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August 5, 2014

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The Blackstone Valley’s Neighborhood Newspaper since 1885
Newsstand: 50 Cents
Lots to see
and do
throughout
August
More news from the
Blackstone Valley
INSIDE
WEATHER
TODAY
High:
85
Low:
66
WHAT A
W RLD
Local and wire reports
VIDEO OF
SQUIRREL-KICKER
SCRUTINIZED
INSIDE
Tuesday, August 5, 2014
‘Pirates’ in Pawtucket
Authorities confiscate illegal DVDs, cigarettes
RUSS OLIVO
rolivo@woonsocketcall.com
PAWTUCKET – Police seized
contraband cigarettes and suspected pirated DVDs after raiding a
Broad Street convenience store
Friday, they said.
The co-owners of RI Market 2,
Mahmoud Najib and Ghassub
Hasim Aljandali, both of Cranston,
were charged with one count each
of the sale of unstamped cigarettes;
forgery; importation of cigarettes
with the intent to evade taxes; and
conspiracy.
Major Arthur Martins said all of
the charges stem from the seizure
of about 20 packages of improperly
stamped cigarettes. He said more
charges could be filed against
Najib and Aljandali if authorities
from motion pictures trade association in California confirm the
SUNNY DAYS ARE HERE AGAIN
FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP)
— Authorities are looking into
a viral Internet video that
shows a man kicking a squirrel off what appears to be the
edge of the Grand Canyon.
But park officials say the
chances of finding the man
are slim.
"Right now they are working on it," park spokeswoman
Kirby-Lynn Shedlowski said
Monday. "They realize that it's
been seen by a lot of people
and that there's some sensitivity to treatment of wildlife."
The short video posted on
YouTube shows a shirtless,
barefoot man in shorts and a
straw cowboy hat leaving a
trail of food at the edge of a
canyon. He then puts on one
of his shoes and kicks the
squirrel into the air.
See TEEN, Page A2
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Pawtucket Times
TODAY’S QUESTION
Go to pawtuckettimes.com
to answer
The Times staff photo
Seagulls catch an updraft and soar near an American flag fluttering in the wind. According to weather forecasters,
sunny skies and drier conditions will prevail later this week and into the weekend. See the full weather outlook on
Page A8.
First RI House member subpoenaed
Speaker expects others will be deposed in 38 Studios case
INDEX
Amusements.........................A7
Comics.................................B5
Obituaries.............................A5
Opinion.................................A4
Sports.................................. B1
Television..............................A7
CONTACT US:
Circulation: 401-767-8522
Editorial: 401-767-8550
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Vol. CXXVIIl
No.186
Please
recycle
this paper
Teen says
man tried
to grab her
PAWTUCKET — Police
are investigating a reported
assault and attempted abduction of a teenage girl who was
walking to the William E.
Tolman Senior High School
Sunday morning.
According to police, the
17-year-old girl was walking
from a friend’s house to her
cheerleading practice at
Tolman High School on
Exchange Street at approximately 8:30 Sunday morning
when she noticed a heavy set
man following her near the
Henry J. Winters School on
Follow us
on Twitter:
@TheTimesofPawt
One member
Half of General Assembly
All members
See BUST, Page A2
By THE TIMES STAFF
ON THE WEB
How many lawmakers will be
subpoenaed in 38 Studios case?
DVDs were reproduced unlawfully,
as police suspect.
“They were selling movies
which haven’t been released on
DVD yet,” said Martins.
Some of the titles included films
which were just released in theaters
a few weeks ago. They included
“Dawn of the Planet of the Apes,”
By ERIKA NIEDOWSKI
The Associated Press
PROVIDENCE — At least one
member of the Rhode Island House
is being subpoenaed to give testimony in the 38 Studios lawsuit, and
the chamber's top Democrat said he
expects others will be too, he told
lawmakers over the weekend.
House Speaker Nicholas
Mattiello informed representatives
in an email Saturday evening that
one member had been contacted by
a constable regarding service of a
subpoena. House spokesman Larry
Berman would not immediately
identify the lawmaker on Monday.
Mattiello, D-Cranston, said he
anticipates that others in the
General Assembly who voted in
2010 on the program under which
Curt Schilling's video game compa-
ny got a $75
million loan
guarantee may
also be called to
give testimony.
"We are formulating a plan
to provide legal
counsel for all
members who
may be asked to
testify," the
speaker wrote.
"If you are served with a subpoena,
please contact the speaker's office
to discuss legal representation."
The agency formerly known as
the Economic Development Corp.
sued the ex-Red Sox pitcher and 13
others after 38 Studios went bankrupt in 2012. The state remains
responsible for some $89 million
related to the deal.
The Superior Court judge hearing the case ruled Friday to extend
the discovery period from Aug. 15
through the end of the month after
attorneys for the defendants said
they needed more time.
Gerald Petros, a lawyer for First
Southwest, which served as a financial adviser to the EDC, said
defense attorneys have been operating at a "frenetic pace" to complete
their work. In the last two months,
he said, 25 people had been
deposed over 28 days. Two dozen
more depositions were scheduled
before mid-August.
Max Wistow, the EDC's lead
lawyer, objected to any extension,
saying the defendants' attorneys
have dragged their feet.
Former Republican Gov. Don
Carcieri, a key backer of the deal,
was deposed last week.
C.F. school
campaign
under way
By THE TIMES STAFF
CENTRAL FALLS – With
multiple stakeholders all in
one room, the Central Falls
Alumni Association Monday
kicked off its Back to School
Campaign, in partnership with
Mayor James A. Diossa, the
Central Falls School District,
Parent Teacher Student
Organization, and Central
Falls Police Department.
"Attending school every
day means improved achievement tomorrow. The Central
Falls community is making
every effort to build a better
tomorrow,” said School
Superintendent Francis Gallo.
“Our campaign, including
these home visits, serves as
the foundational work to form
and inform the entire community that school and learning
matters.”
The Back to School
Campaign, which will include
a series of home visits by
school and city officials, aims
to welcome students new to
See SCHOOL, Page A2
Candidates support more money for senior programs
Rhode Island primary is Sept. 9
By MICHELLE R. SMITH,
The Associated Press
WARWICK — The five major
candidates for
Rhode Island governor all agreed
Monday that they
would support
restoring funding for
several programs for
the elderly, which
have been cut 68
percent since 2007.
Block
The $2.8 million
price tag to restore funding for
Meals on Wheels, senior centers
and respite for caregivers is
"measly" and "peanuts," the three
major Democrats and two
Republicans told an audience of
more than 300 at a forum sponsored by the nonprofit advocacy
group Senior
Agenda Coalition
of Rhode Island.
Democrats Clay
Pell, Gina
Raimondo and
Angel Taveras and
Republicans Ken
Block and Allan
Fung
Fung are vying to
replace Gov. Lincoln Chafee. The
primary is Sept. 9.
"These are things that at the end
of the day, they keep people
healthier, they keep people alive,
they keep people stimulated,"
Raimondo, the state's general
treasurer, told the group. "To me,
it's just a smart investment, and it's
the right thing to do."
Advocates say the programs are
an important part of making sure
the elderly can stay
in their homes or in
the community as
they age, and not
have to enter nursing homes, which
cost more in the
long run. The programs were slashed
Raimondo
in 2007 and 2008
amid budget problems, and the
funding has never been restored.
Taveras, the mayor of
Providence, said he wanted to
restore the $2.8 million, plus add
more to the programs, while Fung,
mayor of Cranston, said if the candidates can't find $2.8 million in
an $8 billion budget, "We don't
deserve to be governor."
Block, a businessman, told the
group that he would
go after Medicaid
waste and fraud,
which he said was
costing the system
Pell
$140 million per
year. He said he would put the
money saved back into the system.
Pell spoke frequently of his
grandfather, the late Sen.
Claiborne Pell, said he wants to
stop taxing retirement benefits of
military veterans.
Bill Flynn, director of the
group, said the state was once
known as a leader in senior services, but now trails the country, even
as the state's elderly population is
expected to climb. Rhode Island
has the highest percentage of its
population over age 85 than any
state, and 14.4 percent of its population was over 65
as of the 2010 U.S.
Census.
He said the state
is not doing enough
to help people stay
in their homes, and
that's costing too
much money. For
Taveras
example, he said
that in 2013, it cost the state's
Medicaid system $20,286 on average per person who was at home
or in community-based care, but
$51,694 for those in a nursing
home or hospice care.
"With a new governor, we have
a chance to make some of the
reforms and changes that are so
badly needed," Flynn said.
FROM PAGE ONE/NATION
A2 THE TIMES
Bust
“The Legend of
Hercules,” and
“Transformers: Age of
Extinction,” said Martins.
Typically, pirate DVDs
are made by amateurs who
enter movie theaters with
hand-held recording devices
to produce a “master” tape
of a current film which is
reproduced over and over
again for black market distribution.
Teen
Broadway.
The man continued to
follow her as she made her
way down Broadway and
Fountain Street.
As the girl continued
walking towards the school
she kept looking behind
her, eventually losing sight
of the man who had been
following her, police said.
But, when she reached the
The police weren’t looking for the DVDs when
they raided the store Friday
morning, Martins said.
Acting on a tip, police
and agents from the state
Division of Taxation executed a warrant to search
the 130 Broad St. store for
contraband cigarettes. The
DVDs were in plain view
when police entered the
store.
Police believe the cigarettes originated in Virginia,
where the taxes on tobacco
products are several dollars
less than those of Rhode
Island.
Najib and Aljandali were
selling the cigarettes to their
customers at the same price
as those bearing a legitimate Rhode Island stamp,
which means they were not
only depriving the state of
lawfully imposed taxes, but
they were ripping off their
customers, too, according to
Martins.
Follow Russ Olivo on
Twitter @russolivo.
school parking lot off
Blackstone Street, the man
managed to sneak up
behind her and cover her
mouth with his hand.
According to police, the
screaming girl elbowed her
attacker and was able to
break free from his grasp.
She then ran into the school
building and summoned
help.
The male suspect is
described as a clean-shaven,
heavy set white male in his
late 20’s with pale skin,
between 5’3” to 5’5” tall.
He was wearing a gray
hooded sweatshirt with a
white zipper, black jean
shorts and white low top
sneakers.
Anyone with information
about the suspect or who
may have witnessed the
incident, can contact Det.
Linda Bachand-Doucet at
(401) 727-9100 ext. 769.
Arias to represent herself at death penalty trial
PHOENIX (AP) — A
judge has ruled that Jodi
Arias can represent herself
in the upcoming penalty
phase of her murder trial,
where jurors will decide
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whether she is put to death
for killing her ex-boyfriend.
Arias, 34, was convicted
of first-degree murder last
year in the 2008 killing of
Travis Alexander, but jurors
couldn't reach a decision on
sentencing. Under Arizona
law, Arias' murder conviction stands, and prosecutors
have the option of putting
on a second penalty phase
with a new jury in an effort
to secure a death sentence.
The case captured headlines worldwide and
became a cable television
staple with its tales of sex,
lies and a brutal killing.
A new trial to determine
the sentence is scheduled to
begin Sept. 8. If the second
panel fails to end in a unan-
imous decision, the death
penalty would be removed
from consideration. The
judge would then sentence
Arias to spend her life
behind bars or to be eligible
for release after 25 years.
Arias told the judge
Monday of her intentions to
act as her own lawyer, and
Judge Sherry Stephens
granted the request.
She admitted killing
Travis Alexander at his suburban Phoenix home but
claimed it was self-defense.
He was stabbed nearly 30
times, had his throat slit and
was shot in the forehead.
Prosecutors argued it was
premeditated murder carried out in a jealous rage
when Alexander wanted to
end their affair.
US airfares on the rise
NEW YORK (AP) —
Travelers, prepare to pay
more for your flight.
The average roundtrip
ticket within the U.S.,
LOTTERY
RI Daily
5-2-9-7
Mass. Daily
2-9-4-7
Check tomorrow’s
paper for late lotteries.
THE TIMES
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Newsroom fax: (401) 727-9250
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including taxes, reached
$509.15 in the first six
months of this year, up nearly $14 from the same period
last year. Domestic airfare
continues to outpace inflation, rising 2.7 percent compared to the 2.1 percent gain
in the Consumer Price
Index.
Airfare has gone up 10.7
percent in the past five years
— after adjusting for inflation — according to an
Associated Press analysis of
data from the Airlines
Reporting Corp., which
processes ticket transactions
for airlines and more than
9,400 travel agencies,
including websites such as
Expedia and Orbitz.
The formula for rising
fares seems simple, but it
eluded the airlines for years:
Match the supply of seats to
passenger demand.
"Airlines have reduced
the number of seats while
more people want to fly
because of the economic
recovery. All this leads to
higher airfares," says Chuck
Thackston, managing director of data and analytics at
Airlines Reporting Corp.
"This trend in airfares is
likely to continue for the
near future, as the economy
continues to grow."
These days, fares only
capture part of the cost of
flying. Many passengers pay
extra to check their luggage,
typically $50 roundtrip for
the first bag and $70 for the
second one. But bag fees
haven't changed much in the
past few years. Now, the airlines are increasingly enticing passengers to pay for
fast-track security lines,
early boarding, additional
legroom and other extras.
Submitted photo
School Superintendent Frances Gallo, Mayor James A. Diossa, Police Chief James J.
Mendonca and City Councilwoman and School Committee member Stephanie Gonzalez
answer questions at a press conference kicking off the Back to School Campaign.
School
the Central Falls School District, improve
student achievement by focusing on truancy
and chronic absenteeism as well as promote
the dress code policy, an initiative led by the
Central Falls Parent Student Organization,
which will begin this September.
In Central Falls, a student is considered
chronically absent if that student is out of
school for more than 10percent of the
school year.
"Our district has been doing valuable
work around attendance and the Central
Falls Alumni Association wants to do its
part and take that to a whole new level of
participation, where we engage multiple
community stakeholders in and out of our
schools," said Stephanie Gonzalez, a member of the Central Falls Alumni Association.
"Can you imagine getting a knock on your
door from the mayor, superintendent, and
ADVERTISING
DENVER (AP) — A
popular Denver gay bar discriminated against a man
when a bouncer denied him
entry last year because he
was dressed in drag,
Colorado regulators said in a
decision that could become
more common as anti-discrimination laws increasingly include gender identity.
The civil rights division
of the state's Department of
Regulatory Agencies ordered
the Denver Wrangler to
resolve the dispute with Vito
Marzano, a 27-year-old gay
man who was wearing a
dress, makeup and a wig
when he went to the bar on
Aug. 31, 2013.
A bouncer said he turned
Marzano away because his
appearance didn't match his
driver's license, and he was
following a policy designed
to thwart underage drinkers
from entering the club. But
regulators determined the
bar illegally discriminates
against effeminate men
because its dress code bars
high heels, wigs, "appearance-altering makeup" and
NEW YORK (AP) —
New York City's juvenile
jails are extremely violent
and unsafe, the result of a
deeply ingrained culture of
violence in which guards
routinely violate constitutional rights of teenage
inmates and subject them to
"rampant use of unnecessary
and excessive force," the
federal government said in a
scathing report released
Monday.
The report, the result of a
2½ -year Justice Department
investigation into violence at
three Rikers Island juvenile
jail facilities, recommended
major reforms to almost
every aspect of how young
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strong perfume, according to
the decision issued last
month and obtained Monday.
"In other words, a female
with a masculine gender
presentation would be permitted to enter, whereas, a
male presenting as a female
would be denied entry," civil
rights division Director
Steven Chavez wrote. He
said the Wrangler wrongly
favors bisexual and gay men
who embrace a hypermasculine image and shun interaction gay men who "exhibit
effeminacy."
General Manager Phil
Newland told The
Associated Press that the
decision "contains many
errors and equally as many
disturbing opinions. The
Denver Wrangler does not
deny entrance to anyone,
including women and those
who identify as transgender."
Newland said the bar's
identification policy stems
from state liquor laws. The
Wrangler denied Marzano
entry partly because he was
aggressive and drunk,
Newland told state regulators.
Kenneth Upton, senior
counsel for Lambda Legal,
which pursues litigation on
LGBT issues nationwide,
said the case could signal a
growing trend.
"Now that gender is starting to be respected in a
wider variety of ways under
non-discrimination ordinances, you're going to see
more of these cases, and
they're confusing," Upton
said.
Businesses will have to
strike a difficult balance
between catering to a niche
market as part of a business
strategy and making sure
they don't break laws against
discrimination, he said.
Marzano, who led a boycott against the bar, which
included a Facebook group
with 241 members, said he
hopes the decision will protect others.
Gay people "face enough
hatred and discrimination
from the outside world," he
said. "We do not need it
from our own."
Feds: Violence pervasive in NYC youth jails
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Exchange St., Pawtucket, RI 02860.
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the police chief welcoming you to the district and sharing with you the importance of
school attendance? That is precisely what
our families will experience throughout
August during our Every Day Matters
Campaign," she said.
"This campaign is an example of a community coming together outside of the classroom to improve education,” said Diossa.
“It is important our new families feel welcome and know that their community leaders place a high value on education, as well
as speak to families about the importance of
being at school everyday to receive an education."
The home visits kicked off Monday and
will be held from 5 to 7 p.m. on Wednesday
and Aug. 12-13, 19-21.
Those who are interested in volunteering
for home visits during the EveryDayMatters
campaign can contact Gonzalez at (401)
626-7220 or by email at centralfallsalumni@gmail.com.
Colorado officials rule nightclub
discriminated against man in drag
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offenders are treated.
It identified problems that
occurred between 2011 and
2013 on Rikers that also
likely hold true for adult
inmates, including poor staff
training, inadequate investigations, an ineffective management structure and the
overuse of solitary confinement, particularly for mentally ill inmates.
"The bottom-line conclusion is this: According to
our investigation, for adolescent inmates, Rikers Island
is broken," Manhattan U.S.
Attorney Preet Bharara said
at a news conference."
In past cases investigated
by the Justice Department's
civil rights division, federal
authorities work with local
officials to reform the jails
and reserve the right to sue
if they feel reforms are not
being done.
Mayor Bill de Blasio has
promised to reform the
nation's second-largest jail
system, with an average of
11,500 inmates held at any
time. In March, he appointed Joseph Ponte, a longtime
corrections official from
Maine with a reputation as a
reformer, as commissioner.
Prosecutors acknowledged that de Blasio and
Ponte inherited many of the
problems, which have been
pervasive for years despite
some small reform-minded
undertakings during the final
years of former Mayor
Michael Bloomberg's tenure.
Bharara said Monday he
was optimistic based on past
public comments that city
officials would move
promptly toward implementing the more than 70 suggested reforms listed in the
Rikers report.
In a statement, Pone said
he was committed to "radically" improving security
for adolescent inmates, and
had already started rewriting
use-of-force policy to "bring
it into the 21st century,"
ordered the speedy installation of video cameras and
recruited and trained more
experienced guards.
Still, the theme repeated
throughout the 80-page
report was that violence permeates the three Rikers
facilities for 16- to 18-yearolds. The investigators
found particular problems in
the main jail that houses
young inmates, where new
corrections officers are
assigned to "one of the most
combustible environments at
Rikers, ill-equipped to cope
with adolescents who are
often belligerent and suffer
from a wide range of mental
illnesses.
LOCAL
Tuesday, August 5, 2014
Cumberland
library slates
activities
CUMBERLAND —
Cumberland Public Library,
1464 Diamond Hill Road, is
offering the following
upcoming activities:
• A free film showing of
“Pay It Forward” and book
discussion about
Cumberland High School’s
One Book/One School summer reading title will be
held at the library on Friday,
Aug. 8,at 1:30 p.m.
The movie will start
promptly at 1:30 and will be
followed by a book discussion led by teen librarian
Miss Jenn. This multigenerational event will help students to share their summer
reading experience with others and here from people
who have actually paid it
forward.
• The Teen Coding Club
will meet on Aug. 13 from
5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Coders of
all abilities are welcome.
Teens may bring their own
laptops, although the library
will have several available
for use.
• The library will hold its
monthly Teen Writer’s
Workshop on Wednesday,
Aug. 13, from 2 to 3:30
p.m.. This session will be
working on character development. Writers of all abilities are welcome to this
workshop.
Register online or at the
reference desk.
For more information,
contact Jenn Cournoyer at
(401) 333-2552, ext. 2, or
jenn@cumberlandlibrary.org
Pawtucket
kids’ summer
reading nears
completion
PAWTUCKET —
Summer is almost over, and
that means time to celebrate
the wonderful job by the
young summer readers who
participated in this year’s
“Fizz! Boom! Read” program at the Pawtucket
Public Library (www.pawtucketlibrary.org).
Reminder: the final day
to report your reading hours
is Friday, Aug. 15.
Children of all ages and
their families are invited to
the library’s Campbell
Auditorium for an afterparty
on Wednesday, Aug. 20, at 6
p.m. The party will feature
raffles and refreshments and
will be hosted by Yunus and
Habibah Quddus. Yunus will
bring his ONOMATOPOETRY! mixed art show, which
is an explosive mashup of
creativity in poetry, spoken
word, storytelling, acting,
singing, music and visual
arts. Yunus will stir up your
senses in a fun, unique way.
Professional henna artist
Heather Caunt-Nulton, from
“Henna by Heather,” will
teach the history and science of henna. Heather will
then be applying professional henna on partygoers.
One lucky summer reader
who completed the requirement of reading 12 or more
hours this summer will win
the raffle for a new Xbox
gaming system, generously
donated by the Friends of
the Pawtucket Public
Library.
Light refreshments will
be provided. The program is
free and no registration is
required. This event made
possible through the support
of the Caidin Fund, the
Rhode Island Office of
Library and Information
Services, and the Friends of
the Pawtucket Public
Library. For more information, call the Children’s
Library at 401-725-3714,
ext. 209, or e-mail childrens@pawtucketlibrary.org
Submit your
local news
briefs to:
notices@
pawtuckettimes.com
THE TIMES A3
BANK HONORS NONPROFITS
Submitted photos
Bristol County Savings Bank, through its Bristol County Savings Charitable Foundation,
recently presented checks to eight Pawtucket nonprofits. Above, BCSB presents a $5,000
grant to Books Are Wings. From left, Ken Riley, associated vice president, BCSB, and board
member, BCSCF - Pawtucket Advisory Board; Patrick Murray, president & CEO, BCSB and
president, BCSCF; Jocelynn White, director, Books Are Wings; and Mike Tamburro, president, Pawtucket Red Sox, and board member, BCSCF - Pawtucket Advisory Board. Below,
BCSB presents a total of $26,000 in grants. From left, Riley, Tamburro, Ron Demeulenaere,
president, St. Vincent de Paul Conference of St. Leo the Great Church; White; Susie Schutt,
education and outreach coordinator, Sandra Feinstein-Gamm Theatre; Patrick Murray, president & CEO, BCSB and President, BCSCF; Ricardo Pitts-Wiley, co-Founder and development director, Mixed Magic Theatre and Cultural Events; Edward Queenan, president of the
board of directors, Camp Ruggles; Joanne Bonollo, Pawtucket School Committee member
and Wellness Community Chair, Pawtucket Backpackers; Pamela Hughes, president,
Exchange Street Open Studio Plus; Gretchen Dow Simpson, chair, Arts Marketplace Pawtucket; and Dan Sullivan, president, Collette Vacations and board member, BCSCF Pawtucket Advisory Board.
Children’s Museum schedules activities
PROVIDENCE — The
Providemce Children’s
Museum, 100 South St.,
has scheduled the following upcoming activities:
• Imagination
Playground: Daily, Sunday,
Aug. 10 to Sunday, Aug.
17, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Kids invent their own
ways to play as they stack
and build with huge blue
foam blocks, wheels,
spools, tubes and a variety
of loose parts.
Construct castles and
forts, invent interesting
sculptures and more!
Underwritten by Dominion
Foundation.
• Worm World: Sunday,
Aug. 10, 11a.m. to 2 p.m.
Explore the wonderful
world of worms! Kids
observe how worms wiggle, meet night crawlers,
squirm through tunnels,
and get their hands dirty
digging through a wormy
habitat. Underwritten by
Amgen Foundation.
• After the Beanstalk:
Jack, Jill and the Giant:
Monday, Aug. 11, 10:30
a.m. to 2 p.m.
Help Jack and his sister
Jill solve the giant’s puzzling spatial challenges in
an interactive performance
that expands on the classic
tale. Shows at 10:30 and
11:30 a.m., and 12:30 and
1:30 p.m.; recommended
for ages 3 and up.
Underwritten by Dominion
Foundation.
• Get Out! Mud Play,
Tuesday, Aug. 12, 1 to 3
p.m.
Get out and play in the
Museum’s Children’s
Garden each Tuesday afternoon in August! This week,
kids dig, scoop and mess
around with mud and mold
marvelous mud pies.
Underwritten by National
Grid.
• Wheels at Work:
Ambulance, Wednesday,
Aug. 13, 10 a.m. to noon.
Inspect an ambulance
and learn how technicians
from Brown University
Emergency Medical
Services help people when
they’re injured. Explore a
different vehicle each
Join
Wednesday morning in
August!
• Ready, Set, Recycle!:
Thursday, Aug. 14 and
Friday, Aug. 15, 10 a.m. to
3 p.m.
Learn all about recycling
– play a recycle sorting
game, make tree prints, and
create crafts from recyclables in Discovery
Studio, the Museum’s
hands-on art and science
exploration space.
