
tion, runs excellent
$6,000 or best. Call 401-
426-7461
1973 CADILLAC always
garaged, 8 yrs. not used,
75k miles, $3,590. 401-
767-2248
03 FORD EXPLORER LTD,
4x4, garaged, all records,
single owner, excellent
$3,100. 401-391-9939
02 MAZDA MPV Minivan,
leather seats, DVD,
14,000 miles $3,200. Call
401-487-2584
01 Honda Accord LX. 4dr.,
loaded, auto, burgundy,
wheels, alarm, low miles,
must see & drive, first
$2500. 401-301-0056
123 Autos For Sale
Vehicles
READ THE TIMES EVERY
DAY...to find out what's
happening in your neigh-
borhood. You'll find
school news, employ-
ment news, health news,
sports, who's getting
married, who's getting
promoted, who's running
for office and much
more. If it's important to
you, it'll probably be in
The Times. To get The
Times delivered to your
home every day, call 401-
722-4000.
DID YOU KNOW that the
Classified Section is filled
with lots of interesting in-
formation? You can find
a house, an apartment, a
cat, a job and lots more!!
The Times Classifieds are
loaded with "local" infor-
mation and merchandise
that you will find useful.
Be in the know....read the
classified section every
day.
111 Special Notices
CREDIT
FOR ERRORS
Each advertiser is asked
to check his/her adver-
tisement on the first
day of publication and
to report any error to
the Times classified
department (722-
4000) as soon as pos-
sible for correction.
No adjustment will be
given for typographical
errors, which do not
change the meaning or
lessen the value of the
advertisement.
Credit will be allowed
only to that portion of
the advertisement
where the error oc-
curred.
107 Personals
Annoucements
MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE
106 Stella Drive, North Providence, RI 02911
Will be sold, subject to any and all prior liens
and encumbrances, at public auction on January
2, 2014 at 12:00 PM on the premises by exercise
of the power of sale in a mortgage executed by
John J. Mansolillo and Josephine A. Mansolillo
dated December 7, 2005 and recorded in the
North Providence, RI Land Evidence Records in
Book 2207 at Page 1. Cash, certified or bank
check of $5,000.00 required to bid. Other terms
and conditions will be announced at the sale.
NICHOLAS BARRETT
Attorney for the Holder of the Mortgage
999 South Broadway
East Providence, Rhode Island 02914
www.auctionsri.com RSVP
MORTGAGEE'S SALE
20-22 Barnes Street, Pawtucket, RI 02860
The premises described in the mortgage will be
sold subject to all encumbrances and prior liens
on January 2, 2014 at 4:00 PM on the premises,
by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
mortgage from Gerson Mejia dated September
15, 2003 and recorded in Book L1886 at Page
269 in the Records of Land Evidence in the City
of Pawtucket, RI, the conditions of said mort-
gage having been broken.
$5,000.00 in cash, certified or bank check is re-
quired to bid. Other terms will be announced at
the sale.
By order of the Mortgagee which gives notice of
its intention to bid at such sale or any postpone-
ment or adjournment thereof.
KORDE & ASSOCIATES, P.C.
Attorneys for the Holder of the Mortgage
321 Billerica Road
Suite 210
Chelmsford, MA 01824-4100
(978)256-1500
(12/11/2013, 12/18/2013, 12/25/2013)
13-011737
MORTGAGEE'S SALE
8 Lori Drive, North Providence, RI 02911
The premises described in the mortgage will be
sold subject to all encumbrances and prior liens
on January 2, 2014 at 3:00PM on the premises,
by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
mortgage from Joseph F. Barone, Jr. and Kath-
leen Barone dated October 16, 2006 and record-
ed in Book 2334 at Page 243 in the Records of
Land Evidence in the City of North Providence,
RI, the conditions of said mortgage having been
broken.
$5,000.00 in cash, certified or bank check is re-
quired to bid. Other terms will be announced at
the sale.
By order of the Mortgagee which gives notice of
its intention to bid at such sale or any postpone-
ment or adjournment thereof.
KORDE & ASSOCIATES, P.C.
Attorneys for the Holder of the Mortgage
321 Billerica Road
Suite 210
Chelmsford, MA 01824-4100
(978) 256-1500
(12/11/2013, 12/18/2013, 12/25/2013)
12-010093
Whatever You Wish To Sell!
Your Classified Ad will appear in The Call,
The Times & ‘Burbs, plus Online 24/7!
WE CAN HELP! CALL TODAY!
All new/first time advertisers will receive
25% OFF their first ad!
401- 365- 1438
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6
LOCAL
B8 THE TIMES Wednesday, December 18, 2013
By DONNA KENNY KIRWAN
dkirwan@pawtuckettimes.com
PAWTUCKET — It began
small, with the employees of the
Pawtucket-based Priority
Management Group each receiv-
ing $300 to donate to a charity of
their choice. Later, at the annual
company holiday party, the
employees would talk about what
they had done with the money.
However, about six or seven
years ago, Priority Management
Group owners Richard Santilli
and Robert Skeffington decided
that instead of throwing a lavish
company bash, the money would
be better spent on helping those
less fortunate.
“We said, ‘Let’s do something
on a bigger scale...like feed 1,000
people in one day,'” said Santilli,
PMG's chief financial officer. The
Rhode Island Convention Center
and several other state and local
agencies and volunteers got
behind the effort, and in 2011, the
first “Feed 1,000” event was held.
That year, more than 1,200
Rhode Islanders in need received
a hot meal, a warm coat and toys
for their children during the holi-
day season. The doors to the
Convention Center were open to
all who wanted to come, and free
bus transportation, courtesy of the
Rhode Island Public Transit
Authority, was provided to those
staying at Amos House,
Crossroads and other local shel-
ters and facilities.
Now in its third year, PMG’s
event was renamed “Feed 2,000,”
and last Saturday, over 2,500 took
part. In addition to a full-course
meal, there was holiday music,
toys for the children, and a flu
shot clinic and blood pressure sta-
tion administered by the Rhode
Island Department of Health.
Also, more than 1,800 coats and
2,000 pairs of socks were distrib-
uted, along with gift bags filled
with toiletries.
“Many Rhode Island families
are struggling to keep a roof over
their heads or put food on the
table each night,” said Santilli.
“Each year we have easily sur-
passed our goal, proving that the
need is very real.”
Santilli credited the Rhode
Island Convention Center, and
particularly food and beverage
manager Kathy Masino, along
with the numerous volunteers, for
their efforts in making the holiday
meal special. “We have volun-
teers as waiters and waitresses,
and there are linen tablecloths on
all the tables. We want these peo-
ple to feel like they are at the
Capital Grille,” he stated.
Santilli added that the employ-
ees have all been on board with
the concept since it was first
broached. “We used to do a big
night out for our company party,
in Newport or something like
that, and it was great, but it cost a
lot of money.” He said the prac-
tice now at PMG is to hold a
more simplified office luncheon
to celebrate the season and put
the revenues into helping those
who are struggling.
Founded in 1998, PMG, Inc.
offers expertise in revenue cycle
management for community
health centers. The company's
headquarters are at 700 School
St., Pawtucket.
Pawtucket company’s
holiday bash feeds
2,500 of RI’s needy
No greed, but plenty of feed at PMG event
‘We want these
people to feel like
they are at the
Capital Grille.’
— Richard Santilli,
co-owner, PMG
This document is © 2013 by editor - all rights reserved.
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