WaterFire returns
Saturday evening,
along with ballroom
PROVIDENCE —
WaterFire Providence, the
award-winning sculpture by
artist Barnaby Evans,
announces the details of the
next full lighting of the
2014 season, Saturday Aug.
9. The full lighting is sponsored by National Grid.
Sunset on August 9th is a
7:55 p.m., the fires will be
lit shortly thereafter, and
will burn until midnight.
WaterFire Providence
welcomes back community
partner National Grid for its
second year as a WaterFire
season sponsor. Join
National Grid on the
Washington Street Bridge
for a variety of interactive
and educational energy efficiency demonstrations from
6:30 to 11 p.m.
National Grid will offer
charging stations on
Washington Street and
Canal Street to recharge
your smartphone and other
mobile devices during the
lighting. Learn about making your home more energy
efficient with National Grid
on Washington Street with
interactive displays that
help you learn about how
much energy it takes to
power a standard light bulb
versus the newer, more
energy-efficient CFL bulbs.
Also, let your kids get creative with old refrigerators
that are actually safe to
decorate.
WaterFire Providence
will also celebrate the
150th anniversary of the
Providence Police
Department. One hundred
and fifty Providence Police
officers and retired police
officers will begin this
lighting with a Torch
Promethea in Waterplace
basin. Starting at 8:15
p.m., they will proceed into
the basin, led by the
Providence Police Honor
Guard and the Providence
Police Pipes and Drums,
and will stand side by side
with their fellow officers
and family members lighting 150 torches, representing 150 years of service to
the Providence community.
Following this display, the
torch bearers, Pipes &
Drums, Color Guard and a
fleet of police vehicles and
mounted patrol will make
their way to the WaterFire
Ballroom to kick off their
birthday celebration.
The WaterFire
Providence Ballroom is
back at Turk’s Head Plaza
for the first time since
2012.
Celebrating the 150th
anniversary of the
Providence Police
Department, WaterFire
Providence brings back this
crowd favorite featuring
dance lessons, celebrations
recognizing the Providence
Police, and music that will
make the Ballroom the
READER’S REWARDS
GET YOUR NAME IN THE HAT
Enter to win 2 tickets to:
Sat., August 23 at 7:00pm
6 Pairs of tickets will be awarded.
(ticket value: $21.00)
ENTRY FORM: Summer Pops
Name:________________________________________________
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content, photos, press releases,
etc. directly to us
by email at:
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Must be 18 years old to enter.
We are excited to add your
community news to
place to be:
• 7 to 8 p.m.: Dance lessons with Providence
Swings and DJ Shawn
McAedle
• 8 to 9:10 p.m. and
10:15 to 11:20 p.m.: Roger
Ceresi’s All Starz, for a
double set and their 10th
year of performing at
WaterFire for some rhythm
and blues!
• 9:20 p.m.: The
Providence Police will
arrive to kick off a birthday
celebration like no other.
• 9:30 to 10:10 p.m.
and 11:30 p.m. to midnight:
Tony Cerbo is a local
Rhode Islander and nationally recognized crooner. Be
sure to be on the dance
floor as this local legend
brings the Rat Pack back to
life.
The Ignite Music Music
Stage at WaterFire
Providence on Steeple
Street adds more music to
the night! Presented by
Geico | Local Office and
Fat Belly’s Pub and featuring Jesus Andujar & Grupo
Sazon, the Ignite Stage will
bring even more music to
the night. Since 2003,
Rhode Island-based, Jesus
Andujar and his talented
musicians have been producing authentic music
from the Spanish
Caribbean; salsa, merengue
and Latin jazz. Guests are
invited to stop by to check
out the music and grab a
drink from Fat Belly’s outdoor bar and take a photo
with the Geico Gecko, and
dance their socks off starting at 7:30 p.m..
The WaterFire Arts
Festival Plaza will be open
from 6 to 10 p.m. Located
on Washington Street in the
heart of the WaterFire
installation, the WaterFire
Arts Festival Plaza is a
showcase for local artists
and crafts-people. From
photography and sculpture,
paintings and handcrafted
ceramics, to jewelry and
specialty textiles, the
WaterFire Arts Festival
Plaza features a wide range
of locally crafted artisan
wares to exhibit for sale to
WaterFire’s visitors.
WaterFire is an independent, non-profit arts
organization whose mission
is to inspire Providence and
its visitors by revitalizing
the urban experience, fostering community engagement, and creatively transforming WaterFire for all to
enjoy.
The powerful work of art
is installed on the three
rivers of downtown
Providence as a moving
symbol of Providence’s
Renaissance. To learn more
about WaterFire or make a
donation visit www.waterfire.org or
www.facebook.com/watefireprovidence.
Phone Number:_________________________________________
Entries must be received by
Tuesday, August 12, 2014 at
noon. Winners will be posted
in The Call & The Times on
Wednesday, August 13, 2014.
No Purchase Necessary. Employees of
The Call & The Times and their families
are not eligible.
Please mail or drop off entry form or 3x5 index card to:
The Call - Reader’s Rewards
75 Main St., Woon., RI 02895
OR
The Times - Reader’s Rewards
23 Exchange St., Pawt., RI 02860
Visit www.stadiumtheatre.com for more information
OPINION
Page A4
Interim-Publisher/Controller: Kathleen Needham
Executive Editor: Bianca Pavoncello
Managing Editor: David Pepin
Assistant Editor/News/The Call: Russ Olivo
THE TIMES — Tuesday, August 5, 2014
No defense for America’s
income inequality
Our political discourse today is riven
by the issue of inequality. Some commentators embrace inequality as an inevitable
byproduct of free markets. Others say
inequality is greatly overstated. Both
claims are harmful and deceptive.
Defenders of inequality begin with an
incontrovertible fact: Free markets rely on
inequality. It inspires those who have less
to work harder. But this doesn't explain
why inequality was much lower a generation ago. In 1979, chief executive officer
pay was 29 times higher than the typical
worker's; in 2011, it was 231 times higher.
Nor does it tell us how much inequality is
enough.
As measured by two leading
researchers, Thomas Piketty and
Emmanuel Saez, inequality has grown
when examining tax-return data. Tax
returns are useful when looking at
changes at the highest-income levels
because the Census Bureau, the only other
good data source, treats everyone over a
certain figure (currently $250,000) as
earning the threshold amount.
Piketty and Saez tell us that average
incomes (in constant dollar terms)
increased 15 percent over the 33 years to
2011. The minimum income required to
join the 1-percent club increased 62 percent over that period. And the average
income of the 1-percent club increased
129 percent.
"The market made me do it" isn't a
complete response to these facts. So the
question really is: What defense can be
mounted, not to inequality in general, but
to current levels of inequality?
N. Gregory Mankiw, a well-known
economist and the author of popular economics textbooks, took on this challenge.
In his paper, "Defending the One
Percent," Mankiw doesn't dispute the
surge in inequality. Instead, he explains it
as a consequence of globalization and rising demand for highly educated and
exceptionally talented individuals in the
digital economy.
Mankiw offers the example of the late
Steve Jobs of Apple Inc., who created
tremendous value for customers and
shareholders — and became very rich in
the process. There is certainly a grain of
truth in this. The trouble is that there are
more than 1.5 million Americans in the
top 1 percent — too many for this explanation to be convincing. Most are finance
types, lawyers, doctors, and second- and
third-tier business executives, not Steve
Jobs clones. By definition, all the CEOs
of the Fortune 500 put together are only
500 strong. What are the other 1.4995
million doing?
If technology and globalization explain
the surge in U.S. inequality, one would
expect to see similar rates of inequality
growth elsewhere. Instead, one sees much
more modulated growth.
A more complete explanation would
include "rent seeking" — a topic Mankiw
dismisses too quickly. The idea is that
people look for shortcuts to wealth or
power by advancing their interests
through whatever levers are available to
them, but without creating new economic
value.
Imagine you are the CEO of a company
seeking a new tax benefit for your kiwi
farm, on the theory (or pretext, take your
pick) that such an incentive will stimulate
U.S. kiwi farmers to employ more workers.
You hire a tax lobbyist and head for
meetings with members of Congress.
Money is never discussed when you plead
your case, but the lobbyist explains what
is expected from you and your company's
political action committee.
Finally the lobbyist calls you to
announce with great fanfare that he has
secured your tax break — but only for
two years. After all, the lobbyist explains,
the tax break is expensive, and people
want to see if your promises about job
creation come to fruition. Two years later,
GUEST COMMENTARY
By Edward D. Kleinbard
you must start the process again, this time
seeking an "extender" — the periodic
rollover of "temporary" tax breaks that in
fact are never expected to die.
Everyone in this story is engaging in
rent seeking, but at least you were a transparent and faithful agent of shareholders.
The lobbyist and lawmakers who became
your champions are the real masters of
rent-seeking, and you will have to pay
them both, not once but every couple
years as your tax break comes up for
renewal. They have created annuities for
themselves out of your single tax break.
Perhaps this sheds some light on how the
tax code came to be littered with more
than 100 such business tax "extenders."
In reality, almost everyone engages in
rent seeking. Joseph Stiglitz's book, "The
Price of Inequality," argues that rent seeking explains the surge of top incomes in
the United States. Much of what went on
in the finance industry in the early 2000s
was rent seeking, and even Mankiw
acknowledges some of this. But Mankiw
rejects rent seeking more generally as an
explanation. He does so by defining it
very narrowly, as political lobbying for
monopoly rights and the like.
Inequality defenders like Mankiw also
ignore the role of sheer luck in market
outcomes, and of family money in determining success. However obtained, wealth
can profitably be plowed into investments
in one's children. A moderately able child
can be coached, prodded, cajoled and
bribed all the way into a top tier university, then introduced to her affluent parents'
circle of friends in order to find a first job.
It is now apparent that vast fortunes
can also buy special relationships and
privileges with government, which further
act to turn today's great fortunes into
dynasties.
By the same token, Mankiw also overlooks the magnitude of the handicaps that
poverty imposes. The poor are not just like
us, only with less stuff. At every turn, poverty erodes cognitive ability, the physical and
mental development that comes from adequate nutrition, and equality of educational
opportunity.
Defenders of the status quo have no
answer to why the U.S. is an outlier in the
rate at which income inequality has
grown. There is something about the U.S.
that is unique, and it's not its markets,
which are largely indistinguishable from
those of other countries. No, it's the comparatively parsimonious investments the
U.S. makes in its citizens.
Americans simply do not have equal
opportunities. This is more than an ethical
or social issue: Underinvestment in human
capital leads to lower productivity, which
is to say, lower national income.
Comparative data show that the U.S.
offers less social and economic mobility
than do many of its peer countries — a
startling rebuke to the mythology of
America as the land of opportunity.
Edward D. Kleinbard is a law professor
at the University of Southern California's
Gould School of Law, and a fellow at The
Century Foundation.
As others see it: Drought
The following editorial appears on
Bloomberg View:
Seven Western states have just received
an overdraft notice from nature's water
bank, written in red ink, all caps. It turns
out that three-fourths of the H2O they've
been using during the American West's
record drought (14 years and counting) has
been drawn from their precious savings
account: not the Colorado River itself but
aquifers below ground.
The significance of this discovery, by
scientists looking at a series of satellite
measurements of the river basin, can hardly
be overstated. The West has to measure and
manage its underground water at least as
carefully as it does the surface supply, and
find new ways to drastically conserve.
The Colorado's surface water is measured and parceled out to 40 million people
and 4 million acres of farmland in the
basin according to the "Law of the River,"
a collection of almost a dozen agreements
among seven states, the federal government
and Mexico. That surface supply is diminishing in the present drought, as is obvious
from photos of a 130-foot-deep bathtub
ring around Lake Mead. This reservoir
behind the Hoover Dam is at its lowest
level since it was filled in the 1930s.
Until now, however, no one realized the
extent to which Westerners were using
underground water to make up the shortfall.
That knowledge required NASA satellite
measurements of water mass below the
surface. Since the end of 2004, the
researchers found, two Lake Meads worth
of water have been drained from Colorado
Basin aquifers.
The states are in charge of managing
their own underground water, and many of
them don't. No one knows how much of it
is left, or if the withdrawals of recent years
will soon be replenished. This makes it difficult, to say the least, to ensure that water
use is sustainable.
What's needed are measurements of
underground water tables — this can be
done by measuring a series of local wells
— and a plan to keep those levels from
falling farther.
Can the voters
change the GOP?
The central issue in this fall’s elections
could turn out to be a sleeper: What kind of
Republican Party does the country want?
It is, to be sure, a strange question to put
to an electorate in which independents and
Democrats constitute a
majority. Yet there is no
getting around this: The
single biggest change in
Washington over the last
five years has been a
GOP shift to a more radical form of conservatism.
This, in turn, has led to a
kind of rejectionism that
views cooperation with
E.J. Dionne
President Obama as
inherently unprincipled.
Solving the country’s problems requires,
above all, turning the Republican Party back
into a political enterprise willing to share
the burdens of governing, even when a
Democrat is in the White House.
For those looking for a different, more
constructive Republicanism, this is not a
great year to stage the battle. Because of
gerrymandering, knocking the current band
of Republicans out of control of the House
is a Herculean task. And most of the competitive seats in the fight for the Senate are
held by Democrats in Republican states. The
GOP needs to win six currently Democratic
seats to take over, and it appears already to
have nailed down two or three of these.
Republicans are now favored in the open
seats of South Dakota and West Virginia,
and probably also in Montana.
Nonetheless, there is as yet no sense of
the sort of tide that in 2010 gave a
Republicanism inflected with tea party sensibilities dominance in the House. The core
narrative of the campaign has yet to be
established. Democrats seeking reelection
are holding their own in Senate races in
which they are seen as vulnerable.
And then there was last week’s House
fiasco over resolving the refugee crisis at
our border. It served as a reminder that
Republican leaders are handcuffing themselves by choosing to appease their most
right-wing members rather than pursuing
middle-ground legislation by collaborating
with Democrats.
The bill that House Speaker John
Boehner was trying to pass last Thursday
already tilted well rightward. It provided
Obama with only a fraction of what he said
was needed to deal with the crisis — $659
million, compared with the president’s
request for $3.7?billion. It also included
provisions to put deportations on such a fast
track that Obama threatened to veto it. A
White House statement said that its “arbitrary timelines” were both impractical and
inhumane.
House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi
happened to be meeting with a group of
journalists when the bill collapsed. “In order
for them to pass a bill, they had to make it
worse and worse and worse,” she said,
referring to Boehner’s efforts to placate
members who have entered into an unusual
cross-chamber alliance with Sen. Ted Cruz
(R-Tex.) to foil even conservative legislation
if they regard it as insufficiently pure. When
the bill was pulled back, Pelosi observed:
“They couldn’t make it bad enough.”
On Friday, the GOP leadership pushed
the measure still further right and added $35
million for border states to get it passed at
an unusual evening session — but not
before Republicans themselves had complained loudly about dysfunction in their
own ranks.
In the meantime, the Senate was paralyzed on the issue by filibusters and other
procedural hurdles that have rendered
majority rule an antique notion in what once
proudly proclaimed itself “the world’s greatest deliberative body.”
As the House was preparing to pass its
bill, Obama told a news conference on
Friday that GOP leaders were well aware
that he’d veto it if it came to him and
bemoaned the fact that “even basic, commonsense, plain vanilla legislation” can’t
get through because Republicans fear “giving Obama a victory.”
Last week’s legislative commotion could
change the political winds by putting the
costs of the GOP’s flight from moderation
into stark relief. House Republicans found
themselves in the peculiar position of simultaneously suing Obama for executive overreach and then insisting that he could act
unilaterally to solve the border crisis.
Pelosi, for her part, went out of her way
to praise “the Grand Old Party that did so
much and has done so much for our country.” Commending the opposing party is not
an election year habit, but her point was to
underscore that Republicans had been
“hijacked” by a “radical right wing” that is
not simply “anti-government” but also “antigovernance.”
On balance, Washington gridlock has hurt
Democrats more than Republicans by dispiriting moderate and progressive constituencies that had hoped Obama could usher in
an era of reform. The key to the election
will be whether Democrats can persuade
these voters that the radical right is the real
culprit in their disappointment — and get
them to act accordingly on Election Day.
Read more from E.J. Dionne’s archive,
follow him on Twitter or subscribe to his
updates on Facebook.
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OBITUARIES/LOCAL/REGION
Tuesday, August 5, 2014
THE TIMES A5
Jim Brady, 73; Reagan press secretary, shot
in assassination attempt; gun control advocate
DOUGLASS K. DANIEL
Associated Press
Andrew Ian Dodge;
former Maine U.S.
Senate candidate
HARPSWELL, Maine
(AP) — Maine tea party
activist and former U.S.
Senate candidate Andrew Ian
Dodge has died. He was 46.
Dodge’s relatives say he
died from colon cancer
Friday at his home in
Harpswell.
The Colby College graduate and Libertarian ran
unsuccessfully in 2012 for
the Senate seat being vacated
by Olympia Snowe.
Independent former Gov.
Angus King won the election.
Dodge’s family posted a
final statement by him on his
website Sunday. He paid tribute to his wife, Kim, and
thanked many people including editors and co-writers
who worked with him on
political, musical and creative projects.
Dodge included a link to a
YouTube video in the statement. The video is of the
song “Always Look on the
Bright Side of Life” from the
Monty Python movie “Life
of Brian.”
Send your notices to:
obits@woonsocketcall.com
WASHINGTON — A
major trait that endeared Jim
Brady to the Washington
press corps was his sense of
humor, especially when he
made fun of his own boss.
When Ronald Reagan was
campaigning for president in
1980, Reagan drew scorn
from environmentalists for
saying that trees were a
greater source of pollution
than cars. Aboard the campaign plane, Brady pointed at
a forest fire in the distance
and yelled, “Killer trees!
Killer trees!” to the great
amusement of reporters.
After the election,
Reagan’s advisers appeared
hesitant to appoint Brady
press secretary. Nancy
Reagan was said to feel the
job required someone
younger and better-looking
than the 40-year-old, moonfaced, balding Brady.
“I come before you today
not as just another pretty face
but out of sheer talent,”
Brady told reporters. A week
later, he got the job.
Brady, who died Monday
at 73, would need humor and
much more after March 30,
1981. On that day John
Hinckley Jr. attempted to
assassinate Reagan outside
the Washington Hilton Hotel
just two months into the new
president’s term. Reagan
nearly died from a chest
wound. Three others, including Brady, were struck by
bullets from Hinckley's
handgun.
Shot in the head, Brady
lived through hours of delicate surgery and then many
more operations over the
years. But he never recovered the normal use of his
limbs and was often in a
wheelchair. Besides partial
paralysis from brain damage,
he suffered short-term memory impairment, slurred
speech and constant pain.
Still, along with his wife,
Sarah, he went on to become
the face and as much as possible the voice of the guncontrol movement in the
United States. A federal law
requiring background checks
for handgun buyers bears his
name.
Mrs. Reagan, the former
first lady, said Monday she
was “deeply saddened to
learn of Jim Brady’s passing
today. Thinking of him
brings back so many memories — happy and sad — of a
time in all of our lives when
we learned what it means to
‘play the hand we’re dealt.’ ”
The lasting public image
of Brady came from the
worst day of his life. A news
clip of the 1981 shooting,
replayed often on television
and in documentaries,
showed him sprawled on the
sidewalk after several Secret
Service agents had hustled
the wounded president into
his limousine and others had
pounced on Hinckley.
Although Brady returned
to the White House only
briefly, a year after the shooting, he was allowed to keep
the title of presidential press
secretary — and the $89,500
annual salary as assistant to
the president for press relations — until Reagan left
office.
The TV replays did take a
toll on Brady. He told The
Associated Press years later
that he relived the moment
each time.
“I want to take every bit
of (that) film ... and put them
in a cement incinerator, slosh
them with gasoline and
throw a lighted cigarette in,”
he said.
Officials at St. Elizabeths
Hospital in Washington,
where Hinckley is a patient,
have said that the mental illness that led him to shoot
Reagan in an effort to
impress actress Jodie Foster
has been in remission for
decades. Hinckley has been
allowed to leave the hospital
to visit his mother’s home in
Williamsburg, Va.
Brady was a strong
Republican from an early
age. As a boy of 12 in
Centralia, Ill., where he was
born on Aug. 29, 1940, he
distributed election literature
for Dwight D. Eisenhower.
In a long string of political jobs, Brady worked for
Sen. Everett M. Dirksen of
Illinois, Sen. William V. Roth
Jr. of Delaware and John
Connally, the former Texas
governor who ran for president in 1979. When Connally
dropped out, Brady joined
Reagan’s campaign as director of public affairs and
research.
Previously, he had worked
in the administrations of
Presidents Richard Nixon
and Gerald Ford: as special
assistant to the secretary of
Housing and Urban
Development, as special
assistant to the director of the
Office of Management and
Budget, and as an assistant to
the defense secretary.
He was divorced from the
former Sue Beh when, in
1973, he courted Sarah Jane
Kemp, the daughter of an
FBI agent who was working
with him in a congressional
office.
Sarah Brady became
involved in gun-control
efforts in 1985, and later
chaired Handgun Control
Inc., but Brady took a few
more years to join her, and
Reagan did not endorse their
efforts until 10 years after he
was shot. Reagan’s surprise
endorsement — he was a
longtime National Rifle
Association member and an
opponent of gun control laws
— helped turn the tide in
Congress.
“They’re not going to
accuse him of being some
bed-wetting liberal, no way
can they do that,” said Brady,
who had become an active
lobbyist for the bill.
The Brady law required a
five-day wait and background check before a handgun can be sold. In
November 1993, as President
Bill Clinton signed the bill
into law, Brady said: “Every
once in a while, you need to
wake up and smell the
propane. I needed to be hit in
the head before I started hitting the bricks.”
At the time of the 30th
anniversary of the shooting,
the Bradys told NPR they
were no longer Republicans.
“Times change,” Sarah
Brady said.
President Barack Obama
described Brady as a White
House legend, who turned
“the events of that terrible
afternoon into a remarkable
legacy of service.” Thanks to
Brady and the law bearing
his name, “an untold number
of people are alive today
who otherwise wouldn’t be,”
the president said in a statement.
Dan Gross, president of
the Brady Campaign to
Prevent Gun Violence, said
in a statement that because of
Brady’s work on gun control
“there are few Americans in
history who are as directly
responsible for saving as
many lives as Jim.”
Submitted photo
Edaville Railroad, in Carver. Mass., is offering a chance to meet and picnic with the Berenstain
Bears this Saturday and Sunday.
Picnic with the Berenstains
at Edaville Railroad event
CARVER, Mass. — Edaville Railroad is
offering a picnic with the Berenstain Bears,
America’s favorite treehouse family, on
Saturday, Aug. 9, and Sunday, Aug. 10. The
bears will be out on the event field for photo
opportunities, and special box lunches will
be available at KC’s Cafe so families may
picnic with them.
These special days include unlimited use
of the park and a 20-minute train ride
through the nearby woodlands and cranberry
bogs.
All rides and attractions are included in
general park admission, so guests can enjoy
Dinoland and unlimited use of the amusements.
General admission is $23 (free for those
under age 2), and $20 for seniors. Tickets
can be purchased at www.edaville.com or at
the park entrance.
Rare Greek coins repatriated
in prosecution of RI collector
NEW YORK (AP) —
Five ancient coins were
returned to the Greek government Monday after a
prominent collector from
Rhode Island was prosecuted in a New York case that
roiled the numismatic world.
Dating as far back as 515
B.C., the silver coins will be
displayed for public view
and research at the
Numismatic Museum of
Athens, Manhattan District
Attorney Cyrus R. Vance Jr.
and Greek announced at a
ceremony marking the repatriation of coins dating to
500 B.C.
"The coins being returned
to us by the New York
County district attorney are
exquisite ancient artifacts
that reflect Greece's culture,
history and enduring
strength," said Ambassador
Christos Panagopoulos.
"Back home, where they
belong, they will be displayed — with the gratitude
of the Greek people to the
DA — for all to admire, our
citizens and visitors to
Greece alike."
The pieces include two
types of ancient Greek currency — staters and a
didracham, or two-drachma
coin — bearing images that
include gods and other
mythological figures.
They "will be of greater
public benefit in an open
place of study and scholarship than locked away in a
safe," Vance said.
The coins were part of a
case against hand surgeon
and coin aficionado Dr.
Arnold-Peter Weiss, whose
January 2012 arrest during a
coin auction at the WaldorfAstoria hotel.
An orthopedics professor
at Brown University's Alpert
Medical School and author
of a hand-surgery textbook,
Weiss also had been on a
coin collector and investor
for 35 years and had served
as on the board of the
American Numismatic
Society.
He later pleaded guilty to
attempted criminal possession of stolen property.
Those charges involved
three coins he thought were
fourth century B.C. Greek
pieces that had been illegally taken from Italy — but
were actually forgeries,
prosecutors said. Weiss was
aiming to sell one of them
for about $350,000 and two
others for about $1.2 million
apiece, prosecutors said.
As part of his plea agreement, Weiss also forfeited
about 20 other coins, including the authentic pieces
headed back to Greece. Two
of the coins have been
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returned to a previous
owner, and the rest are to be
given to cultural and academic institutions, prosecutors said.
Weiss also was required
to do 70 hours of community service and write an article about the problem of
trading in coins of uncertain
origin.
His prosecution furthered
a series of court cases and
disputes over collecting and
trading in objects that Italy,
Greece and other countries
consider looted pieces of
their cultural patrimony.
Institutions including the
Metropolitan Museum of Art
in New York and the J. Paul
Getty Museum in Los
Angeles have agreed to
return various items to Italy.
Dyer-Lake Funeral Home
161 Commonwealth Avenue, North Attleboro,
MA 02763 • 508-695-0200
Sperry & McHoul Funeral Home
15 Grove Street, N. Attleboro, MA 02760
508-695-5651
Darlington Mortuary of
L. Heroux & Sons, Inc.
1042 Newport Avenue, Pawtucket, RI 02861
401-722-4376
Keefe Funeral Home
5 Higginson Avenue, Lincoln, RI 02865
401-725-4253
Lincoln Funeral Home
210 Taunton Avenue, E. Providence, RI 02915
401-434-2600
Bellows Funeral Chapel
160 River Road, Lincoln, RI 02865
401-723-9792
Cheetham Funeral Home
1012 Newport Avenue, Pawtucket, RI 02861
401-725-4525
Costigan-O’Neill Funeral Home
220 Cottage Street, Pawtucket, RI 02860
401-723-4035
Lachapelle Funeral Home
643 Main Street, Pawtucket, RI 02860
401-724-2226
Manning-Heffern Funeral Home
68 Broadway, Pawtucket, RI 02860
401-723-1312
Merrick Williams Funeral Home
530 Smithfield Avenue, Pawtucket, RI 02860
401-723-2042
Prata Funeral Home
1501 Lonsdale Ave., Lincoln, RI 02865
401-726-4117
220 Cottage Street, Pawtucket, RI 02860
401-722-8324
342 High Street, Central Falls, RI 02863
401-722-7250
1008 Newport Avenue, Pawtucket, RI 02861
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Karol A. Romenski Funeral Home William Tripp Funeral Home
R.W. Chatigny Funeral Home
Russell Boyle Funeral Home
151 Cross Street, Central Falls, RI 02863
401-725-7756
331 Smith Street, Providence, RI 02908
401-272-3100
J.J. Duffy Funeral Home
Mariani & Son Funeral Home
757 Mendon Road, Cumberland, RI 02864
401-334-2300
200 Hawkins Street, Providence, RI 02904
401-861-5432
Perry-McStay Funeral Home
O’Neill Funeral Home
2555 Pawtucket Avenue, E. Providence,
RI 02914 • 401-434-3885
3102 Mendon Road, Cumberland, RI 02864
401-658-1155
Rebello Funeral Home
901 Broadway, E. Providence, RI 02914
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A6 THE TIMES
Tuesday, August 5, 2014
ALLIANCE
BLACKSTONE VALLEY FEDERAL CREDIT UNION
594 Central Avenue, Pawtucket, RI • 401-722-8236 • www.ABVFCU.com
Mon. 9-5pm, Tues. & Wed. 9-4:30pm, Thur. & Fri. 9-6pm, Sat. 9-12pm
PRESENTS YOUR COMMUNITY CALENDAR
Sunday
August
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
4
5
6
7
Cumberland
East Providence
Pawtucket
Central Falls
Cumberland
Providence
Woonsocket
• Widow support group meets
every Sunday — the first two
Sundays of the month are at the
Community Chapel on Diamond
Hill Rd. The second two are at
Emerald Bay Manor, Diamond
Hill Road. All meetings 2 p.m.
Call 401-333-5815.
• Providence Children’s
Museum’s 31st annual Allen
H. Chatterton Jr. Memorial
Golf Tournament. For registration and information about sponsorship and tee signs, visit
www.childrenmuseum.org/Golf.
• The Leon Mathieu Senior
Center and Shri Studio have
partnered to offer a “Yoga for
Seniors” on Tuesday mornings
from 9:30am-10:30am at Shri
Studio, 21 Broad St.,
Pawtucket. The fee for Leon
Mathieu Senior Center members is $5 per person per
month. Transportation is available from the Senior Center to
the Studio for those who need
it. For more information and/or
to register for the class please
contact the Senior Center at
728-7582.
• Forand Manor holds Bingo
every Monday and Wednesday,
starting at 5:15 p.m.
• The Cumberland Public
Library will host a Stop Rockets
program for teens from 2 to
3:30 p.m. Teens will make
paper rockets and there will be
a contest to see whose rocket
launches the farthest. Register
online or at the reference desk.
• The Providence Children’s
Museum is open free of charge
every Friday evening through
Labor Day for a free time to
explor, splash and play.
• Rigamajiig at the Providence
Children’s Museum is a time for
hcildren to play with a large
scale building kit that includes
all sorts of fun toys.
The Lodge of Elks #850 is holding a beer tasting on August 9
from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. at the
Elks Lodge under their tent. The
grill will be fired up and the DJ
will provide the music. Tickets
are $20 for the 21 and older
event. Tickets can be purchased at the event. Call Gary
at 766-2838 for more information.
3
Warwick
• Auditions for adults who wish
to perform in plays this winter
and next spring with the Ocean
State Theatre Company. Visit
oceanstatetheatre.org for more
information about available roles
and audition times. Auditions will
also be held on the 4th.
Woonsocket
• Annual motorcycle run to benefit the Tomorrow Fund from 2
to 5 p.m. Cost is $15 per person for both riders and non riders and it includes a barbecue.
Email daigle23.jd@gmail.com
for more information.
Smithfield
• Swinging Squares of RI workshop, 7-9 p.m., East Smithfield
Neighborhood Center, 7
Esmond St.; $6 per person.
Attleboro
The P.E.A.L. club will meet
August 4 at noon at Morin’s
restaurant on Main Street in
Attleboro. Lunch will follow the
meeting. and there will be a
mystery raffle for which members do not need to bring items.
Providence
• Public hearing on the closing
of Route 49. Meetings are at 10
a.m. and 6 p.m.
Woonsocket
• Farmers’ market will be held
every Tuesday until Oct. 28th
from 3 to 6 p.m., Thundermist
Health Center of Woonsocket
parking lot, 450 Clinton St.
Pawtucket
• Fogarty Manor Tenant
Association BINGO is open
Monday and Wednesday Nights,
doors open at 4p.m. and the
game starts at 6:30 p.m. until 8
p.m. Our address is 214
Roosevelt Ave.
• August 6 at 6 p.m., the
Pawtucket Library is hosting
“The Lego Movie.” The event is
free to all and the film will be
shown in the library's Campbell
Auditorium (in the basement).
East Providence
• Clinical services available at
the senior center and no preregistration is needed. A lab slip
should be brought to ensure
efficient service.
Woonsocket
8
• The Museum of Work &
Culture hosts a film festival event
featuring filmmakers from
Quebec. The event begins at 7
p.m. Tickets are $10. For more
information, visit rifilmfest.org or
call 401-769-9675.
9
North Kingstown
June-August every ThursdaySunday from 12-3p.m. at
Smith's Castle, 55 Richard
Smith Drive, North Kingstown.
Enjoy a tour of the earliest
stages of Rhode Island History.
Admission is $6 for adults and
$2 for children. For more information visit
www.smithscastle.org or call
294-3521.
Providence
• An ensemble of urban teens
are in a music show at the
columbus Theatre at 5:30 p.m.
The show is free and open to
the public.
Pawtucket
Live Music at The Met, 1005
Main St., Pawtucket. For tickets
and information visit
themetri.com.
10
11
12
13
14
Cumberland
Central Falls
Pawtucket
Central Falls
East Providence
Providence
Woonsocket
• Widow support group meets
every Sunday — the first two
Sundays of the month are at the
Community Chapel on Diamond
Hill Rd. The second two are at
Emerald Bay Manor, Diamond
Hill Road. All meetings 2 p.m.
Call 401-333-5815.
• Forand Manor holds Bingo
every Monday and Wednesday,
starting at 5:15 p.m.
• The Leon Mathieu Senior
Center and Shri Studio have
partnered to offer a “Yoga for
Seniors” on Tuesday mornings
from 9:30am-10:30am at Shri
Studio, 21 Broad St.,
Pawtucket. The fee for Leon
Mathieu Senior Center members is $5 per person per
month. Transportation is available from the Senior Center to
the Studio for those who need
it. For more information and/or
to register for the class please
contact the Senior Center at
728-7582.
• Forand Manor holds Bingo
every Monday and Wednesday,
starting at 5:15 p.m.
• Farmers Market at the Weaver
Library from 4 to 7 p.m. The
market features fresh produce,
entertainment and workshops.
• The Providence Children’s
Museum is open free of charge
every Friday evening through
Labor Day for a free time to
explor, splash and play.
• Sacred Heart Church, 415
Olo Street, Woonsocket, RI is
sponsoring a Casino/Bingo Bus
Trip to Foxwoods Casino on
Saturday, August 16.The cost is
$30 per person. Coffee and
donuts will be served in the
Parish Center at 7:00 a.m. and
the bus leaves at 7:30 a.m. The
bus departs from the casino at
4:00 p.m. For reservations, call
Kathy Robbio at 1-508-8838761 or Janet Ballou at 1-401787-3458.
• A yard sale and barbecue will
be held at St. John The Baptist
Romanian Orthodox Church,
501 East School St.,
Woonsocket, from 8:30 a.m. to
1 p.m. on the church grounds
(rain or shine).Pastries, soft
drinks, food, and barbecue from
11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Uxbridge
Remove waterchestnuts from
the Rice Pond in Uxbridge.
shifts are from nine to noon and
1 to 3 p.m.. Email events@thebrwa.org for more information.
Providence
Imagination playground at the
Providence Children’s Museum
is a time for children to play with
all sorts of toys and construct
different things.
Pawtucket
• Fogarty Manor Tenant
Association BINGO is open
Monday and Wednesday Nights,
doors open at 4p.m. and the
game starts at 6:30 p.m. until 8
p.m. Our address is 214
Roosevelt Ave.
• Victory day observaytion with
wreath-laying and and ceremony
at 11 a.m. at the corner of
Roosevelt Avenue and
Exchange Street next to the city
hall complex.
Woonsocket
• Farmers’ market will be held
every Tuesday until Oct. 28th
from 3 to 6 p.m., Thundermist
Health Center of Woonsocket
parking lot, 450 Clinton St.
Pawtucket
• Fogarty Manor Tenant
Association BINGO is open
Monday and Wednesday Nights,
doors open at 4p.m. and the
game starts at 6:30 p.m. until 8
p.m. Our address is 214
Burrillville
• A regular meeting of the
Burrillville Housing Authority is at
the authority’s community room
on Ashton Court in Harrisville at
6:30 p.m.
15
Burrillville
The Commissioners of the
Burrillville Housing Authority will
meet in regular session at the
Burrillville Housing Authority
community room, Ashton Court,
Harrisville, at 6:30 PM.
Cumberland
• Scott Jablonski is coming to
the Cumberland Public Library
as Ben Franklin in what promises to be an educational and
amusing event. Tickets are available at the library for a nominal
fee of 50 cents starting Aug. 4.
Pawtucket
Westerly
Pawtucket
• Weekly concerts outside at
Daggett Farm at Slater Park run
from 6 to 7:30 p.m.
‘Run for your Wife’ at Granit
Theatre. Weekends in July and
August starting July 25 at The
Granite Theatre, 1 Granite St.,
Westerly. For information visit
granitetheatre.com.
16
• Rhode Island Watercolor society fundraiser and art exhibition
from 5 to 8 p.m.Tickets are $10
for exhibiting artists and $20 for
general admission.
17
18
19
20
21
Cumberland
Central Falls
Pawtucket
Central Falls
East Providence
Providence
Providence
• Widow support group meets
every Sunday — the first two
Sundays of the month are at the
Community Chapel on Diamond
Hill Rd. The second two are at
Emerald Bay Manor, Diamond
Hill Road. All meetings 2 p.m.
Call 401-333-5815
• Forand Manor holds Bingo
every Monday and Wednesday,
starting at 5:15 p.m.
• Applications due by noon for
those who wish to apply to be a
Central Falls police officer. Visit
centralfallspolice.com for more
information.
• Forand Manor holds Bingo
every Monday and Wednesday,
starting at 5:15 p.m.
• Farmers Market at the Weaver
Library from 4 to 7 p.m. The
market features fresh produce,
entertainment and workshops.
• The Providence Children’s
Museum is open free of charge
every Friday evening through
Labor Day for a free time to
explor, splash and play.
Westerly
Pawtucket
• The Leon Mathieu Senior
Center and Shri Studio have
partnered to offer a “Yoga for
Seniors” on Tuesday mornings
from 9:30am-10:30am at Shri
Studio, 21 Broad St.,
Pawtucket. The fee for Leon
Mathieu Senior Center members is $5 per person per
month. Transportation is available from the Senior Center to
the Studio for those who need
it. For more information and/or
to register for the class please
contact the Senior Center at
728-7582.
• H.P. Lovecraft readathon at
the Providence Public Library. In
celebration of the late author’s
birthday, there will be an interactive, multimedia reading event
of some of Lovecraft’s mostloved works. Refreshments will
be served and there will be
musical performances as well.
The cost is $10 per person and
tickets can be purchased at
lovecraftreadathon.com or by
emailing programs@rihs.org.
‘Run for your Wife’ at Granit
Theatre. Weekends in July and
August starting July 25 at The
Granite Theatre, 1 Granite St.,
Westerly. For information visit
granitetheatre.com.
• Fogarty Manor Tenant
Association BINGO is open
Monday and Wednesday Nights,
doors open at 4p.m. and the
game starts at 6:30 p.m. until 8
p.m. Our address is 214
Roosevelt Ave.
Woonsocket
Woonsocket Council Knights of
Columbus 113 will host the
Installation of Officers at All
Saints Parish on Rathbun St. at
7 p.m.. This is an open meeting
for all members, family and
friends. The public is welcome.
Woonsocket
• Farmers’ market will be held
every Tuesday until Oct. 28th
from 3 to 6 p.m., Thundermist
Health Center of Woonsocket
parking lot, 450 Clinton St.
Pawtucket
• Fogarty Manor Tenant
Association BINGO is open
Monday and Wednesday Nights,
doors open at 4p.m. and the
game starts at 6:30 p.m. until 8
p.m. Our address is 214
Woonsocket
Open house for the Hope Street
childcare center from 6 to 8
p.m. Parents are welcome to
come and see what the center
provides.
22
Pawtucket
• Weekly concerts outside at
Daggett Farm at Slater Park run
from 6 to 7:30 p.m.
Lincoln
• The James Michael Ray
Memorial Chapter #818 of the
Vietnam Vetreans of America will
meet at 7 p.m. at the Lincoln
Senior Center on Jenckes Hill
Road. Dinner will be served at
6 p.m. and all Vietnam War veterans are welcome. Call Joe
Gamache at 401-651-6060 for
more information.
23
Woonsocket
• Summer cookout hosted by
the St. Joseph Veterans
Association. There will be burgers and hot dogs for sale with all
the fixings. There will also be all
sorts of games. It begins at
noon at 99 Louise Street.
24
25
26
27
28
Cumberland
Central Falls
Woonsocket
Central Falls
East Providence
Providence
North Kingstown
• Widow support group meets
every Sunday — the first two
Sundays of the month are at the
Community Chapel on Diamond
Hill Rd. The second two are at
Emerald Bay Manor, Diamond
Hill Road. All meetings 2 p.m.
Call 401-333-5815
• Forand Manor holds Bingo
every Monday and Wednesday,
starting at 5:15 p.m.
• Applications due by noon for
those who wish to apply to be a
Central Falls police officer. Visit
centralfallspolice.com for more
information.
• Farmers’ market will be held
every Tuesday until Oct. 28th
from 3 to 6 p.m., Thundermist
Health Center of Woonsocket
parking lot, 450 Clinton St.
• Forand Manor holds Bingo
every Monday and Wednesday,
starting at 5:15 p.m.
• Farmers Market at the Weaver
Library from 4 to 7 p.m. The
market features fresh produce,
entertainment and workshops.
• The Providence Children’s
Museum is open free of charge
every Friday evening through
Labor Day for a free time to
explor, splash and play.
Westerly
Pawtucket
June-August every ThursdaySunday from 12-3p.m. at
Smith's Castle, 55 Richard
Smith Drive, North Kingstown.
Enjoy a tour of the earliest
stages of Rhode Island History.
Admission is $6 for adults and
$2 for children. For more information visit
www.smithscastle.org or call
294-3521.
‘Run for your Wife’ at Granit
Theatre. Weekends in July and
August starting July 25 at The
Granite Theatre, 1 Granite St.,
Westerly. For information visit
granitetheatre.com.
• Fogarty Manor Tenant
Association BINGO is open
Monday and Wednesday Nights,
doors open at 4p.m. and the
game starts at 6:30 p.m. until 8
p.m. Our address is 214
Roosevelt Ave.
Narragansett
Mondays in July and August
from 7 to 9 p.m. at
Narragansett Town Beach.
Performances include Jason
Colonies, Shawn Reilly, Boat
Cake, Karaoke with Stella
Tunes, Larry Martinelli and
Brass Force. For information
visit narragansettri.gov.
Pawtucket
• Fogarty Manor Tenant
Association BINGO is open
Monday and Wednesday Nights,
doors open at 4p.m. and the
game starts at 6:30 p.m. until 8
p.m. Our address is 214
Roosevelt Ave.
Pawtucket
• Weekly concerts outside at
Daggett Farm at Slater Park run
from 6 to 7:30 p.m.
North Kingstown
29
30
June-August every ThursdaySunday from 12-3p.m. at
Smith's Castle, 55 Richard
Smith Drive, North Kingstown.
Enjoy a tour of the earliest
stages of Rhode Island History.
Admission is $6 for adults and
$2 for children. For more information visit
www.smithscastle.org or call
294-3521.
Send your community events to notices@pawtuckettimes.com or woonsocketcall.com
AMUSEMENTS
Tuesday, August 5, 2014
THE TIMES A7
Tread carefully when naming
baby after deceased relative
DEAR ABBY:
What is the protocol for
naming a baby after a
deceased person? If the
name you want to use is a
deceased family member’s
name, do we ask his next
of kin for approval? Do we
say nothing? Is it assumed
that people who wish to
use someone’s name when
naming their child should
seek permission (whether
the person is living or
dead)?
Obviously, some people
will use the name regardless of being granted a
blessing or not, but I’m
wondering what is appropriate in this situation.
— PREGNANT
IN ILLINOIS
DEAR PREGNANT: In
the Jewish faith, it is traditional for a baby to be
named for a deceased parent or grandparent — or at
least given a name with
the same first initial.
However, if the person
who died was a child of a
close relative, I can see
how that could be very
painful for the parents
who lost their child.
The appropriate thing
to do would be to first
have a conversation with
the surviving family mem-
DEAR ABBY
Jeanne Phillips
ber(s) to be sure it will be
considered the honor it is
intended to be and not
open fresh wounds. If it
would cause pain, perhaps
the expectant parents
should consider making
the name of the deceased
their baby’s middle name
instead of first name.
DEAR ABBY:
During my teens, I was
diagnosed with depression
and institutionalized following a suicide attempt.
Depression is something I
live with daily.
Unfortunately, my parents
and siblings have a “don’t
ask, don’t tell” policy
when it comes to anything
that may stir up emotions.
Horoscope
A - Cox B - Uxbridge, Millville Comcast
C - Blackstone, Franklin Comcast D - Bellingham Comcast
By HOLIDAY MATHIS
ARIES (March 21-April 19).
Healthy rest is the order of the
day. Often you don’t give yourself permission to rest as much
as you really need to, but make
the commitment. Go to bed
early.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20).
It’s easier to over-deliver if you
under-promise. That’s your ticket
to impressing the powers that be
in your life — suggesting that
something small is coming up
and then delivering something
big.
GEMINI (May 21-June 21).
You have some strong feelings
locked inside you — and that’s an
excellent place for them today.
Work it through on your own
first, as you’ll regret revealing
too much.
CANCER (June 22-July 22).
The only thing you should try to
be better than is the most recent
self that you were. Your colleagues and competitors don’t
matter now. Don’t look sideways; look within.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). The
way you can help another person
is not clear now, but you can
love that person and love will
find the way, or perhaps love will
be the way. Open your heart and
pour your love.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22).
You’re likelier to believe the one
searching for the answer than
you are to believe the one who
proclaims he has found it.
Anyway, you want to do your
own research and will feel good
about only the conclusions you
come to on your own.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23).
Your style is changing as you
allow yourself to be influenced
by what you see in magazines, in
store windows and on people in
the streets. You’ll be a trendsetter among your friends.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21).
If only you could unfollow people without unfriending them as
you can on a Facebook feed.
Alas, you’ll get too much information about certain people or
hear news you care little about.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21). Working on or out of
your home will take up much of
the day. Once you’re in the
groove, you’ll notice what needs
to be moved, cleaned up or reorganized to create an even more
efficient experience.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19). One small but important
success will seem to pay for a
hundred failures. This is real
growth, and it’s all yours; it’s
something that no one can take
from you.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18). You may feel as though life
is purposely knocking you off
your center of gravity, but you
are an expert at adjusting. You’ll
find a new way to stay up, move
freely and even make a dance of
this.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20).
When it’s time to decide, you
will, and it will be settled. You
won’t vacillate or worry. You
won’t regret. You’ll have the
strength of your convictions, and
that’s that.
I feel that it’s detrimental
to my well-being.
My doctor has suggested cutting my family out of
my life. Dealing with them
gives me great anxiety. My
mother is a master manipulator who denies my suicide attempt ever happened, and I’m afraid she
will tell my extended family members (many of
whom I have relationships
with) that I have “abandoned the family.”
No one outside my
immediate family knows
about my depression or
suicide attempt, and I feel
I may be forced to reveal
that very private part of
my life in order to defend
my actions. I don’t know
what to do.
— RELUCTANT
TO REVEAL
DEAR RELUCTANT
TO REVEAL: I think you
should follow your doctor’s advice and not be
intimidated. You have an
illness — depression —
that, according to the
Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention, is
shared by about 9 percent
of our population. It is
nothing to be ashamed of.
Because you’re afraid of
what your mother will say,
^ WGBH
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20 15 15
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CABLE
6 PM
PBS NewsHour (N) Å
37 64 37 37
A-P
42 56 63 63
AMC
25 71 59 59
BET
79
BRAV
70 63 57 57
CNBC
48 44 46 46
CNN
49 41 42 42
COM
58 67 61 61
CSNE
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DISC
24 59 39 39
DISN
34 53 24 24
E!
63 72 34 34
ESPN
30 34 49 49
ESPN2
29 35 50 50
ESPNC
132 309 258 258
EWTN
22 96 56 56
FAM
38
FOOD
28
FX
53
HGTV
44
HIST
41 69 58 58
LIFE
40 28 36 36
MTV
60 76 28 28
NESN
56 37 51 51
NICK
35 52 25 25
SYFY
69 73 62 62
SPIKE
26 74 55 55
TLC
39 55 38 38
TNT
27 32 33 33
TOON
36 51 60 60
TVL
43 48 64 64
USA
52 31 35 35
WTBS
45 33 31 31
67
6:30
ENC
292 630 326 326
HBO
200 400 301 301
MAX
220 450 341 341
SHOW
240 500 361 361
STARZ
280 600 321 321
TMC
260 550 381 381
7 PM
Dear Abby is written by
Abigail Van Buren, also
known as Jeanne Phillips,
and was founded by her
mother, Pauline Phillips.
Contact Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or P.O.
Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA
90069.
Sudoku solution
TUESDAY EVENING AUGUST 5, 2014
7:30
7:30
8 PM
8:30
9 PM
9:30
Mark Twain Finances force Clemens to lecture. Å (DVS)
10 PM
10:30
Frontline Teens and companies
that target them. Å
NCIS “Oil & Water” An explosion NCIS: Los Angeles A murder is (:01) Person of Interest “Nothing
occurs on an oil rig.
linked to an ancient system.
to Hide” Å
CMA Music Festival: Country’s Night to Rock Highlights of the four-day event. (N) Å
CMA Music Festival: Country’s Night to Rock Highlights of the four-day event. (N) Å
Food Fighters A woman competes with G. Garvin. (N)
Food Fighters A woman competes with G. Garvin. (N)
NCIS “Oil & Water” An explosion
occurs on an oil rig.
Family Guy Å Brooklyn NineNine
(DVS)
Arrow “Suicide Squad” Oliver
prepares for battle with Slade.
Last of the
As Time Goes
Summer Wine By Å
Bones “A Boy in a Bush” Suspects. Å
Father Brown Physician is
blamed for murder. Å
Arrow “Suicide Squad” Oliver
prepares for battle with Slade.
Family Guy Å Brooklyn NineNine
(DVS)
Criminal Minds A girl is abducted in broad daylight.
Criminal Minds A girl is abducted in broad daylight.
8 PM
8:30
11 PM
Charlie Rose (N) Å
11:30
America’s Got Talent “Quarter Finals 2” Twelve acts perform live.
(N) Å
America’s Got Talent “Quarter Finals 2” Twelve acts perform live.
(N) Å
NCIS: Los Angeles A murder is (:01) Person of Interest “Nothing
linked to an ancient system.
to Hide” Å
New Girl “Fired The Mindy
Fox 25 News at 10 (N) Å
Up”
Project
Supernatural “Thinman” Famous Two and a Half Two and a Half
supernaturalists. Å
Men
Men
Yes, Minister The Café Å
Miranda “Dog”
Rev. Å
Å
Bones A mummified corpse is
WBZ News
Seinfeld “The
found at a club. Å
(N) Å
Boyfriend”
Masterpiece Mystery! “Poirot, Season 12: Dead Vicious (Season
Man’s Folly” Murder hunt game. (N)
Finale)
Supernatural “Thinman” Famous 7 News at 10PM on CW56 (N) Å Everybody-Ray- Everybody-Raysupernaturalists. Å
mond
mond
New Girl “Fired The Mindy
Eyewitness
(:45) Sports
Seinfeld “The Family Guy Å
Up”
Project
News at 10
Wrap
Boyfriend”
Criminal Minds Small-town resi- Criminal Minds The team inter- The Listener Witness to murder
dents poisoned. Å
views serial killers. Å
is unable to speak. (N)
Criminal Minds Small-town resi- Criminal Minds The team inter- The Listener Witness to murder
dents poisoned. Å
views serial killers. Å
is unable to speak. (N)
9 PM
9:30
10 PM
10:30
11 PM
Daily Mass Å
11:30
Threshold of Hope Å
Grab Your Cat- Women of
echism
Grace
Pretty Little Liars Hanna’s drink- The 700 Club Å
ing gets out of control.
Chopped Salsa verde; couscous Chopped Baskets have circusand buffalo. (N)
themed ingredients.
Tyrant Sheik Rashid may survive Tyrant Sheik Rashid may survive
Jamal’s attack. (N)
Jamal’s attack.
House Hunters Hunters Int’l
Flip or Flop Å Flip or Flop A
(N) Å
short sale.
Counting Cars Counting Cars Counting Cars Counting Cars Counting Cars Counting Cars Counting Cars (:31) Counting (:03) Dark
(:33) Dark
(:03) Biker Battleground Phoenix
Å
Å
Å
Å
“Pimpmobile” “Hog Wild”
(N) Å
Cars (N)
Horse Nation Horse Nation “Big Gamble” (N)
Wife Swap A doting mother, a
Raising Asia Asia prepares for a Dance Moms Abby rewards
Dance Moms Abby recruits a
Raising Asia
Raising Asia
(:01) Raising (:31) Raising
demanding innkeeper.
performance. Å
Mackenzie with a solo. (N)
former Candy Apple. (N)
(N) Å
(N) Å
Asia Å
Asia Å
True Life Women want to reunite True Life Unusual phobias wreak True Life Families dislike long- Finding Carter “The Heat” Eliza- Finding Carter Carter admits to Finding Carter Carter admits to
with lost loves.
havoc.
term boyfriends.
beth and Carter bond.
feelings for Crash. (N)
feelings for Crash.
NESN Live (N) NESN Live
Red Sox First Red Sox Game- MLB Baseball Boston Red Sox at St. Louis Cardinals. From Busch Stadium in St. Louis. (N Subject
Extra Innings Red Sox Final
Pitch (N)
Day
to Blackout)
Live (N)
(N)
iCarly Carly’s
The Thunder- Sam & Cat Å Every Witch
Nick News With Full House Å Full House Å Full House Å Full House Å Full House Å Friends Å
(:36) Friends Å
teacher.
mans Å
Way (N)
Linda
(5:00) } ★★ Underworld: Rise Face Off Contestants must sur- Face Off Over-the-top makeup
Face Off “Ancient Aliens” (N) Å Wil Wheaton
Wil Wheaton
Face Off “Ancient Aliens” Å
of the Lycans (2009) Å
vive one final audition.
for crime bosses.
Project
Project
(5:00) } ★★★ Bad Boys (1995, Action) Martin Lawrence. Two } ★★ Shooter (2007, Suspense) Mark Wahlberg, Michael Peña, Danny Glover. Premiere. A wound- } ★★ The Losers (2010,
Miami cops attempt to recover stolen police evidence.
ed sniper plots revenge against those who betrayed him.
Action) Jeffrey Dean Morgan.
Extreme Cou- Extreme Cou- Extreme Cou- Extreme Cou- Next Great Baker A life size cake Next Great Baker Creating grav- Buddy’s Bakery Rescue (N) Å Next Great Baker Creating gravponing Å
poning Å
poning Å
poning Å
of Theresa Caputo.
ity defying cakes. (N)
ity defying cakes. Å
Castle “Boom!” The serial killer Castle Investigating a museum Rizzoli & Isles The murder of a Rizzoli & Isles The team tries to (:01) Perception “Prologue”
(:02) Rizzoli & Isles The team
remains at large.
curator’s death. Å
rare bookseller. Å
find a witness. (N) Å
Pierce agrees to help Moretti.
tries to find a witness. Å
Teen Titans Go! World of Gum- Adventure Time Regular Show King of the
King of the
The Cleveland The Cleveland American
American
Family Guy Å Family Guy Å
ball
Hill Å
Hill Å
Show
Show
Dad Å
Dad Å
(5:11) Walker, The Andy
The Andy
The Andy
(:12) The Andy Griffith Show “Up The King of
(:24) The King The King of
The King of
Hot in Cleve- (:36) Jennifer
Texas Ranger Griffith Show Griffith Show Griffith Show in Barney’s Room”
Queens Å
of Queens
Queens Å
Queens Å
land Å
Falls Å
(:01) Covert Affairs Annie
(:02) Modern (:32) Modern
Law & Order: Special Victims
Law & Order: Special Victims
Law & Order: Special Victims
Royal Pains “Oh, M. G.” (N)
Å (DVS)
searches for an ex-agent. (N)
Family
Family
Unit “Charisma”
Unit “Weak” Assault suspect.
Unit “Twenty-Five Acts”
Seinfeld “The Seinfeld “The Seinfeld “The Seinfeld “The The Big Bang The Big Bang The Big Bang The Big Bang Sullivan &
The Big Bang Conan (N) Å
Deal” Å
Keys” Å
Trip” Å
Trip” Å
Theory
Theory
Theory
Theory
Son (N)
Theory
6 PM
6:30
Mother Angelica Live Classics EWTN News
The Holy
“2 Corinthians 3:18”
Nightly
Rosary
Pretty Little Liars Alison moves Pretty Little Liars Hanna’s drink- Chasing Life April readies for her
in with Hanna. Å
ing gets out of control.
hospital stay. (N) Å
Chopped Winners of “Food Net- Chopped Canned spiced ham in Chopped Chicken tenderloin;
work Star.”
the first basket.
hanger steak.
Two and a Half } ★★ Safe House (2012, Action) Denzel Washington, Ryan Reynolds, Vera
Men
Farmiga. A rookie and a renegade operative try to evade assassins.
Flip or Flop Å Flip or Flop Å Flip or Flop Å Flip or Flop Å Flip or Flop Å Flip or Flop Å
7 PM
7:30
8 PM
8:30
9 PM
9:30
10 PM
10:30
11 PM
DISH DTV P-VF BrVF BuVF
2
WBZ News
Late Show W/
(N) Å
Letterman
NewsCenter 5 (:35) Jimmy
at 11:00 (N)
Kimmel Live
ABC6 News at (:35) Jimmy
11pm (N)
Kimmel Live
7 News at
Tonight Show
11PM (N)
NBC 10 News at Tonight Show
11pm (N)
News at 11
Late Show W/
Letterman
Fox 25 News at TMZ (N) Å
11 (N)
The Office
The Office “The
“Spooked”
Surplus”
BBC World
(Off Air)
News Å
Seinfeld “The The Office
Busboy”
“Spooked”
PBS NewsHour (N) Å
Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Shipping Wars (:31) Shipping (:02) Storage (:32) Storage
Å
Å
Å
Å
Å
Å
Å
Å
(N)
Wars Å
Wars Å
Wars Å
Finding Bigfoot: Further EviTo Be Announced
Shark Feeding Frenzy Feeding Bear Feeding Frenzy
Lion Feeding Frenzy Cat’s preda- Shark Feeding Frenzy Feeding
dence “Badlands Bigfoot”
habits of sharks.
tory instincts. Å
habits of sharks.
(5:15) } ★★★ The Mummy (1999, Adventure) Brendan Fraser. A } ★★ Jaws 2 (1978, Horror) Roy Scheider, Lorraine Gary, Murray Hamilton. Tour- } ★★ Jaws 2 (1978, Horror) Roy Scheider, Lormummy seeks revenge for a 3,000-year-old curse. Å
ist town and police chief dread huge white shark at beach. Å
raine Gary, Murray Hamilton. Å
106 & Park “Top 10 Countdown” } ★★ Just Wright (2010, Romance-Comedy) Queen Latifah, Common, Paula Patton. A physical
Apollo Live Special performance Apollo Live Special performance
(N) Å
therapist falls in love with her patient. Å
by Lalah Hathaway. (N)
by Lalah Hathaway.
The Real Housewives of New
The Real Housewives of New
The Real Housewives of New
The Real Housewives of New
The Real Housewives of New
Watch What
Housewives/
York City “The Last Leg”
York City The ladies reunite.
Jersey “A Hairy Situation”
York City “Reunion Part 2”
York City “Reunion Part 2”
Happens: Live NYC
Mad Money (N)
Restaurant Startup A catering
Shark Tank A $4 million invest- Shark Tank Body jewelry; organic Restaurant Startup “Pasta-bilities Shark Tank A $4 million investand farmer’s market staple.
ment. Å
skin care. Å
For Investment” (N)
ment. Å
(5:00) The Situ- Crossfire (N)
Erin Burnett OutFront (N)
Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Å
CNN Special Report
To Be Announced
Anderson Cooper 360 Å
ation Room
(5:53) South
(:25) Tosh.0 Å The Colbert
Daily Show/Jon Tosh.0: Shart Attack! Surprises during Shart Week. (N) Å
Drunk History Nathan for You Daily Show/Jon (:31) The ColPark Å
Report Å
Stewart
“Hollywood”
(N) Å
Stewart
bert Report
SportsNet Cen- Early Edition
SportsNet
Early Edition
MLS Soccer New England Revolution at New York Red Bulls. From Sports Tonight SportsNet Cen- Sports Tonight SportsNet Central (N)
(N)
Central
Red Bull Arena in Harrison, N.J. (Subject to Blackout)
(N)
tral (N)
tral (N)
Deadliest Catch Å
Deadliest Catch Å
Deadliest Catch: The Bait
Deadliest Catch “You’ll Know My Name Is the Lord...” An arctic
(:04) Deadliest Catch An arctic
“Touchdown” (N) Å
hurricane strikes the fleet. (N) Å
hurricane strikes the fleet.
} Lemonade Mouth (2011, Musical) Bridgit Mendler. Five highDog With a
Dog With a
Jessie Å
Liv & MadAustin & Ally Å Girl Meets
Jessie Å
Dog With a
Blog Å
Blog Å
die Å
World Å
school students form a music group. ‘NR’ Å
Blog Å
Keeping Up With the KarE! News (N)
Botched Kimber James; botched Botched Toby’s quest to look like RichKids of
RichKids of
Chelsea Lately E! News
dashians
surgeries.
Justin Bieber.
Beverly Hills
Beverly Hills
(N)
SportsCenter (N) Å
NFL Live Å
2014 World Series of Poker Big 2014 World Series of Poker Big Baseball Tonight (N) Å
SportsCenter (N) Å
One for One Drop.
One for One Drop.
Little League Baseball
SportsCenter (N) Å
Little League Baseball World Series Southwest Regional, Second NFL Live (N) Å
Olbermann (N) Å
Semifinal: Teams TBA. From Waco, Texas. (N) Å
(5:00) College Football From Oct. 5, 2002. Å
College Football From Sept. 9, 2000. Å
College Football From Sept. 30, 2000. Å
EWTN News
Saint John
Nightly (N)
Vianney
Chasing Life Leo surprises
50 26 26
April. Å
Chopped Chicken livers and
62 53 53
chicken tenders.
How I Met Your Two and a Half
30 30 30
Mother
Men
Flip or Flop Å Flip or Flop Å
61 32 32
PREMIUM
7 PM
Greater BosRick Steves’
ton Å
Europe Å
WBZ News
CBS Evening
Wheel of For- Jeopardy! Å
(N) Å
News/Pelley
tune Å
NewsCenter 5 ABC World
Inside Edition Chronicle Å
at 6:00 (N)
News
(N) Å
ABC6 News at 6 ABC World
The Insider
Inside Edition
(N) Å
News
(N) Å
(N) Å
7 News at 6PM NBC Nightly
Access HolExtra (N) Å
(N)
News (N)
lywood (N)
NBC 10 News at NBC Nightly
NBC 10 News at Extra (N) Å
6pm (N)
News (N)
7pm (N)
12 News at 6 CBS Evening
Wheel of For- Jeopardy! Å
News/Pelley
tune Å
Fox 25 News at Fox 25 News at TMZ (N) Å
Dish Nation
6 (N) Å
6:30 (N)
(N) Å
Modern Fam- Modern Fam- The Big Bang The Big Bang
ily Å
ily Å
Theory Å
Theory Å
World News
Nightly BusiAntiques Road- Are You Being
America
ness Report
show
Served?
Two and a Half Two and a Half The Big Bang The Big Bang
Men
Men
Theory Å
Theory Å
Sara’s Week- America’s Test
Well Read Å Nightly Business Report
night Meals
Kitchen
The Middle
The Middle
Modern Fam- Modern Fam“The Play”
“The Jeans”
ily Å
ily Å
Entertainment Eyewitness
Access HolTMZ (N) Å
Tonight (N)
News
lywood (N)
Criminal Minds “The Popular
Criminal Minds The mind of a
Kids” Cults. Å
psychotic killer. Å
Criminal Minds “The Popular
Criminal Minds The mind of a
Kids” Cults. Å
psychotic killer. Å
6 PM
A&E
6:30
explain to those relatives
you feel close to what you
need to do and the reasons
for it. I can’t guarantee
that some of them won’t
take sides, but I’m sure not
all of them will. Sadly, not
all families are functional.
Not all parents are good
parents, and some of them
are toxic.
P.S. Because your struggle with depression is
ongoing, I hope you are
still under the care of a
psychotherapist. If you’re
not, please consider it.
11:30
} ★★ The Pacifier (2005) Vin Diesel. A Navy
(:10) } ★★ Masterminds (1997, Suspense) Patrick Stewart. A
(:40) } ★ After Earth (2013) Jaden Smith. A boy traverses hostile (:25) } White
security expert takes students hostage. ‘PG-13’ Å
SEAL becomes the guardian of five siblings.
terrain to recover a rescue beacon. ‘PG-13’ Å
House Down
}
★★★
(:15)
The Dark Knight Rises (2012, Action) Christian Bale, Anne Hathaway, Tom Hardy.
The Leftovers Nora attends a
Hard Knocks: Training Camp
The Leftovers Nora attends a
Batman faces a masked villain named Bane. ‘PG-13’ Å
conference in New York.
With the Atlanta Falcons (N)
conference in New York.
(5:20) } ★★ Admission
(:15) } ★★★ The Patriot (2000, War) Mel Gibson, Heath Ledger, Joely Richardson. A man and his } ★ Identity Thief (2013, Comedy) Jason Bateman, Melissa
(2013) Tina Fey. ‘PG-13’ Å
son fight side by side in the Revolutionary War. ‘R’ Å
McCarthy. A victim of identity theft fights back. ‘NR’ Å
} ★★★ Barbershop 2: Back in Business (2004) Ice Cube. A bar- Masters of Sex “Dirty Jobs”
Ray Donovan “S U C K” Abby
Masters of Sex “Dirty Jobs”
Ray Donovan “S U C K” Abby
bershop owner considers selling his establishment. Å
Langham goes to DePaul.
makes a new friend.
Langham goes to DePaul.
makes a new friend.
(5:20) } ★★ Austenland
The White Queen Queen Eliza- The White Queen Old enemies Power “Loyalty” (iTV) Tasha
(:05) Power (iTV) Ghost plans a (:10) } ★★★ The Mask of
(2013) Keri Russell. ‘PG-13’ Å beth conjures up a storm.
form new alliances.
finally sees Angela.
big party at Truth. Å
Zorro (1998) ‘PG-13’ Å
(5:45) } ★★ The Best Offer (2013, Drama) Jim Sturgess. An art } ★★ Waiting... (2005) Ryan Reynolds. Res- (:35) } ★★ A Case of You (2013, Romance(:10) } ★ As Cool as I Am
auctioneer becomes obsessed with an heiress. ‘R’ Å
taurant employees ponder their lives. ‘R’ Å
Comedy) Justin Long, Sam Rockwell. ‘R’ Å
(2013) Claire Danes. ‘R’ Å
6
6
6
2
2
4
4
5
5
6
7
10
10
10
10
12
12
12
12
7
8
28
28
9
9
36
36
8
8
18
3
3
44
26
64
64
11
12
11
15
15
15
CABLE
265 118 181 181 181
282 184 130 130 130
254 130 231 231 231
329 124 270 270 270
273 129 185 185 185
355 208 102 102 102
202 200 100 100 100
249 107 190 190 190
77
77
77
278 182 120 120 120
290 172 250 250 250
236 114 196 196 196
206 140
70
70
70
209 144
74
74
74
208 143
71
71
71
422 261 285 285 285
311 180 199 199 199
231 110 164 164 164
248 137
53
53
53
229 112 165 165 165
269 120 128 128 128
252 108 140 140 140
331 160 210 210 210
623 434
76
76
76
299 170 252 252 252
244 122 180 180 180
262 168
54
54
54
280 183 139 139 139
245 138
51
51
51
296 176 257 257 257
301 106 244 244 244
242 105
50
50
50
247 139
52
52
52
PREMIUM
526 340 350 350 350
501 300 400 400 400
512 310 420 420 420
537 318 365 365 365
520 350 340 340 340
544 327 385 385 385
WEATHER/HEALTH
A8 THE TIMES
Tuesday, August 5, 2014
Today’s Forecast
Narragansett
Buzzards
Merrimack to
Chatham to
Bay
Bay
Chatham
Watch Hill
Weather
..............Partly Sunny........
Wind (knots)
p
TUE  
p
WED  
THU
g
FRI
SW-SE 5-10
Seas (feet)
SAT
Visibility (miles)
SW-SE 5-10
SW-SE 5-10
S-SE 5-10
2
1-2
2
2-3
1-4
1-3
1-3
1-3
Mark Searles’s Southern New England Area Forecast
80-85 76-80
65-69 65-69
P. Sunny
Ch Shwrs
75-79
60-65
75-78
57-63
76-80
58-63
P. Sunny
P.  Sunny
Sunny
Five Day Forecast data supplied by Storm Team 10
Looks like our warmest day of the week is on tap today with inland high temperatures reaching into the mid 80s...a light southeasterly wind will keep beaches and
south coastal areas in the upper 70s to near 80°. A weak front to our northwest
will slowly approach later Tuesday into Wednesday morning. It looks like a few
showers and an isolated thunderstorm will form to our north today but scattered
showers are possible tomorrow as this front drops through.
Webinar to walk employers through family leave law
PROVIDENCE — The
Cranston Chamber of Commerce,
in conjunction with small business
organization Small Business
Majority, will host a webinar on
Wednesday from 11 a.m. to noon
on the state’s new Temporary
Caregiver Insurance program and
how it impacts Rhode Island small
employers.
The TCI program, which
became effective in January, provides up to four weeks of wage
replacement benefits to workers
who need to take time off from
work to bond with a new child or
to care for a seriously ill child,
spouse or family member.
“These types of policies help
level the playing field between
small businesses that want to offer
this benefit but can’t, and their
larger counterparts that can,” said
Steve Boyle, president of the
Cranston Chamber of Commerce.
“These interactive dialogues are a
great way for small businesses to
get the information they need to
take advantage of this new program, and for us to get feedback on
their thoughts and concerns.”
This free webinar, which is open
to all Rhode Island small business
owners, will feature Small
Business Majority Northeast
Outreach Manager, Erik Rettig,
who will provide an overview of
the TCI program, discuss its
impacts to small businesses and
explain how entrepreneurs can take
advantage of its benefits.
A question-and answer period
will follow the discussion.
Polling recently released by
Small Business Majority found six
in 10 small business owners support publicly administered family
and medical leave insurance pools,
paid with payroll contributions by
employees.
“Many small business owners
think of their employees as family,
so they support policies that enable
them to foster a happier workforce
while protecting their workers and
their bottom line. But they need to
know how to take advantage of
programs like the one Rhode
Island recently enacted,” Rettig
said. “Our hope is that this seminar
allows employers, including those
who are so busy that they only
have a few spare moments, to get
the information they need to better
understand the Temporary
Caregiver Insurance program.”
Small business owners can register for the interactive call online
at https://cc.readytalk.com/cc/s/registrations/new?cid=bg3qv815eir2.
For more information, please contact Erik Rettig at erettig@smallbusineemajority.org.
To view a fact sheet with information about Rhode Island’s
Temporary Caregiver Insurance
program, visit: http://www.smallbusinessmajority.org/small-business-resources/workforce/rhodeisland-caregiver-insurance.php
Parents warned about topical gels for teething babies MHRI earns national honor
PROVIDENCE — When babies are
teething, everyone is stressed —
babies and parents. And in an attempt
to soothe their baby’s pain, many parents often turn to topical pain medications to provide pain relief.
But the pediatric experts at Hasbro
Children’s Hospital are warning parents against using these medications,
both prescription and over-the-counter,
on infants as they can be harmful and
cause injury to children.
“Teething is a normal part of an
infant’s life and can be treated without
the use of medication,” says Donald
McKaig, R.Ph., CDOE, medication
quality and safety specialist at Hasbro
Children’s Hospital.
“Topical numbing medications
rubbed on your child’s gums can be
harmful if too much is used and the
child swallows too much.”
The Food and Drug Administration
(FDA) has issued a warning about the
dangers of lidocaine for infants’
teething pain. Viscous lidocaine is a
topical numbing medication that is
only available by prescription.
Lidocaine is not approved for use in
infants for relief of teething pain and
should, in fact, never be used in
infants. So far in 2014, the FDA has
reviewed 22 reports of infants and
young children, between the ages of 5
months and 3.5 years, who have experienced serious and fatal side effects
from the use of lidocaine.
“The risk to babies is that they may
swallow some of the medication,
which can numb their throat and cause
difficulty swallowing and increase the
risk of choking,” says McKaig. "If too
much lidocaine is applied or a baby
swallows too much, it can be toxic and
cause severe damage to the heart and
nervous system.” Symptoms of this
damage can include jitteriness, confusion, vision problems, vomiting,
falling asleep too easily, shaking and
seizures.
Lidocaine isn’t the only numbing
medication; there are a number of
over-the-counter products that contain
benzocaine, which the FDA also warns
against. In 2011, the FDA warned that
when used on babies for teething pain
benzocaine products can lead to a rare
but serious condition called methemoglobinemia. This condition causes a
large decrease in the amount of oxygen being carried in the blood, which
can be life-threatening. Some of the
common names of products that contain this ingredient include Anbesol,
Hurricaine, Orajel, Baby Orajel,
Orabase, and various store brands.
McKaig recommends that parents
and caregivers follow the American
Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommendations for alleviating a child’s
tender and swollen gums, including:
• Gently rub or massage the child’s
gums with your finger.
• Give your child a cool teething
ring or a clean, wet, cool washcloth to
chew on. Teething rings should be
refrigerated for a short time so they are
cool — not cold or frozen. Frozen
teething rings can cause damage to the
baby’s gums. Chewing on a cool
teething ring will help to dull the
nerves in the child’s gums, numbing
the pain.
• Additionally, to prevent accidental ingestion, securely store all medications, including viscous lidocaine solution or benzocaine gels and liquids,
out of the reach of children.
For more information about the
dangers of topical pain medications for
infants, please visit
http://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/Co
nsumerUpdates/ucm385817.htm
RIPTA buses promoting HHCRI license plates
PROVIDENCE — Home & Hospice
Care of Rhode Island (HHCRI)
announced today that buses from the
Rhode Island Public Transit Authority
(RIPTA) fleet have begun promoting
HHCRI’s specially designed charity
license plate.
A significant portion of the proceeds
from the sale of each license plate are
donated to HHCRI, which has been a
leader in hospice and palliative care for
more than three decades.
The Rhode Island General
Assembly gave approval for the creation of a special HHCRI charity
license plate in 2013, which the organization began selling to employees and
supporters earlier this year. The plate is
designed with an authentic Rhode
Island theme, featuring the “anchor of
hope” from the state flag, an ocean
backdrop, and two seagulls flying high
above the water. The words “Home &
Hospice Care of Rhode Island” are also
prominently featured above the plate
number.
The RIPTA campaign is part of a
larger effort to encourage more individuals, who recognize the value hospice
and palliative care services can have, to
show their support for HHCRI on the
roads.
“As one of the oldest hospice
providers in the nation, we have helped
care for thousands of patients and families over the years when it mattered
most,” said Charles P. Iacono, HHCRI’s
vice president of philanthropy.
“This license plate is a unique way
for individuals to help honor the loved
ones we have cared for and to help
HHCRI carry out its mission.”
The cost for these uniquely Rhode
Island-themed plates is $41.50, with
$20 of each registration going directly
to the mission and work of HHCRI.
Anyone with a Rhode Island registration can request these plates for their
currently registered vehicle or when
registering a new vehicle in Rhode
Island. Individuals interested in purchasing the HHCRI license plate are
encouraged to visit www.hhcri.org to
download and complete the HHCRI
license plate registration form or call
the HHCRI philanthropy department at
401-415-4206.
for Family Care Center
The Family Care Center at
Memorial Hospital of Rhode
Island recently earned recognition as a Level 3 PatientCentered Medical Home from
the National Committee of
Quality Assurance (NCQA).
“We are very pleased to
achieve the NCQA’s highest
level of recognition for
patient-centered medical
homes. This recognition is
the most widely-used way to
transform primary care practices into medical homes and
is considered to be the current
‘gold standard’ in the field,”
says Jeffrey Borkan, MD,
PhD, physician-in-chief of
family medicine at Memorial
Hospital, and chair and professor in the Department of
Family Medicine at The
Warren Alpert Medical
School of Brown University.
He is also assistant dean for
primary care-population
health program planning at
the Alpert Medical School.
The recognition is valid
through July 9, 2017.
“The Family Care Center
at Memorial earned a remarkable 92.25 out of 100 on the
NCQA evaluation. This is
evidence of the strength of
the primary care program
here and the dedication of our
staff to providing high-quality
primary care to the people of
our community,” adds
Edward Schottland, president
and chief operating officer at
Memorial.
A patient-centered medical
home is a team-based model
of care led by a personal
physician who provides continuous and coordinated care
throughout a patient’s lifetime
to maximize health outcomes.
The model provides for all of
the patient’s health care needs
or arranges care with other
qualified professionals. It
includes the provision of preventive services, treatment of
acute and chronic illness, and
help with end-of-life issues.
The Family Care Center
has multiple providers who
care for patients from infants
through seniors in three distinct practices on the main
Memorial campus in
Pawtucket. The practices
have convenient access to
diagnostic imaging and laboratory services when needed,
as well as an array of specialists on the hospital’s staff. To
find the name of a physician
accepting new patients, call
1-800-MHRI-DOC.
Sturdy offering New Moms Group
ATTLEBORO — Sturdy
Memorial Hospital offers a
free New Moms Group for
women with babies between
the ages of 2 weeks and 12
months. Participants can talk
about their growing babies,
discuss concerns and expectations, learn different tips from
other mothers in the group,
and more. This is an on-
going program in which interested participants can join the
group at any time. The group
meets every Wednesday from
10 to 11:30 a.m. in the
Clinical Education Center,
near the main lobby of the
hospital. For more information or to register, please call
Nursing Administration at
508-236-7151.
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SPORTS
Blackstone Valley
THE TIMES, Tuesday, August 5, 2014 — B1
Little League baseball
Showing no mercy again
Cumberland American makes short work of N.H., 10-0
By JON BAKER
jbaker@pawtuckettimes.com
BRISTOL, Conn. — Lightning struck twice for the
Cumberland American All-Stars on Monday night.
After pasting Massachusetts champion Barnstable,
25-5, in its opener on Saturday, the bat-savvy Rhode
Islanders strolled to a 10-0
“mercy-rule” victory over
Lincoln
Goffstown, N.H. in another
pool-play contest of what is
romps to
becoming a terrific Little
regional
League New England Regional
Tournament at Breen Field.
victory
Not surprisingly, Addison
Kopack, who saw action at
— Page B3
third base, left field and on the
hill, led this surge as well.
After going 2-for-4 with a whopping seven RBI and
two runs scored in the opener, he went 3-for-3 with
two doubles and a homer while closing his evening
with two RBI and three runs scored.
But his offense wasn’t all he provided his teammates. He earned a bags-filled predicament in the top
half of the fourth, but struck out the side. Nick
Croteau nevertheless earned the win, and CALL
improved to a perfect 9-0 since the district event.
“Addison had quite a night, going 3-for-3, and he
also got out of that bases-loaded jam,” grinned skipper Dave Belisle, whose club stroked nine hits en
route to victory. “He did it all. He also kept his pitch
count under 20, so I can use him again (today at 4
p.m., when Cumberland takes on Fairfield American,
Conn. in a tilt to be televised by NESN).
Kopack allowed two infield hits while mustering
those three whiffs.
Other offensive stalwarts included batterymate
Trey Bourque, who went 1-for-2 with two RBI and
two runs; Tyler Provost 1-for-3 with two RBI and a
run; C.J. Davock a trio of walk and a run; and
Brendan Wright, who went 1-for-1 with an RBI.
It was Kopack who greeted reliever Bobby
Doherty, crushed a double down the left-field line to
See CALL, page B3
ERNEST A. BROWN / Blackstone Valley Sports photo
Cumberland American manager Dave Belisle congratulates Addison
Kopack after hitting a three-run home run last Saturday against Barnstable,
Mass. Cumberland improved to 2-0 in the New England Little League
regionals following a 10-0 win over New Hampshire on Monday night.
International League
A Spring
in his step
Pawtucket Red Sox catcher
understands place in game
Matt Spring might not qualify
as a prospect, but there’s no
denying the intangibles that
the PawSox catcher carries
with him to the ballpark each
and every day.
ERNEST A. BROWN /
Blackstone Valley Sports photo
By BRENDAN McGAIR
bmcgair@pawtuckettimes.com
PAWTUCKET — Matt Spring is a career minor-league
catcher who gets it.
You won’t find his name mentioned in the same way as
acclaimed youngsters Christian Vazquez and Blake
Swihart, two under-25 prospects who are viewed by many
as potential catchers-of-thefuture for the rebuilding Boston
Red Sox.
Meanwhile, Spring sits three
months shy of his 30th birthday,
and is in the midst of his first
extended stay at the Triple-A
level with the PawSox.
His own days as a perceived
up-and-comer are over, and
going forward his career will
only be seen through the prism
of what is, rather than what
could be. Minor league veterans
Matt Spring
such as Spring are expected to
stand off to the side while attention is paid toward the
prospects still on the rise. At the same time they are
expected to keep their heads held high, never sulk and
never question why the spotlight isn’t shining on them.
Spring himself is open about his place on the roster.
The Arizona native understands that for starters, you need
patience in order to survive as long as he has in the
minors.
“Everybody goes from being a prospect to not being
one. It’s a hard lesson to learn and happened one of my
See SPRING, page B2
FAMILIAR BATTERYMATES
DEBUT WITH PAWSOX
On the same night that saw Henry Owens, right, make his
long-anticipated debut with the Pawtucket Red Sox, the talented left-handed pitcher was joined by someone who has
plenty experience when it comes to catching him. Earlier
Monday, Blake Swihart, left, was promoted from Double-A
Portland after hitting .300 in 92 games for the Sea Dogs
with 12 home runs and 55 RBI. Swihart helped guide
Owens through 6.2 scoreless innings with nine strikeouts
Monday night as Pawtucket blanked Columbus, 5-0.
Batting eighth, Swihart went 0-for-3 with a strikeout.
For complete story, see page B4.
JILLIAN SOUZA / Pawtucket Red Sox photo
NFL
Belichick shares tale of connection to Washington Redskins
By JOSEPH WHITE
AP Sports Writer
RICHMOND, Va. — Bill Belichick says
the Washington Redskins were almost his
"second home" during his first NFL season
as a low-level assistant with the Baltimore
Colts.
It seems Ted Marchibroda didn't change a
thing after going from Redskins offensive
coordinator to Colts head coach in 1975, so
Belichick was put in a charge of changing
the name on the playbook.
"One of my jobs was to white-out
'Washington Redskins' and type in
'Baltimore Colts' on it and then Xerox it
off," Belichick said. "It was literally the
same offense, and Maxie Baughan was the
defensive coordinator and it was the same
defense.
"And I remember there were a couple of
pages that somehow snuck into the playbook
that 'Redskins' didn't get whited out — and I
heard about it. ... I learned a lot of about the
Redskins organization through the Colts."
Belichick gets a look at the modern-day
Redskins this week.
See PATRIOTS, page B3
SPORTS
B2 THE TIMES
REGIONAL
SCOREBOARD
LITTLE LEAGUE BASEBALL
NEW ENGLAND REGIONAL TOURNAMENT
Eastern Region Headquarters; Bristol, Connecticut
At Breen Field; A. Bartlett Giamatti Little League Center
Day 5 (Tuesday, August 5):
(Falmouth) Maine versus (Barnstable) Massachusetts (1 p.m.) (NESN)
(Fairfield) Connecticut versus Cumberland American (Rhode Island) (4 p.m.)
(NESN)
Day 6 (Wednesday, August 6):
Williston (Vermont) versus Cumberland American (Rhode Island) (1 p.m.)
(NESN)
(Barnstable) Massachusetts versus Goffstown Junior Baseball (New
Hampshire) (4 p.m.) (NESN)
New England Tournament Semifinals (Thursday, August 7)
Second Place Team versus Third Place Team (12:00 p.m.) (NESN)
First Place Team versus Fourth Place Team (3:00 p.m.) (NESN)
New England Tournament Championship Game (Saturday, August 9)
Winner Game 13 versus Winner Game 14 (TITLE) (7:00 p.m.) (ESPN)
LITTLE LEAGUE BASEBALL
EASTERN REGION INVITATIONAL
9/10 Eastern Region Invitational
All games at Michael P. Varrato Field, Cranston
Wednesday, August 6
7:30 p.m. — Maine vs. Lincoln
Thursday, August 7
7:30 p.m. — New Hampshire vs. Lincoln
Friday, August 8
5 p.m. — Mid-Atlantic Championship Game
7:30 p.m. — New England Championship Game
Saturday, August 9
11 a.m. — East Region Championship Game – New England vs. MidAtlantic
AREA ROAD RACE SCHEDULE
Saturday, August 9
CUMBERLAND — 24th Annual Cumberlandfest 5K, 10 a.m. Diamond Hill Park
on Route 114. Pre $14 Post $16. T-shirts first 100 entries. Registration starts at
9 a.m. Contact: Tom Kenwood either via mail (8 Shelter Lane, Cumberland,
02864), email (kenwood2@cox.net) or call 658-0831. Download entry forms
from the web site cumberlandfest.org.
Sunday, August 10
NARRAGANSET — Bobby Doyle Summer Classic, 9 a.m., Narragansett Pier
Middle School, 5 Miles, 401-659-7882.
Saturday, August 23
CUMBERLAND — Yo Raymond Memorial 5K, 9 a.m., Scenic 5K event that
starts and finishes at Camp Ker Anna. 401-413-8167or steve.raymond@fmr.com
Saturday, August 30
PAWTUCKET — PawSox 5k Race/Walk, 9 a.m., McCoy Stadium, 1 Columbus
Ave., T-shirts to the first 500. Cash & prize package to top male and female overall, $25, visit www.pawsox.com for more information.
AREA GOLF SCORES
Metacomet Country Club
Winterbottom Cup
Masters Division: Team Corrente def. Team Kalin, 10.5-9.5
U.S. Open Division: Team Churchill def. Team Maggiacomo, 13-7
British Open Division: Team Alterman def. Team Grassi, 11.5-8.5
On The Banner
PHOTO FEATURED IN PIC OF THE DAY LAST WEEK
June 25, 2014 - North Smithfield/Woonsocket Co-Op
baserunner Alyson Murray (43) gets to second base before
the tag by Cumberland shortstop Mackenzie Vallely in the
bottom of the first inning at Pacheco Park Wednesday night.
Ernest A. Brown/RIMG photo
Aug. 10
Osborne Celebrity Softball Classic
PAWTUCKET — The Pawtucket Red Sox are
pleased to announce that they will host The Jeffrey
Osborne Celebrity All-Star
Softball Classic, featuring
Magic Johnson and Kareem
Abdul-Jabbar, at McCoy
Stadium on Sunday, Aug. 10 at
6:05 p.m. Gates will open at
4:30 p.m. and the game,
between the Magic
Johnson/Jeffrey Osborne AllStars and the New England
Patriots Alumni Celebrity AllStars, will be played at 6:05 p.m. All ticket proceeds
will benefit the Jeffrey Osborne Foundation and the
Pawtucket Red Sox Charitable Trust. Presented by TMobile, Elmwood Sports Center, and Barrington
Printing.
Tickets for the event are on sale at the PawSox
Box Office at McCoy, on-line at www.pawsox.com, or
over the phone by calling (401) 724-7300. All tickets
will be priced the same as regular-season PawSox
tickets, which are $12 for reserved box seats and $8
for general admission ($5 for children aged 12 &
under and senior citizens). There will also be a special deal to include a pre-game meet and greet barbecue with the celebrity All-Stars and a ticket to the
game for a donation of $50.
Edd Pedro Wiffleball Tournament
PAWTUCKET — The 11th Annual Edd Pedro’s Fight
for a Cure Mega Raffle & Wiffleball Event to benefit
the Arthritis Foundation will take place on Sunday,
August 10 at Slater Park.
In addition to some highly competitive wiffleball
contests, this all-day event will include food, carnival
Tuesday, August 5, 2014
International League
Spring brings plenty of value to PawSox
Continued from page B1
last years with Tampa Bay,” said Spring,
a fourth-round pick of the Rays in 2004.
“If you don’t accept or embrace the idea,
the game will just weed you out. Having
a negative attitude or worrying about
things you can’t control, it’s not going to
get you anywhere, not to mention wear
you down.”
But that self-awareness hasn’t dulled
his competitiveness, or made him alter
his approach to the
game. Make no
“He’s the
mistake, Sping is
best guy
still a ballplayer at
heart who loves to
I’ve ever
play the game and
remains a believer
had in the
in his own abilities.
clubhouse
“I come to the
on any
field every day
expecting to be in
team.”
the lineup. If I’m
— PawSox
not, I just do what
I need to in order
manager Kevin
to be ready for the
Boles on
next time that I am
in the lineup,”
Matt Spring
Spring said. “If
you have a negative attitude and you get the chance to
play, you’re pressing and trying to hit a
six-run home run with no one on base.
That kind of stuff doesn’t happen.
“Obviously it’s not what I want, but if
I’m not okay with it, I’ll either not have
a job or be miserable in the job that I
have.”
Most followers of minor league baseball are acquainted with players according to the exposure they receive on various “prospect lists,” or in ever-present
trade rumors. Despite Spring’s presence
in the Red Sox organization since 2011,
odds are that mentioning his name
among most fans would lead to awkward pauses and head scratching.
Nevertheless, the backstop is one the
best ballplayers you could ask to have
on your side, at least according to
Pawtucket manager Ken Boles.
“Having Matt last year [in Double-A
Portland] — he’s the best guy I’ve ever
had in the clubhouse on any team. That
speaks volumes about his character
because this is such a competitive environment,” Boles said. “I can’t begin to
tell you what a plus he is and the energy
he brings. He does not have a bad day.”
Not to mention, Spring can still make
professional pitchers think twice about
challenging him at the plate. Despite his
“non-prospect” status and .215 career
batting average, Spring has put together
some productive years in Boston’s farm
system. He hit 11 home runs in only 47
games between High-A Salem, Portland
and Pawtucket in 2011, and in 2013, he
earned a spot on the Eastern League AllStar team. This year he sports a .492
slugging percentage and has made the
most of his recent wave of regular playing time with Pawtucket, slugging two
home runs in his past three starts heading into Monday’s game against
Columbus.
But Spring feels that perhaps his most
important role, as someone with a
decade-plus in pro ball, is that of mentor
to young men -- who may or may not go
on to more promising careers, depending
on how they fare during their time in the
minors.
“I think the one thing that’s kept me
here and not go to another team and
restart another reputation is the way I’m
in the clubhouse, especially in Double A
with the younger players,” Spring said.
“I don’t want to be their dad but to just
help them out. If I can teach them something that I learned in big-league camp
or Triple A, then they’ll be ahead of the
curve.”
Boles said that approach is a rare and
valued commodity in the minor leagues,
oftentimes a challenging cut-throat environment where players can be resentful
of others’ success, since it ultimately
may come at their own expense.
“One night on the bench, he was the
first one up to congratulate Dan Butler
after he blocked a ball in the dirt. He
takes care of the younger players and
protects them. If someone doesn’t come
in with the right frame of mind, he gets
them there,” Boles said. “That speaks
volumes of his character, but he’s not
lying down. He’s on a mission to get to
the big leagues just like everyone else.”
As far as someday finding work in
Boston, Spring knows that he will need
plenty of breaks. As long as the more
highly-touted Vazquez and Swihart are
around (the latter joined the PawSox on
Monday), they are going to receive the
first crack at earning major-league jobs.
Spring is very familiar with both
players, having served as a Double-A
back-up to Vazquez last season and likewise with Swihart this year before getting promoted to Pawtucket on July 10.
“I think the both of them are going to
have great big-league careers. They’ve
come a long way as far as a maturity
level behind the plate,” said Spring
before getting into what makes Vazquez
and Swihart special in their own right.
“Vazquez has had a lot of great mentors
down in Puerto Rico, but he also pays
attention as to how other people are
having success. He could always throw,
but he watched and learned and became
an excellent pitch caller and blocker.
He’s done a good job as far as controlling a staff.
“On the flip side, Blake will ask you
a million questions until your ears
bleed. They’re all good questions and
that’s how he goes about it. He’s also an
unbelievable athlete at a position where
it’s hard to show athleticism,” Spring
expounded further. “Whether it’s making a play in front of the plate that every
catcher is telling the pitcher to throw to
first, he’s figured out a way to let his
athleticism play.”
It speaks volumes to his own baseball IQ and maturity that Spring continues to stick around the Red Sox at a
time when the organization is flush with
catching options. While he’s far from
ready to have the curtain lowered on his
career, he does acknowledge that he has
thought about how he could remain in
baseball even after his playing days are
done. If such a scenario is to happen,
there’s no doubt that he’s picked a
organization that has appreciation for
his know-how.
“One of our strengths in this organization is developing starting pitching.
Matt guides and leads them while working with the catchers,” Boles said. “This
is definitely a top guy to have around.”
Follow Brendan McGair on Twitter
@BWMcGair03
Golf
The Tiger watch is on for final major of the year
LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — Joe
LaCava walked nearly every blade of
grass on the 18th green at Valhalla Golf
Club, jotting notes in his yardage book
after stepping off the distances from
every edge of the green to every possible
pin position. It was just like any other
Monday at a major.
The caddie just didn't know whether
any of this information would be useful
in the PGA Championship. LaCava was
awaiting word on whether his boss —
Tiger Woods — would be healthy
enough to play the final major of the
year.
"I'm optimistic," LaCava said after he
finished charting the entire golf course.
"I'm hoping he plays. So I'm just doing
whatever work I would normally do."
games and music. There are three wiffleball divisions:
Tournament Fun, Youth, and Adult Competitive.
As always, participants will have a chance to win
some great raffle prizes. Some
of the prizes – over 100 to be
exact – that will be featured
include four tickets to the New
England Patriots’ regular-season
home opener on Sept. 21
against the Oakland Raiders, two
seats from the old Yankee Stadium, a “mega” wine
basket, photos and an autographed jersey from
Boston Bruins legend Bobby Orr and a deep sea
fishing trip for four, over 100 prizes.
Former Red Sox and PawSox pitcher Oil Can Boyd
will also be on hand. This event is always on the lookout for more volunteers.
For more information or to sign your team up, visit
www.wiffleman.com or call Edd Pedro at 401-5753672.
Aug. 23-24
KR Baseball to hold AAU tryouts
PAWTUCKET – KR Baseball will be conducting
free tryouts for their AAU teams.
All tryouts will take place in Slater Park. Applications
will be applied at the tryouts.
For the 9 & under through 10 & under age group,
tryouts will take place on Saturday, August 23 from
12-2 p.m. at the Slater Park Athletic Complex located
off Newport Ave. (Newport Ave.
For the 11 & under through 12 & under age group,
tryouts will take place on Saturday, August 23 from 35 p.m. at the Boat House Field located next to the
Slater Park tennis courts.
For the 13 & under age group, tryouts will take
place on Sunday, August 24 from 12-2 p.m. at the
McConnon Senior League Field in Slater Park.
For the 14 & under through 15 & under age group,
tryouts 14u-15u: Tryouts will take place on August
24th from 2-4pm at the McConnon Senior League
The caddie was at Valhalla. So was
his car, a silver SUV parked in the spot
assigned to the four-time major champion.
As for Woods?
Stay tuned. His agent, Mark Steinberg
at Excel Sports Management, said in an
email that Monday would be too early
for doctors to decide whether Woods
could or even should try to play this
week after another back injury.
The PGA of America said that Woods
would not have his previously scheduled
news conference Tuesday morning. It
did not provide additional details. Woods
took another turn toward an uncertain
future when he withdrew after eight
holes and one final shot Sunday at the
Bridgestone Invitational. Before leaving
Field in Slater Park.
For more information, call (401) 724-7555 or visit
www.krbaseball.com.
Fall
Woonsocket High seeks varsity coaches
WOONSOCKET – The Woonsocket High School
Athletic Department is currently accepting applications for the following fall varsity sports: two football
assistant coaches, one girls soccer head coach, and
one cross country coach.
For those interested, contact Interim Athletic
Director Carnell Henderson at (401) 767-4704.
Gator’s Pub making plans for
adult fall volleyball league
BURRILLVILLE — Information for the Adult Fall
Volleyball Leagues at Gator's Pub is available online at
www.gatorspubvolleyball.com.
CoEd B, 6's and Any 4's leagues are starting in
September. The leagues run for five weeks plus playoffs.
For further information, please contact Deb McGee
at djmcgee@cox.net or call (401) 769.2594.
Oct. 4
Woonsocket Little League Golf Tournament
Woonsocket Little League will be holding a Golf
Tournament Fundraiser at Blissful Meadows Golf
Course in Uxbridge on Saturday, Oct. 4.
It will cost $125 per person to participate in the
tournament, which is limited to 40 foursomes.
Interested golfers must reserve a spot by Sunday,
Sept. 7.
A post-tournament dinner will be held at the Elks
Lodge on Social Street in Woonsocket, immediately
following the tournament. Tickets for the dinner only
Firestone, he said he jarred his back
when he hopped into a deep bunker after
playing a shot on the par-5 second hole
from an awkward lie off the slope above
the sand.
"It's just the whole lower back,"
Woods said. "I don't know what happened."
Making the picture look even bleaker
was the timing. Woods had back surgery
March 31 to alleviate the pain from a
pinched nerve. The Bridgestone
Invitational was only his third tournament since returning from a three-month
absence. And there he went again, riding
off the golf course in a cart, struggling to
even remove his shoes before LaCava
drove him to the airport for a flight back
to Florida for evaluation.
are $20 each. All proceeds raised from the tournament and dinner will benefit Woonsocket Little
League. For more information, contact Kim
Sgambato at 401-255-3731.
Oct. 9
Revolution creating team for
Boston Light the Night Walk
FOXBORO — The New England Revolution has
been directly affected by cancer in the last year, with
several long-time supporters, front office staff and
defender Kevin Alston diagnosed with various cancers. To help support research and the on-going race
for a cure for blood cancers, the Revolution is joining
the greater New England community at the Leukemia
& Lymphoma Society’s annual Boston Light the Night
Walk at 5 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 9, on the historic
Boston Common (Charles St., Boston, Mass.).
The Revolution has created a corporate team to
participate in the Light the Night Walk, and is seeking
fans and those affected by cancers to join and help
fundraise on behalf of the New England Revolution
Charitable Foundation.
Every member who signs up to walk as part of the
Revolution’s team will receive red, white and blue
glow sticks and necklaces at the walk.
The team’s top fan fundraisers will be eligible to win
prize packages including tickets in the Putnam Club,
pregame field passes or a VIP player meet & greet
and. The top fundraiser will also be honored in a
pregame ceremony at the Oct. 4 match against the
Columbus Crew. The Revolution Charitable
Foundation will match the first $2,500 in donations
received by the team’s walkers.
For up-to-the-minute information on the Revolution,
visit the team’s official web site at
revolutionsoccer.net, or join the conversation and
interact with fans on any of the team’s social platforms.
SPORTS
Tuesday, August 5, 2014
THE TIMES B3
NFL
Patriots getting ready for preseason
opener against Washington Redskins
Continued from page B1
ERNEST A. BROWN / Blackstone Valley Sports photo
Addison Kopack homered for the second straight game Monday night as Cumberland
American cruised to a 10-0 victory over New Hampshire.
Little League baseball
CALL wins with ease again
Continued from page B1
start the fourth, one in which CALL already
had garnered an 8-0 advantage. Trey
Thibeaul’s groundout pushed him to third, and
he scored on Bourque’s infield hit. Bourque’s
pinch-runner, Mason Matos, then took second
on a wild pitch and scored on Wright’s bloop,
two-out, walkoff single to left.
“I’ve just got a team that’s very foused, and
you can tell they’re all ready to go,” Belisle
noted. “This is the second game in a row
we’ve put up a big number in the first. With
Addison, when he’s in the batting cages, his
concentration is perfect, and it pays off on the
field.”
Like its contest Saturday against
Barnstable, CALL jumped out to a sizeable
lead, notching seven in the back half of the
initial frame. Goffstown righthander Brett
Patnode struck leadoff batter Nick Croteau
with his first delivery, then walked C.J.
Davock on five.
Struble’s single to right scored Croteau, and
Provost pushed in a pair with a hit to right
before Kopack’s ground-rule two-bagger to
left plated Provost. The next hitter, Sean
Meers, drilled a ground single to left to send
Kopack to third, and Trey Bourque reached on
an infield single to score Kopack. John Belisle
then beat out an infield miscue to fill the bags.
When No. 9 batter Matos grounded to third
baseman Myles Green, the latter threw home
to catch Meers on the force out, though
Bourque scampered home on a passed ball
and Belisle on a wild pitch to give the “hosts”
a 7-0 cushion.
All told, Patnode lasted only 2/3 of the
first, yielding five hits, seven runs (five
earned) and two passes with a strikeout before
giving way to T.J. Dutton.
With one out in the second, Kopack picked
up where he left off, launching a Dutton fstball high over the left-field fence to make it 80. Meers followed with a double and Bourque
was hit by a pitch, but Belisle flew out to short
and Matos’ grounded to Green to end the mild
rally.
In the interim, Croteau was sailing, allowing just a hit and walk through the first two
frames, though Belisle pulled him in favor of
lefty Brendan Wright with one down in the
third. Conor O’Connell immediately lifted a
shallow fly to center, and Provost made a
spectacular diving catch for the second out.
Wright followed with freebies to Connor
Hujsak and Dutton, and Goffstown seemed
ready to slice the deficit after the tandem
moved up on a passed ball. The southpaw
nevertheless forced clean-up batter Derek
Steckowych to foul out to catcher Bourque to
end it.
After Wright walked leadoff batter
Campbell to start the fourth, Coach Belisle
opted to replace him with Kopack, who quickly allowed Green to reach on an infield hit.
When Liam Kilbreth did the same, that loaded
the bases still with no one retired.
The tall, lanky righty, however, fanned the
side, including Conor O’Connell looking, to
escape.
“I’m just driving the ball where it’s pithed,”
Kopack stated shyly. “If it’s inside, I try to
pull it, and – if it’s outside – I just go with it.
This feels great; we’re playing well, and we
want it to continue.”
***
His New England Patriots joined
Washington on Monday for the start of
three days of joint practices ahead of their
preseason opener Thursday.
"I'm sure there will be plenty of things
that we can learn from the way the
Redskins do things," Belichick said. "And
maybe there'll be some things they do the
same, and if there are some things that are
different, we'll probably take a look at them
and say, 'Is that something we can do?' As a
head coach of an NFL team, you don't really get many opportunities to see what other
people are doing."
That's fairly magnanimous, given the
state of the two franchises.
Belichick has won three Super Bowls as
a head coach. His counterpart, Jay Gruden,
has won two Arena Bowls. While Belichick
can spin yarns about the pre-Indianapolis
Colts, many of Gruden's tales go back to
the Orlando Predators and Florida Tuskers.
"These guys have been consistently to
playoffs and Super Bowls for the last 10,
15 years," Gruden said. "To see how they
consistently go about their business is
going to be good for all of us."
DeSean Jackson got to go one-on-one
with Darrelle Revis. Vince Wilfork got to
hit some unfamiliar linemen. Tom Brady
carved up the Redskins first-team secondary, something Robert Griffin III hasn't
been able to do with any regularity during
this camp. When he wasn't otherwise busy,
Griffin was able to watch Brady runs some
plays.
"It's not really a time for us to watch him
like we're at a zoo," said Griffin, who then
predicted that quote would become "a headline."
When both had free time during a special teams drill, Brady (bright red No. 12
jersey) and Griffin III (bright gold No. 10)
chatted on the sideline.
"He was saying he's been in the same
offense for 15 years, which is astounding.
It's amazing," Griffin said. "He said it's
only my third year and that I've got a lot of
football left in me. That's big coming from
a guy like him. I appreciate that. Hopefully
I get a chance to sit down with him if he's
not too busy."
Griffin stayed after practice to sign autographs; Brady didn't. Patriots fans mingled
with Redskins counterparts to make up a
significant portion of a crowd that was
capped using a ticketing system to give
everyone space to breathe.
The two coaches were proactively
involved, with Belichick paying more
attention to defense and Gruden focusing
on offense. There were more than 170 players running simultaneous drills on two
fields, requiring some serious choreography
between the two organizations from the
time they started planning this in the spring.
"We originally put a schedule together,
sent it to coach Belichick," Gruden said.
"He recommended some other things, so
we adjusted it to fit what he wanted to do,
what we wanted to do, and it really didn't
take long. We both have the same goal in
mind, and that's to look at our guys and get
a good feel for if our guys can play."
One thing the Patriots have yet to master: how to scale back downfield contact on
receivers. The Redskins were instructed on
the tighter enforcement of the rules last
week, but New England won't get its visit
from the officials until next week. That was
evident Monday when New England's cornerbacks where grabbing and pushing well
past the five-yard limit.
"I don't know if they've got that briefing
yet, but we definitely did," Redskins receiver Andre Roberts said with a laugh as he
walked off the field. "And we kind of
noticed that today."
Goffstown, N.H.
000
0 -- 0 – 3 – 2
Cumberland American 710
2 -- 10 – 9 – 0
Brett Patnode, T.J. Dutton (1), Bobby Doherty (4) and Clay
Campbell. Nick Croteau, Brendan Wright (3), Addison Kopack (4)
and Trey Bourque. 2B – Kopack 2, Sean Meers. HR – Kopack.
Big second inning lifts Lincoln
Staff reports
CRANSTON — Sparked by a six-run
uprising in the second inning, the Lincoln 9-10
Year-Old All-Stars soared to a convincing 11-3
triumph over Vermont’s Essex Junction
Monday night at Michael P. Varrato. The win
improves Lincoln to 2-0 in the New England
regionals.
Alexander Ferranti paced Lincoln’s 13-hit
attack with a 3-for-4 showing while scoring
twice and driving in two runs. Cameron Labrie
finished 3-for-3 while Cameron Benard went
2-for-3 out of the leadoff spot.
Danny Fish, Nathan Kelly and Jaden White
combined to strike out 10 for Lincoln while
holding Vermont to three runs on four hits.
Kelly turned in 2 2/3 hitless innings in relief of
Fish.
Up 1-0 in the second, Lincoln put the game
out of reach behind two-run singles by Benard
and Kelly. Fish also produced a run with a base
hit.
For good measure, Lincoln scored twice in
the fourth inning before added solo runs in the
fifth and sixth. The locals swing back into
action on Wednesday against Scarborough,
Maine.
READER’S REWARDS
GET YOUR NAME IN THE HAT
Enter to win 4 tickets to:
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2014 General Admission
Ticket Vouchers
Twenty 4-packs of vouchers will be awarded.
ENTRY FORM: Pawsox
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City:_______________________________________State:______
Phone Number:_________________________________________
Must be 18 years old to enter.
Entries must be received by
Thursday, August 14, 2014 at
noon. Winners will be posted in
The Call & The Times on Friday,
August 15, 2014.
No Purchase Necessary. Employees of The
Call & The Times and their families are
not eligible.
Please mail or drop off entry form or 3x5 index card to:
The Call - Reader’s Rewards
75 Main St., Woon., RI 02895
OR
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23 Exchange St., Pawt., RI 02860
Visit www.pawsox.com for more information
Free Pic of the Day
Photo Give-A-Way
If your child’s name appears in the Pic of the Day you are welcome to receive
FREE photo reproductions of the Pic of the Day. Call Diane Ames at 401-7678505 to request your Pic of the Day photo set and you will receive one 8”x10”
and two 5”x7” photos as a free gift from Navigant Credit Union. Please give us
the date that your Pic of the Day ran in the paper.
Additional photos can be ordered at a cost of
$8.00 each for one 8”x10” or two 5”x7”
11”x17” Posters can also be ordered at a cost of $10.00
Please leave your order quantities and contact information when you call. You will be called when your
order will be ready for pick up. We accept cash, check and all major credit cards.
B4
SPORTS
THE TIMES
SCOREBOARD
AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
W
L Pct GB
Baltimore
62 48 .564

Toronto
60 53 .531 3½
New York
57 53 .518
5
Tampa Bay
54 57 .486 8½
Boston
49 62 .441 13½
Central Division
W
L Pct GB
Detroit
61 47 .565

Kansas City
57 53 .518
5
Cleveland
56 55 .505 6½
Chicago
54 58 .482
9
Minnesota
50 60 .455 12
West Division
W
L Pct GB
Oakland
67 43 .609

Los Angeles
66 44 .600
1
Seattle
57 54 .514 10½
Houston
47 65 .420 21
Texas
43 68 .387 24½
———
Sunday's Games
Cleveland 4, Texas 3, 12 innings
Detroit 4, Colorado 0
Baltimore 1, Seattle 0
L.A. Angels 7, Tampa Bay 5
Minnesota 16, Chicago White Sox 3
Houston 6, Toronto 1
Kansas City 4, Oakland 2
N.Y. Yankees 8, Boston 7
Monday's Games
Baltimore at Washington, (n)
Cincinnati at Cleveland, (n)
Detroit at N.Y. Yankees, (n)
Texas at Chicago White Sox, (n)
Tampa Bay at Oakland, (n)
L.A. Angels at L.A. Dodgers, (n)
Tuesday's Games
Cincinnati (Cueto 12-6) at Cleveland
(Tomlin 5-7), 7:05 p.m.
Detroit (Price 11-8) at N.Y. Yankees
(Kuroda 7-7), 7:05 p.m.
Houston (Keuchel 10-7) at Philadelphia
(K.Kendrick 5-11), 7:05 p.m.
Baltimore (B.Norris 8-7) at Toronto
(Buehrle 11-7), 7:07 p.m.
San Diego (Hahn 7-2) at Minnesota
(P.Hughes 10-8), 8:10 p.m.
Texas (Lewis 7-8) at Chicago White Sox
(Joh.Danks 9-6), 8:10 p.m.
Boston (R.De La Rosa 3-4) at St. Louis
(Lynn 11-8), 8:15 p.m.
Kansas City (D.Duffy 5-10) at Arizona
(Miley 7-7), 9:40 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Smyly 6-9) at Oakland
(Hammel 0-4), 10:05 p.m.
Atlanta (A.Wood 7-8) at Seattle
(F.Hernandez 11-3), 10:10 p.m.
L.A. Angels (H.Santiago 3-7) at L.A.
Dodgers (Kershaw 13-2), 10:10 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
San Diego at Minnesota, 1:10 p.m.
Texas at Chicago White Sox, 2:10 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Oakland, 3:35 p.m.
Atlanta at Seattle, 3:40 p.m.
Detroit at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
Houston at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
Baltimore at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.
Cleveland at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m.
Boston at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m.
Kansas City at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at L.A. Angels, 10:05
p.m.
AMERICAN LEAGUE LEADERS
THROUGH AUGUST 3
BATTING
G AB
R H BA
Altuve, HOU 109 457 60 155.339
Cano, SEA 106 412 53 136.330
Beltre, TEX 97 372 57 120.323
Brntley, CLE 107 419 73 135.322
Mrtinez, DET 97 365 54 117.321
Cbrera, DET 107 410 68 129 .315
Gillspie, CHW 86 318 42 100 .314
Cbrera, TOR 112 459 70 142.309
Suzuki, MIN 92 315 28 97.308
Chsnhall, CLE94 320 46 98.306
RUNS_Dozier, Minnesota, 77; Trout, Los
Angeles, 76; Brantley, Cleveland, 73;
Donaldson, Oakland, 73; MeCabrera,
Toronto, 70; Gardner, New York, 70;
Kinsler, Detroit, 70.
RBI_JAbreu, Chicago, 84; MiCabrera,
Detroit, 83; Ortiz, Boston, 82; Trout, Los
Angeles, 80; Donaldson, Oakland, 77;
NCruz, Baltimore, 75; Moss, Oakland, 72.
HITS_Altuve, Houston, 155; MeCabrera,
Toronto, 142; Cano, Seattle, 136; Brantley,
Cleveland, 135; Kinsler, Detroit, 131;
Markakis, Baltimore, 131; MiCabrera,
Detroit, 129.
DOUBLES_MiCabrera, Detroit, 36; Altuve,
Houston, 32; Plouffe, Minnesota, 31;
Trout, Los Angeles, 31; Kinsler, Detroit, 30;
Brantley, Cleveland, 29; Pedroia, Boston,
29.
TRIPLES_Rios, Texas, 8; Bourn,
Cleveland, 7; Eaton, Chicago, 7; Gardner,
New York, 6; LMartin, Texas, 6; De Aza,
Chicago, 5; BHolt, Boston, 5; AJackson,
Seattle, 5; Odor, Texas, 5; Trout, Los
Angeles, 5.
HOME RUNS_JAbreu, Chicago, 31;
NCruz, Baltimore, 29; Encarnacion,
Toronto, 26; Ortiz, Boston, 26; Trout, Los
Angeles, 25; Donaldson, Oakland, 23;
VMartinez, Detroit, 23; Moss, Oakland,
23.
STOLEN BASES_Altuve, Houston, 43;
Ellsbury, New York, 29; RDavis, Detroit,
26; AEscobar, Kansas City, 23; JDyson,
Kansas City, 22; Andrus, Texas, 21;
JJones, Seattle, 20; Reyes, Toronto, 20.
PITCHING_Scherzer, Detroit, 13-3;
Porcello, Detroit, 13-5; WChen,
Baltimore, 12-3; Gray, Oakland, 12-4;
Tanaka, New York, 12-4; Kazmir,
Oakland, 12-4; Weaver, Los Angeles, 126.
ERA_FHernandez, Seattle, 2.01; Sale,
Chicago, 2.09; Tanaka, New York, 2.51;
Kazmir, Oakland, 2.53; Gray, Oakland,
2.59; Lester, Oakland, 2.59; Lester,
Oakland, 2.59.
STRIKEOUTS_Price, Tampa Bay, 189;
FHernandez, Seattle, 178; Darvish,
Texas, 175; Kluber, Cleveland, 170;
Scherzer, Detroit, 167; Lester, Oakland,
152; Richards, Los Angeles, 143.
SAVES_Holland, Kansas City, 31;
Rodney, Seattle, 30; DavRobertson, New
York, 29; Perkins, Minnesota, 27; Britton,
Baltimore, 23; Uehara, Boston, 22;
Nathan, Detroit, 22.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
East Division
W
L Pct GB
Washington
60 49 .550

Atlanta
58 54 .518 3½
Miami
54 57 .486
7
New York
53 59 .473 8½
Philadelphia
49 63 .438 12½
Central Division
W
L Pct GB
Milwaukee
61 51 .545

St. Louis
59 51 .536
1
Pittsburgh
59 52 .532 1½
Cincinnati
56 55 .505 4½
Chicago
47 63 .427 13
West Division
W
L Pct GB
Los Angeles
63 49 .563

San Francisco
61 51 .545
2
San Diego
51 60 .459 11½
Arizona
49 63 .438 14
Colorado
44 67 .396 18½
———
Sunday's Games
Detroit 4, Colorado 0
Cincinnati 7, Miami 3
San Francisco 9, N.Y. Mets 0
Washington 4, Philadelphia 0
St. Louis 3, Milwaukee 2
San Diego 4, Atlanta 3, 10 innings
Chicago Cubs 7, L.A. Dodgers 3
Arizona 3, Pittsburgh 2, 10 innings
Monday's Games
San Francisco 4, N.Y. Mets 3
Baltimore at Washington, (n)
Cincinnati at Cleveland, (n)
L.A. Angels at L.A. Dodgers, (n)
Tuesday's Games
Cincinnati (Cueto 12-6) at Cleveland
(Tomlin 5-7), 7:05 p.m.
Houston (Keuchel 10-7) at Philadelphia
(K.Kendrick 5-11), 7:05 p.m.
Miami (Hand 2-3) at Pittsburgh (Morton 510), 7:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Za.Wheeler 6-8) at Washington
(G.Gonzalez 6-7), 7:05 p.m.
San Diego (Hahn 7-2) at Minnesota
(P.Hughes 10-8), 8:10 p.m.
San Francisco (Lincecum 9-7) at
Milwaukee (J.Nelson 1-2), 8:10 p.m.
Boston (R.De La Rosa 3-4) at St. Louis
(Lynn 11-8), 8:15 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (T.Wood 7-9) at Colorado
(B.Anderson 1-3), 8:40 p.m.
Kansas City (D.Duffy 5-10) at Arizona
(Miley 7-7), 9:40 p.m.
Atlanta (A.Wood 7-8) at Seattle
(F.Hernandez 11-3), 10:10 p.m.
L.A. Angels (H.Santiago 3-7) at L.A.
Dodgers (Kershaw 13-2), 10:10 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
San Diego at Minnesota, 1:10 p.m.
Atlanta at Seattle, 3:40 p.m.
Houston at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
Miami at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Washington, 7:05 p.m.
Cleveland at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m.
San Francisco at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m.
Boston at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at Colorado, 8:40 p.m.
Kansas City at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at L.A. Angels, 10:05
p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERS
THROUGH AUGUST 2
BATTING
G AB
R H BA
Tlwitzki, COL 91 315 71 107.340
Puig, LAD 101 377 62 121.321
Mrneau, COL94 352 40 110.313
Adams, STL 94 354 37 110.311
McCtchn, PIT108410 64 127.310
Revere, PHL100 380 48 116.305
Lucroy, MIL 103 394 54 120.305
McGhee, MIA109419 39 127.303
Gldschmdt, ARI109406 75 122.300
Blckmon, COL106409 56 121.296
RUNS_Rendon,
Washington,
77;
Goldschmidt, Arizona, 75; Pence, San
Francisco, 74; Rizzo, Chicago, 74;
Tulowitzki, Colorado, 71; FFreeman,
Atlanta, 70; Stanton, Miami, 70.
RBI_Stanton, Miami, 74; AdGonzalez,
Los Angeles, 71; Goldschmidt, Arizona,
69; Desmond, Washington, 66;
AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, 66; Braun,
Milwaukee, 65; Byrd, Philadelphia, 63;
Howard, Philadelphia, 63; Morneau,
Colorado, 63; JUpton, Atlanta, 63.
HITS_DanMurphy, New York, 132;
Pence,
San
Francisco,
128;
AMcCutchen,
Pittsburgh,
127;
McGehee, Miami, 127; DGordon, Los
Angeles, 124; Goldschmidt, Arizona,
122; Blackmon, Colorado, 121;
FFreeman, Atlanta, 121; CGomez,
Milwaukee, 121; Puig, Los Angeles,
121.
DOUBLES_Goldschmidt, Arizona, 39;
Lucroy, Milwaukee, 35; AMcCutchen,
Pittsburgh, 31; DanMurphy, New York,
31; Puig, Los Angeles, 30; SCastro,
Chicago, 29; FFreeman, Atlanta, 29;
Span, Washington, 29.
TRIPLES_DGordon, Los Angeles, 10;
BCrawford, San Francisco, 9; Puig, Los
Angeles, 9; Pence, San Francisco, 7;
Braun, Milwaukee, 6; BHamilton,
Cincinnati, 6; Segura, Milwaukee, 6;
Yelich, Miami, 6.
HOME RUNS_Stanton, Miami, 26;
Rizzo, Chicago, 25; Byrd, Philadelphia,
21; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 21; Duda, New
York, 20; Frazier, Cincinnati, 20;
Goldschmidt, Arizona, 19; JUpton,
Atlanta, 19.
STOLEN
BASES_DGordon,
Los
Angeles, 51; BHamilton, Cincinnati, 42;
Revere, Philadelphia, 30; EYoung, New
York, 26; CGomez, Milwaukee, 22;
SMarte, Pittsburgh, 21; Rollins,
Philadelphia, 21; Span, Washington, 21.
PITCHING_Kershaw, Los Angeles, 13-2;
WPeralta, Milwaukee, 13-6; Wainwright,
St. Louis, 13-6; Ryu, Los Angeles, 12-5;
Cueto, Cincinnati, 12-6; Greinke, Los
Angeles, 12-6; Simon, Cincinnati, 12-6;
Bumgarner, San Francisco, 12-8.
ERA_Kershaw, Los Angeles, 1.71;
Cueto, Cincinnati, 2.05; Wainwright, St.
Louis, 2.26; HAlvarez, Miami, 2.48;
Hamels, Philadelphia, 2.55; TRoss, San
Diego, 2.60; Greinke, Los Angeles,
2.65.
STRIKEOUTS_Strasburg, Washington,
167; Cueto, Cincinnati, 166; Greinke,
Los Angeles, 153; TRoss, San Diego,
150; Kershaw, Los Angeles, 150;
Kennedy, San Diego, 150; Bumgarner,
San Francisco, 143.
SAVES_Rosenthal, St. Louis, 33;
FrRodriguez, Milwaukee, 32; Kimbrel,
Atlanta, 32; Jansen, Los Angeles, 31;
Cishek, Miami, 27; AReed, Arizona, 27;
Papelbon, Philadelphia, 26.
INTERNATIONAL LEAGUE
North Division
W
L Pct. GB
Syracuse (Nats)
63 51 .553

Pawtucket (Red Sox)64 53 .547
½
Rochester (Twins) 63 53 .543
1
Buffalo (Blue Jays) 59 55 .518
4
Scranton/WB (Yanks)57 58 .496 6½
Lehigh Valley (Phillies)54 63 .462 10½
South Division
W
L Pct. GB
Durham (Rays)
60 55 .522

Norfolk (Orioles)
54 62 .466 6½
Charlotte (White Sox)53 64 .453
8
Gwinnett (Braves) 51 64 .443
9
West Division
W
L Pct. GB
Columbus (Indians) 61 56 .521

Indianapolis (Pirates)59 59 .500 2½
Toledo (Tigers)
58 60 .492 3½
Louisville (Reds)
57 60 .487
4
———
Saturday's Games
Rochester 6, Louisville 3
Columbus 2, Pawtucket 1, 11 innings
Lehigh Valley 4, Durham 1
Charlotte 5, Gwinnett 3
Indianapolis 4, Toledo 3, 10 innings
Norfolk 2, Buffalo 1, 8 innings
Scranton/Wilkes-Barre 13, Syracuse 0
Sunday's Games
Scranton/Wilkes-Barre 3, Syracuse 1
Columbus 9, Pawtucket 4
Toledo 2, Indianapolis 1
Gwinnett 5, Charlotte 4
Durham 9, Lehigh Valley 2
Buffalo 2, Norfolk 1
Rochester 6, Louisville 5, 15 innings
Monday's Games
Scranton/Wilkes-Barre at Syracuse, (n)
Pawtucket 5, Columbus 0
Toledo 4, Indianapolis 1
Lehigh Valley 7, Durham 1
Louisville 5, Rochester 1
Buffalo at Norfolk, (n)
Tuesday's Games
Durham at Lehigh Valley, 11:35 a.m.
Columbus at Pawtucket, 12:05 p.m.
Buffalo at Norfolk, 12:05 p.m.
Scranton/Wilkes-Barre at Syracuse, 7
p.m.
Rochester at Louisville, 7:05 p.m.
Toledo at Indianapolis, 7:05 p.m.
Gwinnett at Charlotte, 7:05 p.m.
Tuesday, August 5, 2014
SPORTS ON THE AIR
TODAY
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
7 p.m. — N.Y. Yankees or Baltimore at Toronto, MLB Network,
WPRV (790).
8:15 p.m. — Boston at St. Louis, NESN, WPRV (790).
MINOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
Noon — Columbus at Pawtucket, WHJJ (920).
LITTLE LEAGUE BASEBALL
1 p.m. — Playoffs, New England Regional pool play, Falmouth,
Maine vs. Barnstable, Massachusetts, at Bristol, Conn., NESN.
4 p.m. — Playoffs, New England Regional pool play, Cumberland
American vs. Fairfield, Connecticut, NESN.
5 p.m. — Playoffs, Southwest Regional semifinal, at Waco, Texas,
ESPN2.
8 p.m. — Playoffs, Southwest Regional semifinal, at Waco, Texas,
ESPN2.
TRANSACTIONS
Monday's Sports Transactions
By The Associated Press
BASEBALL
American League
BALTIMORE ORIOLES — Optioned RHP Ryan
Webb to Norfolk (IL). Sent RHP Ubaldo Jimenez
to Norfolk for a rehab assignment.
CHICAGO WHITE SOX — Optioned RHP Taylor
Thompson to Charlotte (IL). Selected the contract
of RHP Maikel Cleto from Charlotte.
CLEVELAND INDIANS — Optioned RHP Zach
McAllister to Columbus (IL).
HOUSTON ASTROS — Sent OF George
Springer to Quad Cities (MWL) for a rehab assignment.
KANSAS CITY ROYALS — Assigned C Brett
Hayes outright to Omaha (PCL).
MINNESOTA TWINS — Optioned LHP Logan
Darnell to Rochester (IL). Claimed OF Jordan
Schafer off waivers from Atlanta.
TAMPA BAY RAYS — Released LHP Erik Bedard
and RHP Juan Carlos Oviedo. Sent 2B Tim
Beckham to Charlotte (IL) for a rehab assignment.
TEXAS RANGERS — Sent LHP Derek Holland to
Round Rock (PCL) for a rehab assignment.
Placed C Chris Gimenez on paternity leave.
TORONTO BLUE JAYS — Assigned OF Cole
Gillespie outright to Buffalo (IL).
National League
ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS — Sent OF A.J.
Pollock to Reno (PCL) for a rehab assignment.
MILWAUKEE BREWERS — Sent LHP Wei-Chung
Wang to the AZL Brewers for a rehab assignment.
SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS — Sent INF Nick
Noonan outright to Fresno (PCL).
WASHINGTON NATIONALS — Placed OF Nate
McLouth on the 15-day DL, retroactive to
Saturday. Recalled OF Steven Souza Jr. from
Syracuse (IL).
American Association
AMARILLO SOX — Signed LHP Ryan Rogers and
INF Christian Figueroa. Released LHP Seth Lintz.
FARGO-MOORHEAD REDHAWKS — Signed
LHP Shawn O'Neill.
GRAND PRAIRIE AIRHOGS — Signed LHP
Thomas Keeling.
KANSAS CITY T-BONES — Released LHP Rick
Zagone.
LINCOLN SALTDOGS — Released INF Kevin
Howard.
WINNIPEG GOLDEYES — Released RHP
Chandler Barnard.
Can-Am League
QUEBEC CAPITALES — Released RHP Brett
Schreiber.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
CINCINNATI BENGALS — Signed QB Andy
Dalton to a six-year contract extension.
JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS — Activated CB Alan
Ball from the PUP list.
SEATTLE SEAHAWKS — Placed OT Michael
Bowie on the waived/injured list. Released LB
Brandon Denmark and WR Ronald Johnson.
Signed DT Andru Pulu. Claimed OT Cory
Brandon off waivers from Arizona.
WASHINGTON REDSKINS — Placed WR Jerry
Rice Jr. on the waived-injured list. Signed DL
Jeremy Towns.
Canadian Football League
MONTREAL ALOUETTES — Named Jeff Garcia
to the coaching staff.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
BUFFALO SABRES — Named Bryan Trottier,
Danny Flynn and Tom Coolen assistant coaches
and Arturs Irbe goalie coach.
ECHL
READING ROYALS — Agreed to terms with F
Brock Higgs.
UTAH GRIZZLIES — Re-signed D Channing Boe.
COLLEGE
BECKER — Named Eliza Kelley women's ice
hockey coach.
DARTMOUTH — Named Shannon Doepking softball coach.
HOFSTRA — Named Dennis Papadatos wrestling
coach.
YESHIVA — Named Erica Lamm assistant director
of athletics.
THIS DATE IN SPORTS
By The Associated Press
Aug. 5
1921 — Radio station KDKA and announcer Harold Arlin provide the first broadcast of a major league
game as the Pirates beat the Phillies 8-5 at Pittsburgh.
1936 — At the Berlin Olympics, Jesse Owens wins his third of four gold medals, winning the 200-meter
race in an Olympic-record 20.7 seconds.
1954 — The first election for the Boxing Hall of Fame is held. Twenty-four fighters are elected, with the
most noteworthy from the modern era Jack Dempsey, Joe Louis and Henry Armstrong. Fifteen are
selected from the pioneer era including John L. Sullivan, Gentleman Jim Corbett and Jack Johnson.
1967 — The Denver Broncos beat the Detroit Lions, 13-7, in a preseason game, for the first AFL victory over an NFL team.
1984 — American Joan Benoit wins the first Olympic marathon for women in 2:24:52, finishing 400
meters ahead of Norway's Grete Waitz.
1991 — Sergei Bubka becomes the first to clear 20 feet outdoors in the pole vault, breaking his own
world record by a half-inch at the Galan track meet in Malmo, Sweden.
1992 — The U.S. women's basketball team is upset by the Unified Team 79-73 in the semifinals at the
Summer Olympics.
1997 — Michael Johnson wins his third straight 400-meter title at the world championships in Athens,
Greece, capturing the gold medal in 44.12 seconds. Sally Barsosio becomes the first Kenyan woman
to win a gold medal at either the World Championships or the Olympics, taking the 10,000 meters in
a world junior record time of 31:32.92.
1999 — Mark McGwire becomes the 16th member of the 500-home run club, hitting two homers —
Nos. 500 and 501 — in the St. Louis Cardinals' loss to San Diego.
2001 — Se Ri Pak wins the Women's British Open by two strokes and moves within one victory of the
career Grand Slam. Pak finishes with an 11-under of 277 to add to her 1998 U.S. Open and LPGA
Championship titles.
2005 — Jason Gore shoots a 12-under 59 in the second round of the Nationwide Tour's Cox Classic
in Omaha, Neb. Gore is the third Nationwide player to shoot a 59.
2007 — Tom Glavine earns his 300th victory in an 8-3 victory over the Chicago Cubs.
2007 — Lorena Ochoa wins the Women's British Open — the first women's professional tournament
played at venerable St. Andrews — for her first major title.
2012 — Jamaica's Usain Bolt claims consecutive gold medals in the marquee track and field event at
the Summer Games in London. Only about fifth-fastest of the eight runners to the halfway mark, Bolt
erases that deficit and overtakes a star-studded field to win the 100-meter dash final in 9.63 seconds,
an Olympic record that lets him join Carl Lewis as the only men to win the event twice.
2012 — Britain's Andy Murray cruises past Roger Federer 6-2, 6-1, 6-4 in the men's Olympic tennis
singles final at Wimbledon. Serena and Venus Williams win the women's doubles title, as Serena
becomes tennis' first double gold medalist at an Olympics since Venus won singles and doubles at the
2000 Sydney Games. Ben Ainslie earns another gold in the Finn class to become the most successful sailor in Olympic history.
2013 — Alex Rodriguez is suspended through 2014 (211 games) and All-Stars Nelson Cruz, Jhonny
Peralta and Everth Cabrera are banned 50 games apiece when Major League Baseball disciplines 13
players in a drug case — the most sweeping punishment since the Black Sox scandal nearly a century ago.
NFL PRESEASON GLANCE
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W
L
T Pct PF
Miami
0
0
0 .000 0
New England 0
0
0 .000 0
N.Y. Jets
0
0
0 .000 0
Buffalo
0
1
0 .000 13
South
W
L
T Pct PF
Houston
0
0
0 .000 0
Indianapolis
0
0
0 .000 0
Jacksonville
0
0
0 .000 0
Tennessee
0
0
0 .000 0
North
W
L
T Pct PF
Baltimore
0
0
0 .000 0
Cincinnati
0
0
0 .000 0
Cleveland
0
0
0 .000 0
Pittsburgh
0
0
0 .000 0
West
W
L
T Pct PF
Denver
0
0
0 .000 0
Kansas City
0
0
0 .000 0
Oakland
0
0
0 .000 0
San Diego
0
0
0 .000 0
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W
L
T Pct PF
N.Y. Giants
1
0
01.000 17
Dallas
0
0
0 .000 0
Philadelphia
0
0
0 .000 0
Washington
0
0
0 .000 0
South
W
L
T Pct PF
Atlanta
0
0
0 .000 0
Carolina
0
0
0 .000 0
New Orleans
Tampa Bay
PA
0
0
0
17
PA
0
0
0
0
PA
0
0
0
0
PA
0
0
0
0
PA
13
0
0
0
PA
0
0
0
0
0
0 .000 0
0
0 .000 0
North
W
L
T Pct PF
Chicago
0
0
0 .000 0
Detroit
0
0
0 .000 0
Green Bay
0
0
0 .000 0
Minnesota
0
0
0 .000 0
West
W
L
T Pct PF
Arizona
0
0
0 .000 0
San Francisco 0
0
0 .000 0
Seattle
0
0
0 .000 0
St. Louis
0
0
0 .000 0
———
Sunday's Game
N.Y. Giants 17, Buffalo 13
Thursday’s Games
Indianapolis at N.Y. Jets, 7 p.m.
New England at Washington, 7:30 p.m.
San Francisco at Baltimore, 7:30 p.m.
Cincinnati at Kansas City, 8 p.m.
Seattle at Denver, 9 p.m.
Dallas at San Diego, 10 p.m.
Friday’s Games
Miami at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
Buffalo at Carolina, 7:30 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Jacksonville, 7:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Oakland at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
New Orleans at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
Cleveland at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Pittsburgh at N.Y. Giants, 7:30 p.m.
Green Bay at Tennessee, 8 p.m.
Houston at Arizona, 8:30 p.m.
0
0
PA
0
0
0
0
PA
0
0
0
0
BOXING
Fight Schedule
By The Associated Press
(Televised fights in parentheses)
Thursday, Aug. 7
At American Bank Center, Corpus Christi, Texas (FS1), Jerry Belmontes vs. Abner Cotto, 10, junior
lightweights.
Saturday, Aug. 9
At Barclays Center, Brooklyn, N.Y. (SHO), Daniel Jacobs vs. Jarrod Fletcher, 12, for the vacant WBA
World middleweight title; Lamont Peterson vs. Edgar Santana, 12, for Peterson's IBF junior welterweight title; Danny Garcia vs. Rod Salka, 12, for Garcia's WBC-WBA Super World junior welterweight
titles.
At Ica, Peru, Nehomar Cermeno vs. Carlos Zambrano, 12, for Cermeno's interim WBA World junior
featherweight title.
International League
Owens sparkles in
first PawSox start
Staff reports
PAWTUCKET – Pawtucket starter Henry Owens dazzled in
his Triple-A debut, tossing 6.2 scoreless innings with nine strikeouts and combined with two relievers on a four-hit shutout as the
PawSox blanked the Columbus Clippers, 5-0, Monday night at
McCoy Stadium in front of 8,161 fans to snap a three-game losing skid.
Owens (1-0) held Columbus without a hit through the first 5.1
innings before Francisco Lindor’s infield single. The 22-yearold worked well with catcher Blake Swihart, another 22-year-old
super-prospect who was also making his PawSox debut after
being promoted from Double-A Portland earlier in the day.
With the victory, the PawSox moved 0.5 games ahead of
Rochester in the I.L. wildcard standings after the Red Wings lost
5-1 at Louisville. Pawtucket (64-53) moved to within 0.5 games
of Syracuse (63-51) in the North Division standings, pending the
Chiefs result at home against Scranton/Wilkes-Barre.
Bryce Brentz, playing in only his second game back after a 2
½-month stint on the disabled list, homered and went 3-for-4 to
pace the PawSox 12-hit attack. After the game was scoreless
through three innings, Pawtucket struck for five runs over the
next four innings against Clippers starter Tyler Cloyd (9-6).
RBI hits from Garin Cecchini (single) and Deven Marrero
(double) highlighted the PawSox’s two-run, four-hit rally against
Cloyd in the fourth to go in front 2-0.
Travis Shaw’s double-play groundout in the fifth increased
the margin to 3-0, then Brentz (7) and Derrik Gibson (2) hit leadoff solo homers in the sixth and seventh innings respectively.
Owens allowed two hits and three walks in his 6.2 innings of
work and earned his professional baseball-leading 15th victory
of the season. John Ely (1.1 innings, one hit) and Drake Britton
(1.0 innings, one hit) finished the shutout for Pawtucket.
Justin Henry went 3-for-3 with a walk and a run scored for the
PawSox, while Swihart went 0-for-3 with a strikeout in his
Triple-A debut. Cloyd, one start removed from pitching a nineinning no-hitter, permitted 11 hits and five runs in 7.0 innings of
work.
The PawSox seven-game homestand concludes Tuesday
afternoon as the finale of the four-game series is scheduled to
begin at 12:05 pm. Left-hander Edwin Escobar (0-0, 1.50) is
expected to get the ball for manager Kevin Boles, while righty
Zach McAllister (5-0, 2.23) is expected start for the Clippers.
MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER
EASTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF
Sporting K.C. 11 5 6 39 32
D.C.
11 6 4 37 32
Toronto FC
8 7 5 29 29
New York
6 6 10 28 35
Columbus
6 7 9 27 26
New England 8 12 2 26 29
Philadelphia
5 8 9 24 34
Houston
6 11 4 22 23
Chicago
3 5 13 22 28
Montreal
3 13 5 14 21
WESTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF
Seattle
12 6 2 38 35
Real Salt Lake 9 4 9 36 33
Los Angeles
9 4 6 33 32
FC Dallas
9 7 6 33 35
Colorado
8 8 6 30 31
Vancouver
6 4 11 29 31
Portland
6 7 9 27 36
San Jose
6 8 5 23 23 20
Chivas USA
6 10 5 23 21 34
NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie.
———
Sunday's Games
Houston 1, D.C. United 0
FC Dallas 1, Chivas USA 0
Wednesday’s Game
Bayern Munchen at MLS All-Stars, 9:30 p.m.
Friday’s Game
San Jose at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
Montreal at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Toronto FC at Columbus, 7:30 p.m.
Colorado at FC Dallas, 9 p.m.
D.C. United at Real Salt Lake, 10 p.m.
Chivas USA at Portland, 10:30 p.m.
Sunday’s Games
Sporting Kansas City at Vancouver, 8 p.m.
New York at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Houston at Seattle FC, 10:30 p.m.
GA
20
21
28
33
28
35
36
40
34
39
GA
28
27
17
31
28
29
38
WNBA
———
Saturday's Games
Minnesota 84, Tulsa 75
Phoenix 79, Indiana 69
Sunday's Games
New York 83, Atlanta 76
Los Angeles 70, Connecticut 69
Chicago 76, Washington 65
Seattle 71, San Antonio 65
Monday's Games
No games scheduled
Tuesday's Games
Chicago at Connecticut, 7 p.m.
Minnesota at Indiana, 7 p.m.
New York at Washington, 7 p.m.
Atlanta at Phoenix, 10 p.m.
Tulsa at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.
EASTERN CONFERENCE
W
L Pct GB
Atlanta
17 10 .630

Indiana
13 15 .464 4½
Washington 13 15 .464 4½
New York
12 15 .444
5
Chicago
12 16 .429 5½
Connecticut 11 18 .379
7
WESTERN CONFERENCE
W
L Pct GB
x-Phoenix
23
4 .852

x-Minnesota 22
6 .786 1½
Los Angeles 13 15 .464 10½
San Antonio 13 16 .448 11
Tulsa
10 19 .345 14
Seattle
10 20 .333 14½
x-clinched playoff spot
GOLF
PGA Tour FedExCup Leaders
The Associated Press
Through Aug. 3
Rank Player Points
YTD
1. Jimmy Walker
2,407
2. Bubba Watson
2,167
3. Rory McIlroy
1,982
4. Matt Kuchar
1,921
5. Dustin Johnson
1,769
6. Jim Furyk
1,736
7. Jordan Spieth
1,692
8. Sergio Garcia
1,666
9. Patrick Reed
1,612
10. Chris Kirk
1,571
11. Zach Johnson
1,551
12. Brendon Todd
1,541
13. Martin Kaymer
1,525
14. Harris English
1,469
15. Webb Simpson
1,436
16. Adam Scott
1,426
17. Kevin Na
1,413
18. Ryan Moore
1,400
19. Justin Rose
1,400
20. Brian Harman
1,320
21. Rickie Fowler
1,291
22. Keegan Bradley
1,278
23. Hideki Matsuyama 1,253
24. Matt Every
1,250
25. John Senden
1,157
26. Marc Leishman
1,118
27. Tim Clark
1,068
28. Kevin Stadler
1,062
29. Gary Woodland
1,059
30. Graham DeLaet
1,059
31. Charles Howell III 1,042
32. Charley Hoffman
1,026
33. J.B. Holmes
1,001
34. Bill Haas
980
35. Jason Day
974
36. Kevin Streelman
972
37. George McNeill
962
38. Ryan Palmer
953
39. Matt Jones
950
40. Seung-Yul Noh
950
41. Graeme McDowell 929
42. Will MacKenzie
920
43. Justin Hicks
912
44. Russell Knox
885
45. Russell Henley
864
46. Brian Stuard
854
47. Daniel Summerhays 832
48. Chris Stroud
829
49. Steven Bowditch
817
50. K.J. Choi
814
51. Angel Cabrera
807
52. Jason Dufner
798
53. Scott Brown
797
Money
$5,074,340
$5,166,661
$5,165,896
$4,129,969
$4,249,180
$4,268,095
$3,854,682
$4,326,180
$3,562,590
$3,016,867
$2,970,955
$3,153,495
$4,007,537
$2,898,822
$2,999,661
$3,262,804
$2,762,427
$3,029,563
$3,409,734
$2,318,354
$3,362,317
$2,697,889
$2,481,924
$2,506,290
$2,275,285
$2,498,295
$1,989,278
$2,128,054
$2,222,419
$2,269,612
$1,853,837
$1,912,449
$2,147,304
$1,687,978
$2,463,018
$2,007,480
$1,914,991
$1,835,452
$1,869,712
$1,842,371
$1,983,955
$1,812,878
$1,532,401
$1,350,830
$1,748,520
$1,659,799
$1,360,448
$1,652,025
$1,612,369
$1,608,178
$1,636,359
$1,651,491
$1,401,470
PGA Tour Statistics
By The Associated Press
Through Aug. 3
Scoring Average
1, Sergio Garcia, 68.739. 2, Rory
McIlroy, 69.057. 3, Adam Scott,
69.323. 4, Matt Kuchar, 69.343. 5,
Graeme McDowell, 69.434. 6, Jim
Furyk, 69.460. 7, Dustin Johnson,
69.546. 8, Bubba Watson, 69.671. 9,
Charl Schwartzel, 69.700. 10, Justin
Rose, 69.718.
Driving Distance
1, Bubba Watson, 314.8. 2, Dustin
Johnson, 311.0. 3, Rory McIlroy,
310.3. 4, J.B. Holmes, 308.2. 5,
Andrew Loupe, 306.8. 6, Brooks
Koepka, 306.2. 7, Robert Garrigus,
305.5. 8, Jason Kokrak, 304.7. 9,
Jhonattan Vegas, 304.6. 10, Charles
Howell III, 304.2.
Ernst, 85. 8, Hudson Swafford, 87. 9,
Nick Watney, 90. 10, Kevin Chappell,
95.
Birdie Average
1, Rory McIlroy, 4.59. 2, Jimmy
Walker, 4.24. 3, Adam Scott, 4.19. 4,
Hideki Matsuyama, 4.12. 5, Sergio
Garcia, 4.10. 6, Dustin Johnson, 4.05.
7 (tie), Charley Hoffman and Bubba
Watson, 4.04. 9, Charl Schwartzel,
3.98. 10, Chris Stroud, 3.97.
Eagles (Holes per)
1, Justin Rose, 85.1. 2, Will
MacKenzie, 87.4. 3 (tie), Miguel Angel
Carballo and Billy Horschel, 102.0. 5,
Bubba Watson, 106.0. 6, Patrick
Reed, 109.6. 7, Stewart Cink, 112.2.
8, Steven Bowditch, 112.5. 9, Dustin
Johnson, 114.0. 10, Matt Jones,
114.5.
Sand Save Percentage
1, Vijay Singh, 64.04%. 2, Tim Clark,
63.55%. 3, Mike Weir, 62.16%. 4,
Charlie Wi, 61.54%. 5, Justin Leonard,
60.58%. 6, Bill Haas, 60.42%. 7, John
Senden, 60.14%. 8, Heath Slocum,
59.79%. 9, Jordan Spieth, 59.76%.
10, Phil Mickelson, 59.65%.
All-Around Ranking
1, Adam Scott, 175. 2, Sergio Garcia,
241. 3, Dustin Johnson, 275. 4 (tie),
Bubba Watson and Rory McIlroy, 306.
6, Justin Rose, 343. 7, Ryan Moore,
353. 8, Marc Leishman, 366. 9, Zach
Johnson, 376. 10, Matt Kuchar, 380.
NASCAR
NASCAR Sprint Cup Leaders
The Associated Press
Through Aug. 3
Points
1, Jeff Gordon, 757. 2, Dale Earnhardt Jr., 740. 3, Brad
Keselowski, 687. 4, Matt Kenseth, 668. 5, Ryan Newman,
642. 6, Jimmie Johnson, 633. 7, Joey Logano, 633. 8, Carl
Edwards, 618. 9, Clint Bowyer, 617. 10, Kyle Busch, 611. 11,
Kevin Harvick, 608. 12, Kyle Larson, 595. 13, Greg Biffle,
590. 14, Kasey Kahne, 589. 15, Austin Dillon, 588. 16, Paul
Menard, 562. 17, Marcos Ambrose, 541. 18, Brian Vickers,
539. 19, Tony Stewart, 537. 20, Jamie McMurray, 536.
Money
1, Brad Keselowski, $4,774,247. 2, Jeff Gordon,
$4,537,170. 3, Dale Earnhardt Jr., $4,463,649. 4, Jimmie
Johnson, $4,384,000. 5, Jamie McMurray, $4,172,813. 6,
Kevin Harvick, $4,088,052. 7, Matt Kenseth, $4,062,004.
8, Kyle Busch, $4,040,797. 9, Joey Logano, $4,013,780.
10, Denny Hamlin, $3,885,911. 11, Greg Biffle,
$3,453,774. 12, Austin Dillon, $3,377,221. 13, Clint
Bowyer, $3,317,192. 14, Paul Menard, $3,255,934. 15,
Aric Almirola, $3,251,201. 16, Brian Vickers, $3,250,083.
17, Carl Edwards, $3,242,597. 18, Tony Stewart,
$3,178,572. 19, Kyle Larson, $3,132,810. 20, Ricky
Stenhouse Jr., $3,075,815.
———
NASCAR Sprint Cup Schedule
By The Associated Press
Aug. 10 — Cheez-It 355 at The Glen, Watkins Glen, N.Y.
Aug. 17 — Pure Michigan 400, Brooklyn, Mich.
Aug. 23 — Irwin Tools Night Race, Bristol, Tenn.
Aug. 31 — Atlanta 500, Hampton, Ga.
Sep. 6 — Federated Auto Parts 400, Richmond, Va.
Sep. 14 — Chicagoland 400, Joliet, Ill.
Sep. 21 — Sylvania 300, Loudon, N.H.
Sep. 28 — AAA 400, Dover, Del.
Oct. 5 — Hollywood Casino 400, Kansas City, Kan.
Oct. 11 — Bank of America 500, Concord, N.C.
Oct. 19 — GEICO 500, Talladega, Ala.
Oct. 26 — Goody's Headache Relief Shot 500, Ridgeway,
Va.
Nov. 2 — AAA Texas 500, Fort Worth, Texas
Nov. 9 — Quicken Loans Race for Heroes 500, Avondale,
Ariz.
Nov. 16 — Ford EcoBoost 400, Homestead, Fla.
COMICS
Tuesday, August 5, 2014
Retail
For Better or Worse
Blondie
By Norm Feuti
By Lynn Johnston
By Dean Young & Denis Lebrun
Mother Goose & Grimm
Baby Blues
By Mike Peters
By Rick Kirkman & Jerry Scott
By Pat Brady
Rose Is Rose
Funky Winkerbean
By Tom Batiuk
By Johnny Hart
B.C.
Cryptoquote
THE TIMES B5
Lio
By Mark Tatulli
Crankshaft
By Tom Batiuk
Garfield
Gasoline Alley
Zits
By Jim Davis
By Jim Scancarelli
By Jerry Scott & Jim Borgman
Marvin
By Tom Armstrong
Pearls Before Swine
By Stephan Pastis
Get Fuzzy
By Darby Conley
Su Do Ku Tips and computer program at www.sudoku.com.
For solutions, check “JRC Publications” on the
solutions page of www.sudoku.com.
© Puzzles by Pappocom
B6 THE TIMES
Blackstone es
u
l
Valley Va
Tuesday, August 5, 2014
100 Legals
100 Legals
MORTGAGEE'S SALE
88 Elder Street Pawtucket, RI
The premises described in the mortgage will be
sold subject to all encumbrances and prior liens
on August 26, 2014 at 9:00 a.m. on the premises, by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
mortgage by John N. Blais dated June 26, 2008
and recorded in the Pawtucket Land Evidence
Records in Book 3036, Page 144, the conditions
of said mortgage having been broken.
Legals
107 Personals
123 Autos For Sale
NOTICE OF AMENDMENT
CREDIT
FOR ERRORS
The City of Central Falls is requesting the Rhode
Island Office of Housing and Community Development amend the City's Community Development Block Grant Program Income funds as follows:
Each advertiser is asked
to check his/her advertisement on the first
day of publication and
to report any error to
the Times classified
department (3651438) as soon as possible for correction.
2001 TOYOTA RAV4 4WD
4cyl, automatic, silver, 70k
mi. $3700 Phone #786520-5649
100 Legals
100 Legals
100 Legals
Decrease Activity entitled
“CDBG Revolving Funds from
$655,479 to $580,479”
No adjustment will be
given for typographical
errors, which do not
change the meaning or
lessen the value of the
advertisement.
2002 Jeep Grand Cherokee
Limited. 4 dr., 2 or 4
wheel dr., loaded, roof,
leather, mint, one owner,
$2500. 401-241-0354
2004 Cady DeVille Limited 4
dr. black chrome wheels,
moonroof low miles Must
see $ 3950. 401-301-0056
2004 DODGE STRATUS
4DR 97K ONE OWNER
LEGAL NOTICE
LOOKS NEW RUN GREAT
509 WINTHROP (RTE 44)
INFORMATION
REHOBOTH MA $3500
Create an Activity entitled
$5,000.00 in cash, certified or bank check is reLegal Notices may be
“115 Illinois St. Acquisition at $75,000”
quired to bid. Other terms will be announced at
2005
Pontiac Sunfire SE 2
Credit will be allowed
mailed to:
dr Coupe. Loaded, 4 cyl.,
only to that portion of
the sale.
The Times,
33MPG, auto, silver, roof,
the advertisement
Written inquiries and comments regarding the
like new, $1850. Call 401where the error ocP.O. Box 307,
241-0413
proposed amendment will be received at the fol- Pawtucket, RI 02860
HARMON LAW OFFICES, P.C.
curred.
SELL YOUR CAR, VAN OR
lowing address and should be made within Faxed to:
Attorney for the Holder of the Mortgage
TRUCK THE EASY WAY.
seven (7) days of publication of this notice.
150 California Street
Call the classified team at
(401) 767-8509
Vehicles
The Times today. Tell
Newton, MA 02458
or Emailed to:
more than 40,000 adult
Central Falls Office of Planning and
(617) 558-0500
classified@pawtuckettimes.com
readers in the are about
your vehicle. It's easy to
Economic Development
201101-1591 - YEL
do, just dial 401-365Complete
instructions
580 Broad St.
1438 or visit us at www.should include:
pawtuckettimes.com
Central
Falls,
RI
02863
MORTGAGEE'S SALE
Publication dates,
146 Oakland Ave., Pawtucket, RI
Billing information and
125 AntiqueStephen C. Larrick
Assessor s Plat: 11 Assessor s Lot: 745
the Name and Phone
Director of Planning
Classic Cars
123
Autos
For
Sale
number of individual to
Will be sold at public auction, subject to all taxcontact if necessary. 01 DODGE- Grand Cara- 67 Ford – Galaxy 500 cones, assessments, mortgages, and other encumvertible. All original, low
van. 107K miles, needs mileage, $13,900 or best.
brances which may constitute a lien, on August
LEGAL NOTICES
some work. $1,000. Call Chas 401-294-3123
20, 2014 at 2 p.m., Local Time, on the premises
MUST BE RECEIVED 401-207-1815/363-1677.
described in the mortgage, by virtue of the powMORTGAGEE'S SALE
3 BUSINESS DAYS 1993 Toyota Corolla,
126 Trucks
Brown. Runs good but
er of sale contained in a Mortgage made by Sally
146-148 Lafayette Street,
PRIOR TO
needs tlc 4 door. InspectA. Horan and Michael E. Horan dated July 9,
Pawtucket, RI 02860
ed. Very economic. 4 cyl. '04 GMC Yukon Denali. ExPUBLICATION
condition. Naviga2007 and recorded in Book 2902 at Page 219 in
For further information $800. Call 401-497-5616 cellent
tion, DVD player, maintethe Office of Land Evidence Records of the City The premises described in the mortgage will be
1996 Toyota Carolla. Runs nance records, new tires,
Call 365-1438
great. Green. 174K miles. $11,000 obo. 766-4737
of Pawtucket, State of Rhode Island the condi- sold subject to all encumbrances and prior liens Monday thru Friday;
Asking $1500 or best oftions of said mortgage having been broken.
on August 20, 2014 at 1:00PM on the premises, 8:30 a.m. To 4:30 p.m. fer. 401-728-0162
1998 Ranger, 5 speed,
4x4, extended cab, runs
by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
1997 OLDS Achieva, 4 cyl., great. $2,495. Call 401Deposit of Five Thousand and 00/100 ($5,000) mortgage from Jean Phillipe Barros dated Octoauto, runs great, $1095 447-4451
or best.
769-0095 or
Dollars in cash, certified or bank check is re- ber 31, 2005 and recorded in Book L2514 at
2001 FORD F150
401-447-4451
without problems, 121K
quired at time and place of sale. Other terms and Page 120 in the Records of Land Evidence in the
miles.
$4000 You can call
Mustang 5.0 Limited
conditions will be announced at the sale.
City of Pawtucket, RI, the conditions of said Annoucements 1998
Conv. V8, 5 speed, black, me at 240-224-3050
mortgage having been broken.
saddle leather, wheels,
mint, low miles, very fast,
By order of the holder of the mortgage, who
131 Boats - Marine
$2950. 401-301-0056
hereby gives notice of its intention to bid at said $5,000.00 in cash, certified or bank check is re1999
Chrysler
Sebring
JXI
61 PEARSON Triton –
sale or any postponement or adjournment there- quired to bid. Other terms will be announced at
Limited, 2dr., convertible, Sloop, 28ft, with sails. In
of.
the sale.
loaded, auto, V6, low use thru 2012. Needs
Brennan, Recupero, Cascione,
Scungio & McAllister
Attorney for the holder of the Mortgage
362 Broadway
Providence, Rhode Island 02909
(401) 453-2300
File #14-7158
STATE OF RHODE ISLAND
Probate Court of the
CITY OF PAWTUCKET
NOTICE
OF MATTERS PENDING AND FOR HEARING
IN SAID COURT
CITY OF PAWTUCKET
The Court will be in session at 2:00PM
on the dates specified in notices below
KORDE & ASSOCIATES, P.C.
Attorneys for the Holder of the Mortgage
321 Billerica Road, Suite 210
Chelmsford, MA 01824-4100
(978) 256-1500
(7/29/2014, 8/5/2014, 8/12/2014)
13-013661
CONDOMINIUM LIEN FORECLOSURE SALE
9 Wake Robin Road, Unit 501
Lincoln, RI
FIGUEROA, ASHLEY N., ward.
Will be sold at Public Auction on August 14,
Appointment of Guardian: for hearing August 2014, at 1:00 P.M., on the premises, by power of
13, 2014.
sale granted to The Gardens at Wake Robin Condominium Association by R.I.G.L. § 34-36.1DEL PAPA, GLORIA E., estate.
3.16 and pursuant to R.I.G.L. § 34-36.1-3.21,
Thomas F. Corley of Pasco, WA and Bank of the obligation of the Unit Owner, Stephen M.
America, NA c/o Lorraine E. O'Rourke of Provi- Garrahan, to pay condominium assessments
dence have qualified as Co-Executors and having been defaulted. That certain condominiThomas F. Corley has appointed Deborah DiNar- um Unit in The Gardens at Wake Robin Condodo, Esq. of Partridge Snow & Hahn of 40 West- minium described in the deed into owner for
minster Street, Suite 1100 as his Agent in Rhode Unit 501, recorded in the Lincoln Land Evidence
Island: creditors must file their claims in the Records, in Book 1388 at Page 243, containing
office of the probate clerk within the time re- the recording data for the Declaration which is
quired by law beginning July 29, 2014.
incorporated herein. The Unit will be sold subject to matters which may constitute valid liens
DONAIS, DEBORAH, estate.
or encumbrances after sale. Terms and condiWilliam Byrne of Pawtucket has qualified as Ex- tions of sale to be announced at sale. Cash, cerecutor: creditors must file their claims in the of- tified or bank check for $5,000 required to bid.
fice of the probate clerk within the time required
by law beginning July 29, 2014.
RAYMOND HARRISON
Attorney for The Gardens at
HAZEL, LINDA H. (alias Linda A. Hazel) estate.
Wake Robin Condo. Assoc.
Thomas Hazel IV of Pawtucket has qualified as
33 College Hill Road, Suite 5B
Administrator: creditors must file their claims in
Warwick, RI 02886
the office of the probate clerk within the time
(401) 821-8200
required by law beginning July 29, 2014.
NEUMANN, LILLIAN G., estate.
Cheryl L. Brooks of Warwick has qualified as
Executrix: creditors must file their claims in the
office of the probate clerk within the time required by law beginning July 29, 2014.
MORTGAGEE'S SALE
15 Don Court, Pawtucket, RI 02861
The premises described in the mortgage will be
sold subject to all encumbrances and prior liens
on July 30, 2014 at 5:00PM on the premises, by
virtue of the power of sale contained in a mortgage from Christina L. Hereth and Jamie P.
Giguere dated October 20, 2004 and recorded in
Book L2211 at Page 76 in the Records of Land
SZELIGA, WALTER A., estate.
Evidence in the City of Pawtucket, RI, the condiLinda M. McCabe of Brookeville, MD has quali- tions of said mortgage having been broken.
fied as Executrix and has appointed Paul A.
Brule, Esq. of 1334 Mendon Rd., Cumberland as $5,000.00 in cash, certified or bank check is reher Agent in Rhode Island: creditors must file quired to bid. Other terms will be announced at
their claims in the office of the probate clerk the sale.
within the time required by law beginning July
29, 2014.
By order of the Mortgagee which gives notice of
its intention to bid at such sale or any postponeSPENCER, KEVIN R., ward.
ment or adjournment thereof.
Julieta Spencer and Silvestre Spencer of Pawtucket have qualified as Co-Guardians: creditors
KORDE & ASSOCIATES, P.C.
must file their claims in the office of the probate
Attorneys for the Holder of the Mortgage
clerk within the time required by law beginning
321 Billerica Road, Suite 210
July 29, 2014.
Chelmsford, MA 01824-4100
(978)256-1500
THURBER, SUSAN A., ward.
(7/8/2014, 7/15/2014, 7/22/2014)
Christopher M. Lefebvre, Esq. of Pawtucket has
qualified as Guardian: creditors must file their
NOTICE OF ADJOURNMENT
claims in the office of the probate clerk within At the above time and place, the above referthe time required by law beginning July 29, enced foreclosure was postponed, continued and
2014.
adjourned until August 14, 2014 at 2:00PM
SCHERZA, CHARLES H., estate.
M. Richard Scherza of North Scituate has qualified as Executor: creditors must file their claims
in the office of the probate clerk within the time
required by law beginning July 29, 2014.
WOOD, ALICE E., estate.
Raymond J. Wood of South Attleboro, Massachusetts has qualified as Administrator and
has appointed Michael A. Devane, Esq. of 1588
Newport Ave. Pawtucket as his Agent in Rhode
Island: creditors must file their claims in the office of the probate clerk within the time required
by law beginning July 29, 2014.
Richard J. Goldstein,
City Clerk
miles, must see. $1800.
Call 401-419-7095
By order of the Mortgagee which gives notice of
its intention to bid at such sale or any postponement or adjournment thereof.
106 Lost And Found
2000 Chevy Cavalier LS. 2
dr., Coupe, loaded, auto,
4cyl., 32MPG, ice cold
air,
mint,
1 owner,
$1500. 401-241-0354
TLC. Make offer. 401423-1588
Employment
2000 Ford Escort ZX2.
$2300. Low miles. Good
condition. 508-883-9417
2000
Mitsubishi
Very
Good Condition, white 4
Lost navy baseball cap cyl. fully load w/moon
(USS NITRO) is very sen- roof $1750. or B.O. Call
200 Employment
timental please return to 508-622-1732
Services
McDonalds on Mendon
2001 Nissan Maxima SE
Rd
4dr., auto, V6, low miles
(new inspection) Roof, The Times does not knowwheels, like new, 2nd own- ingly accept advertisements in the Employment
er, $1950. 401-241-0413
classifications that are
not bona fide job offers.
Classification 200 is pro100 Legals
100 Legals
vided for Employment Information, Services and
Referrals. This newspaMORTGAGEE'S SALE
per does not knowingly
295 ENGLAND STREET CUMBERLAND, RI
accept Employment ads
that indicate a preference
bases on age from emThe premises described in the mortgage will be ployees covered be Age
sold subject to all encumbrances and prior liens Discrimination In Employment Act. Nor do we
on August 19, 2014 at 10:00 a.m. on the premis- in any way condone emes, by virtue of the power of sale contained in a ployment based solely
discrimination pracmortgage by James P. Bailey and Lisa J. Bailey upon
tices.
dated January 17, 2005 and recorded in the
CUMBERLAND Land Evidence Records in Book
1248, Page 311, the conditions of said mortgage
having been broken.
204 General Help
Wanted
$5,000.00 in cash, certified or bank check is required to bid. Other terms will be announced at
the sale.
AUTOMOTIVE garage help
wanted, full or part time,
must have valid drivers license. Apply to 20 Cape
Rd., Mendon, Mass
HARMON LAW OFFICES, P.C.
Attorney for the Holder of the Mortgage
150 California Street
Newton, MA 02458
(617) 558-0500
201404-1132 - PRP
Chimney
sweeps,
Will
train. Learn a trade. Earn
up to 50k-80k per year
Benefits. Year round. 4
Mill St., Bellingham 508966-2316
NEW TODAY
STATE OF RHODE ISLAND
Probate Court of the
CITY OF PAWTUCKET
NOTICE
OF MATTERS PENDING AND FOR HEARING
IN SAID COURT
CITY OF PAWTUCKET
The Court will be in session at 2:00PM
on the dates specified in notices below
GINISH, NANCY ROSE
(alias Nanci Rose Ginish) estate.
Granting of letters of Administration: for hearing
August 20, 2014.
GINISH, NANCI R.,
(alias Nancy Rose Ginish) estate.
Granting of letters of Administration: for hearing
August 20, 2014.
HIMAN, WILLIAM FREDERIC,
(alias William F. Himan) estate.
Granting of letters of Administration: for hearing
August 20, 2014.
NOEL, DOLORES C., estate.
First Account of Executrix: for hearing August
20, 2014.
PRIME, RICHARD L., estate.
First Account of Successor Administrator: for
hearing August 20, 2014.
NEW TODAY
Counter Help. Mornings,
Full and part time positions available. Honeydew
Donuts, 760 Cumberland
Hill Rd., Woonsocket.
401-769-0708.
Drivers. Class A or B.
Local supplier to convenience stores in NE.
M-F, home nights and
weekends. Salary, incentives,
sign
on
bonus and great benefits! Apply Core-Mark,
355
Main
St.,
Whitinsville, MA or
pkalafarski@coremark.com
FLAT ROOF MECHANICS
Experienced
TPO
and
EPDM roofing mechanics
wanted. Steady employment with well established company. Drug
testing is required. If interested,
email
apply@ChaffeeRoofing.com
FTI Coach in Northbridge,
MA is currently looking
for a Full Time & Part
Time Driver. Applicants
should have a minimum
of 3 years Motorcoach
experience and be familiar with New England,
especially Boston and
NYC. Safety and professionalism is a must.
Please call our office at
508.234.4585 or email
kmenard@foxytravel.com
WAITRESS/Breakfast
Apply within daily 1039
Cass Ave., Woonsocket
Merchandise
MONASTESSE, LEO W., estate.
Lawrence Monastesse of Pawtucket has qualified as Executor: creditors must file their claims
in the office of the probate clerk within the time
By order of the Mortgagee which gives notice of required by law beginning August 5, 2014.
its intention to bid at such sale or any postponeO'GARA, MAY, (alias May Hazel O'Gara,
251 Appliances
ment or adjournment thereof.
May Hazel Fox) estate.
William E. O'Gara of Rumford has qualified as WHIRLPOOL Washer, $50.
KORDE & ASSOCIATES, P.C.
Call 401-585-1237
Administrator: creditors must file their claims in
Attorneys for the Holder of the Mortgage
the
office
of
the
probate
clerk
within
the
time
re321 Billerica Road, Suite 210
261 Coins & Stamps
quired by law beginning August 5, 2014.
Chelmsford, MA 01824-4100
1890-CC Morgan silver
(978) 256-1500
dollar, very good+ condiRichard J. Goldstein,
(8/2/2014, 8/5/2014, 8/12/2014)
tion, $83.00. Woonsocket
City Clerk
13-013657
401-597-6426
THE TIMES B7
Tuesday, August 5, 2014
261 Coins & Stamps Real Estate-Rent
Buying US coins dated before 1965: dimes $1.26,
quarters $3.15, halves
$6.30. Woonsocket 401597-6426
265 Furniture Household
303 Roommate
Wanted
URI professors:
Ebola shouldn’t
cause panic in US
NEED ROOMMATE
First Floor handicap excessible 22 Greene St. Pawt
call 401-516-7799
300 Rental Agencies
Blonde oak mission dining
table. 41” diameter. Excellent condition. $30. Readers of The Times are
advised The Times does
Call 401-762-5728
not knowingly accept adMirror. 57 inches length x vertisements that are in
37 inches high. Beautiful violation of the Federal
solid wood frame. $40. Fair Housing Law and the
258-5424
Rhode Island Fair HousSolid pine bureau with 4 ing Practices Act. The
draws, 2 small, 2 large. Federal Fair Housing Law
40 inches long x 30 inch- and Rhode Island Fair
es high. D 19”. $40. 258- Housing Practices Act are
designed to prevent dis5424
crimination in the purchase and rental of hous273 Miscellaneous ing. Refusal to rent,
lease, or sell property to
Merchandise
anyone due to age, race,
color, religion, sex, sexu20 gallon Terrarium, on al orientation, marital sta30 in. tall stand, $30.00. tus, disability, familial
status, or country of an401-762-5728
cestral origin is in violaAIR CONDITIONER, 5,000 tion of the Fair Housing
BTU, $30. Call 401-585- Law. If you have a com1237
plaint, contact the Rhode
JVC GPS Navigational Sys- Island Commission for
tem. 3.5 inch screen. Human Rights. They will
Good condition. $30. Call help any person that has
been
discriminated
401-724-0729
against in the rental of
LOOKING FOR SOME- housing, the sale of
THING HARD TO FIND? housing, home financing
Be sure to look in the or public accommodaclassified pages of The tions. Call the Rhode IsTImes every day. Surely land Commission for Huyou'll find interesting man Rights, 401-222things that you may want 2661.
or need. The Times is the
perfect marketplace you
can enjoy in the comfort
301 Room – No
of your own home. There
is something for everyBoard
one in The Times classifieds!
274 Musical
Merchandise
PAWTUCKET: Near center,
laundry facilities, wall to
wall carpets. $100 & up
401-726-0995.
Cash for old musical instruments of any kind
broken or not. Call anytime 401-365-3636
302 Room & Board
293 Consignment
Motorola 10 amp power
supply. For use with
Ham/CB radios, etc. Good
condition. $25. 401-7240729
204 General Help
Wanted
304 Apartments
Unfurnished
19 CHESTER St. 1st floor
rear, Woonsocket, 1-2
bed, no pets. $600. 401935-9278
1st floor, 1 bed; clean and
cozy, refrigerator, stove,
garage, porch, coin op
laundry, $750 with $750
security
deposit.
Call
401-766-4353
1st floor, large 3 bed, completely renovated, new
kitchen & bathroom, new
appliances, nice landscaped yard, hardwoods,
All utilities, off st. parking
& laundry facilities inc.
$1350 mo. Woonsocket.
401-269-9191
NEW TODAY
Blackstone. 1 bed, 2nd ,
$650 month, no utilities,
fridge, parking. Call 508883-4070
Woonsocket. 1st floor, 2
beds, 2 living rooms,
parking, yard, big porch,
Pawtucket.
Quiet area. appliances, hkups, storShopping,
restaurants, age,
secure
hallway,
etc. Bus line close by. $800. 401-765-1240
Two rooms available.
$100/$75 week. All utilities incl. Fully furnished.
No security dep. required.
Call Ray 365-7360
—BANDIT
adopted 11-26-09
305 Apartments
Furnished
204 General Help
Wanted
Inside B to B
Telemarketer
SHE SNORES MORE
THAN I DO, BUT I STILL
LOVE MY HUMAN.
1 & 2 BED All new, ready to
move in Woonsocket. Call
401-447-4451 or 769-0095
The Northern Rhode Island Newspaper Group,
publisher of the Call and the Times is looking for
a part-time inside Advertising Telemarketer to
handle outbound Business to Business sales
in our Woonsocket office
Hours are Monday – Friday; 10 am – 2pm.
Real Estate-Sale
We are looking for an energetic, sales motivated
individual to prospect, present and close new
customers using the telephone. The ideal candidate
will possess exceptional professionalism, excellent
communication, prospecting, relationship building,
and closing and customer service skills. The ability
to meet and exceed sales goals and follow scripting
and coaching is a primary expectation.
We offer an hourly wage plus commission based on
experience and a history of success in outbound
Business to Business sales. The ideal candidate
must be reliable with a dependable form of
transportation.
330 Brokers - Agents
For immediate consideration,
please email a cover letter and resume to
dames@woonsocketcall.com
No phone calls please.
FIND A HOME. Sell a
home. Find a tenant. Call
the classified team at The
Times to place your advertisement. Call 401365-1438.
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
FOR $2.00 A DAY ADVERTISE YOUR BUSINESS HERE
CALL FOR DETAILS 401-767-8503
+ WE ARE EXPERIENCED MATH SPECIALISTS
+ WE TEACH ALL LEVELS OF MATH ABILITY
+ PROVEN RESULTS
(401) 431-MATH (6284)
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(401) 725-6854
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(401) 334-1357
Licensed & insured in RI & MA
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Family Owned Since 1926
Plumbing & Heating
EMERGENCY SERVICE
From New Toilets, Faucets to New Gas Boilers installed.
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From small to large jobs, we want you to be our customer!
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Financing Available ~ 0% Interest
www.RIPROPERTYMGT.com
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SOUTH KINGSTOWN
– URI Professors Jef
Bratberg and Annie De
Groot have been at the forefront of several public
health emergencies during
their careers, but they agree
that in the United States,
Ebola won’t be one of
them.
“We should not be worried in the United States for
a number of reasons,” said
Bratberg, an expert in
responding to bioterrorism,
pandemics and natural disasters. “The Ebola virus is
not transmitted by an airborne route, like tuberculosis is. So, if you are on a
plane and someone with
tuberculosis is sitting a row
away and coughs, you could
still be infected. Ebola
doesn’t behave that way.”
A member of URI’s pharmacy faculty for 12 years,
Bratberg is part of the
Rhode Island Disaster
Medical Assistance Team,
which responded to the
Katrina disaster and assisted
in Rhode Island’s response
to the H1N1, or swine flu,
outbreak several years ago.
“Ebola captures people’s
imaginations,” Bratberg
said. “Although the disease
initially presents with
influenza-like symptoms
about ten days after exposure, in half of the cases it’s
a horrible-looking disease,
which makes people bleed
out of every orifice, and the
infection persists in bodily
fluids even after a person
dies.”
In remote areas of
Africa, people might touch
a stricken person’s body to
prepare it for burial and
then become infected. “But
if a person has no visible
symptoms of Ebola, and
does not have a fever, it is
extraordinarily unlikely a
person could acquire the
disease from that person,”
Bratberg said.
Meanwhile, as world
health experts work to contain the disease and educate
the public, URI scientists
like De Groot are working
to develop vaccines for a
number of exotic tropical
diseases, including Ebola.
She has conducted preliminary studies of an Ebola
vaccine in collaboration
with scientists at the U.S.
Army Medical Research
Institute of Infectious
Diseases.
Using Ebola epitopes,
she demonstrated an
immune response in what
she described as a humanized mouse model. While
that initial study was limited in scope, she said she is
confident she could produce
an effective vaccine if her
studies were expanded to
additional Ebola antigens.
“Not only would this
approach be safer than
whole-antigen approaches
that are currently being
explored, but it would be
more rapid,” she said.
Director of the URI
Institute for Immunology
and Informatics, De Groot
is also medical director of
Clinica Esperanza in
Providence and CEO of
biotechnology company
EpiVax, Inc.
“The key to making an
effective Ebola vaccine, I
believe, is to trick the
immune system into pro-
ducing robust immune
response to Ebola antigens
while avoiding any components that might cause
adverse effects,” she said.
“That’s the best attribute of
epitope-based vaccines,
which are well-accepted in
cancer therapy but have
faced unanticipated barriers
to entry in infectious diseases.”
While De Groot and others work on vaccines, questions are being asked why
Kent Brantly, the doctor
working in Liberia, contracted the disease even
though he wore protective
gear while working with
patients. Bratberg said the
doctor was working at
ground zero for Ebola for a
charity and was being bombarded by the disease.
“But the thinking at this
point was that he was
exposed to someone while
not wearing protective
equipment,” Bratberg said.
“In other words he was not
working in a clinical capacity. The breakdown was
likely related to the overwhelming numbers of
infected and exposed
patients in the area, perhaps
even a member of his health
care team, as health care
workers taking care of
patients infected with Ebola
are among those at the
highest risk.”
Aid worker Nancy
Writebol also contracted the
disease while working in
Liberia.
Bratberg said U.S. residents should not be worried
that the two patients are
being treated at Emory
University Hospital because
they will be in a state-ofthe-art isolation unit.
“If you are a nurse or a
doctor at Emory Hospital,
you are at zero risk because
of the precautions, the technology and the specially
designed unit to isolate and
treat these illnesses.”
So what about the frenzy
being spread by folks who
argue the doctor and health
aide should not have been
brought to the United States
for treatment?
“It’s this simple, if you
are not around people who
are symptomatic, you are
not at risk,” Bratberg said.
But what about the statistic that 6 in 10 people are
dying from the disease?
“Yes, that is true, but the
high rate of mortality is
driven by people in very
remote areas with little
access to quality health
care. It’s thought that if
these patients had access to
the standard supportive care
provided in the United
States, this would be a far
lower ratio. In fact, this is
the primary reason that the
U.S. citizens are being
treated in the U.S.
“In addition, the residents of villages where
modern infection control
has never been practiced
become alarmed when they
see people dressed in personal protection suits. Some
villages have run health
workers out because they
think the workers are bringing the disease instead of
preventing its spread and
educating villagers about
Ebola, which has never
been seen before in many of
the affected areas.”
Sturdy appoints new director
of multiple sclerosis center
ATTLEBORO – Sturdy
Memorial Hospital is pleased
to announce that Dr. Tarun
Singhal, a physician of
Brigham and Women’s
Department of Neurology,
has assumed the role of medical director of Sturdy’s
Multiple Sclerosis (MS)
Center. Dr. Singhal joins Dr.
Ranbir Dhillon and the MS
Center’s multidisciplinary
team of Physical Therapists,
certified Nurses, Social
Workers, and others, to
deliver specialized and coordinated care and services to
people with MS.
Dr. Singhal is board certified in neurology. He
received his medical degree
from the All India Institute
of Medical Sciences in New
Delhi, completed his
advanced neurology fellowship at Massachusetts
General Hospital, and fulfilled his residency training
at Brigham and Women’s
Hospital and Massachusetts
General Hospital. Dr.
Singhal was also recently
appointed to Harvard
Medical School as an
Instructor.
The MS Center offers a
wide range of services that
help minimize the impact of
the disease process and maximize physical and emotional
well-being.
Dr. Singhal is accepting
new patients. To schedule an
appointment at the MS
Center, or to learn about
Sturdy’s MS treatments and
services, please call 508236-7170 or 508-236-7098.
B8 THE TIMES
Tuesday, August 5, 2014
This document is © 2014 by editor - all rights reserved.
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